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Anthropological Center for Training and Research on Global Environmental Change

A Research Center of the Office of the Vice Provost for Research at Indiana University Bloomington
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Fabio de Castro

Profile photo of Fabio de Castro
Assistant Professor, CEDLA, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Centrum Studie en Documentatie van Latijns Amerika (CEDLA), Keizersgracht 395-97
1016 EK Amsterdam
Phone:             +31 20 525 3246      
F.deCastro[at]cedla [dot] nl

Fábio de Castro is Assistant Professor in Brazilian Studies and Human Ecology at the Centre for Latin American Research and Documentation (CEDLA). He has research experience with academic, non-governmental and governmental organizations in Brazil and in the United States. He is a collaborating researcher at the Anthropological Center for Training and Research on Global Environmental Change (Indiana University, USA).

Fábio is interested in socio-ecological processes shaping patterns of resource use and management. His research focuses on local governance of natural resource and the dilemma of conservation and development goals at local and regional levels. He has conducted research in many different sites in the Amazon and Atlantic Forest in Brazil, focusing on local use and management of fishing and forest resources.

His interdisciplinary background is reflected in his theoretical and methodological approach. He combines ethnographic, historical, socioeconomic, institutional, and ecological data to understand how patterns of resource use are shaped and transformed. Fabio is particularly interested in the connections between processes across socio-ecological scales, and how partnerships between users, government and private sectors influence resource conservation.

Selected Publications

Forthcoming Castro, F. Multi-scale environmental citizenship: Traditional populations and protected areas in Brazil. In A. Latta and H. Wittman. Environment and Citizenship in Latin America: Sites of Struggle, Points of Departure. CLAS book series. Berghahn, London.

2011 Baud, M., Castro, F. and Hogenboom, B. Environmental governance in Latin America: Towards an integrative research agenda. ERLACS 90:79-88.

2011 Castro, F. Management and Conservation of Aquatic Resources: Fish and Wildlife. Introduction. In: Pinedo Vasquez, M.; Ruffino, M.; Brondizio, E. and Padoch, C. The Amazonian Floodplain: The decade past and the decade ahead. Springer, Dordrecht, pp. 101-6.

2009 Castro, F. Patterns of resource use by caboclo communities in the Middle-Lower Amazon. In: C. Adams, W. Neves, R. Murrieta, M. Harris (eds.) Amazonian Peasant Societies: Modernity and Invisibility. Dordrecht: Springer: pp. 157-77.

2006 Castro, F.; Siqueira, A.; Brondizio, E. and Ferreira, L. Use and misuse of the concepts of tradition and property rights in the conservation of natural resources in the Atlantic Forest (Brazil). Ambiente e Sociedade, 9(1): 23-39.

2003 Castro, F. and McGrath, D. Community-Based Management of Lakes and Sustainability of Floodplain Resources in the Lower Amazon. Human Organization 62(2):123-133 .Castro, F. 2002. From myths to rules: The evolution of the local management in the Lower Amazonian floodplain. Environment and History 8(2):197-216.

2002 Futemma, C., Castro, F. Silva-Forsberg, M.C. and Ostrom, E. The emergence and outcomes of collective actions: An institutional and ecosystem approach. Society and Natural Resource 15(6): 503-522.

1999 McGrath, D., Castro, F., Camara, E. and Futemma, C. Community management of floodplain lakes and the sustainable development of Amazonian fisheries. In: C. Padoch; M. Ayres; M. Pinedo-1999 Vasques and A. Henderson (eds.) Varzea: Diversity, Development, and Conservation of Amazonia’s Whitewater floodplains. Advances in Economic Botany, Vol. 13. The New York Botanical Garden Press, N.Y, 59-82.

1994 McGrath, D., Castro, F., Futemma, C., Amaral, B.D. and Calabria, J. Fisheries and the evolution of resource management on the Lower Amazon Basin. Human Ecology 21 (2):167-95.