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Anthropological Center for Training and Research on Global Environmental Change

A Research Center of the Office of the Vice Provost for Research at Indiana University Bloomington
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Anders Siren

Profile photo of Anders Siren
Academic year: 1998, 2002
Dept. of Geography
University of Turku
FIN-20014 Turku
Finland
Phone:  +358-2-3335588      
andsir[at]utu [dot] fi

Anders Siren, as a Ph.D. student at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, came to ACT for two visits in 1998 and 2002 to work with Dr. Brondizio. Since 2010 he has been involved in a project at the Dept. of Geography at the University of Turku concerning biodiversity harvest in the Amazon.

He continued my PhD studies at the Dept. of Rural Development at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, and completed his PhD in 2004. The title of Anders' thesis was:

Changing interactions between humans and nature in Sarayaku, Ecuadorian Amazon. Acta Universitatis Agriculturae Sueciae: Agraria 447.

In 2007 and 2008 Anders was a postdoc at the QCA herbarium at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Ecuador, in Quito, Ecuador. In 2009 he was a postdoc at the University of Turku, Finland, first at the dept. of biology, but then transferred to the dept. of geography. During all this time Anders was studying habitat variability in tropical rainforest, by means of inventory of ferns as indicator species, in combination with remote sensing, and also studied hunting. The final purpose of that was to compare data on habitat quality with spatially explicit data on hunting, to see whether habitat quality influences hunting yields - that analysis is still pending. During these years Dr. Siren also wrote a report for FAO about fisheries in the Ecuadorean Amazon.

Since 2010 Anders is involved in a project at the Dept. of Geography at the University of Turku about biodiversity harvest in the Amazon. In addition to working with his old hunting data, Siren is also studying the harvest of the palm Pholydostachys synanthera, which is used for thatched roofs. He will compare the spatial patterns of resource abundance and harvest for hunted wildlife and palms for thatch, respectively, using spatial bioeconomic modelling.