Indiana University Bloomington

College of Arts and Sciences
Department Website | Newsletter Archive Volume 24 Issue 1 | Fall 2012

 

Student News

Student Updates

AAADS graduate students and family at the fall 2011 orientation. 
Back row from left: L. Andre Bispo de Jesus, Ade Doss, Sam Davis, Walter Tucker
Middle Row: Yukari Shinagawa, Marsha Horsley, Jordache Ellapen, Monica Black
Front Row: Katie Dieter, Caralee Jones, Abegunde, Dr. Audrey McCluskey, Nana Amoah, Dr. Valerie Grim

AAADS graduate students and family at the fall 2011 orientation. Back row from left: L. Andre Bispo de Jesus, Ade Doss, Sam Davis, Walter Tucker Middle Row: Yukari Shinagawa, Marsha Horsley, Jordache Ellapen, Monica Black Front Row: Katie Dieter, Caralee Jones, Abegunde, Dr. Audrey McCluskey, Nana Amoah, Dr. Valerie Grim

Maria E. Hamilton Abegunde in May 2012, presented her paper, "The Ariran's Last Life: The Healing Work of Memory" at the third annual John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation symposium. The paper was presented as part of the "Art as a Vehicle for Dialogue, Social Change and Healing" panel. The symposium theme was "The Politics of Reconciliation". Abegunde’s article "When the Past Becomes [the] Present: Remembering and Writing My Own Ancestral Past" was published in the Spring 2012 edition of in Let Spirit Speak! Cultural Journeys through the African Diaspora (ed. Vanessa K. Valdes, SUNY Press). In Fall of 2012, she presented a paper on anger and stereotypes for the "No Assumptions: Shedding Light on Common African American Stereotypes" panel sponsored by Iota Phi Theta Fraternity, Inc.

Samuel M. Davis successfully defended his thesis, titled, “Policing Blackness in the Cultural politics of the National Basketball Association” which was an explication of the policing of blackness within the National Basketball Association, supporting a construction of a monolithic black masculinity and simultaneously protects white hegemonic masculinity. His co-chairs were Dr. Vernon Williams and Dr. Gary Sailes.

Floyd D. Hobson III has been researching both visual anthropology and photo ethnography as a tool of cultural analysis. He is currently the Second Vice President of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Incorporated (Omicron Nu Sigma Alumni Chapter). Hobson’s observational field study on the African Diaspora in Paris was recently highlighted in the new Fall 2012 issue of Heed Magazine. The ten-page installation highlights a few of the images Hobson observed while conducting his study abroad in France this past summer.

Caralee Jones
successfully completed her qualifying exams oral defense, where she discussed race, how it has been defined and how it has been transformed and adapted within Black Studies. Jones also discussed the notion of Diaspora, its evolution and transformation with a specific focus on Paul Gilroy’s work, the Black Atlantic, as well as spoke on the Black and White dichotomy and how it has been challenged and reconformed by new wave immigrants from Asia, Latin America, and Africa. The chair of her committee was Dr. Matt Guterl.

Yukari Shinagawa is currently researching: African American Music (With a concentration in gospel music); Characteristics of African American Musical Performance (call-and-response, polyrhythms, improvisation, etc.); Black Aesthetics, Influence of Music in African American Literature. She presented "Rural Japanese Perceptions of African Americans," Conference on Citizenship in the United States: Integrating Domestic and International Horizons-A New Perspective.  African American and African Diaspora Studies, Asian American Studies, and Latino Studies, Indiana University, September 2010; "The Pattern of Call and Response in James Baldwin's Sonny's Blues," Kyushu American Literature Society, Saga, Japan, May 20, 2008. She published CD Reviews on Black Grooves, Website of Archive of African American Music & Culture, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN (see: http://blackgrooves.org/index.php?s=yukari). She is also currently a member of African American Choral Ensemble (since 2009)

Wideline Seraphin successfully defended her thesis titled, "Multicultural Education and the Black Immigrant Experience: Incorporating the Cultural Resources of Haitian Students into the Classroom."  Her thesis advisor and chair is Dr. Audrey T. McCluskey.

 

 

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