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HIV/STD Prevention in Rural America

   
 
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HIV/STD PREVENTION IN RURAL AMERICA

Chapter 8: References
 
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7

CHAPTER ONE

  1. Johnson, K. Demographic Trends in Rural and Small Town America. Carsey Institute, Durham, New Hampshire: University of New Hampshire, 2006.
  2. U.S. Department of Commerce, United States Census 2000. Washington, DC: GPO, 2001.
  3. Office of Management and Budget. Standards for Defining Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas. Washington, DC, 2000.
  4. Office of Management and Budget. Revised Definitions of Metropolitan Statistical Areas, New Definitions of Micropolitan Statistical Areas and Combined Statistical Areas, and Guidance on Uses of the Statistical Definitions of These Areas. Washington, DC, 2003.
  5. United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service. Rural Urban Continuum Codes. 2003. Available online at http://www.ers.usda.gov/Data/RuralUrbanContinuumCodes/
  6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV/AIDS Surveillance Supplemental Report. 6(No. 2): 2000, 1-16.
  7. Eberhardt, M.S., Pamuk, E.R. The importance of place of residence: Examining health in rural and non-rural areas. American Journal of Public Health. 94 (2004): 1682-1686.
  8. Mansfield, C.J., Wilson, J.L., Kobrinski, E.J., Mitchell, J. Premature mortality in the United States: The roles of geographic area, socioeconomic status, household type, and availability of medical care. American Journal of Public Health. 89 (1999): 893–898.
  9. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV/AIDS Surveillance in Urban and Non-urban Areas (through 2007). Slide set. Available online at http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/urban-nonurban/index.htm
  10. Southern AIDS Coalition. Southern States Manifesto: Update 2008. HIV/AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases in the South. July 2008.
  11. Eberhardt, M.S., Ingram, D.D., Makuc, D.M., et al. Urban and Rural Health Chart-book. Health, United States, 2001. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 2001.
  12. Pamuk, E., Makuc, D., Heck, K., Reuben, C., Lochner, K. Socioeconomic Status and Health Chartbook. Health, United States, 1998. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 1998.
  13. Eberhardt, M.S. Rural health of Black Americans, a complex frontier. In: Livingston, I, ed. Praeger Handbook of Black American Health (2nd Edition): Policies and Issues Behind Disparities in Health. Westport, Conn: Praeger Publishers, 2004.
  14. Hoyt, D.R., Conger, R.D., Valde JG, Weihs K. Psychological distress and help seeking in rural America. American Journal of Community Psychology 25 (1997): 449–470.
  15. Dobalian, A., Tsao, J.C.I., Radcliff, T.A. Diagnosed mental and physical health conditions in the United States nursing home population: differences between urban and rural facilities. Journal of Rural Health. 19 (2003): 477–480.
  16. Petterson SM. Metropolitan–nonmetropolitan differences in amount and type of mental health treatment. Archives of Psychiatric Nursing.17 (2003):12–19.
  17. Foster, P. Use of stigma, fear, and denial in development of a framework for prevention of HIV/AIDS in rural African American communities. Family and Community Health. 30(4) (2006): 318-327.
  18. Dreisbach, S. Rural Methamphetamine Use and HIV/STD Risk. Rural Center for AIDS/STD Prevention, 2006. Available online at http://www.indiana.edu/~aids/factsheets/factsheets18.pdf
  19. Clayton, S.A., Bowen, A.M. HIV/AIDS Stigma among Wyoming Residents. Presentation at the Regional Rural HIV Prevention Conference, Denver, CO, 2007.
  20. Lichtenstein, B. Public tolerance, private pain: Stigma and sexually transmitted infections in the American Deep South. Culture, Health & Sexuality. 7(1) (2005): 43 -57.
  21. Lichtenstein, B. Stigma as a barrier to treatment of sexually transmitted infection in theAmerican Deep South: Issues of race, gender and poverty. Social Science & Medicine. 57(12) (2003): 2435-2445.
  22. Lichtenstein, B. Secret encounters: Black men, bisexuality, and AIDS in Alabama. Medical Anthropology Quarterly. 14(3) (2000): 374-393.
  23. Preston, D.B., D’Augelli, A.R., Cain, R.E. Issues in the Development of HIV-Preventive
  24. Interventions for Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM) in Rural Areas. The Journal of Primary Prevention. 23(2) (2002): 199-214 Barnett, S., Bowen, A.M., Alexander, E. A pilot study of the epidemiology of HIV in a rural area. Int Conf AIDS. 12: 454 (abstract no. 23559).
  25. Mansergh, G., Purcell, DW., Stall, R., et al. CDC consultation on methamphetamine use and sexual risk behavior for HIV/STD infection: Summary and suggestions. Public Health Reports 121 (2006): 127–132.
  26. Whetten, K., Leserman, J., Whetten, R., et al. Exploring lack of trust in careproviders and the government as a barrier to health service use. American Journal of Public Health. 96 (2006): 716–721.
  27. Rossner, B.R.S., Horvath, K.J. Predictors of success in implementing HIV prevention in rural America: A state-level structural factor analysis of HIV prevention targeting men who have sex with men. AIDS and Behavior 12 (2008): 159-168.

CHAPTER TWO

  1. Lam, N.S., Lui, K. Spread of AIDS in Rural America, 1982-1990. Journal of Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome. 7 (1994):485-490.
  2. Holmberg, S.D. The estimated prevalence and incidence of HIV in 96 large US metropolitan areas. American Journal of Public Health. 86 (1996): 642-654.
  3. Steinberg, S., Flemming, P. The geographic distribution of AIDS in the United States: Is there a rural epidemic? Journal of Rural Health. 16 (2000): 11-19.
  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Rural-urban data analysis per RCAP request based on Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance, 2008. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; data run April 2010.    
  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Trends in Reportable Sexually Transmitted Diseases in the United States, 2006 - National Surveillance Data for Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, and Syphilis. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2007.
  6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV/AIDS surveillance in urban and non-urban areas (through 2008). Slide set. Available online at http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/urban-nonurban/index.htm (Note: this slide set replaces the previous slide set referenced in the print version of Fences and does not include the data for Figure 4 currently.
  7. Lansky, A., Nakashima, A.K., Diaz, T., et al. Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection in rural areas and small cities of the Southeast: Contributions of migra¬tion and behavior. Journal of Rural Health. 16(1) (2000): 20–30.
  8. Southern AIDS Coalition. 2009 – 2010 HIV/AIDS Health Care Policy Brief and Recommendations
  9. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV Prevalence, Unrecognized Infection, and HIV Testing Among Men Who Have Sex with Men – Five U.S. Cities, June 2004-April 2005. MMWR 54(24) (2005): 597-601.
  10. Montgomery, J.P., Mokotoff, E.D., Gentry, A.C., Blair, J.M. The extent of bisexual behavior in HIV-infected men and implications for transmission to their female sex partners. AIDS Care. 16(6) (2003): 920-837.
  11. Millett, G., Malebranche, D., Mason, B., Spikes, P. Focusing “down low”: Bisexual black men, HIV risk and heterosexual transmission. J Natl Med Assoc. 97(7 Suppl) (2005): 52S-59S.
  12. Crosby, R., Holtgrave, D.R., Stall, R., Peterson, J.L., Shouse, L. Differences in HIV risk behaviors among black and white men who have sex with men. Sex Trans Dis. 34(10) (2007): 744-748.
  13. Lichtenstein, B. Secret encounters: Black men, bisexuality, and AIDS in Alabama. Medical Anthropology Quarterly. 14(3) (2000): 374-393.
  14. Gay, C.L, Napravnik, S., Eron, J.J. Advanced immunosuppression at entry to HIV care in the southeastern United States and associated risk factors. AIDS. 20(5) (2006): 775-778.
  15. Hall, H.I., Li, J., McKenna, M.T. HIV in predominantly rural areas of the United States. Journal of Rural Health. 21 (2005): 245-253.
  16. Weis, K.E., Liese, A.D., Hussey, J., et.al.  Associations of Rural Residence with Timing of HIV Diagnosis and Stage of Disease at Diagnosis, South Carolina 2001-2005. Journal of Rural Health. 26(2) (2010): 105-112. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1748-0361.2010.00271.x/full
  17. Fleming, P.L., Lansky, A., Lee, L.M., Nakashima, A.K. The epidemiology of HIV/AIDS in women in the southern United States. Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 33(7) (2006): S32–S38.
  18. National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors (NASTAD). The Landscape of HIV/AIDS among African American Women in the United States. Issue Brief 1; Washington, D.C., May 2008.
  19. Dreisbach, S, Hickler, B, Koester, S. Methamphetamine Use in Rural Colorado: Health Risks and Community Challenges, Association for Prevention Teaching and Research, Washington, D.C., 2004.
  20. Crosby, R.A., Yarber, W.L., Meyerson, B.E. Frequency and predictors of condom use and reasons for not using condoms among low-income women. Journal of Sexuality Education Therapy. 24 (1999): 63-70.
  21. Crosby, R.A., Yarber, W.L., DiClemente, R.J., Wingood, G.M, Meyerson, B.E. HIV-associated histories, perceptions, and practice among low-income African American women: Does rural residence matter? American Journal of Public Health. 92(4), (2002): 655-659.
  22. Feinleib, J.A., Michael, R.T. Reported changes in sexual behavior in response to AIDS in the United States. Preventive Medicine. 27 (1998): 400-411.
  23. Anderson, J.E., Wilson, R., Doll, L., Jones, T.S., and Barker, P. Condom use and HIV risk behaviors among U.S. adults: Data from a national survey. Family Planning Perspectives. 31 (1999): 24-28.
  24. Yarber, W.l., Milhausen, R.R., Huang, B., Crosby, R.A. Do rural and non-rural single, young adults differ in their risk and protective HIV/STD behaviors: Results from a national survey. Health Education Monograph. 25(2) (2008): 7-12.
  25. Potterat, .JJ., Muth, S.Q., Brody S. Evidence undermining the adequacy of the HIV reproduction number formula. Sexually Transmitted Diseases. 27(2000): 644-645.
  26. Adimora, A.A., Schoenbach, V.J., Martinson, F.E.A., et al. Concurrent partnerships among rural African Americans with recently reported heterosexually transmitted HIV infection. Journal of AIDS. 34 (2003): 423-429.

CHAPTER THREE

  1. Kaiser Family Foundation. Sex Education in America: General Public/Parents Survey. Washington, DC: National Public Radio, Kaiser Family Foundation, Kennedy School of Government, 2004. Available online at http://www.kff.org/kaiserpolls/pomr012904oth.cfm
  2. Guttmacher Institute. Sex and STI/HIV Education: State Policies in Brief. 2008. Available online at: http://www.guttmacher.org/statecenter/spibs/spib_SE.pdf
  3. Kirby, D., Laris, B., Rolleri, L. The Characteristics of Effective Curriculum-Based Sex and HIV Education Programs for Adolescents. (2006). Scotts Valley, CA: ETR Associates. Available online at
  4. Kirby, D. Emerging Answers: Research Findings on Programs to Reduce Teen Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 2007. Available online at http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/EA2007/EA2007_sum.pdf
  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Prevention Research Synthesis Project. Compendium of HIV Prevention Interventions with Evidence of Effectiveness. Atlanta, GA.: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: 1999 (Revised 2001, 2007). Available online at http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/prev_prog/rep/resources/initiatives/compendium.htm
  6. Dillon, M., Savage, S. Values and Religion in Rural America: Attitudes toward Abortion and Same-Sex Relations. Issue Brief 1. Carsey Institute, Durham, New Hampshire: University of New Hampshire, 2006.
  7. Trenholm, C. Devaney, B., Fortson, K., Clark, M., Quay, L., Wheeler, J. "Impacts of abstinence education on teen sexual activity, risk of pregnancy, and risk of sexually transmitted diseases." Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 27.7 (2008):255-276.
  8. Committee on Government Reform Special Investigations Division. The Waxman Report: The Content of Federally Funded Abstinence-Only Education Programs. Washington, DC. 2004.
  9. Trenholm, C. Devaney, B., Fortson, K., Clark, M., Quay, L., Wheeler, J. "Impacts of abstinence education on teen sexual activity, risk of pregnancy, and risk of sexually transmitted diseases." Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 27.7 (2008):255-276.
  10. Rossner, B.R.S., Horvath, K.J. Predictors of success in implementing HIV prevention in rural America: A state-level structural factor analysis of HIV prevention targeting men who have sex with men. AIDS and Behavior 12 (2008): 159-168.
  11. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Special Projects of National Significance: Border Health Initiatives. Health Resources and Services Administration’s HIV/AIDS Bureau. December, 2004.
  12. Snyder, L.B., Hamilton, M.A., Mitchell, E.W., Kiwanuka-Tondo,J., Fleming-Milici, F., Proctor, D. A meta-analysis of the effect of mediated health communication campaigns on behavior change in the United States. Journal of Health Communication 9 (2004): 71-96.
  13. Noar, S. HIV/AIDS Mass Media Campaigns. Rural Center for AIDS/STD Prevention Fact Sheet #20, 2007. Available online at http://www.indiana.edu/~aids/factsheets/Fact_Sheet_20_v2.pdf
  14. AIDS Action. Connecting to Care II: Addressing Unmet Need in HIV. Washington, D.C., 2006
  15. National Conclave on HIV/AIDS Policy for Black Clergy, Clergy Statement and National HIV/AIDS Elimination Act, Available online at http://www.prnewswire.com/cgi-bin/stories.pl?ACCT=ind_focus.story&STORY=/www/story/10-10-2007/0004679286&EDATE=WED+Oct+10+2007,+09:53+AM
  16. Green, E.C. Faith-Based Organizations: Contributions to HIV Prevention. Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies. U.S. Agency for International Development. 2003.
  17. Lichtenstein, B. Stigma as a Barrier to Prevention in the Deep South. Rural Center for AIDS/STD Prevention Fact Sheet #16, 2005. Available online at http://www.indiana.edu/~aids/factsheets/074077_applied_health_final.pdf

CHAPTER FOUR

  1. Mugavero, M.J., Castellano, C., Edelman, D., Hicks, C. Late diagnosis of HIV infection: The role of age and sex. American Journal of Medicine. 120 (2007): 370-373.
  2. Gay, C.L, Napravnik, S., Eron, J.J. Advanced immunosuppression at entry to HIV care in the southeastern United States and associated risk factors. AIDS. 20(5) (2006): 775-778.
  3. Hall, H.I., Li, J., McKenna, M.T. HIV in predominantly rural areas of the United States. Journal of Rural Health, 21 (2005): 245-253.
  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Sexually Transmitted Disease Treatment Guidelines, 2006. MMWR. 55 (No. RR-11),(2006): 1-76.
  5. National Rural Health Association. Fighting Stigma and Denial. Kansas, City, MO.
  6. Dreisbach, S., Corbett, K., Ferraro, A., Koester, S. Policy to prevention: Challenges and opportunities for HIV/STD prevention in rural Colorado. Health Education Monograph, 22(3): 4-8.
  7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Revised Recommendations for HIV Testing of Adults, Adolescents, and Pregnant Women in Health-Care. MMWR 55 (No. RR-14), (2006):1-13.
  8. National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors. Report on Findings from anAssessment of Health Department Efforts to Implement HIV Screening in Health Care Settings, 2007. Available online at: http://www.nastad.org/Docs/highlight/2007626_NASTAD_Screening_Assessment_Report_062607.pdf
  9. National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors. Rapid HIV Testing Assessment.2006 www.nastad.org/Docs/highlight/20061030_NASTAD_RT_Implementation_2006_FINAL.pdf
  10. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Revised Guidelines for HIV Counseling, Testing, and Referral. MMWR 50(RR-19), (2001):1-58.
  11. Keane, D., Nielsen, C., Dower, C. Community Health Workers and Promotores in California. UCSF Center for Health Professions, San Francisco, CA. 2004. Available online at http://www.futurehealth.ucsf.edu
  12. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Border Health Initiative, Special Projects of National Significance. 2004. Available at ftp://ftp.hrsa.gov//hab/border_innovative.pdf
  13. Vermunds, S.H., Wilson, M. Barriers to HIV testing – Where next? Lancet. 360(9341) (2002): 1186-1187.
  14. Foundation for AIDS Research, amFar Policy Statement on Routine HIV Testing. Washington, DC. (2007). Available online at: http://www.amfar.org/
  15. Weinhart, L.S., Carey, M., Johnson, B., Bickham, N. Effects of HIV Counseling and Testing on Sexual Risk Behavior: A Meta-Analytic Review of Published Research, 1985-1997. American Journal of Public Health 89(9) (1999): 1397-1405.

CHAPTER FIVE

  1. National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors. A New Blueprint: Ending the HIV/AIDS Epidemic through the Power of Prevention. NASTAD, Washington, DC. 2008.
  2. Southern AIDS Coalition, Southern States Manifesto: Update 2008. HIV/AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases in the South. July 2008.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recommendations for Partner Services Programs for HIV Infection, Syphilis, Gonorrhea, and Chlamydial Infection. MMWR. (October 30, 2008) / 57(Early Release):1-63
  4. St. Lawrence, J.S., Montano, D.A. Kasprzyk, D., Phillips, W.R., Armstrong, K., Leichliter, J. National survey of US physicians’ STD screening, testing, case reporting, clinical and notification practices. American Journal of Public Health. 92(11) (2002): 1784-1788.

CHAPTER SIX

  1. Gross, J. AIDS Patients Face Downside of Living Longer. New York Times, January 6, 2008.
  2. AIDS Action. Connecting to Care II: Addressing Unmet Need in HIV. Washington, D.C., 2006
  3. Ormand, B. Zuckerman, S., Lhila, A. Rural / Urban Differences in Health Care are Not Uniform across States. Assessing the New Federalism Brief B-11. Urban Institute, May 2000.
  4. Heckman, T. G., Somlai, A. M., Peters, J., Walker, J., Otto-Salaj, L., Galdabini, C. A., & Kelly, J. A. Barriers to care among persons living with HIV/AIDS in urban and rural areas. AIDS Care.10 (1998): 365-375.
  5. Reif S, Golin CE, Smith SR., Barriers to accessing HIV/AIDS care in North Carolina: rural and urban differences. AIDS Care. Jul;17(5)(2005): 558-65
  6. Southern AIDS Coalition, Southern States Manifesto: Update 2008. HIV/AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases in the South. July 2008.
  7. Soft Smoke: AIDS in the Rural West. Telluride, CO: Sparky Productions, 2000.
  8. Dreisbach, S., Moyer, M. Promising Approaches to Rural HIV Prevention. Health Education Monograph. (2008): 38-44.
  9. Heckman, T., Carlson, B. A randomized clinical trial of two telephone-delivered, mental health interventions for HIV-infected persons in rural areas of the United States. AIDS and Behavior 11,1(2007):5-14.

CHAPTER SEVEN

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV/AIDS Surveillance in Urban and Non-urban Areas (through 2006). Slide set. Available online at http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/urban-nonurban/index.htm
  2. DiClemente, R.J., Peterson, J. Changing HIV/AIDS risk behaviors: The role of behavioral interventions. In R.J. DiClemente and J. Peterson (Eds), Handbook of HIV Prevention. New York, Plenum Press. 1994.
  3. Kirby, D., Understanding what works and what doesn’t in reducing adolescent sexual risk-taking. Family Planning Persepctives. 33(6) (2001): 276-281.
  4. Herbst, J.H., Sherba, R.T., Crepas, N. et. al. A Meta-Analytic Review of HIV Behavioral Interventions for Reducing Sexual Risk Behavior of Men Who Have Sex with Men. Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. 39(2005):228–241.
  5. Noar, S.M. Behavioral interventions to reduce HIV-related sexual behavior: Review and synthesis of meta-analytic evidence. AIDS and Behavior. 12(2008):335-353.
  6. Card, J.J., Solomon, J., Berman, J. Tools for Building Culturally Competent HIV Prevention Programs. Springer Publishing, New York, NY. (2007).
  7. Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated Compendium of Evidence Based Interventions. Available online at http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/research/prs/evidence-based-interventions.htm
  8. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Provisional Procedural Guidance for Community-Based Organizations. Available online at http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/prev_prog/AHP/resources/guidelines/pro_guidance.htm
  9. McKleroy, V.S., Galbraith, J.S., Cummings, B., et al. Adapting evidence-based behavioral interventions for new settings and target populations. AIDS Education and Prevention. 18 (Supp A) (2006): 59-73.
  10. Holtgrave, D.R., Crosby, R.A. Social capital, poverty, and income inequality as predictors of gonorrhea, syphilis, Chlamydia, and AIDS cases in the United States. Sexually Transmitted Diseases. 79 (2003): 62-64.
  11. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, 2004. Atlanta: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC, 16 (2005):1–46.
  12. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV incidence among young men who have sex with men—seven US cities, 1994–2000. MMWR. 50, (2001):440–444.
  13. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV/STD risks in young men who have sex with men who do not disclose their sexual orientation—six US cities, 1994–2000. MMWR. 52 (2003):81–85.
  14. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV Prevention in the Third Decade. Atlanta: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC, (2005).
  15. Kirby, D., Laris, B.A., Rolleri, L. The Impact of Sex and HIV Education Programs in Schools and Communities on Sexual Behaviors among Young Adults. Research Triangle Park, NC: Family Health International, 2006
  16. and Communities on Sexual Behaviors among Young Adults. Research Triangle Park, NC: Family Health International, 2006.
  17. Smith, M., DiClemente, R.J. STAND: a peer educator training curriculum for sexual risk reduction in the rural South. Students Together Against Negative Decisions. Preventive Medicine. 30(6) (2000): 441-9.
  18. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, 2006. Vol. 17. Rev ed. Atlanta: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC. 2007:1–46.

 

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