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Indiana University Bloomington
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Department of American Studies College of Arts and Sciences
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About Our Students

We have great students who pursue a variety of rewarding careers.

They become lawyers; educators in public schools and universities; researchers, policy analysts, and program administrators for government agencies and private foundations; public servants and advocates working through NGOs; community and development planning specialists; historians, archivists, and curators in museums; foundation managers; marketing representatives, organizational planners, and managers in corporations; writers, editors, journalists, and political and cultural and artistic consultants.

While studying at IU, they work with accomplished teacher/scholars in stimulating classes to develop both a deep and broad understanding of American culture, which enables them to navigate thoughtfully and successfully the challenges of our complex and changing times, to pursue a variety of career paths, and to contribute to the enrichment of civil society. By choosing American Studies, they have also elected to focus on globalization, migration, and diaspora as a backdrop for American history and culture, as a feature of a hemispheric and transnational conception of "American," and as key social forces in world history.

We Remember Differently: Race, Memory, Imagination Jordache Ellapen is a PhD candidate in American Studies and
co-editor, along with Jyoti Mistry, of the book
'We Remember Differently': Race, Memory, Imagination (South Africa: Unisa Press, 2012).

Our students are a unique subset of the IU student body.

Students who are attracted to the major in American Studies want to cultivate their critical faculties to engage the problems and challenges of civic life productively and purposefully.

They want a major with a thematic focus and a wide lens for integrating their interests in the social, political, historical, literary, and artistic dimensions of public life and culture.

They are confident and inquiring students of human and world affairs who are looking for new intellectual challenges.

They study American culture to develop invaluable critical-thinking skills for negotiating an ever-changing world.

They look for ways to understand their place in this dynamic world from hemispheric and global perspectives.

They want to do something big with their lives and make a difference in the future.