[X] Anthropological 
Linguistics

[ Index of Recent Volumes | Previous Issue | Next Issue | Order ]

Vol. 33, no. 4 (Winter 1991)

Special Issue:
John P. Harrington and His Legacy


Contents

Articles

John P. Harrington and His Legacy Victor Golla 337
Encounter with John P. Harrington Catherine A. Callaghan 350
The Sound Recordings of John P. Harrington: A Report on Their Disposition and State of Preservation James R. Glenn 357
The Papers of John P. Harrington at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History John R. Johnson, Amy Miller, and Linda Agren 367
"Precious Beyond the Power of Money to Buy": John P. Harrington's Fieldwork with Rosario Cooper Kathryn A. Klar 379
John P. Harrington and Salish M. Dale Kinkade and William R. Seaburg 392
Some Observations on John P. Harrington's Peoria Vocabulary Anthony P. Grant and David J. Costa 406
Kitanemuk: Reconstruction of a Dead Phonology Using John P. Harrington's Transcriptions Alice J. Anderton 437
The Spanish of John P. Harrington's Kitanemuk Notes Alice J. Anderton 448

Book Reviews

Semantic Universals and Universal Semantics (Dietmar Zaefferer, ed.) Emmon Bach 458
Advances in Spoken Discourse Analysis (Malcolm Coulthard, ed.) Carl Mills 460
A Macro-Sociolinguistic Analysis of Language Vitality: Geolinguistic Profiles and Scenarios of Language Contact in India (Grant D. McConnell) Rakesh M. Bhatt 461
Power in Family Discourse (Richard J. Watts) Kathleen Warden Ferrara 463
Birth of a National Language: The History of Setswana (Tore Janson and Joseph Tsonope) Ben G. Blount 465
Language Reportoires and State Construction in Africa (David D. Laitin) Fiona McLaughlin 466
The Study of Names. A Guide to the Principles and Topics (Frank Nuessel) John L. Idol, Jr. 468
Sociolinguistic Perspectives on Bilingual Education (Christina Bratt Paulston, ed.) Sijefredo Loa 469
History and Mythology of the Aztecs-The Codex Chimalpopoca and Codex Chimalpopoca. The Text in Nahuatl with a Glossary and Grammatical Notes (John Bierhorst) Frances Karttunen 470
Australian Aboriginal Words in English: their Origin and Meaning (R. M. W. Dixon, W. S. Ramson, and Mandy Thomas) Aram A. Yengoyan 473

Publications Received475

Abstracts

Encounter with John P. Harrington

Catherine A. Callaghan
Ohio State University

Abstract. In this article, I describe my experiences as the first linguist to sift through Harrington's effects when they arrived at the Smithsonian Institution. I then evaluate his contributions to Utian (i.e., Miwok-Costanoan) scholarship.

The Sound Recordings of John P. Harrington: A Report on their Disposition and State of Preservation

James R. Glenn
National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution

Abstract. In his studies of American Indians, John P. Harrington became one of the most prolific collectors of anthropological sound recordings, a fact obscured by problems relating to access. Brief historical data and an accompanying chart broadly sketch the nature of the collection and show how it is divided among the Smithsonian Institution, Library of Congress, and National Archives and Records Administration. The greater part of the collection is at the Smithsonian and presents several difficulties, including damage, problems with identifications, and problems relating to re-recordings. Cooperative efforts among organizations and individuals to overcome some of these problems is suggested.

The Papers of John P. Harrington at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History

John R. Johnson, Amy Miller, and Linda Agren
Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History

Abstract. The Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History is the repository for a small but significant portion of the unpublished papers and personal library of John Peabody Harrington. The ethnographic and linguistic papers, correspondence, and photographs in the Museum's collection are being organized according to the format used by the National Anthropological Archives. Summaries of these components of the collection elucidate Harrington's research interests, field methods, and personal history.

"Precious Beyond the Power of Money to Buy": John P. Harrington's Fieldwork with Rosario Cooper

Kathryn A. Klar
University of California, Berkeley

Abstract. During the years 1912-17, John P. Harrington spent a total of approximately six to seven weeks doing intensive fieldwork with the last speaker of Obispeño Chumash, Mrs. Rosario Cooper of Arroyo Grande, California. In this early work we have a microcosm of the means and methods that Harrington employed throughout his long career. Using the official correspondence between Harrington and F. W. Hodge of the Bureau of American Ethnology and Harrington's notes from his field sessions with Mrs. Cooper, I reconstruct some of their working conditions and the relationship between Harrington and Mrs. Cooper, as well as offer a verbal sketch of Mrs. Cooper herself.

John P. Harrington and Salish

William R. Seaburg
University of Washington

M. Dale Kinkade
University of British Columbia

Abstract. John P. Harrington worked on Salishan languages in two different periods thirty years apart. The first period was in 1910, when he taught summer classes at the University of Washington and collected Duwamish data. The second period was in the early 1940s, when he collected data on eight Salishan languages; some of this material was incidental to his efforts to find speakers of languages already extinct (Kwalhioqua, Nicola, Chimakum, Chinook). This paper explores the differences in the quality of Harrington's transcriptions in these two periods and notes changes in his transcriptional practices.

Some Observations on John P. Harrington's Peoria Vocabulary

Anthony P. Grant
University of Bradford, England

David J. Costa
University of California at Berkeley

Abstract. This paper discusses the form and content of the short Peoria vocabulary recorded in the 1940s by John P. Harrington from two consultants in Ottawa County, Oklahoma, with emphasis on the competence of the consultants, the phonology of terminal Peoria as represented in the speech of his consultants, and the ramifications of this material for an understanding of the history of intertribal contact and bilingualism in Ottawa County.

Kitanemuk: Reconstruction of a Dead Phonology Using John P. Harrington's Transcriptions

Alice J. Anderton
University of Oklahoma

Abstract. The sound system of Kitanemuk has been largely reconstructed, even though the language is extinct. The primary source is the field notes of John P. Harrington, whose transcription system is idiosyncratic and incompletely understood. Transcriptional uncertainties were resolved using various kinds of evidence. This paper illustrates some of my strategies and findings in the hope that these will aid other researchers trying to decipher Harrington's notes for other languages.

The Spanish of John P. Harrington's Kitanemuk Notes

Alice J. Anderton
University of Oklahoma

Abstract. This paper addresses the problem of nonstandard Spanish in the field notes of John P. Harrington. The author suggests resources, summarizes common orthographic and morphological differences, and lists many non-standard words with their equivalents in standard Spanish and in English. Other more problematic forms are also listed, with their contexts, in order to suggest meanings.

Last updated: 12 March 1996
URL: http://www.indiana.edu/~anthling/v33-4.html
Comments: anthling@indiana.edu
Copyright © 1996 Anthropological Linguistics.