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Vol. 36, no. 3 (Fall 1994)


Contents

Articles

A Sketch of the Structure of Oob No'ok (Mountain Pima) David Leedom Shaul 277
Four Projected Functions of New Writing Systems for Chinese Ping Chen 366

Book Reviews

Mesoamerican Writing Systems: Propaganda, Myth, and History in Four Ancient Civilizations (Joyce Marcus) Nicholas A. Hopkins 382
A Grammar of Upriver Halkomelem (Brent D. Galloway) Wayne Suttles 386
Swahili and Sabaki: A Linguistic History (Derek Nurse and Thomas J. Hinnebusch) Robert K. Herbert 390
Nubians and the Nubian Language in Contemporary Egypt: A Case of Cultural and Linguistic Contact (Aleya Rouchdy) Angelika Jakobi 392
Conjunction, Contiguity, Contingency: On Relationships between Events in the Egyptian and Coptic Verbal Systems (Leo Depuydt) Helmut Satzinger 395
Linguistic Diversity and National Unity: Language Ecology in Thailand (William A. Smalley) John Hartmann 398
The Give and Take of Everyday Life: Language Socialization of Kaluli Children (Bambi B. Schieffelin) Kate Riley 400
Constructing and Reconstructing Gender: The Links Among Communication, Language, and Gender (Linda A. M. Perry, Lynn H. Turner, and Helen M. Sterk, editors) Keith Walters 402

Abstracts

A Sketch of the Structure of Oob No'ok (Mountain Pima)

David Leedom Shaul
Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology
University of Arizona

Abstract. This paper sketches the salient features of the morphosyntax of Oob No'ok (Mountain Pima), a Uto-Aztecan language of northern Mexico previously undocumented in the published literature. The purpose is to facilitate comparative study within the Tepiman subfamily of Uto-Aztecan, to which Oob No'ok belongs. Appendices present a small collection of texts, an Oob No'ok morpheme list, and an index to that list.

Four Projected Functions of New Writing Systems for Chinese

Ping Chen
The University of Queensland, Australia

Abstract. New writing systems for Chinese are mainly designed to perform one or more of four functions, in relation to the traditional logographic script, namely, auxiliary, supplementary, alternative, and superseding. So far only those intended for the auxiliary role have achieved success. Since schemes to perform each of the other three functions would affect the traditional script in one way or another, they have yet to overcome the resistance stemming from linguistic, psychological, pedagogical, political, and socio-cultural factors discussed in this paper.

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