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Vol. 39, no. 2 (Summer 1997)


Contents

Articles

The Indo-European First and Second Person Pronouns in the Perspective of Eurasiatic, Especially Chukotkan Joseph H. Greenberg 187
An Egyptian Etymology: Egypto-Coptic m3c Carleton T. Hodge 196
Mandan Switch Reference: A Preliminary View Mauricio J. Mixco 220

Review Essay

The World's Writing Systems (Peter T. Daniels and William Bright) Lloyd Anderson 299

Book Reviews

La parole inuit: Langue, culture et société dans l'arctique nord-americain (Louis-Jacques Dorais) Shanley E. M. Allen 325
Telling Our Selves: Ethnicity and Discourse in Southwestern Alaska (Chase Hensel) Steven A. Jacobson 328
Cuentos y colorados en popoluca de Texistepec (Søren Wichmann) Doris A. Bartholomew 330
Language Use in Rural Development: An African Perspective (Clinton D. W. Robinson) Robert K. Herbert 332
A Grammar of Kisi: A Southern Atlantic Language (G. Tucker Childs) W. A. A. Wilson 335
Minor Mlabri: A Hunter-Gatherer Language of Northern Indochina (Jørgen Rischel) Frank Proschan 337
Die Creol Taal: 250 Years of Negerhollands Texts (Cefas van Rossem and Hein van der Voort, editors) Anthony P. Grant 339
Ethnography, Linguistics, Narrative Inequality: Toward an Understanding of Voice (Dell Hymes) Regna Darnell 342
Sociocultural Approaches to Language and Literacy: An Interactionist Perspective (Vera John-Steiner, Carolyn P. Panofsky, and Larry W. Smith, editors) Clotilde Pontecorvo 343
The Romance Languages (Rebecca Posner) Suzanne Fleischman 346

Abstracts

The Indo-European First and Second Person Pronouns in the Perspective of Eurasiatic, Especially Chukotkan

Joseph H. Greenberg
Stanford University

Abstract. Suppletion in the first person singular pronoun and the form of the second person singular pronoun of Indo-European are discussed in the context of Eurasiatic, especially Chukotkan. The first person singular pronoun in present-day Chukchi is gem, but a prefixed vowel i ~ e is found in suffixed forms. The second person plural is tu-ri. Early recordings of the Chukotkan group show the suppletion kim/ma in Southern Itel'men (Kamchadal) and tu in the second singular both in Chukchi and Itel'men. Survivals of (e)gem in other branches of Eurasiatic and possible connections of the plural -ri of Chukchi and Koryak are also discussed.

An Egyptian Etymology: Egypto-Coptic m3c

Carleton T. Hodge
Indiana University

Abstract. Examination of the contexts in which older Egyptian m3c (mlwc) and its Coptic derivative meue occur demonstrates that it had a technical use as the ritual enumeration of qualities believed to be thus magically conferred on the individual indicated. This is akin to similar practices ancient and modern. Ancient usage is illustrated by the formal biblical "blessings," and the modern by African praise poetry. The etymology of mlwc is discussed, with its origin and related etyma given in some detail.

Mandan Switch Reference: A Preliminary View

Mauricio J. Mixco
University of Utah

Abstract. Canonical switch reference is generally defined as the marking of a clause to indicate whether the immediately following clause has the same or a different subject. This paper argues for the existence of such a switch-reference system in Mandan, manifested principally by the marking of the last predicate of a nonfinal (medial) clause with one of the following suffixes: -ri 'same subject', -ak 'different subject', and -ki 'different subject irrealis'.

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