[X] Anthropological Linguistics

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Vol. 42, no. 4 (Winter 2000)


Contents

The Passamaquoddy "Witchcraft Tales" of Newell S. Francis Philip S. LeSourd441
Language and Space in Tonga: "The Front of the House Is Where the Chief Sits!" Giovanni Bennardo499
Amuzgo and Zapotec: Two More Cases of Laryngeally Complex Languages Esther Herrera Z.545

Book Reviews

Potlatch at Gitsegukla: William Beynon's 1945 Field Notebooks (Margaret Anderson and Marjorie Halpin, editors) Jay Miller564
Power Sharing: Language, Rank, Gender, and Social Space in Pohnpei, Micronesia (Elizabeth Keating) Richard J. Parmentier566
Speaking through the Silence: Narratives, Social Conventions, and Power in Java (Laine Berman) Kenneth M. George568
The Powers of Genre: Interpreting Haya Oral Literature (Peter Seitel) Russell H. Kaschula570
Language Relations across Bering Strait: Reappraising the Archaeological and Linguistic Evidence (Michael Fortescue)Lyle Campbell572
Selected Papers on Indo-European Linguistics with a Section on Comparative Eskimo Linguistics (Jens Elmegård Rasmussen)Brent Vine580
Etymological Dictionary of the Kartvelian Languages (Georgij A. Klimov) Kevin Tuite583
Linguistic Minorities in Central and Eastern Europe (Christina Bratt Paulston and Donald Peckham, editors) Catherine Rudin587
Relexification in Creole and Non-Creole Languages, with Special Attention to Haitian Creole, Modern Hebrew, Romani, and Rumanian (Julia Horvath and Paul Wexler, editors) Anthony P. Grant589
Polygenesis, Convergence, and Entropy: An Alternative Model of Linguistic Evolution Applied to Semitic Linguistics (Lutz Edzard) David Appleyard 592
Publications Received 596

Abstracts

The Passamaquoddy "Witchcraft Tales" of Newell S. Francis

Philip S. LeSourd
Indiana University

Abstract. In 1899, John Dyneley Prince recorded six brief texts in Passamaquoddy, an Eastern Algonquian language, from Newell S. Francis of Pleasant Point, Maine. Prince called the texts "witchcraft tales," since all of them deal with individuals or beings with extraordinary power: five concern the activities of shamans, while the sixth describes an encounter with a cannibal giant. This article presents retranscriptions and analyses of these texts, summarizes the available information about their author, and documents the cultural context of the tales. Prince also collected translations of three of the texts into Penobscot, another Eastern Algonquian language of Maine. Retranscriptions and analyses of these Penobscot texts are presented as well.

Language and Space in Tonga: "The Front of the House Is Where the Chief Sits!"

Giovanni Bennardo
Northern Illinois University

Abstract. This article describes how Tongans conceptualize and express spatial relationships, including the concept of "front." I introduce the lexical items used in Tongan to express spatial relationships and discuss how these words realize "frames of reference." The study suggests that Tongans prefer different frames of reference for small-scale and large-scale spatial contexts. These preferences are related to the way "front" is assigned to houses, churches, and villages. Use of the "translation" subtype of the relative frame of reference by Tongans in both contexts represents a rare case in the literature on spatial reference.

Amuzgo and Zapotec: Two More Cases of Laryngeally Complex Languages

Esther Herrera Z.
El Colegio de México

Abstract. This article describes the main acoustic properties of breathy vowels in Amuzgo and creaky vowels in Zapotec. Following Daniel Silverman's phasing and recoverability hypothesis, I propose an alternative interpretation of so-called ballistic syllables in Amuzgo. Drawing on the phasing hypotheis in the instrumental analysis of creaky vowels in Zapotec, I then address the issue of articulatory incompatibility of gestures involved in creakiness and pitch.

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