[X] Anthropological Linguistics

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Vol. 45, no. 1 (Spring 2003)


Contents

Warrior Powers from an Underwater Spirit: Cultural and Linguistic Aspects of an Illustrated Meskwaki Text Amy Dahlstrom 1

Contact among Some Mayan Languages: Inferences from Loanwords Søren Wichmann and Cecil H. Brown 57

Review Essay

Morpheme Order and Semantic Scope: Word Formation in the Athapaskan Verb (Keren Rice) Sharon Hargus and Siri G. Tuttle 94
 

Book Reviews

Relatively Speaking: Language, Thought, and Kinship among the Mopan Maya (Eve Danziger) Nora C. England 117
Tuscarora-English/English-Tuscarora Dictionary (Blair A. Rudes) Clifford Abbott 118
Himalayan Space: Cultural Horizons and Practices (Balthasar Bickel and Martin Gaenszle, editors) David Bradley 120
The Handbook of Language and Gender (Janet Holmes and Miriam Meyerhoff, editors) Nancy Bonvillain 124
Talking about Treatment: Recommendations for Breast Cancer Adjuvant Therapy (Felicia D. Roberts) Vilma Santiago-Irizarry 126

Abstracts

Warrior Powers from an Underwater Spirit: Cultural and Linguistic Aspects of an Illustrated Meskwaki Text

Amy Dahlstrom
University of Chicago

Abstract. A Meskwaki (Fox) text written around 1912 by Alfred Kiyana in the Meskwaki syllabary is presented here, with interlinear glosses and translation. Of particular interest are Kiyana's illustrations, depicting an underwater spirit and a winged spirit. A number of the cultural and linguistic features of the text are also discussed.

Contact among Some Mayan Languages: Inferences from Loanwords

Søren Wichmann
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and University of Copenhagen

Cecil H. Brown
Northern Illinois University

Abstract. Evidence is assembled showing lexical interference in three Mayan languages (Ixhil, Q'eqchii', and Chicomuceltec) from other Mayan languages. Inferences are made concerning sociolinguistic contexts possibly underlying borrowings. This entails attention to semantic domains into which loanwords group. It is difficult to determine detailed circumstances for loans into Ixhil, but a possible explanation for them is marriage among Ixhilan men and Q'anjob'alan women. Loans into Q'eqchii' mostly relate to influence from neighboring Lowland Mayan languages, in particular Ch'olti'. Borrowings into Chicomuceltec indicate cultural influence from immediately neighboring groups.


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