[X] Anthropological Linguistics

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Vol. 45, no. 4 (Winter 2003)


Contents

Arapaho Place Names in Colorado: Form and Function, Language and Culture Andrew Cowell and Alonzo Moss, Sr. 349

Dissociation in Tense, Realis, and Location in Chindali Verbs Robert Botne 390

The Use of the [q] Variant in the Arabic Dialect of Tirat Haifa Mahmoud El Salman 413

American Indians as Linguists (Part 3)

William Morgan (1917-2001): Navajo Linguist David W. Dinwoodie 426

Review Essay

Xinalugsko-russkij slovar' [Khinalug-Russian Dictionary] (Faida Abubakarovna Ganieva) Wolfgang Schulze 450

Book Reviews

Yuchi Ceremonial Life: Performance, Meaning, and Tradition in a Contemporary American Indian Community (Jason Baird Jackson) Patricia Galloway 459
Handbook of North American Indians. Volume 13: Plains (Raymond J. DeMallie, editor; William C. Sturtevant, general editor) Randolph Graczyk 461
An Introduction to Contact Linguistics (Donald Winford) Nancy C. Dorian 464
Principles of Linguistic Change. Volume 2: Social Factors (William Labov) Jeffrey Heath 466
Publications Received 473

Abstracts

Arapaho Place Names in Colorado: Form and Function, Language and Culture

Andrew Cowell
University of Colorado

Alonzo Moss, Sr.
Wind River Reservation

Abstract. The first part of the article presents a list of 123 Arapaho place names recorded in 1914, providing transcription, translation, and linguistic analysis produced with a native speaker, as well as cultural annotations. The place names are discussed in terms of the internal evidence (congruencies of linguistic structure, semantic content, and the known or apparent inspiration for the names) supporting specific indigenous categories of place-naming. External evidence, in the form of ethnographic data on Arapaho symbolism, particularly as revealed in studies of decorative arts motifs, permits a better understanding of the place names. An examination of this external evidence reveals the deeper connections between the specific place names and place-name categories and Arapaho symbolic, sacred, and mythological thought of the nineteenth century. Comparative evidence from contemporary Arapaho place names demonstrates the virtually complete loss of certain of the nineteenth-century patterns of naming, particularly those most highly connected to traditional religious and mythological thought.

Dissociation in Tense, Realis, and Location in Chindali Verbs

Robert Botne
Indiana University

Abstract. Analyses of complex multiple tense-aspect systems in Bantu languages have commonly treated the various tense markers as situating events at greater and greater remove from the deictic center, i.e., from the time of the act of speaking. In this article, it is proposed that such analyses are insufficient to account for the distribution and uses of the different verbal forms. Instead, tense marking and realis marking constitute two coeval verbal categories that can be unified in a simple dichotomy between a P-domain (the here, real, and now) and conceptually dissociated D-domains.

The Use of the [q] Variant in the Arabic Dialect of Tirat Haifa

Mahmoud El Salman
Al Balqa' Applied University, Jordan

Abstract. This article is a sociolinguistic study of Palestinians now living in Irbid, Jordan, who originally migrated from the village of Tirat Haifa, Palestine. A key feature of the Arabic dialect spoken by members of this group is the [q] variant of the (Q) variable. In this study, variation in the use of [q] in the speech of informants from this group is examined to identify possible correlations with selected extralinguistic factors.

William Morgan (1917-2001): Navajo Linguist

David W. Dinwoodie
University of New Mexico

Abstract. William Morgan is best known to anthropologists and linguists for coauthoring with Robert W. Young the monumental Analytical Lexicon of Navajo published in 1992. Born in 1917 in a hogan near Gallup, New Mexico, he began his schooling at the Bureau of Indian Affairs boarding school at Tohatchie, Arizona. Eventually Morgan was recognized as an important linguist, educator, and author; he received an honorary Doctorate of Letters from the University of New Mexico in 1970. This article presents a narrative of Morgan's autobiography as told to a visiting student in 1995.


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