[X] Anthropological Linguistics

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Vol. 46, no. 2 (Summer 2004)


Contents

The Origin of the Chechen and Ingush: A Study in Alpine Linguistic and Ethnic Geography Johanna Nichols 129

Fragments of Waikuri (Baja California) Raoul Zamponi 156

Training Linguistics Students for the Realities of Fieldwork Monica Macaulay 194

Book Reviews

The Amazonian Languages (R. M. W. Dixon and Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald, editors) Hein van der Voort 210
Essays in Algonquian, Catawban, and Siouan Linguistics in Memory of Frank T. Siebert, Jr. (Blair A. Rudes and David J. Costa, editors) George F. Aubin 216
Dora Noyes DeSautel ɬaʔ  kɬ captikwɬ (Anthony Mattina and Madeline DeSautel, editors; Adrian Holm) Ivy Doak 220
Areal and Genetic Factors in Language Classification and Description: Africa out of the Sahara (Petr Zima, editor) Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald 222
Dynamics of Language Contact: English and Immigrant Languages (Michael Clyne) Anthony P. Grant 225

Abstracts

The Origin of the Chechen and Ingush: A Study in Alpine Linguistic and Ethnic Geography

Johanna Nichols
University of California, Berkeley

Abstract. A general model is proposed for language and dialect spreads and population movement in mountain societies. Languages (and societies) are vertically distributed and often discontinuous. Isoglosses and language spreads move downhill during warm periods and uphill during cold periods. Population movements go in the opposite direction. The ethnic scope and degree of mythologization of origin legends correlate well with chronology and vertical directionality of movements, so that even highly mythologized legends are reliable evidence of movements. This model is demonstrated on the ethnolinguistic history of the Chechen and Ingush peoples of the central Caucasus.

Fragments of Waikuri (Baja California)

Raoul Zamponi
University of Siena, Italy

Abstract. This article presents an analysis of some basic grammatical traits of the extinct Waikuri language of southern Baja California. It discusses what it has been possible to infer concerning the phonology, morphology, and syntax of Waikuri from the meager old materials at our disposal. In order to document this language as completely as possible, the two available short texts are provided together with a morphemic analysis and a word list.

Training Linguistics Students for the Realities of Fieldwork

Monica Macaulay
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Abstract. This article uses examples from the author's first fieldwork experience to illustrate the need for better training of graduate students in linguistics on the subject of fieldwork, especially in the personal and practical aspects. This very personal account also points out the need for the development of a better and more extensive literature on linguistic fieldwork, and makes suggestions about issues that should be covered in such a literature.


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