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Vol. 50, no. 2 (Summer 2008)


Contents

“The Bloody Moose Got Up and Took Off”: Talking Carefully about Food Animals in a Northern Athabaskan Village Thomas McIlwraith 125

The Partitive Marker in Abma Cynthia Schneider 148

Metaphors, Source Domains, and Key Words in Tongan Speech about Social Relationships: ‘Ofa ‘Love’ Is Giving Giovanni Bennardo 174

Book Reviews

Tales from Maliseet Country: The Maliseet Texts of Karl V. Teeter (Philip S. LeSourd, translator and editor) David J. Costa 205
Pitch Woman and Other Stories: The Oral Traditions of Coquelle Thompson, Upper Coquille Athabaskan Indian (William R. Seaburg, editor) Jay Miller 207
The Syntax of Welsh (Robert D. Borsley, Maggie Tallerman, and David Willis) Kevin J. Rottet 209
The Tujia Language (Cecilia Brassett, Philip Brassett, and Meiyan Lu) David Bradley 211
A Grammar of South Efate: An Oceanic Language of Vanuatu (Nicholas Thieberger) Elizabeth Pearce 216

Abstracts

“The Bloody Moose Got Up and Took Off”: Talking Carefully about Food Animals in a Northern Athabaskan Village

Thomas McIlwraith
Douglas College

Abstract. At Iskut Village, British Columbia, moose hunting is frequently spoken about in the form of conversational narratives. Upon analysis, these narratives are full of conventions aimed at valorizing the slain moose even while speakers talk about hunting success indirectly. Here, I present four short moose pursuit stories, along with additional evidence from the speech of Iskut hunters, to show that care is always required when talking about food animals. By extension, such care is indicative of ideal social relations between people.

The Partitive Marker in Abma

Cynthia Schneider
La Trobe University

Abstract. The partitive is traditionally regarded in the literature as a nominal case marker that expresses a part-of-whole relationship. This article examines the partitive in Abma, an Oceanic (Austronesian) language of Vanuatu, in which it is a verbal marker that operates on transitive and intransitive verbs in the affirmative, but also manipulates the semantics of negation and questions. It is further shown that the Abma partitive is grammaticalizing in certain contexts into part of a complex negative marker, and that historically it may also have functioned as a nonspecific article or object case marker.

Metaphors, Source Domains, and Key Words in Tongan Speech about Social Relationships: ’Ofa ‘Love’ Is Giving

Giovanni Bennardo
Northern Illinois University

Abstract. In this article metaphors used by Tongans when talking about social relationships are analyzed. A number of types of metaphors are identified and their source domains highlighted. Many of these metaphors involve the concept of ’ofa ‘love’ and related concepts like faka’apa’apa ‘respect’. The metaphor analysis reveals a comprehensive organizational structure for the domain of social relationships—a cultural model. This structure replicates the organization present in other domains of Tongan knowledge, providing further support for the hypothesis that a cultural model of radiality is the basis of the preferred Tongan way of mentally organizing knowledge.


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