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Vol. 53, no. 2 (Summer 2011)


Contents

Enclitic Particles in Western Abenaki: The Syntax of Second Position Philip S. LeSourd 91

Ethnobiological Classification in Two Indigenous Languages of the Gran Chaco Region: Toba (Guaycuruan) and Maká (Mataco-Mataguayan) Cristina Messineo and Paola Cúneo 132

Book Reviews

Skwxú7mesh Sníchim-Xwelíten Sníchim Skexwrts/ Squamish-English Dictionary (Squamish Nation Dictionary Project) Honoré Watanabe 170
Lessons from a Quechua Strongwoman on Ideophony, Dialogue, and Perspective (Janis B. Nuckolls) Michael A. Uzendoski 174
The Manambu Language of East Sepik, Papua New Guinea (Aikhenvald, Alexandra Y., with the assistance of Jacklyn Yuamali Ala and Pauline Agnes Yuaneng Luma Laki) John Newman 176
Godoberinsko-russkij slovar’ [Godoberi-Russian Dictionary] (Patimat Abdulaevna Saidova) Johanna Nichols 179

Abstracts

Enclitic Particles in Western Abenaki: The Syntax of Second Position

Philip S. LeSourd
Indiana University

Abstract. In Western Abenaki, an Eastern Algonquian language, a number of enclitic particles, as well as certain cliticized words, are stationed in second position in the clause. In simple cases, second position is the position following the first phonological word of the clause, but complexities arise in particular constructions. A clause-initial conjunction may either host an enclitic or be skipped over in figuring clitic placement. A wh-word or focused expression may be skipped over as well, with clitics then appearing well inside the clause. Two preverbs that occupy a left-peripheral position appear to receive special treatment. These effects are shown here to follow from simple assumptions about phrase structure, coupled with a clitic placement rule that states only that clitics are stationed in second position within CP or IP.

Ethnobiological Classification in Two Indigenous Languages of the Gran Chaco Region: Toba (Guaycuruan) and Maká (Mataco-Mataguayan)

Cristina Messineo
CONICET and University of Buenos Aires

Paola Cúneo
CONICET and University of Buenos Aires

Abstract. This article examines the linguistic devices involved in the classification of nouns referring to the plant and animal world in two languages of the Gran Chaco area: Toba (Guaycuruan) and Maká (Mataco-Mataguayan). Drawing on previous studies of nominal classification in these languages, it analyzes how derivational morphology and nominal composition are used as mechanisms in categorizing the natural world in the formation of ethnobotanical and ethnozoological lexicon. The article contributes to the typology of nominal classification in general and in particular to that of the indigenous languages of the Gran Chaco region.


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