[X] Anthropological Linguistics

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Vol. 55, no. 2 (Summer 2013)


Contents

Pronominal Clitics and Indexability Hierarchies in Hanis and Miluk Coosan Paul D. Kroeber 105

Reconstructing Long-Term Limits on Diffusion in Australia Mark Harvey 158

Book Reviews

Analysis of Texts and a Basic Lexicon of the Abkhaz Language (Tamio Yanagisawa; Ana Tsvinaria) and Dictionary of Abkhaz (Tamio Yanagisawa; Anna Tsvinaria-Abramishvili) John Colarusso 184
Historical Linguistics and the Comparative Study of African Languages (Gerrit Dimmendaal) Jeffrey Heath 190
The Ecology of the Spoken Word: Amazonian Storytelling and Shamanism among the Napo Runa (Michael A. Uzendoski and Edith Felicia Calapucha-Tapuy) Suzanne Oakdale 191

Abstracts

Pronominal Clitics and Indexability Hierarchies in Hanis and Miluk Coosan

Paul D. Kroeber
Indiana University

Abstract. The subject and object pronominal clitics of the two Coosan languages, Hanis and Miluk, and their associations with inflectional affixes of the verb are examined on the basis of available text corpora, supplementing and correcting Frachtenberg’s original description of the Hanis forms. In Hanis, an additional proclitic position must be recognized in certain imperative and transitive clauses, differing syntactically from the position of the ordinary proclitics; also, the Algonquian-like hierarchy privileging second person over first person that holds for singular enclitics requires modification for nonsingular ones. In Miluk, the pronominal enclitics differ dramatically from the Hanis proclitics in syntactic position and in some cases also in shape, but in most other respects seem comparable in behavior, as do patterns of inflectional suffixation of verbs. Brief comparative remarks are offered on other languages of the southerly Pacific Northwest.

Reconstructing Long-Term Limits on Diffusion in Australia

Mark Harvey
University of Newcastle

Abstract. There has been extensive research on precolonial and postcolonial diffusions in Australia, but little research concerning the limits on diffusion—something that is central to advancing analysis of diffusional processes. There is evidence that persistent and systematic limits can be reconstructed for some diffusions in precolonial Australia, and that colonization favored diffusion, altering limits. Precolonial limits and postcolonial changes are modeled using social network theory; weak ties favor diffusion, while strong ties do not. Precolonial limits on diffusion correlate with fewer weak ties; colonization increased the proportion of weak ties, favoring diffusion.


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