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Department of Anthropology College of Arts and Sciences
One Discipline, Four Fields

Graduate Courses

FALL 2017


GENERAL ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH-A 521 INTERNSHIP-TEACHING ANTH
002051
09:05A-11:20A F
SB 050
Robinson J

ANTH-A 576 GRADUATE MUSEUM PRACTICUM
091353
Jackson J

The Graduate Museum Practicum (1-4 cr.) provides students with the opportunity to gain hands-on work experience in museums while earning academic credit through Indiana University's Department of Anthropology. Practica require prior agreement and must be arranged with supervising museum personnel and the course instructor, Professor Jason Jackson, Director of the Mathers Museum of World Cultures (jbj@indiana.edu, 812-856-1868).

Practica may be arranged at any museum. If you wish to arrange a practicum at a museum other than the Mathers Museum of World Cultures, you must obtain written permission from a designated supervisor at that institution. General guidelines require that you and your supervisor agree upon the number of credit hours to be awarded, the number of hours to be worked per week, and the specific work schedule. Your designated supervisor will be responsible for assessing your performance and assigning a grade.  Please bring a copy of the supervisor's statement of permission to Professor Jackson when you request authorization to enroll. (It may also be forwarded directly to Professor Jackson from your supervisor.) Students interested in arranging practica at the Mathers Museum should visit   http://www.mathers.indiana.edu/museumprac.html - for detailed information regarding a specific practicum. Practica may involve collections research, curation, conservation, education/programs, the museum store, exhibits, and photography.

To apply for a practicum at the Mathers Museum, please review the information on the website, then contact the appropriate departmental supervisor (noted at the top of each listing) to request an application and arrange an interview. Acceptance of students is limited. The required number of practicum hours worked per week at the Mathers Museum varies according to the number of credit hours of A408 the student is enrolled in, and the semester of enrollment.

A595 GRADUATE READINGS IN ANTH
091237
Sept J

Individual Readings in Anthropology (1-4 cr.) allows the student to work with a particular professor on a specific topic chosen by the student and agreed to by the professor. Field Study in Anthropology (3-8 cr.) gives the student a chance to earn academic credit for work "in the field."

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ARCHAEOLOGY

ANTH-P 500 PROSEMINAR IN ARCHAEOLOGY
081530
2:30P-04:45P T
AISRI
Scheiber L

ANTH-P 509 ARCHAEOLOGICAL ETHICS
002360
06:30P-08:45P TR    (8W2)
WH 108
Pyburn K 8W2

ANTH-P 600 SEM IN PREHISTORIC ARCHAEOLOGY
Topic 1: "ARCHAEOLOGY OF ANCIENT CHINA"
30572
11:15A-12:30P MW
SB 050
Hung L

Topic 2: "INDUSTRIAL ARCHAEOLOGY"
32566
09:30A-10:45A MW
SB 140
Sievert A

Explores the material character and social context of industrial heritage in North America including resource extraction, manufacturing, and transportation. Studies the record that industry leaves on the landscape including quarries, factories, office buildings, mills, railroads, and worker housing. Analysis of documents, images, material remains, archaeological sites, and ethnographic sources.

Topic 3: "ARCHAEOLOGY OF CENTRAL ASIA"
30592
01:00-03:15P MW    (8W2)
AN 101
Pyburn K

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BIOANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH-B 540 HORMONES AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR
083397
04:00P-05:15P MW
BH 340
Wasserman M

Examines the roles of hormones in the evolution and expression of human and nonhuman primate behaviors in an ecological framework. Emphasis placed on behaviors associated with eating, stress, social cohesion, mating, pregnancy, parenting, and aggression. Particularly relevant for students interested in human health and the environment. Specific topics examined include endocrine disruption, reproductive regulation, how ecological interactions (predation, parasitism, etc.) affect the endocrine system, and food-hormone relationships.

ANTH-B 568 EVOLUTN OF PRIMATE SOC BEHAVR
002130
04:00P-05:15P TR
BH 340
Hunt K

Major patterns of social organization in the order Primates, with focus on several important primate species. Examination of Darwinian theories of behavioral evolution. Particular attention paid to the influence of food-getting and diet on social behavior.

ANTH-B 600 SEMINAR IN BIOANTHROPOLOGY
Topic: "MORTUARY PRACTICES"
32537
02:30P-05:00P F
SB 060
Cook D

This course is a seminar in the anthropology of mortuary ritual and the disposal of the dead.  We will concentrate equally on ethnographic accounts of the great variety of mortuary practices and on applications of this body of information to interpreting the archeological record.  Grades are based on class participation (50%), and on a final paper (50%).

A seminar depends on consistent, thoughtful participation each week from each person.  You must come to class prepared to discuss the material we are reading.  If participating in discussion is difficult for you, it will help to make notes in advance on issues you wish to raise.  Each of you will be responsible for discussing sources that the other seminar members have not read.  When we do individual reading assignments, each person will prepare a written summary of the item he or she has presented for distribution to other seminar participants.  You will find that your colleagues in the seminar are quite helpful in finding resources for your research.   Expect approximately 100 pages of reading per week.  We will develop each-read and all-read assignments as the semester progresses and as each of you develops a topic for a research paper.

Your final paper should aim at a substantial, original review or analysis suitable for submission to an appropriate journal.  Please meet individually with me to discuss a topic for the final paper before our third week of classes.  A one-page prospectus of your project is due at our last meeting before spring break.  Each seminar participant will present a summary of the project at our final class meeting during exam week.   Written versions are due the last day of finals week.
Final papers should be prepared in the format of a suitable journal, for example American Anthropologist,  International Journal of  Osteoarchaeology, or Markers.

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LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH-L 600 SEMINAR IN ETHNOGRAPHY OF COMM
Topic: "LANGUAGE IN/OF MEDIA
30565
02:30P-03:45P MW
BH 221
Graber K

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SOCIAL-CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH-E 593 WORLD FICTION & CULTURAL ANTH
083322
02:30P-03:45P MW
BH 108
Sterling M

This seminar links literature and ethnography as means of understanding culture.  Ethnographic writing and world fiction – novels, short stories, poems, myths, folktales – are analyzed for what they each reveal about the social, cultural and political lives of peoples around the world.  The course is comprised of four sections. The first explores anthropological writings that have reflected on the relationship between fiction and ethnography.  The second considers how such aspects of social identity as religion, gender, race and ethnicity have been represented in ethnography, fiction, and other works located ambiguously in between.  The third section considers fictional and anthropological writing that explore human experience particularly in relation to the state.  The final section is a workshop in which students critically evaluate each others’ final projects for the course.

ANTH-E 600 SEMINAR CULTURAL & SOCIAL ANTH
Topic: "COMP STDY ME&CA ISLM&MSLM LIT"
343241
04:00P-06:30P R
SE 009
Shahrani N

The main focus of the seminar will be on the representations of Islam and Muslims in the ethnographic/historical literature of the Middle East and former Soviet Central Asia. The latest edition of  Orientalism  by Edward Said and a selection of ethnographies by Western and native authors will be read and critically discussed in light of some recent critiques of the nature, purpose and direction of traditional practices in the social sciences.  The central aim of the seminar is to explore relationships between ethnographers (producers) and their ethnographic representations (products) of the Muslim peoples, their religion and cultures they study. In particular the significance of place (of ethnographers culture of orientation, of education and graduate training, of employment, of research and fieldwork), gender, and voice (e.g. speaking of or for people studied, institutions funding the research, and governments and agencies supporting the research efforts) within the broader political ecological and intellectual environment, and their impact upon the ethnographic accounts will be examined and assessed.

ANTH-E 613 GLOBAL AFRICA
090497
11:15A-12:30P TR
SB 140
Buggenhagen B

If prevailing scholarship grapples with the precarious position of postcolonial African societies faced with rapidly changing economic and political orders on a global scale, how do contemporary perspectives, if at all, address the everyday experiences of African women and men? Images of African women and men—from the migrants rescued at sea, to refugees, to student protests—are often met with political polarization, decreasing empathy, and the entrenchment of difference. Through comparative and interdisciplinary discussions, we will apprehend recent ethnographies of the African continent that address contemporary debates over: theorizing Africa and locating the productive and creative practices of African men and women in cities, in unregulated economic spaces, in the arts, within households, and in religious communities. S & H, GCC2

ANTH-E 644 PEOPLE AND PROTECTED AREAS
081528
02:30P-04:45P W
JH 440
Osterhoudt S

From tropical rainforests, to urban playgrounds, parks and protected areas have long been used to promote environmental conservation and the protection of endangered species around the world. Yet, parks are also often sites of historical, political and cultural conflict. This course draws from examples from around the world, including Africa, Latin America, and the United States, to examine the social and cultural dimensions of parks and protected areas. Topics we will cover include cultural ideas of nature and wilderness, the “park versus people” debate, community-based conservation, ecotourism, and new, emerging models for conservation and development.

ANTH-G 599 THESIS RESEARCH
078524
Sept J

Above section for Master’s students only who have enrolled in 30 or more hours of graduate coursework applicable to the degree and who have completed all other requirements of the degree except the thesis or final project or performance.

ANTH-G 901 ADVANCED RESEARCH
002279
Sept J

ANTH-H 500 HIST ANTH THGHT 19TH-20TH CENT
002281
10:10A-12:25P T
LH 025
Gershon I

This course is designed to introduce first year graduates to the development of theory in socio-cultural anthropology. Attention will be paid to the major social theorists and theoretical orientations of the field from the late 19th century through the 1960s. The course is an introduction and companion to E500, which will emphasize contemporary theorists.

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