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Department of Anthropology College of Arts and Sciences
One Discipline, Four Fields

Courses

FALL 2017

 


GENERAL ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH-A 107 Becoming Human
Sept
1:25pm-2:15pm MW
FA015

N&M Distribution & Gen Ed Credit

This course replaces Anth-A 105 Human Origins and Prehistory
This course will introduce you to the interdisciplinary science of human evolution. Paleoanthropology is a branch of anthropology which seeks to understand human uniqueness by studying the human past.  The story of our past can be found in clues from a wide range of sources -- everything from details of DNA to Ice Age art.  This is why the scientific quest for human origins requires the curiosity of a philosopher coupled with the skepticism of a forensic detective.
We will begin with an introduction to evolutionary principles, and a discussion of the nature of scientific reasoning. While people often think of themselves as very different from other animals, you will discover that we can learn a lot about ourselves by studying the genes, bodies and behavior of our closest living relatives, chimpanzees and other primates, and apply this knowledge to help interpret ancient evidence.  During the second half of the class we will dig into the past, to look at ancient environments, fossils and archaeological sites for the evidence revealing when and where humans first began to behave like "odd animals." When did our ancestors begin to walk upright? Where were tools and art invented? Who were the “cave men”? What do we know about the origins of language, or the roots of human bio-cultural diversity today?
Throughout the semester we will examine examples of how researchers define and compare different kinds of scientific evidence and how scientific hypotheses about human evolution can be tested with data from a variety of sources. We will look at examples of contrasting interpretations of scientific evidence for the human past, and study why some arguments have stood the tests of time, and are more convincing than others.
Sitting at the beginning of a new millennium, our goal is to help you appreciate how a knowledge of the scientific evidence of the human past is relevant to your own life, whether as a student at IU today, or as a future parent, medical patient, consumer…. or IT professional! Lectures will include digital media presentations and discussions using interactive student response systems (clickers) to model problem-solving and help explore student understanding of difficult concepts.  Weekly lab /discussion sections will give students the chance to examine different types of paleoanthropological evidence for themselves (e.g., casts of fossils, artifacts) and to learn about the strengths and weaknesses of each approach to interpreting our past.  Weekly quizzes will be administered online, and students will also be graded on their lab exercises and several short written take-home essay assignments and projects.

ANTH-A 122 Interpersonal Communication
Robinson
(Many sections - see online for meeting times and locations)
CASE S&H

Introduction to the study of communication, culture, identity and power. Each student does original primary research. Topics range from groups in North Africa to high school and college students in the United States, and issues such as gendered language, slang, verbal play, and institutional language. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 122 or CMCL-C 122.

ANTH-A 211 The Genetic Science of CSI
Kaestle
2:30pm-3:45pm TR
SB140
5:40pm-7pm MW
SB131

Increasingly, forensic science is featured in the headlines of newspapers and lead stories on television news.  Even more impressive is its presence in today’s television series line-up. This course explores the genetic science of crime scene investigation (CSI) through the examination of popular depictions of the science on television (e.g. CSI, Bones, NCIS) and actual forensic cases (e.g. OJ Simpson, Scott Peterson, the Romanov family, King Tut).  Topics covered will include standard human forensic genetic identification, use of non-standard markers for unusual situations, analysis of DNA to predict appearance and race, unusual sources of human DNA, forensic uses of animal, plant and microbial DNA analysis, accuracy and misuse of forensic genetic analysis, the use of DNA to exonerate the falsely convicted, the ethical and social implications of forensic genetics, and the future of forensic genetics. Course readings will be available as downloadable PDFs. Grades will be based on course exercises, quizzes, discussion participation, and short essays. No prior knowledge of genetics is assumed, and there are no prerequisites for this course.  This course carries GenEd and CASE N&M credit.

ANTH-A 399 Honors Tutorial (3 cr.)
Cook

P: Consent of departmental honors advisor. Research and writing, culminating in honors thesis. May be repeated once.

ANTH-A 403 Introduction to Museum Studies (3 cr.)
Kirk

2:30pm-3:45pm TR

M2 110

Introduction to general principles, goals, and objectives of museum practice. Museum history, administrative organization, physical plant design, restoration, acquisition, exhibit, and educational programs.

ANTH-X 371 Undergraduate Teaching Internship
Suslak

Ever thought about becoming a college professor or a teacher? This course gives advanced undergraduate students the opportunity to work closely with anthropology faculty as they prepare and teach an undergraduate course in anthropology. Interns may do a varieties of activities, including but not limited to: creating teaching materials, overseeing laboratory activities, leading discussions, maintaining educational collections, and tutoring students who need extra help. Interns do not assist in the grading or evaluation of other students. You are not required to have taken the course for which they intern; however, prior experience with the course is a plus. You may concurrently enroll in the class that you are assisting, with instructor permission.  Interns also meet monthly to discuss teaching strategies and participate in online discussions about various aspects of course design and classroom management.

Open to junior or senior Anthropology majors with instructor permission. May be repeated up to 6 credit hours, but taken only once per semester. Grading is satisfactory/fail.

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ARCHAEOLOGY

ANTH-P 200 Introduction to Archaeology
King
11:15am-12:05pm MW
SB150
1:25pm-2:15pm W
SB050
CASE S&H

This course is an introduction to the methods and theories of archaeology.  Archaeology is the study of human societies based on material remains left behind by people.  We will explore the kinds of questions that archaeologists ask about past human societies, and the different ways that archaeologists use archaeological data to interpret social organization, subsistence, environment, architecture, trade, economic systems, interpersonal relations and political life.  You will learn about the goals of archaeology as a subfield of anthropology, the development of archaeology as a scientific discipline and the wide range of methods and theories archaeologists use to collect and analyze material remains.

Throughout the semester, we will draw on examples of archaeological research from across the globe, discuss major transitions in world history and evaluate how archaeologists reached those conclusions.  Examples include the transition from hunting and gathering to sedentary lifestyles, the development of cities and complex societies, and interpretations of everyday life, religion, burial customs, and community membership.  We will also discuss contemporary issues including museums, site preservation, looting, and use of the archaeological past in nation building and ethnic politics.

No course prerequisite.  This course meets CASE S&H requirements. It also fulfills a requirement toward the Anthropology minor or major and is a core course for the multi-disciplinary minor in Archaeology. Honors credit is available to those enrolled in the Honors discussion section.

ANTH-P 250 Introductory World Archaeology (3 cr.)
Alt
11:15am-12:30pm TR
SB150
CASE S& H, CASE GCC

Introduction to archaeological discovery in the Americas, Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Near East. Reviews the last 10,000 years of human culture and history, looking for what varies and what does not. For non-majors and students who have an interest in archaeology and a desire to learn about ancient cultures.

ANTH-P 332 Industrial Archaeology (3 cr.)
Sievert
9:30am-10:45am MW
SB140
CASE S&H, CASE DUS

P: ANTH-P 200 or upper-level archaeology, history, or folklore course. Explores the material character and social context of industrial heritage in North America including resource extraction, manufacturing, and transportation. Studies the record that industry leaves on the landscape including quarries, factories, office buildings, mills, railroads, and worker housing. Analysis of documents, images, material remains, archaeological sites, and ethnographic sources.

ANTH-P 350 Archaeology of Ancient Mexico (3 cr.)
King
9:30am-10:45am TR
SB231
CASE S&H, CASE GCC

Surveys the archaeology of ancient Mexico. Traces cultural developments of indigenous peoples from the Olmec to the Aztec, and examines issues, controversies, and current debates in Mexican archaeology. Topics include the transition to settled villages, initial complexity, craft production, urbanization, ideology, gender, religion, warfare, and the conquest.

ANTH-P401 Cultural Resource Management (3 cr.)
Alt
2:30pm-4:45pm T
SB050

P: Junior standing. The anthropologist in the decision-making process for preservation and conservation of prehistoric and historic sites, structures, artifacts, etc. Legal procedures and anthropological values applicable to land use changes that threaten cultural resources.

ANTH-P409 Archaeological Ethics (3 cr.)
Pyburn
6:30pm-8:45pm TR
WH108

This seminar explores the professional responsibilities of archaeologists by examining timely issues, such as the differences and, sometimes, conflicts between international law and professional ethics, and between archaeologists and others (e.g., Native Americans, antiquities collectors) who affect and are effected by archaeological work. Some background in archaeology is helpful.

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BIOANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH-B 200 Bioanthropology (3 cr.)
Kaestle
12:20pm-1:10pm MW
CH122
CASE N&M

Bioanthropology of humans, basic biological principles, morphology, and function of evolutionary history. Human evolution from lower forms, environmental factors, speciation and differentiation into varieties, mixture, growth, sexual differences, and constitutional variability.

ANTH-B 260 Biocultural Medical Anthropology: Who gets sick? Who stays well?
Wiley
1pm-3:15pm TR (8W2)
MO107

In this course we will explore health and disease from a biocultural perspective, which incorporates the evolutionary, ecological, and socio-cultural context of health and disease, as we try to get a handle on two general questions: Why do we get sick?  and Why is there variation in risk of getting sick and getting/staying well? Our level of analysis will move from the macro-level of evolutionary theory and political economy to the micro-level of genetics and microbes to understand how these act on human biology and contribute to ill health. We will be concerned with how these different types of analysis have implications for the clinical practice of medicine. A variety of health topics will be covered, including childhood, reproductive, infectious, chronic and stress-related disease.

Course Objectives are to gain an understanding of:
the determinants of health within an evolutionary and ecological perspective and the clinical implications of such a perspective;
·    the major sources of ill-health;
·    the historical roots of the distribution of contemporary diseases;

how variation in social, cultural, and economic forces produces variation in disease and well-being.

ANTH-B340 Hormones and Human Behavior (3 cr.)
Wasserman
4pm-5:15pm MW
BH340
CASE N&M

P: Junior or senior standing and an introductory course in bioanthropology, medical science, psychology, or biology or instructor consent. Examines the roles of hormones in the evolution and expression of human and nonhuman primate behaviors in an ecological framework. Emphasis placed on behaviors associated with eating, stress, social cohesion, mating, pregnancy, parenting, and aggression. Particularly relevant for students interested in human health and the environment. Specific topics examined include endocrine disruption, reproductive regulation, how ecological interactions (predation, parasitism, etc.) affect the endocrine system, and food-hormone relationships.

ANTH-B 368 The Evolution of Primate Social Behavior (3 cr.)
Hunt
4pm-5:15pm TR

BH340
CASE N&M

Major patterns of social organization in the order Primates, with focus on several important primate species. Examination of Darwinian theories of behavioral evolution. Particular attention paid to the influence of food-getting and diet on social behavior.

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LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH-L 200 Language and Culture
Suslak
11:15am-12:30pm TR
CH001

This course introduces you to the field of linguistic anthropology and the social scientific study of language. You will examine how the languages that people speak reflect their cultural traditions, how the use of language reproduces those traditions, how categories of language are related to categories of thought, and how linguistic variation both reflects and helps shape social categories such as gender, class, race, and ethnicity. While this is primarily a lecture course, class sessions integrate discussion, as well as individual and partnered exercises practicing the methods of linguistic anthropology. In addition to in-class exams to assess your understanding of the material, work for the course includes brief weekly reading responses, a series of problem sets that will give you experience with the methods of formal linguistic analysis, and two short papers in which you will engage critically with readings for the course in a more structured essay format.

ANTH-L 204 Language and (In)Tolerance in the US (3 cr.)
LeSourd
4pm-5:15pm TR
BH003
CASE S&H, CASE DUS

Explores the roles that perceptions of linguistic differences among groups and individuals play in intolerant behavior on the part of some segments of American society, and the corresponding roles that genuine understanding of these differences can play in promoting tolerance and guiding responses to intolerance. Credit given for only one of L204 or SLST-S 204

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SOCIAL-CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH-E 101 Sustainability and Society
Brondizio
1pm-2:15pm MW
SB231

Almost every day we hear news about degradation or pollution of the air, water, soils, forests, and other natural resources on which people and all living things depend for survival.  What can we do to help create a sustainable world?  We hear little about what can be done to mitigate or reverse these processes.  For three decades, the concepts of sustainable development and sustainability have encapsulated these challenges and gained popularity across all sectors of society. This class will examine human-environment interactions at home and abroad, and explore the historical, economic, cultural dimensions that shape challenges and opportunities for ecological, economic and social sustainability.  We will take an interdisciplinary perspective to explore these issues.

The course is organized according to three overarching learning goals. First, to understand the history of the sustainability concept and the challenges of defining it from local to global scales; what social and cultural values people associate with sustainability? Second, to understand the inter-linked nature of local and global challenges of sustainability – how societies are contributing to global environmental and climate change, and the political and economic implications of sustainability, including how natural resources are used and distributed, patterns in environmental conflicts and injustices, and how people and societies are finding ways to confront the challenges of sustainability. How individual actions, social movements, and international conventions have evolved to deal with environmental problems. Third, to understand how individual behavior, population growth, and changing consumption patterns are impacting the environment, and how are societies responding to environmental problems. Critically examine how different social and cultural notions of wellbeing and progress, the way we ‘measure’ them, the political decisions they involve, and the challenges of meeting the 2030 UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

ANTH-E 208 GLOBAL JAZZ, REGGAE AND HIP-HOP
Sterling
9:30am-10:45am MW
BH006

“Global Jazz, Reggae and Hip-Hop” analyzes the creation, spread and international consumption of African diasporic music as a way of understanding such issues of social identity as race, nation, ethnicity, religion, class and gender. It explores these musical genres as cultural products of the communities that produced them; national debates surrounding these musics; their international spread within and beyond the diaspora; and their developmental relationships to each other in the Americas, the Caribbean, Europe, Africa and Asia.

ANTH-E 251 Post-Taliban Afghanistan and the Future of War on Global Terror
Shahrani
1pm-2:15pm TR
BH336

The unprecedented terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 aimed at targets within the United States prompted US & NATO coalition to launch the so called "War on Global Terror" against the Taliban controlled Afghanistan– regarded as the virtual headquarters of global terrorism led by Osama Bin Laden and his Al Qaeda terrorist network who are implicated in carrying out the attacks. The war on global terror has been waged now for over a decade and a half in Afghanistan, spawned into the invasion of Iraq and greater instability in the Middle East and beyond --western China (Xinjiang province), Pakistan (NWFP & FATA), India (Kashmir), Yemen, Africa (Somalia, Sudan and Nigeria) and Russia (Chechnya).  Even after the killing of Bin Laden (May 2nd, 2011), the alleged master mind of 9-11attacks, there seems to be no end to terrorism in sight, why?

Why the attacks on New York City, Pentagon and Pennsylvania? Who did it and Why? Why and how did Afghanistan become a Global Terrorism Inc.?  Is the rise of Taliban movement in Afghanistan as a contemporary phenomenon unique? How has terrorism been conceptualized and explained by the government officials, academics and media experts in the U.S. and why? What are the root causes of terrorism? What role, if any, does religion/civilization, especially Islamic "fundamentalism" play in the current global security crises? Why "War on Terrorism", so far, has NOT worked? Or has it? What are some alternative approaches/solutions to the problem of terrorism which have not been considered and why? What lessons, if any, are learned, from the war on global terror? What have been the impact of withdrawing US-NATO combat troops from Afghanistan since the fall of 2014, to the world security environment?  Can anthropological knowledge and approaches offer alternative re-conceptualization of security that could help US get closer to realization of our real national goals/interests?

This course will critically examine, from anthropological perspective, these and related questions by focusing on the history, society, economy and political culture of Afghanistan as a case study of a  multi-ethnic modern failed nation-state which has been ravaged by a century of internal colonialism, and most recently by foreign invasions, proxy wars and global terrorism.  We will also try to assess the reasons for the failure of international community in building a viable state as promised. Instead, one of the most kleptocratic “thugocracies” has been midwifed in Afghanistan and the region, why?

ANTH-E 260 Culture, Health, and Illness (3 cr.)
Phillips
10:10am-11am TR
LIND102
CASE S&H, CASE DUS

Across the world, ideas about and experiences of health, “disease,” and medicine are profoundly shaped by culture. Introduction to cross-cultural approaches to understanding health and illness, covering topics such as ethnomedicine, ritual healing, gender and health, and international development and global health.

ANTH-E 318 Nature / Culture: Environmental Anthropology
Osterhoudt
2:30pm-3:45pm TR
SB138
Intensive Writing

When we think of nature, what images come to mind? In this course, we will examine how our ideas of nature are influenced by culture, history, and politics. In considering the complex relationships between environment and culture, we will highlight examples from around the world, including Africa, Latin America, India and the United States. We will discuss topics including the relationships between people and animals; the ways identities connect to landscapes; ideas of wilderness; and politics of indigenous groups. By the end of the course, we will recognize how environments represent a collection not only of plants and animals, but also of meanings and social relationships.

ANTH-E 387 The Ethnography of Europe (3 cr.)
Gilley
11:15am-12:30pm TR
BH134
CASE S&H, CASE GCC

Europe is viewed as an idea, an identity, and an historical consciousness. Students explore the meaning of this idea in the contemporary development of social and cultural anthropology, and in such social areas as regionalism and nationalism, ethnic identity, gender and kinship, religion, the city versus the village, and political life.

ANTH-E 393 WORLD FICTION AND CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
Sterling
2:30pm-3:45pm MW
BH108

This seminar links literature and ethnography as means of understanding culture.  Ethnographic writing and world fiction – novels, short stories, poems, myths, folktales – are analyzed for what they each reveal about the social, cultural and political lives of peoples around the world.  The course is comprised of four sections. The first explores anthropological writings that have reflected on the relationship between fiction and ethnography.  The second considers how such aspects of social identity as religion, gender, race and ethnicity have been represented in ethnography, fiction, and other works located ambiguously in between.  The third section considers fictional and anthropological writing that explore human experience particularly in relation to the state.  The final section is a workshop in which students critically evaluate each others’ final projects for the course.

ANTH-E 400 Fashion, Beauty, Power
Buggenhagen
1pm-2:20pm TR
M2 110

This course will examine the circulation of cloth and clothing and discourses about the body and bodily ornamentation in global contexts. This course follows debates about photography, clothing and fashion, and contemporary self-imaging and self-representations of beauty and aesthetics. We will consider the relationship between ideas about the body and self presentation and ideas about gender, family, race and national consciousness. A & H, IW

ANTH-E 413 Global Africa
Buggenhagen
11:15am-12:30pm TR
SB140

If prevailing scholarship grapples with the precarious position of postcolonial African societies faced with rapidly changing economic and political orders on a global scale, how do contemporary perspectives, if at all, address the everyday experiences of African women and men? Images of African women and men—from the migrants rescued at sea, to refugees, to student protests—are often met with political polarization, decreasing empathy, and the entrenchment of difference. Through comparative and interdisciplinary discussions, we will apprehend recent ethnographies of the African continent that address contemporary debates over: theorizing Africa and locating the productive and creative practices of African men and women in cities, in unregulated economic spaces, in the arts, within households, and in religious communities. S & H, GCC2

ANTH-E 422 Native American and Indigenous Media (3 cr.)
Lepselter
1pm-2:15pm TR
SB138
CASE S&H, CASE DUS

Study of contemporary Native American and global indigenous representation and communication, including oral performance and media. Explores the poetics and politics of media and performance in the context of indigenous histories, cultures, and experiences of colonization. Examines the use of performance forms as symbolic resources in literature, film, the Internet, music and television. Addresses intersections of gender, class and race in indigenous media worlds. Credit given for only one of ANTH-E 422 or CMCL-C 430.

ANTH-E 444 Parks & Protected Areas
Osterhoudt
2:30pm-4:45pm W
JH440

From tropical rainforests, to urban playgrounds, parks and protected areas have long been used to promote environmental conservation and the protection of endangered species around the world. Yet, parks are also often sites of historical, political and cultural conflict. This course draws from examples from around the world, including Africa, Latin America, and the United States, to examine the social and cultural dimensions of parks and protected areas. Topics we will cover include cultural ideas of nature and wilderness, the “park versus people” debate, community-based conservation, ecotourism, and new, emerging models for conservation and development.

ANTH-E 600 Seminar on Comparative Study of CA & ME: Ethnographic Representations of Islam and Muslims in Anthropological Literature
Shahrani
4pm-6:30pm R
WH108

The main focus of the seminar will be on the representations of Islam and Muslims in the ethnographic/historical literature of the Middle East and former Soviet Central Asia. The latest edition of  Orientalism  by Edward Said and a selection of ethnographies by Western and native authors will be read and critically discussed in light of some recent critiques of the nature, purpose and direction of traditional practices in the social sciences.  The central aim of the seminar is to explore relationships between ethnographers (producers) and their ethnographic representations (products) of the Muslim peoples, their religion and cultures they study. In particular the significance of place (of ethnographers culture of orientation, of education and graduate training, of employment, of research and fieldwork), gender, and voice (e.g. speaking of or for people studied, institutions funding the research, and governments and agencies supporting the research efforts) within the broader political ecological and intellectual environment, and their impact upon the ethnographic accounts will be examined and assessed.

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ANTH-H 500 History of Anthropology
Gershon
10:10am-12:25pm T
LH025

This course is designed to introduce first year graduates to the development of theory in socio-cultural anthropology. Attention will be paid to the major social theorists and theoretical orientations of the field from the late 19th century through the 1960s. The course is an introduction and companion to E500, which will emphasize contemporary theorists.

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CMCL Classes that converted to ANTHROPOLOGY

As of Summer 2015, all IUB Communication and Culture (CMCL), Journalism (JOUR), and Telecommunications (TEL) classes have converted new subject codes.  Most JOUR and TEL courses are now listed as MSCH courses.  CMCL courses moved into four distinct categories:  African American and African Diaspora Studies (AAAD), Anthropology (ANTH), English (ENG), and Media School (MSCH).  Below for easy reference are the CMCL courses that now have ANTH numbers.  (You may also view the full course conversion list.)

 

 

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