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What is APO?

General Information

  1. What is APO?
  2. How large is APO?
  3. Why don't you have a house?
  4. Does not having a house make APO just a club?
  5. Who can join APO?
  6. Does that mean APO is for everyone?
  7. What about the initials APO? Doesn't that actually mean Alpha Rho Omicron?
  8. How do I join?
  9. What can I expect of the pledge period?
  10. What is APO's policy on hazing?
  11. What is considered a service hour?

Information for Actives

  1. What is Joint Exec?
  2. When is Joint Exec?
  3. Where do I find the job descriptions of the appointed and elected officers?
  4. Where do I find the Mu Chapter Bylaws?
  5. I just pledged this semester, can I run for an office next semester?

 

  1. What is APO?

    Alpha Phi Omega is a National Service Fraternity -- college students gathered together in an organization based on fraternalism and founded on the principles of Leadership, Friendship and Service. Its aim is to further the freedom that is our national, educational and intellectual heritage.

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  2. How large is APO?

    APO is a very large organization. Nearly 300,000 members have been initiated since our founding in 1925. Our current membership exceeds 17,000 students at 350 colleges and universities. It has also expanded to other countries with chapters in the Phillipines, Australia, and Canada.

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  3. Why don't you have a house?

    APO is offers a very unique fraternal experience. One part of this is that no chapter has an official house on campus. Our national bylaws forbid us from having a house for a few reasons. Mainly, it is to avoid the logistics that come with having a house. That means insurance and upkeep, which would make dues expensive. It would be sad to lose brothers because they couldn't pay dues. Another reason is that the time lost to the upkeep of the house (as well as additional work hours to pay for dues) would mean less time for service. Lastly, by not having a house, we avoid conflicts with social fraternities; if you are a member of a social fraternity or sorority, you are still welcome to become a brother in Alpha Phi Omega.

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  4. Does not having a house make APO just a club?

    No, it doesn't. Despite not having a house, APO shares a lot of characteristics with social fraternities and sororities. We have a heritage dating back to 1925 that we value. Similarly, there are many traditions and rituals that we maintain which are only open to members. We also strive to build brotherhood through the service we do. And, like other fraternities, we work toward maintaining that sense of belonging for life. " Once a brother, always a brother! "

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  5. Who can join APO?

    APO, specifically Mu Chapter, is open to any IU Bloomington student who would like to join. Since we don't have a house, members of social fraternities and sororities are welcome as well as anyone who lives in a dorm or off-campus.

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  6. Does that mean APO is for everyone?

    Ideally, yes. However, that is something that you alone will decide. You do this by pledging for a semester. By pledging, you are not automatically committing to becoming a member. During this period, you learn about APO and decide whether or not you want to make this commitment and become initiated.

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  7. What about the initials APO? Doesn't that actually mean Alpha Rho Omicron?

    Technically, yes. Since there are no exact alphabetic equivalents for the Greek letters Phi and Omega, the first letter of each is often used for an abbreviation. Some chapters use APhiO or APhiQ for an abbreviation, but the majority use APO.

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  8. How do I join?

    To join Mu Chapter, you take a series of steps. We have our Rush period at the beginning of each semester. During this time, there are informational meetings and several opportunities to meet the members of Mu Chapter. The next step is to proceed through the Induction ceremony. This is when you official become a " pledge " of APO. This period lasts approximately 10 weeks. During this time, you learn about the history of APO and the standards that are expected of members, as well as participating in various service projects. At the end of this period, your completion of requirements will be reviewed by the Executive board, made up of the President, VP of Service, VP of Membership, VP of Communications, and VP of Finance, in coordination with the Pledge Trainers. You will then decide whether or not you wish to proceed and become initiated into APO. This is when you become an official member and brother of Alpha Phi Omega.

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  9. What can I expect of the pledge project?

    This period lasts the majority of the semester, normally ending the weekend before " Dead Week " (the last week before Finals). During this time, you are expected to attend weekly pledge meetings, as well as a few active meetings. Since service is the core of our fraternity, participation in service projects is mandatory of both active members and pledges. There will also be numberous social events and opportunities to meet the actives. The period culminates in a service project designed and implemented by the pledge class.

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  10. What is APO's policy on hazing?

    From the National Pledge Standards: " Hazing during pledging. An appropriate period of pledging has no place for hazing practices. These include the degradation of individuals, personal service demands, and any other practices inconsistent with the spirit and principles of Alpha Phi Omega.

    Rationale: The concept of Pledge Membership long ago progressed beyond such practices since they violate the Member's obligation to state law, the National Bylaws of the Fraternity and the regulations of most campuses. Alpha Phi Omega Members respect the worth of human dignity and, in firm support of our heritage of intellectual freedom, do not tolerate unequal or abusive treatment of any person. "

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  11. What is considered a service hour?

    A service hour is any hour spent in service to someone else that you neither receive money nor college credit for doing. For example, if you spend your Saturday afternoons volunteering at the Bloomington Animal Shelter, every hour you're there counts as a service hour. Less obviously, if you tutor a friend in math, it is a service hour as long as you do not receive money nor credit.

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  12. What is Joint Exec?

    Joint executive as defined by the Mu Chapter Bylaws:

    " A special committee meeting shall be held of the outgoing and incoming Executive Committees following the election of officers. This committee shall hear pertitions of those active members desiring an appointed office. This committee shall then submit a list of proposed appointments for ratification at the next chapter meeting. In the event no proposed appointment for a given office is confirmed or in the case of a vacancy, the matter shall be referred back to the current Executive Committee, who shall propose new appointments. All offices except the Rush Chair will be filled in this manner.

    (Plain English) This is where any member of Alpha Phi Omega, Mu Chapter may submit a proposal to run for an appointed position for the upcoming semester.

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  13. When is Joint Exec?

    It is typically the Saturday following banquet, or the Saturday after the last regularly scheduled meeting of the semester.

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  14. Where do I find the job descriptions of the Appointed and Elected Officers?

    The list of Appointed Officer job descriptions is in Article III of the Mu Chapter Bylaws . Each office description is listed under its corresponding Standing Committee (i.e. Executive, Membership, etc.).

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  15. Where do I find the Mu Chapter Bylaws?

    You can find the bylaws online here . A PDF version is also available here .

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  16. I just pledged this semester, can I run for an office next semester?

    This answer to this question is a very emphatic YES! You can run for any appointed or elected officer position you desire. In fact, it is encouraged that you do so. Remember, Leadership is one of our Cardinal Principles.

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Last Updated: November 15, 2009
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