Indiana University Bloomington

Department of the History of Art

Burke Lecture Series

  Burke Lecture Series Archive

2009-2010 Burke Lecture Series

Anhelentia aera, vivos vultus
Breathing Bronze, Living Faces: The Making of Portraits at Aphrodisias and Rome
Professor Christopher Hallett, University of California, Berkeley
Friday, February 19, 2009
Radio-TV 245, 5 pm

Chris Hallett received his training in Classical Archaeology at Bristol
University and Lincoln College, Oxford. He completed his doctorate, in
Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, at the University of
California at Berkeley. He is the recipient of a Rome Prize from the
American Academy in Rome (1995-96), and in 1997-98 he was awarded a Humboldt Fellowship to work with Paul Zanker at the Institut für klassische
Archäologie in Munich.  Professor Hallett specializes in Roman art,
particularly sculpture, and has written a book on Roman portraiture entitled
The Roman Nude: Heroic Portrait Statuary 200 B.C.­300 A.D. (Oxford 2005).
He is also co-author, along with Julie Van Voorhis (and three others), of
R.R.R. Smith (ed.), Roman Portrait Statuary of Aphrodisias (Mainz 2006).

 

'Like Frogs 'Round the Pond'?: Architectural Transmission,  Style and the Churches of the Thirteenth-Century Morea"
Professor Heather Grossman, University of Illinois, Chicago
Friday, February 26, 2009
Woodburn Hall 101, 5 pm
Reception to follow

Heather E. Grossman is Assistant Professor of Art History at the  University of Illinois,
Chicago (UIC). She received her BA in the  History of Art and Old World Archaeology and Art from Brown  University, and her MA and Ph.D from the University of Pennsylvania.  Her primary field is the architectural history and archaeology of the  medieval Mediterranean, and artistic exchange between East and West.  Her work has been supported by many institutions, including the  Archaeological Institute of America, the American School of Classical  Studies at Athens and the Program in Hellenic Studies at Princeton University.  She was a Faculty Fellow of the Institute for the  Humanities at UIC for the 2008-9 academic year, working on her book- in-progress, Building Identity: Architecture and Interaction in a  Medieval Mediterranean Society. It investigates the post-Fourth Crusade architecture of the Greek Peloponnesos, the methods of  medieval architectural transmission and theories of interaction. She  is the author of several published and forthcoming articles, and is  co-editing, with Prof. Alicia Walker, a special issue of Medieval  Encounters (for Fall, 2012 publication) on artistic and architectural
interaction between Byzantium and its neighbors.  Grossman has  excavated and surveyed in France, Greece and Tunisia.

Grossman has strong secondary interests in nineteenth-century photography.  As a Senior Fellow of the Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations (Koç University, Istanbul, Turkey) in 2005-6, Grossman  wrote on nineteenth-century photography of ancient and medieval sites  and photography and architecture's roles in modernization and nation-building in Greece and Turkey.

 

Through the Looking Glass: Shifting Surfaces and Altered Perceptions in Art and Architecture
20th Annual AHA Graduate Symposium

The Indiana University Graduate Art History Program will present a public round-table library talk in accordance with their annual art history symposium. Please join us for this annual tradition on:
Thursday, March 11th at 6 p.m.
Monroe County Public Library
Program Room 2b, second floor
Short presentations will be followed by a casual discussion.
This year’s theme is: Through the Looking Glass: Shifting Surfaces and Altered Perceptions in Art and Architecture
Presentations include:
René Gehr: Gilding the Invisible: The Phenomenology of Maya Lin’s Gallery Work
Lindsey Hansen, Touching and Being Touched: Hapticity, Phenomenology, and the Nature of Play
Emilee Mathews: William Rimmer and the Male Nude
Erin Pauwels: Dressing Up and Acting Out: Photography, Costume Balls and the Performance of Femininity in America’s Gilded Age

Saturday, March 27, 2009
Keynote lecturer, Samuel Y. Edgerton, Williams College
Sacred Violence: When Even Artists Encouraged the Death Penalty
FA 102, 8 am – 6 pm
Reception to follow at Woodburn House

September 18, 2009
Charles Colbert (Assistant Professor, Portland State University)
"Whistler's Haunted Nocturnes: Spiritualism and Art in the Nineteenth Century."
FA 102, Time 4:30 pm

After graduating with a Ph. D. from Harvard University in 1978, Charles Colbert taught at Middlebury College.  He has also taught at Boston College and Brandeis University.  Since 2000 he has resided in Portland, Oregon, where he teaches at Portland State University.  He is the author of A Measure of Perfection: Phrenology and the Fine Arts in America and many articles on American art. His current project, a book on Spiritualism and American Art, is awaiting publication.

September 25, 2009 Renata Holod (Professor, University of Pennsylvania) rholod@sas.upenn.edu

"Event and Memory: The Portrayal of a (Minor) Victory in 13th-Century Iran."

FA 102, Time 5 pm

Renata Holod is Professor of the History of Art, and Curator, Near East Section, Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania.  She received her BA in Islamic Studies from the University of Toronto, MA in the History of Art from University of Michigan and Ph.D. in Fine Arts from Harvard University.  She has carried out archaeological and architectural fieldwork in Syria, Iran, Morocco, Central Asia, Turkey, Tunisia, and Ukraine.  She has co-authored and edited works such as: City in the Desert:  an account of the archaeological expedition to Qasr al-Hayr al-Sharqi, Syria; Architecture and Community: Building in the Islamic World Today; Modern Turkish Architecture; The Mosque and the Modern World;  The City in the Islamic World;  and An Island Through Time: Jerba Studies. 

Professor Holod has served as Convenor, Steering Committee Member, and Master Jury Chair of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture.  She also served as consultant to Skidmore, Owing and Merrill (SOM), Arthur Ericson Architects, and Venturi Scott-Brown Architects. In 2004, the Islamic Environmental Research Centre honored her with an Award for outstanding work in Islamic Architectural Studies.

November 5, 2009
Dr. Gloria Groom, Art Institute of Chicago
“Eva Gonzalès and Berthe Morisot: Manet's Muses and Models”
FA 015, 5:05 pm

Gloria Groom is the David and Mary Winton Green Curator of Nineteenth Century European Painting and Sculpture at The Art Institute of Chicago.  She received her Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin (1989) with a specialty in late l9th century French painting.  During her three years in Paris she studied at the Université de la Sorbonne, UNESCO and Ecole du Louvre, in addition to interning at the Musée Picasso.  She came to the Art Institute in November 1984 as a research assistant for the popular exhibition  A Day in the Country: Impressionism and the French Landscape (1984-1985).  Two years later, she worked on and wrote for the exhibition and catalogue  The Art of Paul Gauguin (1986-1987).

Her book, Edouard Vuillard: Painter-Decorator was published by Yale University Press in 1993.  Since then she has been involved as both curator and catalogue author for exhibitions on important French artists including: Redon (1994), Caillebotte (1995) Renoir (1998), Bonnard and Vuillard (2001) Manet (2003) Seurat (2004), Toulouse-Lautrec (2005) and the major loan exhibition held in New York, Chicago and Paris , entitled Cézanne to Picasso (2007).  Most recently she played a major role in the reinstallation of the 19th century European Art galleries, which reopened in January 2009.   

An internationally acclaimed author, curator, and lecturer, she was bestowed the title Chevalier des arts et lettres by the French government in 2005. Her current projects include the organization of a major loan exhibition, Fashion Impressionism and Modernity, which will open in Paris in fall of 2012 and preparations towards an on-line scholarly and technical catalogue of the 19th century collection. 

Dr. Groom lives in Oak Park with her art teacher husband and two teenage sons.

Friday, November 6, 2009
Dr. Henry Drewal, University of Wisconsin, Madison
"Dynasty and Divinity: Ife Art of Ancient Nigeria"
FA 102, 5 pm

Born and raised in New York City and Hempstead, NY, Henry Drewal received his BA from Hamilton College majoring in French and minoring in Fine Arts.  After graduation he joined the Peace Corps, taught French and English and organized vacation arts camps in Nigeria. It was during his two years in Nigeria that he apprenticed himself to a Yoruba sculptor. That experience was transformative. He returned home, entered graduate school at Columbia University in African Studies with an interdisciplinary specialization in African art history and culture studying under Professors Margaret Mead, Douglas Fraser, Paul Wingert, and Hans Himmelheber. He received two Masters' degrees (1968/69) and a PhD from Columbia in 1973. He began teaching at The Cleveland State University (where he was chair of the Art Department), and was a Visiting Professor at the University of California-Santa Barbara and SUNY-Purchase. He also served as Curator of African Art at The Cleveland Museum of Art and the Neuberger Museum. Since 1991 He has been the Evjue-Bascom Professor of Art History and Afro-American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Adjunct Curator of African Art at the Chazen Museum of Art, UW-Madison.

Over the years he has published several books and edited volumes and many articles on various aspects of African art, primarily on the arts of Yoruba-speaking peoples of West Africa and the Yoruba diaspora in the Americas, primarily Brazil. He has curated many exhibitions of African art: Yoruba: Nine Centuries of African Art and Thought (toured seven cities) and Beads, Body and Soul: Art and Light in the Yoruba Universe (with John Mason), which toured five US cities (Los Angeles, Atlanta, Miami, Madison, and New York) between 1998-2000. The book/catalogue for the exhibition was a finalist for the Arts Council of the ASA award in 2001. He has received numerous academic awards including a Guggenheim Fellowship, several NEH and Fulbright awards, and a Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Residency.

In 2001, he began research (funded with a Senior Fellowship from the American Institute of Indian Studies) on the arts, identities, cultures, and histories of African descendants (Siddis) in India. Most recently, he completed work on an edited volume (Sacred Waters – 46 contributors plus DVD published by Indiana University Press, 681 pp.), curated and wrote the catalogue for the major traveling exhibition entitled Mami Wata: Arts for Water Spirits in Africa and Its Diasporas organized by the Fowler Museum-UCLA.

Spring 2010
Anhelentia aera, vivos vultus
Breathing Bronze, Living Faces: The Making of Portraits at Aphrodisias and Rome
Professor Christopher Hallett, University of California, Berkeley
Friday, February 19, 2009
Location and time TBA

Chris Hallett received his training in Classical Archaeology at Bristol
University and Lincoln College, Oxford. He completed his doctorate, in
Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, at the University of
California at Berkeley. He is the recipient of a Rome Prize from the
American Academy in Rome (1995-96), and in 1997-98 he was awarded a Humboldt Fellowship to work with Paul Zanker at the Institut für klassische
Archäologie in Munich.  Professor Hallett specializes in Roman art,
particularly sculpture, and has written a book on Roman portraiture entitled
The Roman Nude: Heroic Portrait Statuary 200 B.C.­300 A.D. (Oxford 2005).
He is also co-author, along with Julie Van Voorhis (and three others), of
R.R.R. Smith (ed.), Roman Portrait Statuary of Aphrodisias (Mainz 2006).

 

Medieval Burke Lecture, title TBA
Professor Heather Grossman, University of Illinois, Chicago
Friday, February 26, 2009
Location and time TBA

Dr. Grossman received her doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania in 2004.  She has taught at the University of Illinois-Chicago since 2005.

 

AHA Graduate Symposium

Through the Looking Glass: Shifting Surfaces and Altered Perceptions in Art and Architecture
Saturday, March 27, 2009
Keynote lecturer, Samuel Y. Edgerton, Williams College
Sacred Violence: When Even Artists Encouraged the Death Penalty
FA 102, time TBA