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School of
Education
2008-2010
Graduate
Academic Bulletin

Web site: www.indiana.edu/~educate/ 
Education Graduate Studies Office 
Room 4278 
W. W. Wright Education Building 
201 North Rose Avenue 
Bloomington, IN 47405-1006 
(812) 856-8504    Fax (812) 856-8505 
Email: educate@indiana.edu

IUPUI Web site: education.iupui.edu
Education/Social Work Building (ES) 3137
902 W. New York Street
Indianapolis, IN 46202
(317) 274-6801
 

Master of Science in Education Degree

General Information
General Requirements for Master’s Programs
Master of Arts in Teaching, Bloomington
Course Requirements for Each Master’s Program
Licensure Programs that Combine with a Master’s Degree

General Information

Master of Science (M.S.) degrees are offered in the following specialization areas in the School of Education. Some master’s programs are offered at both the Bloomington and Indianapolis campuses. Others are available at only one campus. Students must apply for admission to the campus at which the degree is conferred. Course work for most programs is offered at both campuses, and is treated interchangeably in graduate programs. Application procedures and admission criteria are described in the section titled Admission to Graduate Programs.

Master’s programs available at the Bloomington campus:

  • Art Education
  • Counseling and Counselor Education (school and community tracks)
  • Educational Leadership (K-12 principal leadership and teacher leadership tracks)
  • Elementary Education (elementary and early childhood tracks)
  • Higher Education and Student Affairs (HESA) (higher education and student affairs tracks)
  • History and Philosophy of Education
  • Instructional Systems Technology
  • International and Comparative Education
  • Language Education (English, language arts, foreign language, English as a new language, and reading education tracks)
  • Learning and Developmental Sciences (educational psychology, learning sciences, and inquiry tracks)
  • Secondary Education (general, mathematics, and science education tracks)
  • Social Studies Education
  • Special Education

Master’s programs available at the Indianapolis campus:

Please note: Course requirements and options for the programs offered at the Indianapolis campus can differ significantly from those offered on the IUB campus. If you are considering pursuing a Master of Science in Education at the Indianapolis campus, please consult the IUPUI School of Education Web site for specific course listings and requirements that apply to IUPUI programs.

  • Counseling and Counselor Education (school track)
  • Educational Leadership
  • Elementary Education (elementary and early childhood tracks)
  • Higher Education and Student Affairs (HESA) (higher education and student affairs tracks)
  • Language Education (English as a new language, secondary English, foreign language and reading education tracks)
  • Secondary Education (general, mathematics, and science education tracks)
  • Special Education

In addition, a music education master’s program is available through the School of Music, Bloomington (see School of Music Bulletin); a cooperative program in education and library science is available through the School of Library and Information Science (see School of Library and Information Science Bulletin) ; a speech-pathology program is available through the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences; and a master’s program in art education is available at Indianapolis through the Herron School of Art (see Herron School of Art Bulletin).

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General Requirements for Master’s Programs

General Information
Faculty Advisor
Program of Studies
Master’s Thesis
Practicum

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General Information

A master of science in education program requires a minimum of 36 credit hours. Some master’s programs require more than 36 credit hours. Up to 6 credits may be undergraduate course credits at the 300 and 400 level. (Courses counted in a bachelor’s degree may not be counted in a master’s degree.) All programs require that some minimum number of credit hours be taken in the major area of specialization. (This minimum varies across programs, from 12 to 30 credit hours.) Some programs also have course requirements in the areas of research and foundations. There is no “general” master’s program in education.

A minimum of 12 credit hours must be taken outside of the major program area for all master’s programs. An exception is the master’s degree in Instructional Systems Technology, for which a minimum of 9 credit hours must be taken outside the major. Specific course requirements for each program are listed on this page. Master’s degree students must complete all program course work within seven years of matriculating in the program. Regulations governing all graduate programs in education are found in the section titled Policies Governing Graduate Programs.

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Faculty Advisor

An advisor from the major program area must be selected by the student or assigned by the department. Students should check with the department office at Bloomington or the Office of Student Services at Indianapolis for information about the assignment of faculty advisors. See the section titled The School of Education for a listing of program advisors.

Return to General Requirements for Master’s Programs

Program of Studies

For each master’s program there is a program outline form for use in planning the specific courses to be included in a student’s program of studies. This form is available from the respective departmental offices at Bloomington, or from the Office of Student Services at Indianapolis. It must be completed, signed by the student’s advisor, and submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies by the end of the first year of graduate work.

Return to General Requirements for Master’s Programs

Master’s Thesis

A master’s thesis is an option in many program areas. Some programs encourage their students to carry out master’s thesis research. Carrying out master’s thesis research and writing a master’s thesis are particularly valuable experiences for students who seek a scholarly career. Students who choose to write a master’s thesis should incorporate appropriate research course work in their program of studies.

Students who opt to do a master’s thesis must enroll in 3-6 credit hours of 599 Master’s Thesis as part of the minimum 36 credit hour requirement for the degree. A master’s research committee must be appointed. This committee consists of two or three faculty members. The thesis director must be from the major area of specialization. If the proposed research involves the use of human subjects, a research review form for the use of human subjects must be completed.The thesis study must include the gathering of information or data to answer a question that has been posed that is pertinent to the area of specialization of the student’s major. A thesis manuscript must be written and submitted to the research committee. Upon approval by the research committee, the department chair, and the associate dean for graduate studies, two bound copies of the thesis must be filed with the Office of Graduate Studies at Bloomington or the Office of Student Services at Indianapolis.

The thesis manuscript must explain all aspects of the study, including the question posed, the rationale for the study, a literature review, the method and procedure for collecting information to answer the question, procedure for data reduction, synthesis and analysis, conclusions of the study, and educational implications. It must be typed or computer-printed on 81/2 x 11-inch paper. A nationally approved professional manuscript style (usually one used by a professional organization in the student’s field) must be followed. The printing and figures must be in black ink on white paper. Figures must be on 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper.

The thesis must be defended in a public oral examination. The announcement of this examination must be submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies at Bloomington, or the Office of Student Services at Indianapolis, four weeks prior to the examination date for dissemination to school faculty. The committee members assess the quality of the manuscript and of the oral defense. They must approve the thesis in order for a passing grade to be awarded in  599.

Forms for the appointment of a thesis committee, for the acceptance of thesis proposal, and for the passing of the oral defense, as well as information about the format for the thesis manuscript, are available from the Office of Graduate Studies.

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Practicum

Some programs require practicum course work; in other programs practicums are optional. Practicum course work focuses on experiences and activities in the field.

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Master of Arts in Teaching, Bloomington

Another master’s degree, offered through the University Graduate School, is the Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.). Students in M.A.T. programs do not major in education. They major in a subject field (usually in arts and sciences). M.A.T. programs are useful for secondary teachers desiring to professionalize their teaching license or to earn an original teaching license in conjunction with a master’s degree. Those seeking original licenses must meet these requirements (see section entitled Licensure Programs). Application to M.A.T. programs is not through the School of Education. . It is through the department in which the M.A.T. student is majoring. Two M.A.T. programs that are popular with secondary teachers are the Science and the Social Studies Programs (see University Graduate School Bulletin).

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Course Requirements for Each Master’s Program

The remainder of this section is dedicated to a detailed listing of the requirements for each of the education master’s degree programs offered in the School of Education.

Art Education
Counseling and Counselor Education
Educational Leadership (School Administration)
Learning and Developmental Sciences
Elementary and Early Childhood Education
Higher Education and Student Affairs (HESA)
History and Philosophy of Education
Instructional Systems Technology (IST)
International and Comparative Education
Language Education
Secondary Education
Social Studies Education
Special Education

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Art Education

Program Office: IUB, Education 3130, (812) 856-8102.

This program is available at Bloomington. (An art education master’s program is also available at Indianapolis, through the Herron School of Art and Design at IUPUI. Students seeking information about this program should contact the Herron School of Art and Design, 1701 N. Pennsylvania Street, Indianapolis, IN 46202-1472.)

This program may be used to help experienced teachers improve their competencies, to help practicing artists become art teachers, and to prepare students to teach art at all levels of education. This program offers courses in curriculum theory and development, computer graphics and other technology, art education history and literature, art instruction for atypical populations, development and applications of testing in art education, museum education, and other aspects of art education.

In addition to meeting the standard School of Education admission requirements, students interested in pursuing a master’s degree in art education must have a minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0. Applicants who do not meet this requirement may be admitted if they show evidence of successful professional activity, such as curriculum development or scholarship, or a paper that demonstrates competence in abstract thinking in the English language.

Students must complete 36 credit hours, including the following:

I. Major (18 cr.)
J500 Instruction in the Context of Curriculum (3 cr.)
Z500 Advanced Art Education (3 cr.)
12 additional credit hours in art education.

II. Foundations (3 cr.)
Choose one course:
H504 History of American Education (3 cr.)
H530 Philosophy of Education (3 cr.)
P510 Psychology in Teaching (3 cr.)
P515 Child Development (3 cr.)
P516 Adolescent Development (3 cr.)
P525 Psychological Issues in Education (3 cr.)
P540 Learning and Cognition in Education (3 cr.)
P544 Applied Cognition and Learning Strategies (3 cr.)

III. Thesis (Z599), Practicum (J538), or other courses selected with the approval of program advisor (6 cr.)

IV. Electives (9 cr.)
Nine (9) credit hours must be taken from outside the Art Education Program. These courses must complement the student’s program.

Return to Course Requirements for Each Master’s Program

Counseling and Counselor Education

Program Offices:
IUB, Education 4000, (812) 856-8305.
IUPUI, Education/Social Work 3115, (317) 278-5739

This program is available at Bloomington and Indianapolis (school track). Students may choose either a school track, leading to a standard school counselor license, or a community track. The community track is not available at the Indianapolis campus. The program provides entry-level training in accordance with the licensure requirements of the Indiana Department of Education.

Application deadlines for the Bloomington master’s program in counseling and counselor education are March 1 for summer and fall matriculation and November 1 for spring matriculation. Application deadlines for the IUPUI campus in counseling and counselor education are May 1 for fall matriculation; November 1 for spring matriculation; March 1 for summer matriculation.

Students must complete a minimum of 48 credit hours, including the following:

I. Major in the School Track (39 cr.)
G502 Professional Orientation and Ethics (3 cr.)
G505 Individual Appraisal: Principles and Procedures (3 cr.)
G522 Counseling Theory (3 cr.)
G523 Laboratory in Counseling (3 cr.)
G524 Practicum in Counseling (3 cr.)
G532 Introduction to Group Counseling (3 cr.)
G542 Organization and Development of Counseling Programs (3 cr.)
G550 Internship in Counseling/Counselor Education (6 cr.—i.e., 2 sem. at 3 cr. each)
G552 Career Counseling: Theory/Practice (3 cr.)
G562 School Counseling: Intervention, Consultation, and Program
  Development (3 cr.)
G575 Multicultural Counseling (3 cr.)
G598 Seminar on Professional Issues (3 cr.)

or

I. Major in the Community Track (39 cr.)
G502 Professional Orientation and Ethics (3 cr.)
G505 Individual Appraisal: Principles and Procedures (3 cr.)
G522 Counseling Theory (3 cr.)
G523 Laboratory in Counseling (3 cr.)
G524 Practicum in Counseling (3 cr.)
G532 Introduction to Group Counseling (3 cr.)
G550 Internship in Counseling/Counselor Education (6 cr.—i.e., 2 sem. at 3 cr. each)
G552 Career Counseling: Theory/Practice (3 cr.)
G563 Foundations of Mental Health Counseling
G575 Multicultural Counseling (3 cr.)
G598 Seminar on Professional Issues (3 cr.)
G645 Psychoeducational Consultation (3 cr.)

II. Research (3 cr.)
Y520 Strategies for Educational Inquiry (3 cr.)

III. Human Growth and Development (3 cr.)
P514 Life Span Development: Birth to Death (3 cr.)

IV. Electives (3 cr.)
Three (3) graduate credit hours outside the counseling major are required. This course should broaden understanding in psychological foundations. Specific course selection must have the approval of the student’s advisor. Programs that offer relevant course work include learning and developmental sciences/educational psychology, special education, student affairs administration, instructional systems technology, curriculum and instruction, sociology, criminal justice, psychology, health and physical education, and anthropology.

MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELOR LICENSURE

For detailed information about mental health counselor licensure, see Education Specialist (Ed.S.) degree.

Return to Course Requirements for Each Master’s Program

Educational Leadership (School Administration)

K-12 Building-Level Administration Track
Teacher Leadership Track

K-12 BUILDING-LEVEL ADMINISTRATION TRACK

Program Offices:
IUB, Education 4228, (812) 856-8365.
IUPUI, Education/Social Work 3133, (317) 274-6816.

This program is combined with a licensure program that results in a recommendation for an initial license for building-level administration (all school settings). The program is available at the Bloomington and Indianapolis campuses. The master’s degree program is available only to those who hold a standard teaching license, a proficient practitioner license, or a valid out-of-state equivalent license. All applicants for the master’s degree program must have satisfactorily completed a minimum of two full years of classroom teaching in a state-accredited school.

Upon completion of the master’s degree and a state-mandated examination, graduates will be recommended for an initial license as a building administrator in the state of Indiana. To receive the license, all individuals are required to achieve a qualifying score on the ETS School Leaders Licensure Assessment
(www.ets.org/sls).

Individuals completing administrative programs are required by the Indiana Professional Standards Board to complete an induction program during their first two years of service as an administrator (see www.ai.org/psb or call 1-866-542-3672). Completion of the two-year induction program will result in eligibility for the five-year Proficient Practitioner license.

Please note: Because of changes in the requirements of the Indiana Professional Standards Board (IPSB), the master’s degree program is subject to change at any time. Please check with the Educational Leadership Program or the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies for the most current requirements.

Completion of the following standards-based, performance-driven courses results in fulfilling the ISLLC standards for educational leaders:

I. Foundation Area (9 cr.)
H504 History of American Education (3 cr.) or
  H520 Education and Social Issues (3 cr.)
P507 Testing in the Classroom (3 cr.)
P540 Learning and Cognition in Education (3 cr.)

II. Educational Leadership Area (24 cr.)
A500 Introduction to Educational Leadership (3 cr.)
A510 School Community Relations (3 cr.)
A515 Educational Leadership: Teacher Development and Evaluation (3 cr.)
A608 Legal Perspectives on Education (3 cr.)
A624 Educational Leadership: The Principalship K-12 (3 cr.)
A635 Public School Budgeting and Accounting (3 cr.)
A695 Practicum in Education Leadership (3 cr.)
J500 Instruction in the Context of Curriculum (3 cr.)

III. Elective (3 cr.)
Any graduate-level education course.

Questions about licensure can be directed to:

Office of Educator Licensing and Development
101 West Ohio
Suite 300
Indianapolis, IN 46204
(317) 232-9010
Return to Educational Leadership (School Administration)

TEACHER LEADERSHIP TRACK

At present, this program is available in Bloomington only, but it may be offered in Indianapolis or other sites in the future. It is a cohort program offered to currently practicing teachers in a format and schedule that meets the personal and professional needs of these individuals. Prospective applicants should contact the Educational Leadership Program for information about the program’s availability.

I. Core (24 cr.)
A500 Introduction to Educational Leadership (3 cr.)
A608 Legal Perspectives on Education (3 cr.)
Y520 Strategies for Educational Inquiry (3 cr.)
J500 Instruction in the Context of Curriculum (3 cr.)
A510 School Community Relations (3 cr.)
A515 Educational Leadership: Teacher Development and Evaluation (3 cr.)
P507 Testing in the Classroom (3 cr.)
H520 Education and Social Issues (3 cr.)

II. National Board Seminar (6 cr.)
Seminar courses will span the entire two years of the program. National Board Certification is not a guaranteed outcome of the seminar.
A590 Portfolio Development Seminar (1 cr.)
A695 Practicum in Educational Leadership (2 cr.)
R590 Technology Integration Seminar (3 cr.)

III. Concentration (6 cr.)
Students will be assisted in selecting an area of concentration to support their curricular focus and professional goals.

Return to Educational Leadership (School Administration)

Return to Course Requirements for Each Master’s Program

Learning and Developmental Sciences

Program Office: IUB, Education 4000, (812) 856-8307.

This is a Bloomington program with some course work offered at Indianapolis. Graduates of the master’s program enter positions in research agencies and consulting firms, public schools, foundations, industries, state education departments, or the military. Many master’s students continue on to doctoral study.

In addition to meeting the standard School of Education admission requirements, students interested in pursuing a master’s degree in learning and developmental sciences/educational psychology must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 in their last 60 credit hours of undergraduate course work.

A program planning form is available in the department office. Each student must choose a learning and developmental sciences/educational psychology faculty member as an advisor or be assigned one. The master’s program in educational psychology offers three tracks: an educational psychology track, a learning sciences track, and an inquiry track. Each requires 36 credit hours.

I. Psychology (9–12 cr.)
Courses are selected from one or more of the subareas of psychological studies, which include human development, learning sciences, educational psychology, and personality and social psychology (e.g., P513, P514, P515, P516, P517, P525, P530, P540, P544, P545, P550, P566, P575, P590, P600, P623, P640, P650). Students in the educational psychology or learning sciences tracks must take 12 credit hours of course work in this category.

II. Inquiry (9–12 cr.)
Courses are selected from one or more of the following inquiry areas: statistics, measurement, evaluation, and qualitative or quantitative inquiry methodology (e.g., P501, P591, Y502, Y520, Y527, Y530, Y535, Y590, Y603, Y604, Y611, Y617, Y635). Students in the inquiry track must take 12 credit hours of course work in this category.

III. Educational Foundations (3 cr.)
Many foundations courses in education have an "H" prefix (e.g., history, philosophy, sociology, and anthropology of education).

IV. Curriculum (3 cr.)
Curriculum theory courses have a "J" prefix, and methods courses may have several different prefixes, but are usually found in Curriculum and Instruction program areas.

V. Electives (12 cr.)
9 credit hours, including those in III and IV (above) must be taken outside of Learning and Developmental Sciences/Educational Psychology. Elective courses must contribute to the integrity of student programs and must be approved by a program advisor.

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Elementary and Early Childhood Education

Program Offices:
IUB, Education 3130, (812) 856-8106 or 856-8105.
IUPUI, Education/Social Work 3155, (317) 278-5739.

This program is available at Bloomington and at Indianapolis. It provides extensive professional development for practicing teachers and others with an interest in elementary and early childhood education. Students in the elementary education or the early childhood education tracks must complete 36 credit hours. The Elementary Transition to Teaching Plus Master’s Degree Program track is a 49 credit hour alternative that provides teacher certification. This track is intended for individuals with undergraduate degrees in areas outside of education and is available only at the Bloomington campus.

In addition to meeting the standard School of Education admission requirements, students interested in pursuing a master’s degree in elementary and early childhood education must have an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or above. Applicants who do not meet this requirement may be admitted if they show promise of future successful professional activity.

Elementary Education Track
Early Childhood Education Track
Elementary Transition to Teaching Plus Master’s Degree Program Track (Bloomington Only)

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ELEMENTARY EDUCATION TRACK

The Elementary Master’s Program in the School of Education offers an advanced degree for experienced teachers seeking to enhance their knowledge and skill as teachers. (See site.educ.indiana.edu/default.aspx?tabid=4410 for a description of the program.) Core courses in the major include opportunities for students to explore current theories of learning and instruction, to engage in inquiry and reflection on teaching practice, to examine the social and cultural contexts of contemporary schools, and to analyze the nature and purposes of current perspectives on curriculum. Students also select courses in the advanced study of content areas relevant to elementary education. The program encourages candidates to pursue individual interests in depth through elective courses. Since most of the candidates in the program are practicing teachers, no additional formal field experience is required. Students, however, often use the course assignments as an opportunity to integrate current curriculum theory and teaching methods into their own classroom practices. As a culminating experience, students elect to write a thesis or complete a practicum project. The practicum option is often selected by students and is carried out as an action research project in their own classroom or school. Recent examples of such projects can be found at the School of Education on each campus.

I. Major (12 cr.)
J500 Instruction in the Context of Curriculum (3 cr.)
E535 Elementary School Curriculum (3 cr.)

Choose two courses:
N543 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Mathematics in the Elementary
  Schools (3 cr.)
E545 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Reading in the Elementary Schools
  (3 cr.) (Bloomington) or L500 Instructional Issues In Language Learning
  (3 cr.) (Indianapolis)
E547 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Social Studies in the Elementary
  Schools (3 cr.)
E548 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Science in the Elementary Schools
(3 cr.)
E595 Problem Analysis in Elementary Education: (variable title) (1-3 cr.)
J511 Methods of Individualizing Instruction (3 cr.)

Students may choose other courses related to elementary education with the approval of an advisor.

II. Foundations (3 cr.)
Choose one course:
H504 History of American Education (3 cr.)
H520 Education and Social Issues (3 cr.)
H525 Anthropology of Education (3 cr.)
H530 Philosophy of Education (3 cr.)
H540 Sociology of Education (3 cr.)
P510 Psychology in Teaching (3 cr.)
P515 Child Development (3 cr. )
P516 Adolescent Development (3 cr.)
P525 Psychological Issues in Education (3 cr.)
P540 Learning and Cognition in Education (3 cr.)
P544 Applied Cognition and Learning Strategies (3 cr.)

III. Electives (15 cr.)
Elective courses must complement the major, and may be from within or outside of the School of Education. Students wishing to focus on a particular discipline, such as mathematics, science, or social studies, may include courses from these fields here. Elective courses must be approved by a program advisor.

IV. Thesis (X599), Practicum (J538), or other courses selected with the approval of the program advisor (6 cr.)

Return to Elementary and Early Childhood Education Program

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION TRACK

The program in Early Childhood Education is primarily for individuals who already have a teaching license in early childhood or elementary education and are seeking advanced professional development. Students can choose to focus their courses on the study of preschool or primary education. Several courses are taught over the distance education network, which links the Bloomington and IUPUI campuses.

I. Major (15 cr.)
J500 Instruction in the Context of Curriculum (3 cr.)
E508 Seminar in Early Childhood Education (3 cr.)
E505 Organization and Administration of Early Childhood Education Programs (3 cr.)
E506 Curriculum in Early Childhood Education (3 cr.)
E525 Advanced Curriculum Study in Early Childhood Education (3 cr.)

II. Foundations (3 cr.)
P515 Child Development (3 cr.)

III. Electives (18 credit hours)

Return to Elementary and Early Childhood Education Program

ELEMENTARY TRANSITION TO TEACHING PLUS MASTER’S DEGREE PROGRAM TRACK (BLOOMINGTON ONLY)

I. Field-Related Courses (37 cr.)
E543 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Mathematics (3 cr.)
E547 Experience in Elementary Social Studies Curriculum (3 cr.)
E548 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Science (3 cr.)
E579 Inquiry in Elementary Education (3 cr.)
E594 Seminar in Elementary Education (2 cr.)
L545 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Reading (3 cr.)
L549 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Language Arts (3 cr.)
M501 Laboratory/Field Experience and Seminar (4 cr.)
  (Two semesters at 2 credit hours each)
M550 Practicum (Student Teaching) (10 cr.)
Z500 Advanced Art Education (3 cr.)

II. Campus-Based Courses (12 cr.)
Choose one course:
P510 Psychology in Teaching (3 cr.)
P515 Child Development (3 cr.)
P530 Instructional Psychology (3 cr.)
P540 Learning and Cognition in Education (3 cr.)

Choose one course:
H504 History of American Education (3 cr.)
H520 Education and Social Issues (3 cr.)
H525 Anthropology of Education (3 cr.)
H530 Philosophy of Education (3 cr.)
H540 Sociology of Education (3 cr.)
H551 Comparative Education (3 cr.)
H560 Education and Change in Societies (3 cr.)

Choose one course:
L559 Trade Books in the Elementary Classroom (3 cr.)
L666 Survey of Children’s Literature (4 cr.)
SLIS S571 Library Materials for Children and Young Adults (3 cr.)

Required:
E555 Human Diversity in Education (3 cr.)

Return to Elementary and Early Childhood Education Program

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Higher Education and Student Affairs (HESA)

Program Office:
IUB, Education 4228, (812) 856-8362.
IUPUI, Education/Social Work 3149, (317) 278-5739.

Students interested in the study of higher education and working in a college or university may choose between two concentrations in the master’s degree in student affairs administration and higher education. The concentration in student affairs administration emphasizes the study of college and university administration, student learning and development, assessment of campus environments, issues in student affairs, and communication skills and interpersonal relationships. The concentration in higher education emphasizes the study of higher education and is intended for professionals not working with students. Both concentrations introduce students to relevant theory, research, and practice related to college and university administration and preparation for entry-level and, for those with previous relevant experience, middle-management positions in institutions of higher education.

In addition to the School of Education admission requirements, applicants must interview with the faculty. Students come from diverse geographic locations and academic backgrounds.

Some come to the program with experience in student affairs-related positions, and many come directly from undergraduate study. Most full-time students need two academic years and one summer session to complete the degree requirements. Students are required to begin course work in the fall semester. Because practical experience is valued, all students must obtain a graduate assistantship or be employed at least part-time in a related campus office while pursuing this degree. Students may take courses at either Bloomington (IUB) or Indianapolis (IUPUI).

Student Affairs Administration Concentration
Higher Education Concentration

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STUDENT AFFAIRS ADMINISTRATION CONCENTRATION
(41 cr.)

I. Basic Core (22-24 cr.)
C565 Introduction to College and University Administration (3 cr.)
U544 Introduction to Student Affairs in Higher Education (3 cr.)
U546 Diverse Students on the College Campus (3 cr.)
U547 Practicum in Personnel Work (2 cr.)*
U548 Student Development Theory and Research (3 cr.)
U549 Environmental Theory and Assessment (3 cr.)
U551 Administrative Practices (1 cr.)
U553 College Student and the Law (1 cr.)
U580 Issues and Problems in Higher Education and Student Affairs Administration
  (3 cr.)

*Students with significant full-time work experience in higher education administration, upon their request and with advisor approval, may be exempted from the practicum requirement. These students need only 39 credit hours to complete the degree.

II. Counseling and Counselor Education (3-15 cr.)
G573 Communication Skills and Interpersonal Relations in Counseling (3 cr.)

III. Foundations (6 cr.)
Research (3 cr.):
Y520 Strategies for Educational Inquiry (3 cr.) or
  P501 Introduction to Statistics (3 cr.)

History/Philosophy (3 cr.):
Select one H-prefix course, e.g., H504, H520, H525, H530, H540, etc.

IV. Electives (10 cr.)
Students must choose any U550 course or U559 to total 4 credits. For the remainder of the elective credits, students may choose any graduate-level class outside of the program area, with the following exceptions: correspondence and physical activity courses (e.g., dance, music lessons) typically are not appropriate for this degree.

V. Thesis Option (6 cr.)
Up to 6 credit hours, to be subtracted from electives.

Return to Higher Education and Student Affairs (HESA)

HIGHER EDUCATION CONCENTRATION (41 cr.)

I. Basic Core (12-14 cr.)
C565 Introduction to College and University Administration (3 cr.)
C665 Higher Education Administration (3 cr.)
U544 Introduction to Student Affairs in Higher Education (3 cr.)
U547 Practicum in Personnel Work (2 cr.)*
U580 Issues and Problems in Higher Education and Student Affairs Administration
  (Capstone) (3 cr.)

*Students with significant full-time work experience in higher education administration, upon their request and with advisor approval, may be exempted from the practicum requirement. These students need only 39 credit hours to complete the degree.

II. Recommended Courses (15 cr.)
Any graduate courses offered by the Higher Education and Student Affairs program area (C- and U-prefix courses). Other courses (e.g., A670, G573) may be substituted with prior approval of the student’s advisor. Students who select the thesis option (6 cr.) can reduce the number of credit hours of recommended courses from 15 to 9.

III. Foundations (6 cr.)
Research (3 cr.):
Y520 Strategies for Educational Inquiry (3 cr.) or
  P501 Introduction to Statistics (3 cr.)

History/Philosophy (3 cr.):
Select one H-prefix course, e.g., H504, H520, H525, H530, H540, etc.

IV. Electives outside the Major (6 cr.)
Any graduate-level class outside of the program area, with the following exceptions: correspondence and physical activity courses (e.g., dance, music lessons) typically are not appropriate for this degree.

V. Thesis option (6 cr.)
Up to 6 credit hours, to be subtracted from electives or recommended courses.

Return to Higher Education and Student Affairs (HESA)

Return to Course Requirements for Each Master’s Program

History and Philosophy of Education

Program Office:
IUB, Education 4228, (812) 856-8363.

This master’s program is available only at Bloomington. It provides students the opportunity for growth in fundamental abilities that contribute clarity of direction and purpose to the professional tasks of educators. The program allows the student to inquire into the historical roots of educational policies and problems and to explore the relationship between educational philosophies and the practices and policies of educational and other social institutions.

The 36 credit hour master’s degree in history and philosophy of education is usually a step toward the doctorate and should be individually planned. Students should consult the program faculty before applying for admission. Requirements are as follows:

I. Major (15 cr.)
H504 History of American Education (3 cr.)
H530 Philosophy of Education (3 cr.)
Nine (9) additional credit hours of H-prefixed courses, approved by the program advisor.

II. Courses Outside of Education (9 cr.)
Nine (9) credit hours must be selected from departments outside the School of Education. This course work must be relevant to the history and philosophy of education and should be selected in consultation with the faculty advisor.

III. Electives (12 cr.)
Twelve (12) credit hours of relevant elective courses are also required. These courses may be taken within or outside the School of Education. Elective courses must be approved by the student’s program advisor.

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Instructional Systems Technology (IST)

Program Office:
IUB, Education 2276, (812) 856-8450

Instructional Systems Technology (IST) provides a master’s degree program at Bloomington with an option for study at a distance. The field of IST involves the application of technological processes, including systems analysis and behavioral and cognitive principles, to the design, management, and improvement of instruction. The master’s program prepares students to meet the increasing demand for instructional design and media specialists.

In addition to the standard School of Education admission requirements, the IST Admission Committee will evaluate previous course work and experience in relation to the applicant’s goal statement. Since post-master’s courses draw heavily on theoretical and research literature in the field, students who plan to continue for an advanced graduate degree should consult with their advisor about master’s-level courses that will apply toward specialist and doctoral degree requirements.

Students entering the IST program are expected to exhibit experience with computers in three areas: (1) computer awareness and literacy, (2) basic applications, and (3) educational computing basics. Students deficient in any of these areas will be required to supplement their program with course work in instructional computing.

Students must complete a minimum of 36 credit hours, including the following:

I. Major (27 cr.)
R511 Instructional Technology Foundations I (3 cr.)
R521 Instructional Design and Development I (3 cr.)
R541 Instructional Development and Production Process I (3 cr.)
R561 Evaluation and Change in the Instructional Development Process (3 cr.)

Choose 15-18 credit hours from at least two of the following categories:
Instructional Analysis, Design, and Development (e.g., R620, R621, R625, or R626)
Instructional Development and Production (e.g., R547, R641, or R741)
Implementation and Management (e.g., R563 or R665)

II. Electives (9 cr.)
A minimum of 9 credit hours outside of IST are required. These may be taken inside or outside the School of Education. These courses must be relevant to the student’s program focus and must be approved by a program advisor.

III. Portfolio
A portfolio must be developed and submitted to the faculty for graduation. The portfolio will represent two organized sets of information. The first set will include excerpts from student products developed for classes, extracurricular projects as part of graduate assistantships, and similar materials. The product excerpts are expected to tell the story of the student’s skills. The second set of information will consist of items such as a completed program of studies, a statement of goals, professional resume, and a listing of professional references.

IV. Instructional Project
An instructional project must be developed. The project must address a real-world instructional problem and contain evidence of the student’s successful application of at least three of the five components of the instructional development process. If this project is not done in a course for credit (e.g., R641, R625, R590, R586), then it must be submitted to the IST department for review and approval.

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International and Comparative Education

Program Office:
IUB, Education 4228, (812) 856-8363.

This master’s degree program is available at Bloomington. Many of the courses in this specialization provide students with the opportunity to inquire into the relationship of education to the economic, social, political, and cultural developments that shape national and regional systems of schooling.

In addition, students may receive credit for relevant international travel and study as well as research and practicum experiences within the state and nation, through a series of activities and projects with United States educational organizations and foreign governments.

Students must complete a minimum of 36 credit hours, including the following:

I. Basic Core (9 cr.)
H551 Comparative Education I (3 cr.)
H552 Comparative Education II: Case Studies (3 cr.)
H637 Topical Seminar: Comparative Education topic (3 cr.)

II. Specialized Studies in Educational Foundations (9 cr.)
Three courses from:
A630 Economic Dimensions of Education (3 cr.)
H504 History of American Education (3 cr.)
H520 Education and Social Issues (3 cr.)
H525 Anthropology of Education (3 cr.)
H530 Philosophy of Education (3 cr.)
H540 Sociology of Education (3 cr.)
H620 Seminar in Educational Policy Studies (3 cr.)
H637 Topical Seminar: topic other than International and Comparative
  Education (3 cr.)
H553 Travel Study (3 cr.) or H590 Independent Study (3 cr.)

III. Concentration (9 cr.)
Three courses, selected with the advisor, that form a coherent concnetration pertinent to the student's specific interests in the content of international and comparative education or the application of comparative methods to the study of education; for example, African Studies, curriculum, East Asian Studies, higher education, language education. Courses may be selected from those offered by any appropriate unit in the university, but in planning the concentration, students are particularly encouraged to include courses outside the School of Education.

IV. Inquiry Methodology (3 cr.)
One course in educational inquiry methodology, selected with the advisor. These are usually Y prefix courses in the School of Education, but they may include inquiry outside the School courses on the approved list available at the Inquiry Methodology page.

V. Electives
Students choosing to complete a master’s thesis will take 6 cr. of H599 Master’s Thesis in Education. Otherwise, electives are to be selected in consultation with the student's advisor from appropriate courses within or outside the School of Education.

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Language Education

Program Offices:
IUB, Education 3044, (812) 856-8270
IUPUI, Education/Social Work 3162, (317) 274-6821.

This master’s degree program is available at both Bloomington and Indianapolis. It prepares classroom teachers of English, bilingual education, English as a new language, English as a foreign language, foreign languages, and reading for positions of leadership in their fields, particularly in the development of improved instructional procedures and curricula. Language Education applicants require a strong academic record in a program broadly based in the language arts and children’s or adolescent literature and, preferably, two years of teaching (or alternative experience). Graduates may assume positions as teachers, language education or reading specialists, instructional leaders in language education, or writers and editors of instructional materials.

Language education courses focus upon the improvement of instruction through an understanding of language and literacy processes in cultural contexts, the integration of formal and informal assessment with instruction, and the application of research knowledge to practice and internship opportunities. Course work involves experiences with children, high school and college youth, and adults. Opportunities to apply current technology to teaching and learning are abundant. Students must complete a minimum of 36 credit hours.

I. Major Field (15 cr. min.)
The major area is planned with an advisor to meet the student’s career goals and/or advanced certification requirements. The courses are to be selected from the two categories below. The first category lists the available courses in reading, language education, English education, and second language education that exist in the Department of Literacy, Culture, and Language Education. The second category lists courses outside the department that may be used in the major area.

Courses in Literacy, Culture, and Language Education
See distance education course listings on the Literacy, Culture, and Language Education homepage.

L500 Instructional Issues in Language Learning (3 cr.) (required of all students)
L501 Critical Reading in Content Areas (3 cr.)
L502 Socio-Psycholinguistic Applications to Reading Instruction (3 cr.)
L504 Diagnosis in Language Difficulties (3 cr.)
L506 Reading and Learning Skills Development in Post-Secondary Education
  (3 cr.)
L507 Issues in Language Learning for Graduate-Level Pre-Service English
  Teachers (3 cr.)
L508 Teaching Young Adult Literatures in a Diverse Society for
  Graduate-Level Pre-Service English Teachers (3 cr.)
L511 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Writing in Elementary Schools (3 cr.)
L512 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Writing in Secondary Schools (3 cr.)
L513 Literary Aspects of Designing Documents for Training (3 cr.)
L516 Advanced Study in the Teaching of English/Language Arts (3 cr.)
L517 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Reading in the Junior High and
   Secondary Schools (3 cr.)
L520 Advanced Study in Foreign Language Teaching (3 cr.)
L524 Language Education Issues in Bilingual and Multicultural Education (3 cr.)
L525 Practicum in Language Education (3 cr.)
L530 Topical Workshop in Language Education (3 cr.)
L535 Teaching Adolescent Literature (3 cr.)
L539 Language Foundations for ESL/EFL Teachers (1-3 cr.)
L540 ESL/EFL Instruction and Assessment Approaches (3-9 cr.)
L541 Writing Instruction for TESL Teacher (1-3 cr.)
L536 Methods and Materials for TESOL Teacher Trainers (3 cr.)
L545 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Reading in Elementary Schools (3 cr.)
L559 Trade Books in the Elementary Classroom (3 cr.)
L567 Media in the Teaching of English (3 cr.)
L590 Independent Research in Language Education (3 cr.)
L599 Master’s Thesis in Language Education (3 cr.), for those choosing to
  do a master’s thesis, 6 cr. of L599 required
L600 Issues in Language Education (3 cr.)
L601 Theoretical Issues in the Study of Language and Literacies (3 cr.)
L630 Topics in Language Education: variable title (3 cr.)
L645 Organization and Administration of a School Reading Program (3 cr.)
L646 Administration of System Reading Curricula (3 cr.)
L647 Practicum: Supervision of Reading (3 cr.)
L650 Internship in Language Education (3 cr.)
L690 Readings in Language Education (3 cr.)

Courses Related to Language Education
Second Language Studies
T522 Survey of Applied Linguistics (3 cr.)
S532 Second Language Acquisition (3 cr.)
T556 Language Learning Technology (3 cr.)

English
L503 Teaching of Literature in College (3 cr.)
W501 Teaching of Composition in College (3 cr.)
W553 Studies in Literature (3 cr.)
W554 Teaching Creative Writing (3 cr.)

French
F573 Problems and Methods of College French Teaching (3 cr.)

German
G500 Basics of College German Teaching (3 cr.)

Spanish
S517 Methods of Teaching College Spanish (3 cr.)

Speech and Hearing Sciences
S433 Childhood Language (3 cr.)
S515 Language Intervention: School-Age Child (3 cr.)
S534 Language Development in School-Aged Children (3 cr.)
S539 Second-Language Acquisition and Bilingualism in Children (3 cr.)
Other courses may be added with the consent of the advisor.

II. Foundations (6 cr. min.)
Inquiry Skills (Research) (3 cr.)
H510 Foundations of Educational Inquiry
P501 Statistical Methods Applied to Education
Y520 Strategies for Educational Inquiry
Y535 Evaluation Models and Techniques

Substantive Core (3 cr.)
A608 Legal Perspectives on Education (3 cr.)
E535 Elementary School Curriculum (3 cr.)
H504 History of American Education (3 cr.)
H520 Education and Social Issues (3 cr.)
H540 Educational Sociology (3 cr.)
J630 Curriculum Theory and Practice (3 cr.)
J636 Curriculum Coordination/Supervision (3 cr.)
P515 Child Development (3 cr.)
P516 Adolescent Development (3 cr.)
P530 Research and Theory in School Learning (3 cr.)
P535 The Affective Domain in the Classroom (3 cr.)
P540 Learning and Cognition in Education (3 cr.)
P550 Language and Cognitive Development (3 cr.)
S503 Secondary School Curriculum (3 cr.)

III. Electives (12-18 cr.)
May be taken either within or outside the School of Education. Must be approved by the candidate’s committee as consistent with the student’s total program.

Six (6) credit hours of work must be taken outside of the Department of Language Education.

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Secondary Education

Program Offices:
IUB, Education 3130, (812) 856-8109.
IUPUI, Education/Social Work 3121, (317) 278-5739.

The master’s program in secondary education is available at both Bloomington and Indianapolis. It prepares students for positions in middle schools, junior high schools, and high schools as professional classroom teachers, supervising teachers, or department chairpersons. To be prepared for any of these positions, the student must be eligible to hold an Indiana secondary school teaching license.

In addition to meeting the standard School of Education admission requirements, students interested in pursuing a master’s degree in secondary education must have an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or above. Applicants who do not meet this requirement may be admitted if they show evidence of successful professional activity, such as curriculum development or scholarship, or a paper that demonstrates competence in abstract thinking in the English language.

In addition to general curriculum studies of secondary education, tracks are available in mathematics education and science and environmental education. The master’s degree in secondary education requires 36 credit hours.

General Track
Mathematics Education Track
Science and Environmental Education Track

GENERAL TRACK

I. Major (18 cr.)
J500 Instruction in the Context of Curriculum (3 cr.)
S503 Secondary School Curriculum (3 cr.) or
   S530 Junior High and Middle School Curriculum (3 cr.)
12 additional credit hours in secondary education

II. Foundations (3 cr.)
Choose one course:
H504 History of American Education (3 cr.)
H510 Foundations of Educational Inquiry (3 cr.)
H520 Education and Social Issues (3 cr.)
H525 Anthropology of Education (3 cr.)
H530 Philosophy of Education (3 cr.)
H538 Critical Thinking and Education (3 cr.)
H540 Sociology of Education (3 cr.)
P501 Statistical Methods Applied to Education (3 cr.)
P507 Testing in the Classroom (3 cr.)
P510 Psychology in Teaching (2-3 cr.)
P516 Adolescent Development (3 cr.)
P525 Psychological Issues in Education (3 cr.)
P540 Learning and Cognition in Education (3 cr.)
P544 Applied Cognition and Learning Strategies (3 cr.)

III. Thesis (X599), Practicum (J538), or other courses selected with the approval of the program advisor (6 cr.)

IV. Electives (9 cr.)
Electives must total 9 credit hours and include one major or minor area methods course and one course complementing the student’s program.

Return to Secondary Education

MATHEMATICS EDUCATION TRACK

I. Major (18 cr.)
J500 Instruction in the Context of Curriculum (3 cr.)
N517 Advanced Methods in the Teaching of Middle/Junior High School
Mathematics (3 cr.) or N518 Advanced Methods in the Teaching
  of Middle/Junior High School Mathematics (3 cr.)
Six (6) credit hours of mathematics courses at the 400 level or above are
  selected under the direction of the student’s advisor.
Six (6) additional credit hours are selected under the direction of the student’s
  advisor.

II. Foundations (3 cr.) and III. Thesis/Practicum (3 cr.) requirements are the same as for the General Track, above.

IV. Electives (9 cr.)
These courses must have a unified focus in mathematics education and must be approved by the advisor. With the advisor’s consent, candidates are encouraged to enroll in the following course: N590 Independent Research in Mathematics Education (1-3 cr.).

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SCIENCE AND ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION TRACK

I. Major (18 cr.)
J500 Instruction in the Context of Curriculum (3 cr.)
E548 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Science in the Elementary Schools
   (3 cr.) or Q517 Junior High/Middle School Science Teaching (3 cr.) or
   S518 Advanced Study in the
    Teaching of Secondary School Science (3 cr.)

Science Education (6 cr.)
Choose two courses:
E548 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Science in the Elementary Schools
   (3 cr.)
M446/Q506 Methods of Teaching Senior High/Junior High/Middle School Science (3 cr.)
Q540 Teaching Environmental Education (3 cr.)
S518 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Secondary School Science (3 cr.)

Primary Science Area Courses (6 cr.)
Courses must be at the graduate level in the supporting area in which professionalization is desired.

II. Foundations (3 cr.) requirements are the same as for the general track, above.

III. X599 Thesis, J538 Practicum, Q590 Research Apprenticeship, or other courses with the approval of the program advisor (6 cr.).

IV. Electives in Science or the Supporting Area (9 cr.)
Courses must be at the graduate level in the supporting area in which professionalization is desired.

Return to Secondary Education

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Social Studies Education

Program Office:
IUB, Education 3140, (812) 856-8110.

This master’s program, available only at Bloomington, provides an opportunity for specialization within the social studies education field. It prepares students for positions in schools as professional classroom teachers, supervising teachers, and department chairpersons. Students seeking these positions must also meet the licensure requirements listed on the page titled Licensure Programs.

In addition to meeting the standard School of Education admission requirements, students interested in pursuing a master’s degree in social studies education must have an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or above. Applicants who do not meet this requirement may be admitted if they show evidence of successful professional activity, such as curriculum development or scholarship, or a paper that demonstrates competence with abstract thinking in the English language.

In consultation with a departmental advisor, the student selects courses from the following list to meet degree requirements. The student must complete 36 credit hours.

I. Major (18 cr.)
J500 Instruction in the Context of Curriculum (3 cr.)
E513 Workshop in Elementary Social Studies (3 cr.) or
    M514 Workshop in Social Studies Education (3 cr.)
E535 Elementary School Curriculum (3 cr.) or
    S503 Secondary School Curriculum (3 cr.)
E547 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Social Studies in the Elementary Schools (3 cr.) or
   S519 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Secondary School Social Studies (3 cr.)
M590 Independent Study in Social Studies Education (3 cr.) or
   M680 Internship, Social Studies Education (3 cr.)
M653 The Nature of Social Studies (3 cr.)

II. Foundations/Educational Inquiry (3 cr.)
Choose one course:
H504 History of American Education (3 cr.)
H520 Education and Social Issues (3 cr.)
H530 Philosophy of Education (3 cr.)
H540 Sociology of Education (3 cr.)
H560 Education and Change in Societies (3 cr.)
P501 Statistical Method Applied to Education (3 cr.)
P510 Psychology in Teaching (2-3 cr.)
P515 Child Development (3 cr.)
P516 Adolescent Development (3 cr.)
P540 Learning and Cognition in Education (3 cr.)
P544 Applied Cognition and Learning Strategies (3 cr.)
Y507 Testing in the Classroom (3 cr.)
Y520 Strategies for Educational Inquiry (3 cr.)

III. X599 Thesis, J538 Practicum, or other courses selected with the approval of the program advisor (6 cr.)

IV. Electives (9 cr.)
Choose courses totaling 9 credit hours from the following departments:
Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, History and Philosophy of Science, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology

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Special Education

Program Offices:
IUB, Education 3211, (812) 856-8123
IUPUI, Education/Social Work 3127, (317) 274-6807

Both the Bloomington and Indianapolis campuses offer, for regular and special education teachers, special education certification and master’s degree programs in the areas of learning disabilities, emotional handicaps, and mild mental handicaps. Non-education majors also may earn a basic teaching license with special education certification at both campuses. For certification information, see the page titled Licensure Programs. Master’s programs may be tailored to meet students’ specific needs and interests. Students typically complete this degree as a sequel to earning certification in one or more areas of specialization.

The master’s degree program on the Bloomington campus provides teachers and other practitioners with an opportunity to develop skills in teaching students who display problems in learning and behavior. The program offers teachers course work for improving and broadening their teaching skills, and unlicensed teachers an opportunity to earn certification in exceptional needs: mild intervention for teaching students with learning disabilities. The program offers courses in curriculum and assessment, teaching methods, personnel teaming and collaboration, assistive technology, and other aspects of special education.

Master’s degree programs in severe disabilities and transition planning are available only at IUPUI. Since 2002, the Indiana University School of Education at IUPUI has offered a merged certification in both mild and intense intervention. Eligible candidates must be certified teachers.

Admission to the master’s program in special education requires, in addition to meeting School of Education standards, an undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 and one year of full-time professional experience with children or adolescents (preferably in teaching or applied practice). To earn a master’s degree in special education, students must complete a minimum of 36 credit hours. Depending on their interests and professional goals, students may specialize in teaching persons with learning disabilities, mild mental handicaps, emotional handicaps, or severe mental handicaps, or those in early childhood. Select from the following courses to complete at least 36 credit hours:

I. Special Education Core Courses (15 cr.)
K510 Assistive Technology in Special Education (3 cr.)
K522 Teaching Social Skills (3 cr.)
K525 Assessment and Instruction (3 cr.)
K541 Transition Across the Life Span (3 cr.)
K553 Classroom Management and Behavior Support (3 cr.)
K561 Curriculum and Methods for Students with Severe Disabilities I
  (3 cr.) IUPUI
K562 Curriculum and Methods for Students with Severe Disabilities II
  (3 cr.) IUPUI
K565 Collaboration and Service Delivery (3 cr.) P: K553

II. Specialization Courses (9-12 cr.)
G573 Communication Skills and Interpersonal Relations in Counseling (1-3 cr.)
K500 Topical Workshop in Special Education (variable title) (1-3 cr.)
K520 Survey of Behavioral Disorders (3 cr.)
K525 Assessment and Instruction (3 cr.)
K530 Medical and Physical Management of Students with Severe Disabilities
  (3 cr.) IUPUI
K540 Early Education for Children with Disabilities (3 cr.)
K545 Management of the Severely Emotionally Disturbed (3 cr.) P: K553
K548 Families, School, and Society (3 cr.)
K549 Early Childhood Special Education Program Models (3 cr.)
K573 Communications Interventions for Persons with Severe Disabilities
  (3 cr.) IUPUI
K590 Independent Study in Special Education (3 cr.)
K595 Practicum in Special Education (3 cr.)
K599 Master’s Thesis in Education (6 cr.)

III. Electives (6-9 cr.)
In addition to the special education major courses, 6 to 9 credit hours of course work outside special education are required to complete the master’s degree. These courses, which must be approved by the student’s advisor, may be selected from courses offered within or outside the School of Education.

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Licensure Programs that Combine with a Master’s Degree

Several programs for licensure may be combined with a master’s degree. Please refer to the page on individual licensure programs. The student should consult with both the faculty advisor for the master’s degree and the certification advisor for the licensure program.

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