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Kelley School of
Business 2008-2010
Undergraduate
Academic Bulletin

Undergraduate Program
Kelley School of Business  
Indiana University  
1309 East Tenth Street, BU224  
Bloomington, IN 47405  
Local: (812) 855-0611  
Contact Undergraduate Program
 

Undergraduate Courses

The courses listed in this bulletin represent the Kelley School’s complete undergraduate offerings at the time of publication.

The number of credit hours given in a course is indicated in parentheses following the course title.

The abbreviation “P” refers to the course prerequisite or prerequisites; the abbreviation “C” refers to the course co-requisite or co-requisites.

Some of the courses listed are offered infrequently. Students are advised to check with the departments to determine when a course will be offered.

Accounting
Business Economics and Public Policy
Business Law
Finance
Management & Entrepreneurship
Marketing
Operations and Decision Technologies
Communication Skills
Integrative-Core Courses
Internship Courses
Globalization and Overseas Studies Courses

Accounting

A100 Basic Accounting Skills (1 cr.) A100 is an I-Core prerequisite and required of all business majors. Introduces students to the accounting and financial information environment of the firm. Presents information including (1) financial accounting, (2) auditing and assurance, (3) management accounting, and (4) tax accounting. Includes current real-world examples taken from the popular business press. Provides students with the foundation necessary for higher-level accounting courses.

A200 Foundations of Accounting (Non-majors) (3 cr.) The role of accounting in society and business, with a special emphasis on fundamental concepts and the basic design of accounting systems. For non-business majors who are interested in learning about how accounting affects their lives and businesses. Students cannot receive credit for both A200 and A201 or for both 200 and (A201 or A202).

A201 Introduction to Financial Accounting (3 cr.) P: A100. A201 is an I-Core prerequisite and required of all business majors. Provides balanced coverage of the mechanics, measurement theory, and economic context of financial accounting. Strikes a balance between a preparer's and a user's orientation, emphasizing that students must understand both how transactions lead to financial statements (preparer's orientation) and how one can infer transactions given a set of financial statements (user's orientation). Relies on current, real-world examples taken from the popular business press. First part of the course introduces students to the financial accounting environment, financial statements, the accounting cycle, and the theoretical framework of accounting measurement. Second part of the course covers the elements of financial statements, emphasizing mechanics, measurement theory, and the economic environment. Students cannot receive credit for both A201 and (A205 or A200).

A202 Introduction to Managerial Accounting (3 cr.) P: A100. A202 is an I-Core prerequisite and required of all business majors. Concepts and issues associated with the accounting and management of business; particular emphasis is given to understanding the role of accounting in product costing, strategic decisions, costing for quality, cost-justifying investment decisions, and performance evaluation and control of human behavior. Students cannot receive credit for both A202 and (A207 or A200).

A205 Honors Introduction to Financial Accounting (3 cr.) P: A100 and students must be admitted to the Hutton Honors College or the Business Honors Program. A205 substitutes for A201, an I-Core prerequisite that is required of all business majors. Concepts and issues associated with corporate financial reporting; particular emphasis is placed on understanding the role of financial accounting in the economy, how different accounting methods affect financial statements, and developing a basis for lifelong learning. Credit not given for both A205 and (A201 or A200).

A207 Honors Introduction to Managerial Accounting (3 cr.) P: A100 and students must be admitted to the Hutton College or the Business Honors Program. A207 substitutes for A202, an I-Core prerequisite that is required of all business majors. This course is about developing and using measurement systems to support firms' internal decision making. The course shows students how accounting information fits into the dynamics of managing a complex entity and provides students with a conceptual framework for using managerial accounting practices to solve economic problems. Credit not given for both A206 and (A202 or A200).

A310 Management Decisions and Financial Reporting (3 cr.) P: (A201 or A205) and (A202 or A207) each course with a grade of C or better. Provides students with a thorough understanding of the theoretical foundations underlying financial reporting, the rules used by accountants to measure the effects of business decisions and to report the effects to external parties, the use of judgment in financial reporting, and the transformation of cash flow decisions into accrual-based and cash-based financial statements. Students are expected to develop technical, analytical, and interpretive skills related to economic transactions and accrual-based financial statements. Accounting students should take A311 and A312 to satisfy accounting major requirements. Credit not given for both A310 and (A311 or A312).

A311 Intermediate Accounting I (3 cr.) P: (A201 or A205) and (A202 or A207) each course with a grade of C or better. Provides students with a thorough understanding of the theoretical foundations and mechanics underlying financial reporting. This rigorous course is suitable for students seeking a career in accounting or finance. The course's primary objective is to give students the tools necessary to understand and execute appropriate accounting procedures, with an appreciation of the broader context in which accounting information is produced and utilized. A311 provides an overview of the financial statements and then focuses in more detail on revenue recognition, current assets, long-term assets, and accounting for investments. Credit not given for both A311 and A310.

A312 Intermediate Accounting II (3 cr.) P: A311 with a grade of C or better. Provides students with a thorough understanding of accounting for long-term liabilities and debt investment, stockholders' equity, and preparation of cash flow statements. Course's first objective is to give students the tools necessary to understand and execute appropriate accounting procedures. Course's second objective is to help students understand the process through which accounting standards are determined and to evaluate the outcomes of that process from the perspectives of managers, shareholders, auditors, and others. Students will learn to assess competing accounting theories and methods from multiple perspectives. Credit not given for both A312 and A310.

A324 Cost Management (1.5 cr.) P: (A201 or A205) and (A202 or A207) each course with a grade of C or better. Product costing and strategic cost management. Covers several accounting systems and techniques that ascribe costs to products, services, and other activities, and the costing systems' potential effects on business decisions in light of a firm's strategic, technological, and environmental position. Particular emphasis is placed on interpretation of the numbers and analyses generated by various accounting systems. Accounting majors must take A325. . Credit not given for both A324 and A325.

A 325 Cost Accounting (3 cr.) P: (A201 or A205) and (A202 or A207) each course with a grade of C or better. Enables the student to prepare, use, and critically evaluate management accounting information for purposes of strategic decision making, planning and control, product costing, and performance measurement and evaluation. Particular emphasis is placed on interpretation of the numbers and analyses generated by various accounting systems in order to make effective managerial decisions. Credit not given for both A325 and A324.

A327 Tax Analysis (1.5 cr.) P: (A201 or A205) and (A202 or A207) each course with a grade of C or better. Provides a business framework for tax planning and decision making. Applications include selection of savings vehicles for individuals, comparison of business entities, compensation tax planning, and international tax planning. Accounting majors must take A329. Credit not given for both A327 and A329.

A329 Taxes and Decision Making (3 cr.) P: (A201 or A205) and (A202 or A207) each course with a grade of C or better. Provides a business framework for tax planning and decision making based on discounted, after-tax cash flows. Technical tax topics are covered within the context of the framework. Credit not given for both A329 and A327.

A420 Financial Statement Analysis and Interpretation (1.5 cr.) P: A312 or A 310 with a grade of C or better. Covers issues associated with the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. Particular emphasis is placed upon understanding the economic characteristics of a firm's business, the strategies the firm selects to compete in each of its businesses, and the accounting procedures and principles underlying the financial statements. This course is not offered every semester.

A422 Advanced Financial Accounting I (3 cr.) P: A312 or A310 with a grade of C or better. Generally accepted accounting principles as applied to partnership accounting, business combinations, financial reporting for combined entities, foreign-currency and hedging issues, derivatives, segment reporting and goodwill allocation/impairment. Particular emphasis is given to consolidated financial statements.

A424 Auditing & Assurance Services (3 cr.) P: A312 with a grade of C or better. Objectives of course are to provide students with an understanding of: (1) the auditing environment and professional ethics; (2) audit reports and the conditions under which alternatives are used; (3) basic auditing concepts; (4) audit evidence and documentation; (5) analytical reviews; (6) the audit risk model; (7) review and documentation of internal controls; (8) audits of cycles; (9) statistical sampling; and (10) audit objectives and audit procedures for mechanized systems. Emphasis is on the conceptual development of the subject matter, the nature of professional practice, and the technology of auditing.

A437 Advanced Management Accounting (3 cr.) P: A325 with a grade of C or better. Objective of course is to provide students with advanced managerial accounting knowledge and skills. Emphasis is on strategic decision making and management control systems. Students will provide case analyses and presentations.

A490 Independent Study in Accounting (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of department chairperson and of instructor. Supervised individual study and research in student's special field of interest. Student will propose the investigation desired and, in conjunction with the instructor, develop the scope of work to be completed. Comprehensive written report required.

X301 Communication for Accountants (1 cr.) P: X204 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. This course is restricted to and required for all accounting majors and is intended to develop proficiency in written communication skills. The focus is on both managerial and tax accounting communication.

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Business Economics and Public Policy

G100 Business in the Information Age (3 cr.) This course is designed to provide beginning students with an introductory but comprehensive survey of business practices, public policy, and economic information. The course focuses on sources of information, what that information means and how to interpret it, the accuracy and reliability of the data, and its use and abuse. This course will serve as an introduction to the and other major domestic and foreign information sources such as The Wall Street Journal. Emphasis is on trends, current events, and issue analysis.

G101 Business in the Information Age: Honors (3 cr.) P: Students must be admitted to the Hutton Honors College or the Business Honors Program. This course is designed to provide beginning students with an introductory but comprehensive survey of business practices, public policy, and economic information. The course focuses on sources of information, what it means and how to interpret it, the accuracy and reliability of the data, and its use and abuse. This course will serve as an introduction to and other major domestic and foreign information sources such as The Wall Street Journal. Emphasis is on trends, current events, and issue analysis. G101 is the honors version of G 100 and it shares the same basic course content as G100.

G202 Corporate Social Strategy (2 cr.) P: ECON-E 201 or ECON-S 201 with a grade of C or better. G202 is an I-Core prerequisite that is required of all business majors. This course is intended to make you aware of the broad range of ways in which the non-market environment—especially government policy—affects business, and give you an understanding of the process through which businesses and other special interest groups create and change the rules of the game under which they function. In today’s economy, successful business strategy entails more than outmaneuvering rival companies; managers must also devise strategies to cope with the global, non-market forces that confront businesses and other forms of organization. Managers need to understand how public policy is made and how special interest groups, including their own businesses, can affect the policy process. This is true both for the CEO of a multinational corporation dealing with multiple governments and the administrator for a local partnership trying to deal with city officials.

G300 Introduction to Managerial Economics (3 cr.) Managerial Economics is a course which illustrates how economic principles can be applied to making effective and profitable management decisions for a company. Within the course, students also learn the potentially disastrous ramifications for a firm which does not take economic principles into account. The goal, then, of this course is to expose the student to effective managerial decision making. For a student interested in any management type position, this course will provide a fundamental basis for further study. Managerial economics is also a course that will serve the student throughout their daily life.

G303 Game Theory for Business Strategy (3 cr.) P: (ECON-E 201 or ECON-S 201) and BUS-G 304 with grades of C or better. Game theory, a traditional tool for academic economists, has become increasingly popular in the business world and is an essential tool of economic consultants. A major in Business Economics and Public Policy must have more than a rudimentary knowledge of Game Theory. Managerial decisions are not static and cannot be made in isolation. A manager must take into account and react to the “moves” of rival firms, government, and his or her subordinates and superiors within the company. Game theory is designed for the study of these types of interactions. The ultimate aim of the course is to strengthen your ability to think strategically in business situations, rather than to teach you facts or theories. To achieve this aim, we will iterate between theory and practice. We will use both formal case studies and real world examples to sharpen our strategic thinking skills.

G304 Managerial Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201 or ECON-S 201 with a grade of C or better. Managerial Economics is a course which illustrates how economic principles can be applied to making effective and profitable management decisions for a company. Within the course students also learn the potentially disastrous ramifications for a firm which does not take economic principles into account. The goal, then, of this course is to expose the student to effective managerial decision making. For a student interested in any management type position, this course will provide a fundamental basis for further study. Managerial economics is also a course that will serve the student throughout their daily life.

G345 Money, Banking, and Capital Markets (3 cr.) P: (ECON-E 201 or ECON-S 201) and (ECON-E 202 or ECON-S 202) with grades of C or better. This course is designed to give students a broad introduction to the operation and structure of the U.S. financial system. It provides an analysis of the structure and functions of contemporary financial institutions and markets, together with an analysis of the prices that are determined in these markets. Contemporary macroeconomic and financial developments are emphasized and current phenomena and policy proposals and their implications are discussed.

G350 Statistics and Forecasting for Business Decisions (3 cr.) Statistical analysis is a necessary and powerful tool for many business decisions. This course is designed to apply the tools and methodologies used in the business world. The focus will be on demand analysis, group comparisons, discriminant analysis, and sales/earnings forecasts.

G400 Workshop on Economic Consulting (3 cr.) P: I-Core with grades of C or better. This workshop intends to develop or sharpen those skills that are associated with a successful consultant. A good economic consultant must be able to ask the right questions, possess a strong analytical background, and be able to communicate findings and recommendations effectively to his or her client. By analytical background, we mean familiarity with sound economic thinking; ability to create or use financial, econometric, statistical, or other types of modeling; effective command of spreadsheets, statistical software, and databases. In addition to all of the foregoing, a successful consultant must demonstrate a professional attitude, good judgment, the ability to work well both individually and as part of a team, and the ability to work under pressure without compromising on work quality. The student who takes this course is expected to be highly motivated and have basic diagnostic, analytical, and communication skills. A workshop signals a highly interactive structure between faculty and students.

G406 Business Enterprise and Public Policy (3 cr.) This course is on government regulation. Areas of government regulation that affect business include Antitrust Laws, Consumer Protection Laws, Regulation of Natural Monopoly, Workplace Safety, and Pollution Regulation. A business's ability to deal with such regulations is often the single most important determination of its profitability. The course will look at the reasons regulations exist, including not only why they might help the efficiency of the economy but why they might exist even if they are inefficient, and at how businesses respond to the incentives given them by government.

G455 Topics in Business Economics and Public Policy: Sustainable Enterprise (3 cr.) This course details the connection between sustainable business strategies and maximizing long-term corporate profits, and provides students with the skills necessary to assess firm strategy in terms of sustainable development and pinpoint strengths and weaknesses. The course develops a stakeholder model of the global corporation, where the firm has responsibility to internal stakeholders, such as shareholders and employees, as well as external shareholders, such as environmentally concerned nongovernmental organizations (green NGOs) that represent social concerns. This course will always highlight firm strategy and what is in the company’s best interest, but often showa that, with the right rules and social pressures, the firm action can produce gains in terms of social welfare.

G490 Independent Study in Business Economics and Public Policy (1–3 cr.) P: Consent of department chairperson and of instructor. Supervised individual study and research in the student's special field of interest. The student will propose the investigation desired and, in conjunction with the instructor, develop the scope of work to be completed. Written report required. In conjunction with the Economic Consulting Track, a student can select to work with an economic consulting firm in the summer following the junior year. Upon returning to campus, the student will write a detailed report on the internship activities. An alternative is for the student to work on an actual consulting job under the guidance of a faculty member.

G492 Specialized Topics in Economic Consulting (3 cr.) This course develops and sharpens the research and writing skills relevant to a career in economic consulting. It is centered around a student-specific research paper. Each student identifies possible topics for the paper such as the analysis of a specific industry or company, the effects of globalization on an industry, mergers and acquisitions in an industry, the effect of particular government policies, or the effect of a new technology. The course sessions provide a forum for students and instructor to give each other input on the various subjects. Students will learn how to choose a topic for analysis, how to apply knowledge of economics, and how to write up the analysis so that someone less knowledgeable can still benefit from it.

G494 Public Policy and the International Economy (3 cr.) P: I-Core with grades of C or better. Analyzes international flows of trade and capital, why the exchange in goods and capital is increasing so rapidly, and explores the consequences for different economies. Students study international trade theory and practice and identify potential winners and losers of globalization. The course tackles issues such as structural composition of flows of goods and capital, the implications of balanced trade imbalances, and the motivations and implications of job outsourcing. In addition, the role of supranational organizations such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization will be examined.

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Business Law

L100 Personal Law (3 cr.) Effects of law on everyday lives. Topics may include family law, criminal offenses and traffic violations, personal injury and property damage claims, employee rights, landlord-tenant law, consumer rights, debt collection, selected real and personal property issues, wills and estates, selected contract law issues, and forms of business organization (partnership, proprietorship, and corporation).

L201 Legal Environment of Business (3 cr.) P: Sophomore standing or Hutton Honors College freshman. L201 is an I-Core prerequisite that is required of all business majors. Emphasis on understanding the nature of law through examining a few areas of general interest, such as the duty to avoid harming others (torts), the duty to keep promises (contracts), and government regulation of business.

L250 Law and the Arts (3 cr.) Examines legal issues of importance to visual or performing artists and persons involved in arts-related businesses. Subject areas may include copyright and trademark law; First Amendment concerns; the right of publicity; advertising law; and selected issues of tort, contract, personal property, and agency law. Legal aspects of organizing a business may also be addressed.

L255 Topics in Business Law (1–3 cr.) Variable topic, variable credit course on issues and trends in Business Law.

L293 Honors: Legal Environment of Business (3 cr.) P: Students must be admitted to the Hutton Honors College or the Business Honors Program with sophomore standing. L293 substitutes for L201, an I-Core prerequisite that is required of all business majors. Emphasis on understanding the nature of law through examining a few areas of general interest, such as the duty to avoid harming others (torts), the duty to keep promises (contracts), and government regulation of business. Credit not given for both L293 and L201.

L303 Commercial Law II (3 cr.) P: BUS-L 201or L293 with a grade of C or better. Focuses mainly on the law of ownership, forms of business organization, commercial paper, and secured transactions. For accounting majors and others desiring a broad yet rather detailed knowledge of commercial law.

L311 Law for Entrepreneurs (3 cr.) Focuses on legal issues affecting new and growing businesses. Topics include choosing a legal form for the business; financing-related legal issues; avoiding employment-related liability; contracts and sales; marketing and intellectual property laws; and legal issues concerning business sales, mergers, acquisitions, and liquidations. Completion of BUS-L 201 suggested, though not required.

L312 The Ethical Responsibilities of Business (3 cr.) Covers the debate over corporate social responsibility and the social control of business; the major ethical theories relevant to determining that responsibility; and applications of those theories in areas such as competition, marketing, advertising, the environment, employer-employee relations, and the international arena.

L315 The Business and Law of Entertainment and Sports (3 cr.) P: (L201 or L293) and (K201 or K204) with grades of C or better. Explores the legal and practical problems facing executives managing for-profit enterprises in or related to the entertainment and sports industry. Emphasizes intellectual property law (trade secrets, trademarks, right of publicity, and copyright), telecommunications regulation, and antitrust law. Examines the nature of sports leagues and associations as well as entertainment guilds. Considers contracts in music recording, stadium financing, broadcasting, and sponsorship of sports and entertainment events.

L350 Online Law (3 cr.) Focuses on the management of legal problems that arise from the use of the Internet and other interactive computer networks. The goals of the course are to increase students’ awareness of the legal issues that arise in a variety of online contexts, familiarize students with the legal frameworks that are evolving in the U.S. and other legal systems to resolve those issues, and guide students in strategies for managing the legal risks inherent in communicating and doing business online.

L355 Topics in Business Law (1-3 cr.) Variable topic, variable credit course on issues and trends in Business Law.

L406 Employment Problems and the Law (3 cr.) Examines current legal problems in the area of employment. Topics include race and sex discrimination, harassment, the Americans with Disabilities Act, employment at will, privacy issues such as drug testing, and limits on monitoring and testing.

L408 Real Estate Law (3 cr.) P: L201 or L293 with a grade of C or better. Legal problems related to ownership and transfer of real property; attention to landlord-tenant law and the tools of land-use planning (nuisance law, zoning, private restrictions, subdivision control, and eminent domain).

L409 Law and the Environment (3 cr.) Uses of law to deal with problems involving the degradation of our physical environment.

L411 International Business Law (3 cr.) P: L201 or L293 with a grade of C or better. Covers the law and practice of international trade, licensing, and investment. Subjects include the legal risks of international business, international public law, international organizations, and private dispute settlement procedures. Also discussed are the risks associated with importing and exporting, foreign licensing and franchising, and foreign investment.

L455 Topics in Business Law (1-3 cr.) Variable topic, variable credit course on issues and trends in Business Law.

L470 Research in Business Law and Public Policy (3 cr.) In this three-hour independent study course, students are required to write a 30–35 page research paper on a legal studies topic of their choice. This class is designed to build on the analytical thinking and legal analysis skills students have acquired in earlier business law courses. Additionally, students will become familiar with the diverse legal research sources located within the law school. Students will be expected to learn how to do research by using both legal books and electronic sources. Information gained from these sources will be used in preparing the research paper that should help hone the students’ writing skills and lead to clearer and more persuasive writing. Students will also be expected to demonstrate expertise in legal research and legal citation. Toward that end, the research paper will meet the general format of a law review article.

L490 Independent Study in Business Law (1–3 cr.) P: Consent of department chairperson and of the instructor. Supervised individual study and research in student’s special field of interest. The student will propose the investigation desired and, in conjunction with the instructor, develop the scope of work to be completed. Comprehensive written report required.

M429 Legal Aspects of Marketing (3 cr.) P: M303. Analysis of statutes, regulations, and legal doctrines applicable to marketing practices. Examination of legal issues encountered by marketers in dealing with consumers, competitors, and other marketplace participants.

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Finance

General Finance

Real Estate

General Finance

F228 Introduction to Investment Banking (1.5 cr.) (1.5 cr.) Elective credit only. This is a careers-based course that broadly covers the securities industry and institutional finance as a whole, including venture capital, private equity, mezzanine investing, and the public equity and debt markets. Specific to this learning is the role of the investment banking firm within institutional finance including corporate advisory, capital markets, research, sales and trading, and private wealth management. Although many topics of corporate finance are integrated into the course, the focus is conceptual not application as in 300-level and 400-level finance courses. Serves as a foundation for F428 Investment Banking I, and F429 Investment Banking II, and F390 Excellence in Investment Banking Seminar.

F260 Personal Finance (3 cr.) Financial problems encountered in managing individual affairs: family budgeting, installment buying, insurance, home ownership, and investing in securities. No credit for juniors and seniors in the Kelley School.

F300 Introduction to Financial Management (3 cr.) P: A200 or A201 or A202. Broad survey of finance for non-Kelley School students. Topics include the determinants of interest rates and the time value of money; the sources and uses of financial information; the structure, role, and regulation of financial markets; monetary policy; the pricing of risk in financial markets; goals of investors; and how firms manage their financial affairs, including planning, budgeting, and decision making.

F303 Intermediate Investments (3 cr.) P: F370 with a grade of C or better. Part of the finance core. Rigorous treatment of the core concepts of investments for finance majors. Covers portfolio optimization; examines the pricing of equity, fixed income, and derivatives; and analyzes the degree of market efficiency. Makes extensive use of spreadsheet modeling to implement financial models. Serves as a foundation for all 400-level finance electives.

F304 Financial Management: Honors (3 cr.) P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better) and admission to the Business Honors Program. C: I304, J304, M304, and P304; students are administratively enrolled. Part of Honors I-Core. Broad survey of finance for all honors business students. Provides a conceptual framework for a firm’s investment, financing, and dividend decisions; includes working capital management, capital budgeting, and capital structure strategies.

F305 Intermediate Corporate Finance (3 cr.) P: F370 or F304 with a grade of C or better. Part of the finance core. Rigorous treatment of the core concepts of corporate finance for finance majors. Covers capital budgeting, the valuation of firms, and capital structure and payout policies. Makes extensive use of spreadsheet modeling to implement financial models. Serves as a foundation for all 400-level finance electives.

F307 Working Capital Management (3 cr.) P: F370 or F304 with a grade of C or better. Emphasizes the set of decisions and problems that financial managers face in determining short-term financial policy, financial diagnostics, and operations of the company. Major topics include identifying working capital elements and their relationships to company operations, financial analysis, cash forecasting, banking relations, cash-flow systems, and short-term investment and borrowing strategies.

F317 Venture Capital and Entrepreneurial Finance (3 cr.) P: F370 or F304 with a grade of C or better. Covers the private equity and private debt markets that service smaller entrepreneurial firms. Specific topics include: (1) the financial contracting associated with the provision of external finance to a small informationally opaque firm, (2) angel finance and the formal venture capital market, (3) commercial banks and commercial finance companies, and (4) the financial issues associated with a leveraged buyout.

F335 Security Trading and Market Making (3 cr.) P: F370 or F304 with a grade of C or better. Theory and practice of securities trading at exchanges around the world; how trading and the design of markets affect liquidity, informativeness, transparency, volatility, and fairness. Analyzes alternative trading strategies and the cost of trading. Examines innovations in security exchanges and regulatory policy, and provides hands-on trading experience using realistic trading simulations.

F370 Integrated Business Core—Finance Component (3 cr.) P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better). C: I370, J370, M370 and P370. Students must apply online (www.kelley.iu.edu.ugrad/apps) to take I-Core and, after getting permission, enroll using BUS-BE 370. Cross-functional survey of business management. The finance component provides an introduction into basic principles and perspectives of financial thought. Covered topics include the time value of money, risk and return, interest rates and debt risk, capital budgeting, security pricing, and portfolio concepts. Includes a cross-functional case done in teams.

F390 Topics in Finance (1.5–3 cr.) P: F370 or F304. Course content varies. Course is offered only occasionally.

F402 Corporate Financial Strategy and Governance (3 cr.) P: (F303 or F304) and F305 with grades of C- or better. Advanced treatment of corporate financial management. Covers all major areas of corporate financial decisions: capital budgeting, dividends, capital structure, cash-flow projections, mergers, and acquisitions.

F408 Real Options and Strategic Capital Investment (3 cr.) P: (F303 or F304) and F305 with grades of C- or better. Covers how companies should evaluate projects and business relationships when they are faced with conditions of uncertainty but yet have the potential to learn and adapt as the project or relationship unfolds and uncertainty is resolved. This topic has been traditionally addressed through the use of decision-tree models and discounted cash flow analysis. It is now being reshaped by the innovative use of options methodology. The course also provides an increased understanding and proficiency in the use of spreadsheet modeling and simulation programs.

F420 Equity and Fixed Income Investments (3 cr.) P: (F303 or F304) and F305 with grades of C- or better. A detailed examination of the management of equity and fixed income investments. Covers analysis of individual securities, formation of these securities into portfolios, and use of derivative securities to modify the return/risk profiles of more traditional stock and bond portfolios.

F421 Derivative Securities and Corporate Risk Management (3 cr.) P: (F303 or F304) and F305 with grades of C- or better. Advanced treatment of options, futures, and other derivative securities. Detailed description of the entire spectrum of derivative products. Theoretical and numerical valuation of derivative securities. How corporate risk managers use derivatives to hedge exchange rate risk, interest rate risk, commodity risk, credit risk, etc.

F428 Investment Banking (1.5 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. This course will first introduce the students to the history and structure of the investment banking industry. The remainder of the semester will be spent developing the skills necessary to fill the basic responsibility that a summer intern will face at an investment banking firm. Specifically, these will be spreadsheet skills focusing on pro-forma statement preparation of new issues and pro-forma statements of merged firms. In addition, students will be introduced to tax implications of mergers and the due diligence requirements in assessing new issues. No credit toward finance major requirements.

F429 Investment Banking II (1.5 cr.) P: F428 or consent of instructor. This course will continue the development of the students’ spreadsheet skills and knowledge base of deal structures. There will be an emphasis on developing presentation and writing skills. The major part of the course will involve the students developing a complete oral and written presentation of a deal: a merger, a new issue, a complex refinancing, a solution to a complex hedging problem, or a portfolio structure for a wealthy client. No credit toward finance major requirements.

F446 Banking and Financial Intermediation (3 cr.) P: (F303 or F304) and F305 with grades of C- or better. The main topics are (1) the economic role of financial intermediaries, with an emphasis on commercial banks; (2) the evolution of markets in which banks and other financial intermediaries operate; and (3) the regulation of commercial banks and other financial institutions.

F470 Current Topics in Finance (3 cr.) P: (F303 or F304) and F305 with grades of C- or better. Course content varies. Course is offered only occasionally.

F490 Independent Study in Finance (1–3 cr.) P: Consent of department chairperson and of instructor. Supervised individual study and research in student’s special field of interest. The student will propose the investigation desired and, in conjunction with the instructor, develop the scope of work to be completed. Comprehensive written report required.

F494 International Finance (3 cr.) P: (F303 or F304) and F 305 with grades of C- or better. Covers the international dimension of both investments and corporate finance. Develops strategies for investing internationally, including hedging exchange rate risk, adjusting to client preferences and home currencies, evaluating performance, estimating a corporation’s exposure to real exchange rate risk, strategies to hedge risk or to dynamically adjust to shocks, and reasons for a corporation to hedge. Also covers international capital budgeting, multinational transfer pricing, and international cash management.

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Real Estate

R300 Principles of Real Estate (3 cr.) For students who plan to take only one course in the area of real estate. Topics include real estate law, brokerage, property management, appraising, mortgage finance, and investment analysis. No credit for juniors or seniors in the Kelley School.

R305 Introduction to Real Estate Analysis (3 cr.) P: Econ-E 201 and Kelley School admission. For students who may take additional real estate courses. Topics include real estate law, brokerage, property management, appraising, mortgage finance, and investment analysis. Emphasis is on the analytic techniques applicable to real estate.

R440 Real Estate Appraisals (3 cr.) P: (F370 or F304) and R305. Offered in fall semester only. Techniques and methods of appraising real property, with an emphasis on income property. Covers concepts and analytic techniques used to estimate the market value of real estate. Course content is similar to that which a professional appraiser must learn.

R443 Real Estate Finance and Investment Analysis (3 cr.) P: (F370 or F304) and R305. Offered in spring semester only. Application of financial concepts and techniques to the analysis of real estate financing and investment alternatives. Computer analysis and case studies are used.

R490 Independent Study in Real Estate and Land Economics (1–3 cr.) Consent of department chairperson and of instructor. Supervised individual study and research in student’s special field of interest. The student will propose the investigation desired and, in conjunction with the instructor, develop the scope of work to be completed. Comprehensive written report required.

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Management & Entrepreneurship

J304 Strategic Management: Honors (3 cr.) P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better) and admission to the Business Honors Program. C: F304, I304, M304, and P304; students are administratively enrolled. Part of Honors I-Core. Strategic Management is concerned with the roles and tasks of firms’ top managers (i.e., strategic decision makers). This course is designed to provide an appreciation for the total firm perspective and the means by which firms create and sustain competitive advantage in today’s increasingly challenging and complex business environment (domestic and global). Strategic management of a firm involves diagnosing the firm’s current situation and developing realistic solutions to the strategic and organizational problems that confront top managers. A desired outcome of this course is an enhanced appreciation for the complexities of managing a formal organization. The primary objective of the course is to help develop analytical skills for identifying key strategic issues and formulating appropriate strategies given a firm’s situation. The course will provide exposure to the theories, concepts, and techniques of strategic management through the text, readings, illustrative cases, and video vignettes.

J306 Strategic Management and Leadership (3 cr.) P: Junior standing. Concerned with the roles and tasks of a firm’s top managers. This course is designed to provide an appreciation for the total firm perspective, the role of the general manager, and the means by which firms create and sustain competitive advantage. Strategic management of a firm involves diagnosing the firm’s current competitive situation and effectively responding to complex, real-world organizational problems. This course focuses on multiple organizational contexts, spanning a range from the entrepreneurial firm to the large, established organization. Students may not receive credit for both J370 and J306.

J370 Integrated Business Core—Strategic Management Component (3 cr.) P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better). C: F370, I370, J370, and M370. Students must apply online (www.kelley.iu.edu.ugrad/apps) to take I-Core and, after getting permission, enroll using BUS-BE 370. Cross-functional survey of business management. The strategy component is concerned with the roles and tasks of firm’s top managers (i.e., strategic decision makers). Designed to provide an appreciation for the total firm perspective and the means by which firms create and sustain competitive advantage in today’s increasingly challenging and complex business environment (domestic and global). Strategic management of the firm involves diagnosing the firm’s current situation and developing realistic solutions to the strategic and organizational problems that confront top managers. A desired outcome of this course is an enhanced appreciation for the complexities of managing a formal organization. The primary objective is to help develop analytical skills for identifying key strategic issues and formulating appropriate strategies given a firm’s situation. The course will provide exposure to the theories, concepts, and techniques of strategic management through the text, readings, illustrative cases, and video vignettes. Includes a cross-functional case done in teams.

J411 Analysis of Business Decisions* (1.5 cr.) P: I-Core. NOTE: offered fall semester only. This course adds to the knowledge and skills gained in the strategy portion of I-Core (J370). It explores various strategic modes, concepts, and frameworks essential in analyzing complex, business problems. Students will learn how to use external and internal analyses as inputs into the strategic formulation and implementation processes.

*For purposes of scheduling, J411 and J420 will be treated as a single course. Although one course will be offered in the first 8 weeks of the semester and the second course in the last 8 weeks of the semester, the student cohorts will be identical and the rooms, days of the week, and times will also be identical. Consulting Workshop students who are in the Business Honors Program and have taken J304 will be exempt from taking J411 and will be assigned a separate section of J420 for Consulting Workshop students.

J420 Advanced Case Analysis and Effective Consulting Presentations* (1.5 cr.) P: I-Core. NOTE: offered fall semester only. This course is dedicated to arming top students with state-of-the-art problem solving skills, intensive teamwork techniques, and powerful consulting-style presentation tools. A number of frameworks will be introduced, including a focus on hypothesis-driven analysis and the pyramid principle of presentations. This course will involve several inter-class case competitions.

J490 Independent Study in Policy (1–3 cr.) P: Consent of department chairperson and instructor. Supervised study and research in student’s special field of interest. The student will propose the investigation desired and, in conjunction with the instructor, develop the scope of work to be completed. Comprehensive written report required.

W430 Organizations and Organizational Change (3 cr.) P: Z 302 or Z304. Analysis and development of organization design and change in order to increase organizational effectiveness.

W490 Independent Study in Business Administration (1–3 cr.) P: Consent of the department chairperson and of the instructor. Supervised individual study and research in student’s special field of interest. The student will propose the investigation desired and, in conjunction with the instructor, develop the scope of work to be completed. Comprehensive written report required.

X100 Introduction to Business (3 cr.) Business administration from the standpoint of the manager of a business firm operating in the contemporary economic, political, and social environment. No credit for juniors or seniors in the Kelley School.

X220 Career Perspectives (2 cr.) C: X230. X220 is an I-Core prerequisite that is required of all business majors. Introduces students to the process of career planning and development through self-assessment, exploration of business options, and early planning and goal setting. Provides weekly individualized feedback to students on oral and written communication skills and on the substance of career-related projects. The course is highly interactive, incorporating hundreds of guests per semester including alums and other corporate mentors and speakers, faculty, and senior students.

X230 Career Perspectives Lab (0 cr.) C: X220. This is the lab portion of X220. Students must enroll in both X230 and X220 in order to complete X220 and receive a grade.

X333 Managing Business Functions (3 cr.) Open to juniors in the Liberal Arts and Management Program only. Offering a variety of real-world and simulated projects that wrestle with the complex opportunities and problems facing business managers in a variety of settings, this course emphasizes the development of strategic focus and decision-making skills under conditions of ambiguity, change, and uncertainty.

X403 Management Consulting (1.5 cr.) P: 3.5 GPA or better (or faculty sponsorship), junior standing, I-Core, and admitted to the Consulting Workshop. Note that this course is an exclusive class for Consulting Workshop students. This course is devoted to understanding the inner workings of the consulting industry. Our primary learning objectives are to better understand the consulting industry as a whole, form differences therein, and lifestyle considerations. The course involves research on the industry and visits to several consulting firms to learn more about their cultures and begin networking.

X404 Effective Case Interviewing and Interpersonal Interaction (1.5 cr.) P: 3.5 GPA or better (or faculty sponsorship), junior standing, I-Core, and admitted to the Consulting Workshop. Note that this course is an exclusive class for Consulting Workshop students. This class meets during first eight weeks only. This course is focused on learning effective case analysis techniques and tools for successful interpersonal interaction (both in interviewing situations and during consulting engagements). Our primary learning objectives are to better understand case interviewing (how cases work and tips for success) and interpersonal interactions (systematic study of the nature of personal and business interactions and proven tools for influencing others). The course will be delivered through a series of weekly discussions, meetings with consulting firms, and case interview practice.

X420 Business Career Planning and Placement (2 cr.) C: X430, P: Junior standing. X420 is a required course for all business majors. Assists students in obtaining positions consistent with career goals. Covers career planning, career options, organized employment campaigns, interviewing techniques, alternate job search strategies, employment communications, networking, on-the-job success skills, and career management. Involves in-depth work with resumes, electronic mail, and other communication tools. Includes sessions with corporate managers describing work issues and training programs. Juniors or seniors of any major may enroll in X420.

X430 Business Career Planning and Placement Lab (0 cr.) C: X420, P: Junior standing. This is the lab portion of X420. Students must enroll in both X430 and X420 in order to complete X420 and receive a grade.

Z302 Managing & Behavior in Organizations (3 cr.) P: Junior Standing. Z302 is a required course for all business majors. Integration of behavior and organizational theories. Application of concepts and theories toward improving individual, group, and organizational performance. Builds from a behavioral foundation toward an understanding of managerial processes.

Z304 Honors: Managing & Behavior in Organizations (3 cr.) P: Junior Standing and admission to the Business Honors Program or Hutton Honors College. Z304 substitutes for Z302, a required course for all business majors. The main purpose of Z304 is to provide students with the tools necessary to manage people in a wide variety of contexts. The course will enable students to identify and appropriately respond to the most common managerial challenges. Our primary objective is to facilitate the development of management-related knowledge and skills that will be immediately applicable in positions students are likely to hold early in their careers.

Z340 Introduction to Human Resources (3 cr.) P: Sophomore standing and admission to the Kelley School of Business. Covers the nature of human resource development and utilization in American society and organizations; government programs and policies, labor force statistics, organizational personnel department, personnel planning, forecasting, selection, training, development, and integration of government and organizational human resource programs.

Z404 Effective Negotiations (3 cr.) P: Z302 or Z304. Provides exposure to the concepts of negotiations in both the national and international environments, including negotiation strategies and tactics, influence, third-party intervention, audience effects, nonverbal communication, and ethical and cultural aspects. Case studies, simulations, and guest speakers are used throughout the course.

Z447 Leadership, Teamwork, and Diversity (3cr.) P: Z302 or Z304. In this course, students develop a “tool kit” of leadership behaviors to use in a variety of situations when those working with and/or for them need to be motivated toward a common good, particularly when that work involves the use of teams made up of diverse individuals.

Z490 Independent Student in Personnel Management and Organizational Behavior (1–3 cr.) P: Consent of department chairperson and of the instructor. Supervised individual study and research in student’s special field of interest. The student will propose the investigation desired and, in conjunction with the instructor, develop the scope of work to be completed. Comprehensive written report required.

Z494 Herman B Wells Seminar in Leadership (3 cr.) Open to seniors in the Business Honors Program. Topics may include leadership, globalization, and e-commerce. (formerly W494 or Z493)

W212 Exploring Entrepreneurship (3 cr.) This course provides a survey of the basic concepts of starting a business. The course covers the personal origins for motivation for entrepreneurship and the skills, knowledge, and abilities of the entrepreneur. The course includes guests who have successfully started their own businesses and who speak with students about their experiences. The course concludes with students assessing their own potential and developing an idea for a new business.

W232 Venture Ideas (1.5 cr.) P: Admission to the Kelley School of Business and sophomore standing. This is an experiential course that explores the student’s creativity and skills to generate business ideas and concepts. Once ideas are developed, the class works on strengthening the ideas and concepts and developing these into prospects for start-ups. Finally, a venture screening filter is introduced and the field is narrowed to high potential businesses. An Idea Competition may be held within this course.

W233 Venture Models (1.5 cr.) P: W232. A venture model is the story of a new business. This course explores various business models for new ventures and covers entry modes and franchise systems. Ideas developed, strengthened, and filtered from Venture Ideas are used to design model businesses and alternative modes of entry are examined. A Best Business Model competition may be held within this course.

W300 Small Business Management (3 cr.) P: A200 or A201 or A202. This course provides an exploration into the fundamentals of effective small business management. It will cover diverse activities such as management, marketing, finance, and operations. Topics such as growth, advertising, financial analysis, budgeting, purchasing, inventory management, and financial control are also covered. The course will explore some of the special issues facing small business owners and managers: technology, crime, risk management, family business, ethics, and the global marketplace.

W313 New Venture Planning (3 cr.) P: W232 and W233; P or C: I-Core. This course focuses on the research, planning, and strategies that are key parts in the process of creating a new venture. The outcome for this class should be a complete business plan ready for outside review. Plans may be entered in the Johnson Center for Entrepreneurship & Innovation (JCEI) business plan competition.

W406 Venture Growth Management (3 cr.) P: W313 and (Z302 or Z304). This course focuses on business issues that arise after start-up through the rapid growth phase. Topics include growth strategies as well as the organizational and leadership concerns of a growing firm.

W409 Practicum in Entrepreneurship (3 cr.) P: W313 and permission of the instructor. This course works on real world problems and issues of entrepreneurs. Projects are generated from Johnson Center for Entrepreneurship & Innovation (JCEI) and other sources and students are assigned to work on these projects “as if” they were either consultants to the business or actual entrepreneurs.

W420 Corporate Venturing (3 cr.) P: I-Core. This course takes the corporate perspective on entrepreneurship and examines the issues and challenges of starting a venture within an existing organization.

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International Business (Co-Major)

D301 International Business Environment (3 cr.) P: Junior standing. The national and international environmental aspects of international business. Examines the cultural, political, economic, systemic, legal-regulatory, trade, and financial environments and how they affect the international business activities of firms in the United States and in selected other countries.

D302 International Business: Operations of International Enterprises (3 cr.) P: D301. Focuses on the administration of international aspects of business organizations through an examination of their policy formulation, forms of foreign operations, methods of organization and control, and functional adjustments.

D490 Independent Study in International Business (1–3 cr.) P: Consent of department chairperson and of instructor. Supervised individual study and research in student’s special field of interest. The student will propose the investigation desired and, in conjunction with the instructor, develop the scope of work to be completed. Comprehensive written report required.

D496 Foreign Study in Business (2–6 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Work in, or visits to, business firms; discussions with business executives and government officials. Prior background reading, orientation work, and approval of project required. Two credit hours for each three weeks of foreign residence.

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Marketing

M300 Introduction to Marketing (3 cr.) P: A200, A201, or A202. Offered for students with a formal minor in business who may be majoring in any non-business major on campus, including apparel merchandising and interior design, journalism, telecommunications, or sports marketing and management. Examination of the market economy and marketing institutions in the United States. Decision making and planning from the manager’s point of view and impact of marketing actions from consumer’s point of view. Not open to business students. No credit toward a degree in business.

M303 Marketing Research (3 cr.) P: I-Core. Focuses on the role of research in marketing decision making. Topics include defining research objectives, syndicated and secondary data sources of marketing information, exploratory research methods, survey research design, experimental design, and data analysis.

M304 Introduction to Marketing Management: Honors (3 cr.) P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better) and admission to the Business Honors Program. C: F304, J304, P304, and I304; students are administratively enrolled. Part of Honors I-Core. Examines marketing concepts, strategic planning, marketing research, and information systems. Covers consumer and organizational buying behavior, forecasting sales, and market segmentation and position. Also focuses on new product development process; product lines and brands; pricing strategies; distribution-channel management; advertising; personal selling; and organizing, evaluating, and controlling marketing.

M311 Introduction to Marketing Communications (3 cr.) P: M300 This course is designed to introduce non-business majors to the field of advertising and promotion. Focuses on examining the factors impacting consumers’ receptivity to marketing messages and purchase behavior. Developing competitive marketing strategies, persuasive messages, and appropriate media vehicles for delivering them are covered. Emphasis on practical application of these concepts through course-long development of Integrated Marketing Communications Plan components.

M312 Retail Marketing Management (3 cr.) P: M300 This course is designed specifically for the non-business major interested in retailing. The course objective is to critically analyze the marketing processes and strategic decisions made by major retail firms directly or indirectly associated with the retailing industry. The course examines business challenges related to driving shareholder value through merchandising practices, inventory management, advertising and promotional techniques, and multichannel opportunities.

M 330 Personal Persuasion Strategies and Customer Relationship Management (3 cr.) P: I-Core. This course is designed to provide insights into the sales profession by examining the role of persuasive communication and customer relationship management behaviors, principles, strategies, and actions. It will provide students an opportunity to plan, practice, and review those verbal behaviors associated with sales call success in order to persuade others to think differently regarding ideas, opinions, products, and services.

M342 Management, Analysis, and Display of Marketing Data (1.5 cr.) P: I-Core; restricted to students in the Marketing major; must be taken concurrently with M343—students must enroll using BUS-BE 342 which will put them in both courses. Develops skills needed to manage, evaluate, analyze, and display marketing data. Topics include data coding, data analysis using statistical software, attitude measurement and scaling, graphic display of data, data-driven market segmentation, and competitor analysis.

M343 Database Marketing (1.5 cr.) P: I-Core; restricted to students in the marketing major; must be taken concurrently with M343—students must enroll using BUS-BE 342 which will put them in both courses. Provides skills in the use of single-source and geocoded databases in a marketing decision environment. Emphasis is on using database systems to accomplish specific objectives. Topics include the nature and sources of scanner data, micromerchandising systems, geodemographic systems, and analysis tools for databases.

M344 Creativity and Communication (3 cr.) P: I-Core. Develops various creativity and communication skills necessary for marketing careers. Topics include models of and barriers to creativity and various techniques for stimulating personal and professional creative skills. In addition, interpersonal, professional, visual design, and computer skills are developed. Sample assignments include producing various marketing materials, such as brochures, advertisements, and elaborate communication packages. In-class activities and examples stimulate interest through hands-on experience. Unique concluding activities require students to integrate skills acquired into one final project and/or presentation.

M370 Integrated Business Core—Marketing Component (3 cr.) P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better). C: F370, I370, J370, and P370. Students must apply online (www.kelley.iu.edu.ugrad/apps) to take I-Core and, after getting permission, enroll using BUS-BE 370. Cross-functional survey of business management. The marketing component covers marketing planning and decision making examined from firm and consumer points of view. Topics include the marketing concept and its company-wide implications, the integration of marketing with other functions, and the role that product, price, promotion, and distribution play in marketing strategy and implementation. Includes a cross-functional case done in teams.

M401 International Marketing (3 cr.) P: M303 . Covers world markets, their respective consumers, and their political/economic marketing environments. Examines the marketing issues required to meet the product, promotion, price, and distribution demands of a world market. With a global emphasis the course includes substantial focus on emerging markets.

M402 Marketing Channels (3 cr.) P: M303. Marketing channels are analyzed as organized behavioral systems. Focus is on the institutional structures, relationships, and functions of channels of distribution. Franchising, vertical integration, and vertical channel agreements are also emphasized. (Offered infrequently.)

M405 Consumer Behavior (3 cr.) P: M303 Description and explanation of consumer behavior in retail markets. Topics include demographic, socioeconomic, psychographic, attitudinal, and group influences on consumer decision making. Applications to promotion, product design, distribution, pricing, and segmentation strategies.

M407 Business-to-Business Marketing (3 cr.) P: M303. Problems, activities, and decision methods involved in the marketing of goods and services by business-to-business entities. Product development, pricing, promotion distribution systems, and analysis of the roles of non-consumer buyers.

M415 Advertising and Promotion Management (3 cr.) P: M303. Basic advertising and sales/promotion concepts. The design, management, and integration of a firm’s promotional strategy. Public policy aspects and the role of advertising in marketing communications in different cultures.

M419 Retail Strategy (3 cr.) P: M303. The course objective is to critically analyze the key marketing processes and strategic decisions made by major retail companies within the U.S. retailing industry. The course examines business challenges and opportunities related to driving and sustaining retailer’s shareholder value. Topics include financial requirements for publicly held retail firms, sustaining store-as-brand identity, developing and refining merchandising plans, pricing tactics, in-store execution, and customer’s experience management.

M426 Sales Management (3 cr.) P: M303. Emphasizes the activities and problems of field-sales management. Includes organizing sales force, recruiting, training, compensation, motivation, sales techniques, forecasting, territory design, evaluation, and control. Lectures and case studies.

M429 Legal Aspects of Marketing (3 cr.) P: M303. Analysis of statutes, regulations, and law doctrines applicable to marketing practices. Examination of legal issues encountered by marketers in dealing with consumers, competitors, and other marketplace participants.

M450 Marketing Strategy (3 cr.) P: M303, senior standing, and at least one 400 level marketing course. Focuses on marketing’s role in gaining a sustainable competitive advantage. Topics include competitor analysis, managing competitive interaction, and marketing signaling. Emphasis is on applications through the use of case studies and/or computer game simulation of competitive interaction and the development of a strategic marketing plan.

M490 Independent Study in Marketing (1–3 cr.) P: Consent of department chairperson and of instructor. Supervised individual study and research in student’s special field of interest. The student will propose the investigation desired and, in conjunction with the instructor, develop the scope of work to be completed. Comprehensive written report required.

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Operations and Decision Technologies

Information and Process Management and Technology Management

Supply Chain Management and Production/Operations Management

Information and Process Management and Technology Management

K201 The Computer in Business (3 cr.) K201 is an I-Core prerequisite that is required of all business majors. It provides an introduction to the role of computers and other information technologies in business. It provides instruction in both functional and conceptual computer literacy. Conceptual computer literacy is the focus of the weekly lecture. After introducing the basic concepts of computer use, these lectures devote special attention to current technological innovation in social and business environments. Topics include technology and organizational change, telecommunications, privacy in the information age, and business security on the Internet. Functional computer literacy is the focus of the weekly discussion section, which meets twice a week in a computer lab. This part of the course presents an introduction to two of the most widely used database and spreadsheet packages: Microsoft Access and Microsoft Excel. Students learn, via hands-on examples, many of the powerful tools contained in these two packages, with emphasis on how to analyze a variety of business problems with Access and Excel. The goal is not to teach these packages in an abstract sense, but rather to show how they can be applied to real business problems to help make important decisions.

K204 Honors: The Computer in Business (3 cr.) P: Students must be admitted to the Hutton Honors College or the Business Honors Program. K204 substitutes for K201, an I-Core prerequisite that is required for all business majors. It provides an introduction to the role of computers and other information technologies in business. It provides instruction in both functional and conceptual computer literacy. Conceptual computer literacy is the focus of the weekly lecture. After introducing the basic concepts of computer use, these lectures devote special attention to current technological innovation in social and business environments. Topics include technology and organizational change, telecommunications, privacy in the information age, and business security on the Internet. Functional computer literacy is the focus of the weekly discussion section, which meets twice a week in a computer lab. This part of the course presents an introduction to two of the most widely used database and spreadsheet packages: Microsoft Access and Microsoft Excel. Students learn, via hands-on examples, many of the powerful tools contained in these two packages with emphasis on how to analyze a variety of business problems with Access and Excel. The goal is not to teach these packages in an abstract sense, but rather to show how they can be applied to real business problems to help make important decisions. K204 is the honors version of K201, and it shares the same basic course content as K201. However, its in-class applications and its projects and exams are more challenging than those in K201.

K315 Business Process Management (3 cr.) P: X201 or X202 (honors). This course serves as an introduction to Business Process Management (BPM). BPM is the discipline of modeling, automating, managing and optimizing a business process through its lifecycle to reach a business goal. In particular, the focus is on enabling technologies of Enterprise Application Integration (EAI) and workflow. The sub-topic of automating introduces students to the numerous XML languages (BPML, BPEL) associated with business process management systems. Techniques in process measurement such as 6σ and process simulation are also covered.

K317 Collaboration and Workflow (3 cr.) P: I-Core and K315. This class provides an introduction to the enterprise business processing with particular emphasis on enterprise software systems applied to global processes. Workflow systems integrate people, processes, and technology, commonly known as organizational structure, business processes, and business objects. It covers an in-depth exploration of SAP’s Webflow technology, which provides an introduction to organizational systems, the role of people and organizational structures, as well as the role of regulatory constraints on enterprise systems. It will also cover SAP’s BPM architecture known as NetWeaver, and map processes with Intalio’s BPMS, which lays over SAP’s NetWeaver to demonstrate how global organizations perform business process management over traditional ERP systems.

K410 Decision Support Systems (3 cr.) P: I-Core. Teaches students how to develop mathematical models that can be used to improve decision making within an organization. Uses cases based on actual management situations to enhance the student’s model-building abilities. State-of-the-art computer software helps students implement models that can be used to support an organization’s decision-making process.

K490 Independent Study in Decision Sciences (1–3 cr.) P: Consent of department chairperson and of instructor. Supervised individual study and research in student’s special field of interest. Student will propose the investigation to be completed. Comprehensive written report required.

S305 Technology Infrastructure (3 cr.) P: X201 or X202 (honors). Introduces students to a wide range of telecommunications technologies, including local area networks, wide area networks, and the Internet, as well as to the uses of these technologies in the organization.

S307 Data Management (3 cr.) P: X201 or X202 (honors). The course is designed to improve the understanding of and to develop skills in the design and implementation of business databases using database management systems (DBMS). Emphasis is on the practical aspects of database design and development. Topics include conceptual design of database systems using the entity-relationship (ER) model, logical design and normalization, physical design, and the relational database model with SQL as a language for creating and manipulating database objects. There is a significant hands-on use of DBMS technology and its use in systems design and implementation.

S308 Business Application Development (3 cr.) C: X201 or X202 (honors). Students are introduced to the concepts of programming and software development. A modern programming language such as Visual Basic.Net or C++ is used to illustrate the concepts. Weekly lecture content is supplemented with lab sessions that provide a hands-on exposition of various programming language constructs and software development strategies. Foundational concepts in object-orientation are also introduced.

S310 Systems Analysis and Project Management (3 cr.) P: I-Core. Analysis of an organization and the subsequent design of solutions to meet business requirements are at the heart of the information systems field. This course follows a structured process called the systems development life cycle that companies use to identify and solve business problems, although alternative methodologies are also covered. Students learn tools and techniques for conducting projects, including how to gather system requirements, how to construct models of business processes using data flow diagrams, and the role of computer-aided software engineering (CASE) technology. While S310 emphasizes the system analyst role, all business students will benefit from the ability to analyze the processes, data, and computer systems they will encounter in their work as well as the knowledge of how to work with the system analyst to define strategic business solutions.

S400 Integration of Systems and the Business (3 cr.) P: I-Core. The course’s primary objective is to build upon, extend, and facilitate the integration of business and technical knowledge to help students succeed as managers in a technology-intensive, corporate environment. Through the use of a variety of cases, the course will enable students to understand how information technology can be used to achieve competitive advantage, and to improve decision making, business processes, operations, and organizational design.

S428 Advanced Application Development (3 cr.) P: I-Core and S308. Introduces students to advanced concepts of programming relevant to the development of business applications. The emphasis will be on the concepts of object-orientation. A modern programming language such as Java will be used to illustrate the programming concepts. UML will be used to illustrate the design concepts.

S433 Information Systems Security (3 cr.) P: I-Core and S305. This class covers the broad aspects of information security. Topics covered include: physical security, password security, biometrics, an intensive review of TCP/IP as it relates to security, routers, Network Intrusion Detection, NAT, firewalls, content-filtering, locking down the client machine, Linux and Unix, encryption, vulnerability testing, and a whole series of attacks. Hands-on labs are also an essential component of the course. In addition to the above topics, the class also covers the managerial, human, auditing, and legal aspects of security.

S450 Information Technology Controls (3 cr.) P: S307. Introduces IT processes and controls for Sarbanes-Oxley compliance in an organization. Frameworks such as COSO, COBIT, ISO 17799, and ITIL will be analyzed along with general IT controls and core IT concepts that are the focus of internal control reviews.

S490 Independent Study in Computer Information Systems (1–3 cr.) P: Consent of department chairperson and of instructor. Supervised individual study and research in student’s special field of interest. Student will propose the investigation to be completed. Comprehensive written report required.

X201 Technology (3 cr.) P: K201 or K204 with a grade of C or better. X201 is an I-Core prerequisite that is required of all business majors. It consists of two components: a lab and a lecture. The lecture provides an introduction to a range of technologies currently deployed in organizations including a broad understanding of how technologies are deployed, their impact and potential, their strategic importance, and their impact on organizations and on society. The labs focus on technologies that transform data into usable information to enhance decision making. They rely heavily upon Microsoft Excel and, to a lesser extent, Microsoft Access to develop sophisticated data analysis and modeling tools.

X202 Technology: Honors (3 cr.) P: K201 or K204 with a grade of C or better and admission to the Hutton Honors College or the Business Honors Program. X202 substitutes for X201, an I-Core prerequisite that is required of all business majors. It consists of two components: a lab and a lecture. The course provides an introduction to a range of technologies currently used in organizations including a broad understanding of how technologies are deployed, their impact and potential, and their strategic importance. Student projects focus on technologies that transform data into usable information to enhance decision making. They rely heavily upon Microsoft Excel and, to a lesser extent, Microsoft Access to develop sophisticated data analysis and modeling tools. X202 is the honors version of X201, and it shares the same basic course content as X201. However, its in-class applications and its projects and exams are more challenging than those in X201.

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Supply Chain Management and Production/Operations Management

P300 Introduction to Operations Management (3 cr.) P: A200 or A201 or A202. Offered for students with a formal minor in business. The operations function is concerned with the activity associated with the production of goods and services. Provides an overview of operating decisions and practices in both manufacturing- and service-oriented firms. While no attempt is made to cover any particular area in depth, standard terms and concepts required to communicate effectively with operating personnel are introduced. No credit toward a degree in business.

P304 Operations Management: Honors (3 cr.) P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better) and admission to the Business Honors Program. C: F304, I304, J304, and M304; students are administratively enrolled. Part of Honors I-Core. A survey course concerned with the activity associated with the production of goods and services. Topics include quality management, process design, capacity management, materials management (including materials requirements planning and the just-in-time inventory system), and project management.

P320 Supply Chain Management: Sourcing (3 cr.) P: I-Core. Sourcing/purchasing has become a major source of economic benefit to most firms. This course is a comprehensive look at this important area of supply chain management. The course examines the purchasing function in industrial firms. Topics include sourcing (domestic and international), specifications, and standards; contract and pricing practices; negotiation; quality assurance and reliability; inventory management; value analysis; capital equipment buying; make-or-buy decisions; evaluation of purchasing performance; and ethics.

P370 Integrated Business Core—Operations Component (3 cr.) P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better). C: F370, I370, J370, and M370. Students must apply online (www.kelley.iu.edu.ugrad/apps) to take I-Core and, after getting permission, enroll using BUS-BE 370. Cross-functional survey of business management. The operations component is concerned with the production and distribution of goods and services. Topics include inventory management, demand forecasting, aggregate production planning, shop scheduling, project management, quality control, and layout and process design. Includes a cross-functional case done in teams.

P421 Supply Chain Management (3 cr. P: I-Core. Focuses upon the material planning and execution systems used to manage the flow of material in the distribution and manufacturing stages of the supply chain. Topics include computer/software systems for demand management and forecasting techniques; inventory control systems for distribution channels; materials and capacity requirements; planning systems in manufacturing; and scheduling and order dispatching systems.

P429 Operations Processes (3 cr.) P: I-Core. Focuses on the study of the processes by which products are created. The course emphasizes the process flow method using three measures of process achievement: throughput (the rate of product delivery), flowtime (the time it takes to deliver that product), and inventory. Topics include Little’s Law, the uses of inventory, the importance of time-based competition, process analysis, and bottleneck analysis. Computational analysis using simulation is emphasized.

P431 Supply Chain Management: Logistics and Distribution (3 cr.) P: I-Core. The focus of this course is on logistics and distribution management, from both analytical and practical perspectives. Key logistics and distribution functions covered include logistics strategy, demand planning, design of the warehouse/distribution network, transportation planning and execution, logistics information systems, material handling and packaging systems, and reverse logistics.

P490 Independent Study in Operations Management (1–3 cr.) P: Consent of department chairperson and of instructor. Supervised individual study and research in student’s special field of interest. The student will propose the investigation desired and, in conjunction with the instructor, develop the scope of work to be completed. Comprehensive written report required.

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Communication Skills

X104 Business Presentations (3 cr.) Students are introduced to oral communication in business contexts. The course focus is on theory-based skill development that will enable students to deliver audience-centered messages, work in teams, and analyze and develop oral arguments. Students may not receive credit for both X104 and (X106 or CMCL-C 121).

X106 Business Presentations: Honors (3 cr.) P: Students must be admitted to the Hutton Honors College or the Business Honors Program. Students are introduced to oral communication in business contexts. The course focus is on theory-based skill development that will enable students to deliver audience-centered messages, work in teams, and analyze and develop oral arguments. Students are given an additional opportunity to engage in an international or political communication exercise. Students cannot receive credit for both X106 and (X104 or CMCL-C 121).

X204 Business Communication: (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. This course explores the theory and practice of written and oral communication in business. Students learn strategies for effectively communicating in a variety of business contexts from e-mail to formal written and oral reports. Completion of the Kelley School of Business Oral Communication Proficiency Assessment is required. Students may not receive credit for both X204 and X205.

X205 Business Communication: Honors (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 or equivalent with a grade of C or better and admission to the Hutton Honors College or the Business Honors Program. The overall goal of this course is to develop an awareness of the complexity involved in the communication process in order to communicate effectively both verbally (orally and in writing) and nonverbally in a business setting. The X205 capstone experience is participation in a team case competition. Students may not receive credit for both X205 and X204.

X305 Interpersonal Communication in Business: Honors (3 cr.) This course investigates interpersonal communication theory and strategies framed by current issues facing business leaders. Students approach communication as a strategy through writing, small group, and presentations.

X330 International Communication Strategies (3 cr.) This course explores communication strategies useful for dealing with the demands of doing business in a foreign culture. Students learn about the similarities and differences of verbal and nonverbal communication styles between multiple cultures and countries.

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Integrative-Core Courses

F304 Financial Management: Honors (3 cr.) P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better) and admission to the Business Honors Program. C: I304, J304, M304, and P304; students are administratively enrolled. Part of Honors I-Core. Broad survey of finance for all honors business students. Provides a conceptual framework for a firm’s investment, financing, and dividend decisions; includes working capital management, capital budgeting, and capital structure strategies.

F370 Integrated Business Core—Finance Component (3 cr.) P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better). C: I370, J370, M370 and P370. Students must apply online (www.kelley.iu.edu.ugrad/apps) to take I-Core and, after getting permission, enroll using BUS-BE 370. Cross-functional survey of business management. The finance component provides an introduction into basic principles and perspectives of financial thought. Covered topics include the time value of money, risk and return, interest rates an debt risk, capital budgeting, security pricing, and portfolio concepts. Includes a cross-functional case done in teams.

J304 Strategic Management: Honors (3 cr.) P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better) and admission to the Business Honors Program. C: F304, I304, M304, and P304; students are administratively enrolled. Part of Honors I-Core. Strategic Management is concerned with the roles and tasks of firms’ top managers (i.e., strategic decision makers). This course is designed to provide an appreciation for the total firm perspective and the means by which firms create and sustain competitive advantage in today’s increasingly challenging and complex business environment (domestic and global). Strategic management of a firm involves diagnosing the firm’s current situation and developing realistic solutions to the strategic and organizational problems that confront top managers. A desired outcome of this course is an enhanced appreciation for the complexities of managing a formal organization. The primary objective of the course is to help develop analytical skills for identifying key strategic issues and formulating appropriate strategies given a firm’s situation. The course will provide exposure to the theories, concepts, and techniques of strategic management through the text, readings, illustrative cases, and video vignettes.

J370 Integrated Business Core—Strategic Management Component (3 cr.) P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better). C: F370, I370, J370, and M370. Students must apply online (www.kelley.iu.edu.ugrad/apps) to take I-Core and, after getting permission, enroll using BUS-BE 370. Cross-functional survey of business management. The strategy component is concerned with the roles and tasks of a firm’s top managers (i.e., strategic decision makers). Designed to provide an appreciation for the total firm perspective and the means by which firms create and sustain competitive advantage in today’s increasingly challenging and complex business environment (domestic and global). Strategic management of the firm involves diagnosing the firm’s current situation and developing realistic solutions to the strategic and organizational problems that confront top managers. A desired outcome of this course is an enhanced appreciation for the complexities of managing a formal organization. The primary objective is to help develop analytical skills for identifying key strategic issues and formulating appropriate strategies given a firm’s situation. The course will provide exposure to the theories, concepts, and techniques of strategic management through the text, readings, illustrative cases, and video vignettes. Includes a cross-functional case done in teams.

M304 Introduction to Marketing Management: Honors (3 cr.) P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better) and admission to the Business Honors Program. C: F304, J304, P304, and I304; students are administratively enrolled. Part of Honors I-Core. Examines marketing concepts, strategic planning, marketing research, and information systems. Covers consumer and organizational buying behavior, forecasting sales, and market segmentation and position. Also focuses on new product development process; product lines and brands; pricing strategies; distribution-channel management; advertising; personal selling; and organizing, evaluating, and controlling marketing.

M370 Integrated Business Core—Marketing Component (3 cr.) P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better). C: F370, I370, J370, and P370. Students must apply online (www.kelley.iu.edu.ugrad/apps) to take I-Core and, after getting permission, enroll using BUS-BE 370. Cross-functional survey of business management. The marketing component covers marketing planning and decision making examined from firm and consumer points of view. Topics include the marketing concept and its company-wide implications, the integration of marketing with other functions, and the role that product, price, promotion, and distribution play in marketing strategy and implementation. Includes a cross-functional case done in teams.

P304 Operations Management: Honors (3 cr.) P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better) and admission to the Business Honors Program. C: F304, I304, J304, and M304; students are administratively enrolled. Part of Honors I-Core. A survey course concerned with the activity associated with the production of goods and services. Topics include quality management, process design, capacity management, materials management (including materials requirements planning and the just-in-time inventory system), and project management.

P370 Integrated Business Core—Operations Component (3 cr.) P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better). C: F370, I370, J370, and M370. Students must apply online (www.kelley.iu.edu.ugrad/apps) to take I-Core and, after getting permission, enroll using BUS-BE 370. Cross-functional survey of business management. The operations component is concerned with the production and distribution of goods and services. Topics include inventory management, demand forecasting, aggregate production planning, shop scheduling, project management, quality control, and layout and process design. Includes a cross-functional case done in teams.

I304 Honors Integrative Core: Discussion (2 cr.) P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better) and admission to the Business Honors Program. C: F304, J304, M304, and P304; students are administratively enrolled. Part of Honors I-Core. This course contains components that enhance the functional course to advance the student’s professional development.

I370 Integrative Core: Discussion (2 cr.) P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better). C: F370, J370, M370, and P370. Students must apply online (www.kelley.iu.edu.ugrad/apps) to take I-Core and, after getting permission, enroll using BUS-BE 370. This course contains components that advance the student’s professionalism in areas such as ethics and social responsibility, workplace diversity, and other timely business issues while functional areas of business are developed in the other courses within the Integrative Core. A culminating case study is used to analyze, integrate, and synthesize a complex business situation in a team environment.

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Internship Courses

W499 Co-op/Intern Work Assignment Off Campus (0 cr.) This course is the Kelley School of Business course designation for off-campus COOP/Internship participation. Registration in BUS-W 499 will be listed on a student’s transcript during the semester(s) that the student is participating in an internship. Students request “enrollment” in W499 by completing the online W499 registration form located on the Undergraduate Career Services Office (UCSO) website at https://ucso.indiana.edu/cgi-bin/index.cfm. W499 registration provides documentation of an off-campus internship experience only and does not grant any credits or additional privileges.

X490 Credit for Internship Course (3 cr.) P: Junior standing or permission of the instructor. This course is designed to deepen the overall learning gained from an internship. By completing structured assignments that relate to both the internship work and to elements of the broad-based business curriculum at the Kelley School, the value of the internship may be markedly increased. To earn credit for an internship, a student must participate in an internship that:

  1. is supervised; they must be based and meet in person with a supervisor at least once a week to discuss progress, challenges, etc.
  2. is at least nine weeks in length and 35–40 hours per week.
  3. involves learning something useful, not just doing “busy work.”
  4. includes project-oriented work, and the student must have the responsibility for a relevant business project from start to finish.
  5. is related to the further understanding of career fields and/or coursework.
  6. increases employability in major field of interest.
  7. includes the student’s successful completion of all coursework and assignments

To register, students must submit the online application form through the UCSO website at: https://ucso.indiana.edu/cgi-bin/index.cfm prior to beginning the internship position.

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Globalization and Overseas Studies Courses

X480 Professional Practice Abroad (3 cr.) P: departmental authorization and enrollment in a Kelley School of Business overseas study internship program. Students will receive credit for an internship completed abroad with required completion of academic deliverables. Counts as an international business elective.

X485 Overseas Study I (3 cr.) P: Enrollment in a Kelley School of Business overseas study program. Lectures and discussion on current topics relating to the international environment of business. Counts as an Arts and Humanities course for general education distribution option.

X486 Overseas Study II (3 cr.) P: Enrollment in a Kelley School of Business overseas study program. Lectures and discussion on current topics relating to the international environment of business. Counts as a Social and Historical Studies course for general education distribution option.

X488 Current International Topics (1–6 cr.) P: departmental authorization and current/previous enrollment in an overseas study program or significant international experience. Online course. Lectures and discussion on current topics relating to the international environment of business, as well as to the cultural aspects of the area in which an overseas study program is located.

X491 Overseas Study III (3 cr.) P: Enrollment in a Kelley School of Business overseas study program. Lectures and discussion on current topics relating to the international environment of business. Counts as a Natural and Mathematical course for general education distribution option.

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