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College of Arts
and Sciences (College)
2006-2008
Academic Bulletin

College Programs
College of Arts and Sciences (College) 
Kirkwood Hall 104 
130 S. Woodlawn 
Bloomington, IN 47405  
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Apparel Merchandising and Interior Design

Faculty
Introduction
Majors in Apparel Merchandising or Interior Design-B.S.
Requirements in Fundamental Skills and Distribution Courses
Apparel Merchandising-B.S.
Business Minor for Apparel Merchandising Majors
Minor in Apparel Merchandising
Interior Design-B.S.
Certificate in Fashion Design
Course Descriptions

Faculty

Chairperson

C. Thomas Mitchell

Professor

Kathleen Rowold

Associate Professor

C. Thomas Mitchell

Assistant Professors

Heather Akou, Theresa Winge

Senior Lecturers

Mary Grusak, Cynthia Landis, Eloise Paul, Janis Shaffer, Olivia Snyder

Lecturer

Marleen Lipsick-Newman

Sage Historic Costume Collection Curator

Kathleen Rowold, (812) 855-0338

Assistant Curator

Kelly Richardson, (812) 855-4627

Merchandising Education and Research Center Director

Janis Shaffer, (812) 855-6165

Academic Advising

Sheila Maben, Memorial Hall East 228, (812) 855-7737, smaben@indiana.edu

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Introduction

The Department of Apparel Merchandising and Interior Design (AMID) consists of programs that examine consumer-oriented and aesthetic components of the near environment. In the apparel merchandising program students are exposed to the processes used in creating apparel, as well as the means by which these are merchandised. The interior design program addresses the multidisciplinary design process used in the creation of interior space. The Certificate in Fashion Design combines the studio arts of fashion with a major in a related area.

AMID offers two special resources. The Elizabeth Sage Historic Costume Collection consists of more than 20,000 objects of women's, men's, and children's clothing, dating from the late eighteenth century to the present day. The Sage Collection is used in the study of the history and preservation of costume and textiles. The Merchandising Education and Research Center (MERC) is the nucleus for the curricular, extracurricular, and research activities of the IU apparel merchandising program. MERC offers educational opportunities for students and members of the retailing community and provides consultation and research services in innovative merchandising and retailing strategies.

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Majors in Apparel Merchandising or Interior Design-B.S.

Purpose

This program provides the student with two options: a concentration in apparel merchandising or a concentration in interior design. These options integrate knowledge from the arts and the physical, social, and business sciences with behavioral and technical studies in textiles, apparel, furniture, and interior design. Supervised internships are available.

Upon admission to the apparel merchandising major, students must complete all courses required for the major with a C- or higher, including all required courses outside of AMID, and must have a minimum 2.000 overall GPA in all courses required for the major.

Upon admission to the interior design major, students must receive a grade of C- or higher in extra-departmental requirements and in H265. They must receive a grade of B- or higher in H168 to be considered for enrollment in H271. They must complete all other AMID requirements with a grade of C or higher. Students not receiving a grade of C or higher in any studio or its corequisite lectures/labs will not be permitted to enroll in interior design courses the following semester. Students may not enroll in any co requisite lab/lecture course in interior design until they are eligible to enroll in the respective co requisite studio course.

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Requirements in Fundamental Skills and Distribution Courses

  1. Writing and mathematics, same as B.A.
  2. Foreign language, two years or one year of foreign language and two culture studies courses.
  3. Arts and humanities, 12 credit hours.
  4. Social and historical studies, 12 credit hours.
  5. Natural and mathematical sciences, 8 credit hours.

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Apparel Merchandising-B.S.

The apparel merchandising program offers students a comprehensive examination of merchandising as it relates to the retailing industry of tomorrow. Course work includes product basics as well as current industry trends coupled with a special minor from the Kelley School of Business. Students are encouraged to select a series of related topics from within the AMID courses in order to construct an apparel concentration in either merchandising, apparel technology, costume history, or consumer studies.

Purpose

Students in apparel merchandising can prepare for a variety of careers in retail buying, retail management, product development, consumer services, visual merchandising, fashion promotion, retail account coordination, and wholesale sales.

Requirements

Apparel merchandising majors must complete a total of 32 AMID credit hours, including AMID H100, H203, H204 or H207, H209, H315, H404, H413 and H414, H440; plus 9 credit hours of 300- to 400-level AMID electives. Apparel merchandising majors must also complete selected courses outside AMID, including:

  1. Business K201 or Computer Science A110, Economics E201 and E202, Psychological and Brain Sciences P101, and Sociology S100.
  2. Kelley School of Business courses: Accounting A200 and Marketing M300.
  3. Either Business L201 or Z302.
  4. Two of: Business M405, M415 or M419.
  5. Business X420 or ASCS Q299.

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Business Minor for Apparel Merchandising Majors

Requirements

Students earning a bachelor's degree with a major in apparel merchandising may obtain a minor in business by successfully completing the courses listed above.

Note: Students pursuing this option, with the approval of their faculty advisor, may substitute supporting courses in other divisions (such as journalism, telecommunications, or fine arts) for the business minor.

Apparel merchandising majors may exceed the normal maximum of 22 credit hours outside the College of Arts and Sciences, up to a limit of 28 credit hours, provided those credit hours are chosen from the following courses: Business A200, K201, L201, M300, M303, M405, M415, M419, X420, Z302 or other business courses recommended by the student's academic advisor.

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Minor in Apparel Merchandising

Requirements

A student may declare a minor in apparel merchandising after completing a minimum of 26 credit hours with a GPA of 2.000 or higher.

Students minoring in apparel merchandising must take AMID H100 or H209, H203, and H413 and select two from AMID H308, H309, H327, H352, H401, H404, H406, H409, H410, H411, and H412.

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Interior Design-B.S.

Purpose

This curriculum emphasizes the relationships between the aesthetic, behavioral, and technological concerns in the creation of responsive interior environments. Career opportunities are available in commercial and residential interior design firms, architectural firms, facilities management, retail furniture establishments, government and community agencies, and private design studios. Majors in this program can also prepare for advanced degrees in related areas of design, such as architecture, facilities management, or environmental design.

Requirements

Interior Design majors must complete a total of 42 AMID credit hours, including H168, H264, H265, H271, H272, H277, H335, H363, H368, H373, H374, H469, H475, and H476; plus selected courses outside AMID, including Fine Arts A102, and any two of the following three courses: F100, F101, and F102.

The interior design major requires four academic years to complete. Only students who successfully transfer interior design courses from another institution or campus to IU Bloomington can complete the major in less than four academic years. See "Transferred Credit" and "Transferred Credit Review."

Transferred Credit

All interior design courses transferred from another institution or campus must be evaluated by an appropriate faculty member in the Department of Apparel Merchandising and Interior Design before they may be applied toward a major in interior design. See "Transferred Credit Review."

Transferred Credit Review

Courses in interior design that have been transferred to IU Bloomington from another institution or campus are not counted as part of an interior design major unless they have been reviewed and accepted by an appropriate member of the interior design faculty.

For a review of transferred lecture credit, the student must provide the course title, course description, textbook title, and syllabus. For a review of transferred studio credit, the student must provide the course title, course description, textbook title, syllabus, problem statements, and a portfolio of representative work for each course for which transfer credit is desired. The portfolio should include both preliminary and finished work, and be as complete as possible. Slides or photographs of three-dimensional objects are acceptable.

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Certificate in Fashion Design

Purpose

A student may earn an area certificate as part of completing the bachelor's degree and in addition to completing the requirements for a major. The certificate program in Fashion Design serves students seeking to combine the studio arts of fashion with a major in a related area. Depending on the related area, students completing the certificate will be prepared for a variety of careers in the fashion industry (such as design, theatrical costuming, marketing, and journalism), as well as graduate work in, for example, museum studies, costume design, and collection management.

Requirements

Students pursuing the Certificate in Fashion Design must complete 27 credit hours in three categories of course work (fashion design and construction; drawing and portfolio; and theory and history), including H203, H207, H211, H217, H303, H305, H317, H417, either H306 or H408, and either H311 or H340. Students must complete each course required for the certificate with a grade of C- or higher, and students must have a minimum GPA of 2.000 in all courses required for the certificate.

Note: Certificate course work begins in the fall. No more than 24 students are admitted in any one year. Contact program director Professor Kathleen Rowold 6-12 months in advance to discuss admission.

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Course Descriptions

Apparel Merchandising/Textiles/Apparel

H100 Introduction to Apparel and Textiles (3 cr.) The origins and motives of dress, the interdisciplinary study of apparel and textiles, and introduction to apparel and textile research. Investigation of careers in the textile and apparel industry. I Sem.

H203 Textiles (3 cr.) P: H100 or H209. Textile fibers, yarns, fabrication, and finishes, textile processing and properties; selection and care of textiles for human use. Two lectures plus laboratory. Lab fee required. I Sem., II Sem.

H204 Apparel Manufacturing and Quality Analysis (3 cr.) P: H203. Apparel manufacturing as related to technology, product performance, quality, and value of the product to the consumer. I Sem., II Sem.

H207 Apparel Structure Principles (3 cr.) P: H203. Fabric manipulation, pattern selection, pattern alteration, and garment-fitting techniques applied to basic apparel construction. Lecture and studio class. Lab fee required. I Sem.

H209 Apparel Industries (3 cr.) An overview of the fashion industry as it relates to the economic, social, and business factors involved in various components of the industry. Men's, women's, children's, accessories and hard line businesses are evaluated as well as career opportunities in wholesale and retail sectors. II Sem.

H211 Fashion Design I: Conceptualization (1 cr.) P: H207. Exploration of aesthetic and/ or historical inspiration and foundation for developing a fashion line. Development of design philosophy and concepts leading to a fashion line for senior project.

H217 Fashion Design II: Interpretation (3 cr.) P: H211. Fundamental principles and processes of planning a fashion line, including interpreting design concepts and themes, designing and sketching ensembles, and coordinating fabrication, color, and texture.

H303 Experimental Apparel Structure (3 cr.) P: H207 with a grade of C or higher. Experimental study in design and construction of apparel using a variety of fabrics and designer techniques. Lecture and studio class. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Lab fee required. II Sem.

H305 Creative Apparel Design-Pattern Drafting (3 cr.) P: H303 with grade of C or higher. Apparel design through the fundamental principles and processes of the pattern development methods. Experimentation with sloper development and pattern drafting to produce original apparel designs. Lecture and studio class. Lab fee required. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

H306 Tailoring (3 cr.) P: H303 with grade of C or higher. Precise techniques in contemporary and traditional tailoring. Lecture and studio class. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Lab fee required. II Sem.

H308 Brand Management and Advertising (3 cr.) Utilization of advertising as a strategic marketing initiative to create and develop brand awareness and loyalty.

H309 Strategies in Retail Promotion (3 cr.) P: H100, H209. Application of design elements and principles to commercial display and development of creative visual merchandising techniques; various media explored.

H311 History of Textiles and Costume I (3 cr.) P: H100, H203. R: one course in European history. Costume in Western civilization relating to social, economic, political, and religious events from early civilization through seventeenth century. II Sem. Odd years only.

H315 Principles of Merchandising (3 cr.) P: H100, H203, H209, or permission of instructor. Examination of the contemporary retail environment as it relates to merchandising principles, such as the retail organizational structure; concepts examined include pricing strategy, mark-ups, mark-downs, profit and loss statements; emphasis on comprehensive analysis using merchandising principles.

H317 Fashion Drawing (3 cr.) P: FINA S200. Basic principles of drawing applied to the fashion figure. Use of various media leading to proficiency in rendering of texture, drapery, and the human figure as found in fashion drawing.

H319 Professional Techniques in the Retail Industry (1 cr.) P: H100, H209. Professional techniques and competencies applicable to careers in the apparel and related industries; prepares students for practicums and internships.

H321 Practicum in the Retail Industry (1-3 cr.) P: H209, H315, and H319. Provides apparel merchandising majors an off-campus supervised and coordinated work experience in the apparel industry. Does not require leaving campus for a semester. Maximum total of 6 credits given among the following: Y398, H321, H403.

H325 Creative Apparel Design: Shape and Foundation (3 cr.) P: H303 with grade of C or higher. Fundamental principles of design and construction for garment inner-shaping and foundation; manipulation of a variety of materials and techniques to produce original designs featuring complex super-structures. Lecture and studio class. Lab fee required.

H326 Creative Apparel Design: Accessories (3 cr.) P: H303 with a grade of C or higher. Fundamental principles and techniques for design and construction of accessories including gloves, hats, handbags, jewelry, and masks; manipulation of a variety of materials to produce original accessory design. Lecture and studio class. Lab fee required.

H327 Product Development (3 cr.) P: H315 and junior standing or permission of instructor. Functions and practices of product development; understanding and defining the customer; researching fashion trends from color and fabric to silhouette; identifying how and when to apply trends to targeted customers; practical application of executing concepts into finished products.

H328 CAD for Apparel Merchandising (1-3 cr.) P: H327 and consent of instructor. Computer application for design marketing and merchandising in the apparel and textile industries. Includes color, graphics, prints, knits, and wovens. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Lab fee required.

H340 History of Textiles and Costume II (3 cr.) P: H100, H203. R: one course in European history. History of textiles and costume in Western civilization relating to social, economic, political, and religious events in the eighteenth through twentieth centuries; emphasis on the emergence and evolution of the haute couture. II Sem. Even years only.

H352 Aesthetics of Dress (3 cr.) P: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Aesthetics of dress as a medium of visual communication. Considerations include aesthetic norms, color psychology, elements and principles of design, appearance management strategies, and apparel product design process.

H401 Cultural Aspects of Dress (3 cr.) CSA P: Junior standing and one course in cultural anthropology, sociology, or psychology. Dress as a reflection of the physical, social, psychological, and aesthetic environment of various cultures; responses to and uses of dress as an aspect of culture and individual behavior.

H402 Collection Management for Historic Textiles and Costumes (3 cr.) P: H203, H311, H340, junior standing. Curatorial methods and procedures in museum collection management specifically related to historic textiles and costumes. Topics may vary to include accessioning, cataloging, artifact research and identification, exhibition, conservation, computer utilization. Repeatable up to 6 credit hours. SS.

H403 Practicum in Collection Management for Historic Textiles and Costume (1-3 cr.) P: H402 or consent of instructor, junior standing. Individual work in selected area of collection management for historic textiles and costume. Repeatable up to 6 credit hours. Maximum total of 6 credits given among the following: H321, H403, Y398.

H404 International Textiles and Apparel Trade (3 cr.) P: H203, BUS M300, ECON E202, and junior standing. International factors affecting the textiles and apparel industries and their impact on the economy and consumers; competitive status of United States textile and apparel sectors within the context of a global economy. I Sem.

H406 Fashion Analysis and Theory (3 cr.) P: Junior standing. Survey of methodologies and research techniques for analysis of fashion diffusion and change.

H408 Creative Apparel Design-Draping (3 cr.) P: H303 with grade of C or higher. Apparel design through the fundamental principles and processes of draping; manipulation of two-dimensional materials directly on dress form to produce original apparel design. Lecture and studio class. Lab fee required.

H409 Apparel Industry Field Seminar (3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Study tour designed as an overview of the apparel and textile industry, taught through a series of seminars conducted by business professionals outside the Bloomington community. May not be repeated for credit.

H410 Apparel Entrepreneurship (3 cr.) P: Junior standing. In-depth study and development of individualized plans for opening an apparel-related retail store, including entrepreneurship concept, accounting and control, merchandising and buying, operation and management, and advertising and promotion.

H411 Behavioral Aspects of Dress (3 cr.) S & H P: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Basic concepts and theories from social psychology will be used to study how clothing affects the self and others.

H412 Global Sourcing (3 cr.) P: H315 or junior standing. Issues and strategies of global sourcing in the apparel industry: natural resources, labor issues, factory profiles, quota and duty issues of key sourcing centers.

H413 Planning and Analysis (3 cr.) P: H100 or H209, and H203. C: H414 for majors only. Essentials of merchandise buying and planning: consumer trends, market resources and trade practices, seasonal plans, assortment planning and analytic tools for inventory evaluations.

H414 Computerized Merchandise Planning (1 cr.) P: H315, junior standing, or consent of instructor. C: H413. Hands-on knowledge of how merchandising math and planning software is integrated, as well as how computerized data is analyzed and applied, within the retailing industry.

H415 Readings in Textiles and Apparel (1-3 cr.) P: H203, 6 additional credit hours in textiles and apparel, and consent of department. Review, discussion, and evaluation of current trends and issues in apparel or textiles; analysis of research. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

H417 Fashion Design III: Presentation (2 cr.) P: H305 and H306. Planning and presenting senior fashion line, development of accompanying research documentation, and preparation of portfolio.

H440 Senior Seminar (1 cr.) Contemporary issues from corporate politics to legal and ethical concerns in the workplace. Capstone course for apparel merchandising majors, including completion of the program portfolio and final assessment.

H481 Seminar in Consumer Studies (3 cr.) In-depth examination and analysis of selected consumer concerns about resources of food, clothing, and shelter. Emphasis on discussion and critical evaluation of literature. Repeatable up to 6 credit hours.

Interior Design

H168 Beginning Interior Design (3 cr.) Focus on critical and analytical ability, reasoned understanding and rational application of design elements and principles, development of vocabulary, attitudes and skills basic to design and interior design.

H264 Basic AutoCAD for Interior Design (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H271; C: H272, H277. Basic two-dimensional AutoCAD skills for professional practice of interior design: document and database generation, computer-aided drafting and design. Lab fee required. II Sem.

H265 History of European and American Furniture and Interiors, 1730-1830 (3 cr.) S & H Study of French, English, and American period furnishings, designers, and interior environments, 1730-1830.

H271 Interior Design I-Three-Dimensional Interior Design (3 cr.) P: Grade of B or higher in H168 and consent of instructor. Fundamentals of drawing and rendering in two and three dimensions, presentation methods, and design practices. I Sem.

H272 Interior Design II-Space Design (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H271. C: H264, H277. Introduction to fundamentals of space design for human activity; space standards, programming, and graphic communication. Lab fee required. II Sem.

H277 Materials and Components of Interior Design (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H271. C: H264, H272. Provides basic understanding of the appropriate use of materials specified for the interior environment. Particular emphasis placed on the vital role interior designers play in providing for the health, safety, and welfare of those inhabiting interior spaces. II Sem.

H335 Lighting Interior Spaces (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H272, H264, H277. C: H363, H373. Introduction to the general principles, factors, and techniques of interior lighting, including planning, analysis, calculation methods, aesthetics, cost of projection, hardware, codes, and presentation methods. Field trips required. Credit not given for both AMID H335 and THTR T335. I Sem.

H363 Design Methods (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H272, H264, and H277. C: H335 and H373. Introduction to the basic techniques of design research and evaluation, emerging trends in design thinking, and state-of-the-art design methodologies. I Sem.

H368 Contemporary Issues in Environmental Design (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H363, H373. C: H374. Study of philosophical, theoretical, historical, behavioral, technological, and research issues of contemporary interest to environmental design. II Sem.

H373 Interior Design III-The Dwelling (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H272, H264, and H277. C: H363. Design of dwellings for individuals and groups in a variety of contexts. Integration of social, technical, spatial, and environmental factors. Lab fee required. I Sem.

H374 Interior Design IV-The Workplace (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H335, H363, H373. C: H368. Design of work spaces for a variety of individuals and organizations. Integration of organizational, ergonometric, technical, spatial, and environmental factors. Lab fee required. II Sem.

H394 Advanced CAD Applications for Interior Design (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H264. Advanced CAD visualization for professional design practice: three-dimensional modeling and visualization, image processing, animation, and multimedia presentation. Lab fee required. I Sem.

H467 Building Blocks: Developments in Interior Design (1 cr.) P: Junior standing. Practitioners in architecture, interior design, and related professions discuss the steps and processes in planning a building and its interior spaces from initial planning through post-occupancy evaluation. Building type (office, residence, store, hotel, etc.) varies by semester. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of credit. II Sem. (second eight-week intensive).

H469 Professional Practices in Interior Design (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H363, H368, and H374; C: H475. Survey of business procedures and practices and of professional values and standards for interior designers. I Sem.

H475 Interior Design V-Comprehensive Design (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H264, H363, H368, H374; C: H469. Interdisciplinary team approaches to solution of comprehensive design problems utilizing contemporary design methods and procedures. Lab fee required. I Sem.

H476 Interior Design VI-Special Populations (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H264, H363, H368, H469, and H475. Design of habitats and work spaces for special populations. Lab fee required. II Sem.

H480 Readings in Interior Design (1-3 cr.) P: H168, 6 additional credits in interior design, and consent of department. Review, discussion, and evaluation of current trends and issues in interior design; analysis of research. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

General Apparel Merchandising and Interior Design

Y398 Internship in Professional Practice (2-6 cr.) (S/F grading) P: Junior standing, approval of department. For retailing experience, H315 and M300 required; for interior design experience H272 required. For other professional practice areas, see department chair for prerequisites. Provides AMID majors an off-campus supervised and coordinated career-work experience in a cooperating business, a consumer agency, or other related fields. Maximum total of 6 credit hours given among the following: Y398, H321, and H403.

H490 Special Problems: Topic (1-3 cr.) P: Senior standing, consent of department. Individual work under supervision on problems of special interest. May be repeated for up to 9 credit hours.

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