IU Bulletins HomeBloomington Campusred
Indiana University

Search College of Arts and Sciences 2006-2008 Online Bulletin

Request College of Arts and Sciences 2006-2008 Application Packet

College of Arts and Sciences 2006-2008 Online Bulletin Table of Contents

 

Return to College of Arts and Sciences Departments and Programs
 

College of Arts
and Sciences (College)
2006-2008
Academic Bulletin

College Programs
College of Arts and Sciences (College) 
Kirkwood Hall 104 
130 S. Woodlawn 
Bloomington, IN 47405  
Local (812) 855-1821 
Fax (812) 855-2060 
Contact College
 

Biology

Faculty
Introduction
Departmental Honors Program
Honors Courses
Overseas Study
Options for Special Credit
Outside Courses for Biology Majors
Major in Biology-B.A.
Major in Microbiology-B.A.
Major in Biology-B.S.
Major in Biotechnology-B.S.
Special B.S. for Three-Year Premedical/Predental/Preoptometry Students
Major in Microbiology-B.S.
B.S. in Biotechnology/J.D. 3+3 Program
Biology Minor
Courses for the Nonmajor
Courses for the Biology Major
Courses for a Degree in Biotechnology-B.S.
Courses for Programs Outside the Department of Biology
Related Research Courses
Related College of Arts and Sciences Course

Faculty

Chairperson

Elizabeth C. Raff

Associate Chairpersons

Lynda Delph, Roger Innes

Distinguished Professors

Thomas Kaufman, Ellen Ketterson, Michael Lynch, Jeffrey Palmer, Rudolf Raff, Loren Rieseberg

Professors

Carl Bauer, Jose Bonner, Edmund Brodie III, Yves Brun, Peter Cherbas, Keith Clay, Lynda Delph, Thomas Donahue, Mark Estelle, Pat Foster, Gerald Gastony, Roger Hangarter, Roger Innes, Curtis Lively, Elizabeth C. Raff, Albert Ruesink, William Saxton, Susan Strome, Milton Taylor, Mike Wade, Maxine Watson, Malcolm Winkler, Miriam Zolan

Associate Professors

Alan Bender, James Bever, Yean Chooi-Odle, James Drummond, Clay Fuqua, David Kehoe, Emília Martins, Whitney Schlegel, Stefan Surzycki, Michael Tansey, Gregory Velicer

Assistant Professors

Justen Andrews, Ling-Ling Chen, Gregory Demas, Joseph Duffy, Viola Ellision, Wayne Forrester, Matthew Hahn, Spencer Hall, Richard Hardy, Laura Hurley, Justin Kumar, Scott Michaels, Armin Moczek, Leonie Moyle, Suchetena "Tuli" Mukhopadhyay, Heather Reynolds, Sidney Shaw, Troy Smith, Joel Ybe

Academic Advising

Mary Ann Miller and Anna Bednarski, Jordan Hall A115, (812) 855-3810

Return to Top

Introduction

The Department of Biology (BIOL) offers a wide range of programs, including B.A. and B.S. degrees in biology and microbiology and the B.S. degree in biotechnology. Because the minimal requirements for each degree differ widely and prepare students for varied careers, students should consult advisors and evaluate each degree carefully. Independent research and honors degrees can be earned under any degree program. In departmental course work the letter prefix indicates the major emphasis of the class: "A" and "P" indicate anatomy and physiology courses offered by the Medical Sciences Program; "B" indicates plant sciences; "M" a microbiological emphasis; "T" a biotechnological emphasis; "Z" a zoological emphasis; and "L" courses cover microbiological, botanical, and zoological subjects.

Return to Top

Departmental Honors Program

Outstanding students in any of the departmental degree programs are urged to fulfill the requirements for an honors degree. Since independent research is an integral part of the Department of Biology honors program, students must enroll in at least two semesters of L490 Individual Study. Mary Ann Miller in the Undergraduate Advising Office should be consulted for other requirements, but in general, students completing course work with a minimum grade point average of 3.3, a senior thesis, the L490 credits, and, in some cases, a comprehensive examination or seminar will be awarded a degree with honors. Honors students are urged to enroll in special honors courses and seminars offered by many departments in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Return to Top

Honors Courses

In order to provide opportunities and challenges for superior students, the department offers honors courses equivalent to its main courses and designated with an "S." These small-enrollment courses offer tightly integrated lecture and laboratory experiences that include an experimental approach and a quantitative orientation, in addition to covering the basic material taught in the regular courses. Candidates for an honors degree (see information above) need not necessarily take these courses but would clearly benefit from them.

Return to Top

Overseas Study

Students are encouraged to study abroad, particularly in the Indiana University Overseas Study programs in Costa Rica, the Grand Cayman Islands, Great Britain, Bonaire, Copenhagen, and Australia, where students may continue to make progress toward their biology degrees. For information about study abroad, contact the Office of Overseas Study, Franklin Hall 303, (812) 855-9304.

Return to Top

Options for Special Credit

The department awards 3 hours of credit with a grade of S for E112 to students who score a 4 on the College Board Advanced Placement exam or 6 hours of credit for E111 and E112 to students who score a 5 on the College Board Advanced Placement exam. Students who have taken the College Board SAT II Biology E/M test earn credit as follows: a score of 680 on the Biology E test earns 3 credit hours of E111. A score of 680 on the Biology M test earns 3 credit hours of E112. For students who have taken the older SAT II Biology subject test, a score between 680 and 719 earns credit for E112; a score of 720 or higher earns credit for E111 and E112. A grade of S in E111 and E112 also may be earned by passing a departmental exemption examination given the first Wednesday night of classes each semester. This credit satisfies the introductory course requirements for majors but carries no lab credit. Nonmajors can apply the credit toward College of Arts and Sciences distribution requirements.

Return to Top

Outside Courses for Biology Majors

Biology majors may want to consider the following courses which could be included in their degree program as courses outside the College of Arts and Sciences (see "Courses Outside the College of Arts and Sciences" section). A student may include up to 22 credit hours of appropriate courses from outside the College of Arts and Sciences in the minimum of 122 hours required for graduation.

School of Public and Environmental Affairs

E410 Introduction to Environmental Toxicology (3 cr.)
E440 Wetlands, Biology, and Regulation (3 cr.)
E460 Fisheries and Wildlife Management (3 cr.)
E461 Fisheries and Wildlife Management Lab (3 cr.)
E475 Techniques of Environmental Science (3 cr.)

Please Note: In partial completion of degree requirements, all College of Arts and Sciences students must have a minimum of 25 credit hours of College of Arts and Sciences work in their major. The courses listed above do not count toward the completion of those 25 credit hours, nor do they count for Biology upper lecture or laboratory credit.

Return to Top

Major in Biology-B.A.

Purpose

The B.A. degree is designed to provide training in the major subject areas of biology while remaining the most flexible of all biology degrees offered. Minimal chemistry and mathematics requirements allow students to substitute a second major, such as computer science, chemistry, or psychology, or an outside field, such as environmental studies or business. However, this degree will not automatically fulfill requirements for entrance to medical, dental, or optometry schools, or to most graduate programs.

Major Requirements

Students must complete the following course work with a grade of C- or higher in each course:

  1. L111 Introduction to Biology: Evolution and Diversity (3 cr.), L112 Introduction to Biology: Biological Mechanisms (3 cr.), and L113 Biology Laboratory (3 cr.).
  2. L211 Molecular Biology (3 cr.).
  3. L311 Genetics and Development (3 cr.).
  4. L318 Evolution (3 cr.).
  5. Two additional lecture courses at the 300 or 400 level.
  6. Two additional laboratory courses at the 300 or 400 level.
  7. One of the advanced lecture courses and one advanced laboratory (300-400 level) must be taken on the Bloomington campus.
  8. Chemistry C117, C118 or N330, and C341 or R340.
  9. Mathematics M118 or M119 or M211 or M215.

Note: L111 and L112 can be taken in either order. L112 is a prerequisite of L211, which is the prerequisite of L311.

Students must also meet the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, including culture studies.

Return to Top

Major in Microbiology-B.A.

Purpose

The B.A. degree is designed to provide training in microbiology for those students who do not intend to obtain an advanced degree in microbiology or attend medical, dental, or optometry school. The degree is suitable for students who are double majors as well as those individuals whose career goals include being a laboratory technician or working in an outside field, such as business or environmental studies.

Major Requirements

Students must complete the following courses with a minimum grade of C- in each course:

  1. L112 Introduction to Biology: Biological Mechanisms (3 cr.) and L113 Biology Laboratory (3 cr.).
  2. L211 Molecular Biology (3 cr.).
  3. M250 Microbiology (3 cr.) and M255 Microbiology Lab (2 cr.).
  4. M440 Medical Microbiology (3 cr.) or M460 Biology of the Prokaryotes (3 cr.).
  5. M480 Microbial Genetics (3 cr.).
  6. Either M350 Microbial Physiology and Biochemistry (3 cr.) or L312 Cell Biology (3 cr.).
  7. Two additional courses from the following: B351, L321, M375, M430, or M440. If M440 is selected in section 4, it cannot be selected for credit in section 7.
  8. One additional laboratory from the following: M360, M435, M445, M465, or M485.

Additional Requirements

Students must also complete the following with a minimum grade of C- in each course:

  1. Chemistry C117, C118 or N330, and C341 or R340.
  2. Mathematics M119, M211, Mathematics/ Psychological and Brain Sciences/SPEA K300, Liberal Arts and Management Program L316, or Mathematics/ Psychological and Brain Sciences K310, or Computer Science A201 or C211. (Note that although SPEA K300 fulfills the statistics requirement, credit hours for this course count outside the College of Arts and Sciences).
  3. Physics P201-P202.

Students must also meet the degree requirements for the B.A. degree in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Return to Top

Major in Biology-B.S.

Purpose

The B.S. in biology is designed to provide students with a rigorous general background in the sciences to prepare them for graduate or professional school or for science-related jobs at the bachelor's degree level. The more extensive requirements in chemistry, mathematics, and physics have been selected to optimize students' future opportunities.

Requirements

Students must complete the following fundamental skills and distribution requirements:

  1. Writing, same as for B.A. degree.
  2. Mathematics, fulfilled by major.
  3. Foreign language, three semesters in the same language, or equivalent proficiency. Culture studies courses are not required.
  4. Arts and humanities, two courses.
  5. Social and historical studies, two courses.
  6. Natural and mathematical sciences, fulfilled by major.

Major Requirements

Students must complete the following course work with a minimum grade of C- in each course:

  1. L111 Introduction to Biology: Evolution and Diversity (3 cr.), L112 Introduction to Biology: Biological Mechanisms (3 cr.), and L113 Biology Laboratory (3 cr.).
  2. L211 Molecular Biology (3 cr.).
  3. L311 Genetics and Development (3 cr.).
  4. L318 Evolution (3 cr.).
  5. Three additional lecture courses at the 300 or 400 level.
  6. Three additional laboratory courses at the 300 or 400 level.
  7. Two of the advanced lecture courses (300-400 level) and two of the advanced laboratories (300-400 level) must be taken on the Bloomington campus.

Additional Requirements

Students must also complete with a minimum grade of C- in each course:

  1. Chemistry C117, C118 or N330, C341, C342, and C343.
  2. Physics P201-P202 or P221-P222.
  3. Mathematics M211 or M215, (or M119 and M120), and Mathematics/Psychological and Brain Sciences/SPEA K300, Liberal Arts and Management Program L316, or Mathematics/Psychological and Brain Sciences K310. (Note that although SPEA K300 fulfills the statistics requirement, credit hours for this course count outside the College of Arts and Sciences).

Recommendations

Students are urged to discuss with the academic advisors in Jordan Hall A115 the selection of electives and requirements to meet their specific career goals.

Return to Top

Special B.S. for Three-Year Premedical/Predental/Preoptometry Students

Purpose

This program is designed for students admitted to the Indiana University Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, or Optometry after three years at Indiana University Bloomington. Students who have completed requirements for this major, the fundamental skills and distribution requirements for the standard B.S. in Biology, and at least 90 credit hours in courses offered by the College of Arts and Sciences may apply 8 credit hours of their first-year professional courses toward their major and 24 credit hours of their first-year professional courses as elective credit. Students who have been accepted to medical and dental schools other than Indiana University's must have special permission from the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences to apply for this degree.

Requirements

Students must complete all of the fundamental skills and distribution requirements that are required for the standard B.S. in biology.

Major Requirements

Students must complete the following with a C- or better:

  1. L112, L211, L311, L312, and L318; a total of three associated labs.
  2. Chemistry C117, C118 or N330, C341, C342, and C343.
  3. Physics P201 and P202 or P221 and P222.
  4. Mathematics M211 or M215 (or M119 and M120), and Mathematics/Psychology/ SPEA K300 or Mathematics/Psychology K310. (Note that although SPEA K300 fulfills the statistics requirement, credit hours for this course count outside the College of Arts and Sciences).

Recommendation

Students choosing this option should consult with the academic advisors in Jordan Hall A115.

Return to Top

Major in Microbiology-B.S.

Purpose

The B.S. in microbiology is designed for students who wish to pursue careers as professional microbiologists in health, environmental, governmental, or industrial laboratories. It is also a basis for further professional or graduate training in microbiology and related fields.

Requirements

Students must complete the following fundamental skills and distribution requirements:

  1. Writing, same as for B.A. degree.
  2. Mathematics, fulfilled by major.
  3. Foreign language, three semesters in the same language or equivalent proficiency. Culture studies courses are not required.
  4. Arts and humanities, two courses.
  5. Social and historical studies, two courses.
  6. Natural and mathematical sciences, fulfilled by major.

Major Requirements

Students must complete the following:

  1. Biology L112, L113, and L211.
  2. Microbiology M250 and M255.
  3. Microbiology M350-M360, M430-M435, M440-M445 or M460-M465, and M480-M485. Students who receive a grade lower than C in any of these courses, including M250 and M255, must receive permission from the instructor before enrolling in other courses in the series.
  4. One lecture course selected from B351, L321, M375, or M416.
  5. Chemistry C117, C118 or N330, C341, and C343.
  6. Mathematics M211 or M215, (or M119 and M120) and Mathematics/Psychological and Brain Sciences/SPEA K300, Liberal Arts and Management Program L316, or Mathematics/ Psychological and Brain Sciences K310. (Note that although SPEA K300 fulfills the statistics requirement, it does not count toward College of Arts and Sciences credit hours if the total hours allowed outside the College have been met.)
  7. Physics P201-P202 or P221-P222.

Students must also complete the requirements and procedures listed in this bulletin under "General Requirements for Bachelor's Degrees" except for the culture studies requirement.

Recommendations

Because chemistry is a prerequisite for many upper-level microbiology courses, students are urged to begin chemistry as soon as possible. Students should consult the advising office to plan a coherent program.

Return to Top

Major in Biotechnology-B.S.

Important Schedule Note: Students can declare a major in biotechnology beginning in the fall of 2004. However, students need to be aware that required upper-level courses will be phased in, and that the earliest date at which a student could graduate with the B.S. in Biotechnology is currently projected to be May 2008. See the advisor or the College Recorder's Office (Kirkwood Hall 001) for details.

Purpose

The B.S. in biotechnology is designed for students who wish to pursue careers in the fields of biotechnology or biomedical sciences. It is also a basis for further graduate training in biotechnology, the biological and biomedical sciences, and related professional fields, such as medicine, business, and patent law. The program provides fundamental training in basic scientific principles as well as knowledge of specific techniques and applications used in biotechnology. Graduates will be expected to have acquired the following: knowledge of the principles of biology, microbiology, cell and molecular biology, biochemistry, and bioanalytical chemistry; practical laboratory skills in many of these areas with emphasis on techniques used in modern biotechnology; a firm foundation in scientific integrity and proper scientific procedures; an appreciation of the broader ethical, environmental and societal issues involved in biotechnology; exposure to career opportunities in biotechnology through independent research, internships, and seminar series.

Requirements

Students must complete the following fundamental skills and distribution requirements:

  1. Writing, same as for B.A. degree.
  2. Mathematics, fulfilled by major.
  3. Foreign language, three semesters in the same language or equivalent proficiency. Culture studies courses are not required.
  4. Topics course, one course—students are advised to choose a course that will serve as one of the required arts and humanities or social and historical studies courses listed below.
  5. Arts and humanities, two courses.
  6. Social and historical studies, two courses.
  7. Natural and mathematical sciences, fulfilled by major.

Major Requirements

Students must meet the following with a minimum grade of C- in each course and a minimum major grade point average of C (2.0):

  1. Mathematics M211 (or M119 and M120) and one of the following statistics courses: Liberal Arts and Management Program L316, Psychological and Brain Sciences K300, Mathematics K300, SPEA K300, Psychological and Brain Sciences K310, Mathematics K310. (Note that although SPEA K300 fulfills the statistics requirement, credit hours for this course count outside the College of Arts and Sciences).
  2. Biology L112, L211, M250, M255, T310, T312, and T315.
  3. Chemistry A314, C117, C118 or N330, C341, C342, C343, C484, and C485.
  4. Physics P201-P202.
  5. At least four of the following courses for a minimum of 12 credit hours: Biology L312, L313, M350, M360, M430, M435, M440, M445, M460, M465, M480, M485, L490; Chemistry C318, C361, C432, C443, C481, C487

Students must also meet the degree requirements for the B.S. degree in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Students who wish to complete a business minor or the LAMP certificate as part of their degree program, are advised that they may need to take some of the relevant courses in the summer or in an additional semester. The College of Arts and Sciences allows students to take 22 credit hours outside the College which will count toward graduation. This should also be taken into account when considering the Business minor or the Liberal Arts and Management Program certificate.

Return to Top

B.S. in Biotechnology/J.D. 3+3 Program

Students who are admitted to the IU Bloomington School of Law after completing a minimum of 90 credit hours in the College of Arts and Sciences, and who have satisfied the fundamental skills, distribution, and major concentration requirements for the B.S. in Biotechnology degree program, may apply up to 32 credit hours earned their first year in the law school as electives and, at the end of that year (with a minimum of 122 credit hours), earn the B.S. in Biotechnology degree.

Note: Students who need to satisfy all fundamental skills requirements through course work will need approximately 106 credit hours to complete all of the requirements listed in the statement above. Students who bring to college study a proficiency in foreign language and who satisfy the English composition requirement through test scores may be able to satisfy all requirements with 92 credits. Students who bring other competencies that would result in prerequisites being waived might be able to complete these requirements with fewer than 90 credits. In all cases, however, a student must have completed a minimum of 90 credit hours in the College (including electives if necessary) and all requirements listed above to be eligible for this special arrangement.

Return to Top

Biology Minor

Option 1 or Option 2 must include a minimum of 6 credit hours taken on the Bloomington campus. Students are not allowed to combine the two options. They must choose either Option 1 or Option 2.

Option 1

This option is recommended for students not majoring in science:

BIOL L111, L112, L113, L350, L369.

Option 2

This option is recommended for science majors:

BIOL L111, L112, L113, and sufficient additional biology major courses to total 15 or more total credit hours.

Note: Biology L490 and L499 credit cannot count for either option in the Biology minor.

Return to Top

Course Descriptions

Courses for the Nonmajor

These courses fall into three categories:

  1. L100 is designed to offer the nonmajor an opportunity to examine the fundamental principles of biology and to prepare for more advanced courses should the decision be made to continue in biology.
    L100 Humans and the Biological World (5 cr.) N & M Principles of biological organization, from molecules through cells and organisms to populations. Emphasis on processes common to all organisms, with special reference to humans. Credit given for only one of the following: L100, L104, E112, L112, S115, or Q201.
  2. L104 offers freshmen and sophomores the opportunity to explore particular areas of biology in a lecture-only format. L104 cannot be used to undertake later study as a biology major.
    L104 Introductory Biology Lectures (3 cr.) N & M An introduction to living organisms. Designed for nonscientists with no background in biology. Does not count as a preprofessional course. Primary emphases may vary with the instructor. Enrollment limited to freshmen and sophomores. Credit given for only one of the following: L100, L104, E112, L112, S115, or Q201.
  3. Nonmajor courses at the 200-400 level are designed to acquaint students possessing a minimal science background with the basic principles underlying the modern biological sciences. Emphasis is given to those biological concepts and advances that are of prime importance to the liberally educated nonscientist. These courses may not be counted toward a major in the Department of Biology.

L302 Topics in Human Biology (3 cr.) N & M P: Junior or senior standing. Not open to biology majors. Physiology, genetics, and biochemistry at a level to appreciate the human condition. Topics to be considered may vary from year to year: cancer, genetic disease, cardiovascular disease, blood groups, immune systems, genetic damage, contraception and pregnancy, genetics of intelligence, environmental hazards, genetic engineering.

L330 Biology of the Cell (3 cr.) N & M P: Any college biology course. R: college chemistry. Not open to biology majors. The structure and function of animal, plant, and microbial cells, with attention to membranes and biologically important molecules. Will include the function of nerves, muscles, and the immune system. Credit given for only one of L330 or L312.

L340 Biological Basis of Sex Differences (3 cr.) N & M Not open to biology majors. Course will introduce students to biological processes underlying male-female differences in anatomy, physiology, and behavior. Discussions of sexual differentiation in organisms ranging from yeast to humans will be included. Functional (evolutionary/ecological) and mechanistic (developmental/physiological) explanations for sex differences will be addressed.

L350 Environmental Biology (3 cr.) N & M P: Junior or senior standing. Not open to biology majors. Interactions of human beings with other elements of the biosphere with emphasis on population, community, and ecosystem levels of ecology.

L369 Heredity, Evolution, and Society (3 cr.) N & M P: Junior or senior standing. Not open to biology majors. Basic concepts and principles of evolution, heredity, and individual development. Problems of the individual and society raised by present and future genetic knowledge and technology.

Related Courses in Medical Sciences

These courses are acceptable for biological sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences distribution requirement, but will not count in the biology major.

M131 Disease and the Human Body (3 cr.) N & M Suitable for non-science majors at all levels. Basic science knowledge is advantageous but not necessary. This course is team-taught by Medical Sciences faculty. Provided will be a description of a disease or injury and a discussion of the normal anatomy and physiology of relevant body systems and the alterations that are due to the disease or injury. Included will be various drug and other medical interventions that can be used to diagnose and treat the diseases and injuries. The format consists primarily of lectures with some interactive demonstrations. Four objective exams are scheduled throughout the semester and standard grading policies are utilized. No text is required, and extensive handouts are provided.

A215 Basic Human Anatomy (5 cr.) N & M

Intended for science majors and not recommended for first-semester freshmen. An organ-systems approach to the study of the human body, including microscopic and gross structure. The course starts with an introduction to basic cell structure and tissue construction, and continues with the coverage of all human systems with emphasis on the musculoskeletal system, cardiovascular, reproductive, and nervous systems. Bones, models, and prosected cadavers are used to study these topics concurrently in the laboratory.

P215 Basic Human Physiology (5 cr.) N & M Intended for science majors and not recommended for first-semester freshmen. An organ-systems approach to the study of human body function. Presentation begins with basic cell function and communication systems of the body, progressing to control systems, defense mechanisms, transport, gas exchange, and balancing of nutrients, water, and electrolytes. Focus for the course is on how organ systems contribute to essential metabolic activity and the maintenance of homeostasis. The laboratory emphasizes the application of material presented during lecture and is a required part of this course.

Return to Top

Courses for the Biology Major

Credit will be given for only one of these courses: L100, L104, E112, L112, or Q201.

E111 Basic Biology by Examination I (3 cr.) N & M Credit by examination for demonstrating an understanding of basic facts and concepts of the lecture content of L111. Credit not given for both E111 and L111.

E112 Basic Biology by Examination II (3 cr.) N & M Credit by examination for demonstrating an understanding of basic facts and concepts of the lecture content of L112. Credit given for only one of the following: L100, L104, E112, L112, or Q201.

H111 Integrated Freshman Learning Experience I (4 cr.) N & M P: Acceptance to IFLE Project. Intensive seminar/laboratory experience exploring the interdisciplinary nature of the modern life sciences. The course will revolve around a central question chosen by the students and will analyze how life scientists from biochemistry, cellular/molecular biology, and neuroscience might contribute to the common understanding of a fundamental problem. Credit given for only one of the following: H111, L104, L112, E112, L113, S115, Q201.

H112 Integrated Freshman Learning Experience II (5 cr.) N & M P: Acceptance to IFLE Project, H111. Continuation of H111. Intensive seminar/laboratory experience exploring the interdisciplinary nature of the modern life sciences. The course will revolve around a central question chosen by the students and will analyze how life scientists from biochemistry, cellular/molecular biology, and neuroscience might contribute to the common understanding of a fundamental problem. Credit given for only one of the following: H112, L112, L113.

L111 Introduction to Biology: Evolution and Diversity (3 cr.) N & M For biology and other science majors. Preference will be given to freshmen and sophomores. Processes of evolution (selection, speciation, macroevolution, origin and early history of life) and organismal function (morphology, physiology, and behavior). Credit not given for both E111 and L111.

L112 Introduction to Biology: Biological Mechanisms (3 cr.) N & M P: high school or college chemistry. For biological and other science majors. Preference will be given to freshmen and sophomores. Integrated picture of manner in which organisms at diverse levels of organization meet problems in maintaining and propagating life. Credit given for only one of the following: L100, L104, L112, E112, or Q201.

L113 Biology Laboratory (3 cr.) N & M P or C: L112. R: L111. Laboratory experiments in various aspects of biology, with a focus on investigative logic and methods. Introduces aspects of cell biology, genetics, and evolutionary biology. Should not be taken during first semester of residence unless credit has been earned for both E111 and E112.

L211 Molecular Biology (3 cr.) N & M P: L112. Structure and function of DNA and RNA. DNA replication, mechanisms of mutation, repair, recombination, and transposition. Mechanisms and regulation of gene expression. The genetic code, transcription, and translation. Introduces bacteriophages, plasmids, and the technology of recombinant DNA. Credit given for only one of L211 or S211.

S211 Molecular Biology, Honors (5 cr.) N & M P: L112. R: CHEM C341 concurrent. Structure and function of DNA and RNA. DNA replication, mechanisms of mutation repair, recombination, and transposition, mechanisms and regulation of gene expression. The genetic code, transcription, and translation. Introduces bacteriophages, plasmids, and the technology of recombinant DNA. Course will be taught at an honors level. Credit given for only one of L211, S211, L323, or L324.

M250 Microbiology (3 cr.) N & M P: Two semesters of college chemistry; M255 concurrently; L211 recommended prior or concurrently. Application of fundamental principles to the study of microorganisms. Significance of microorganisms to humans and their environment.

M255 Microbiology Laboratory (2 cr.) P: M250 concurrently. Audio-tutorial laboratory of exercises and demonstrations to yield proficiency in principles and techniques of cultivation and utilization and microorganisms under aseptic techniques.

B300 Vascular Plants (4 cr.) N & M P: One introductory biology course. Survey of the ferns, gymnosperms, and flowering plants, including their morphology, classification, ecology, evolution, and economic importance.

L301 Information Literacy in Biology (1 cr.) C: Enrollment in an upper-level biology lecture, field, or laboratory course. Methods of information search and retrieval, critical evaluation of primary literature, and generation of technical writing skills necessary for research in biology. Work will focus on a topic chosen from an upper-level lecture, field, or laboratory course in which the student must be concurrently enrolled.

L305 Project Laboratory in Molecular Biology and Genetics (3 cr.) P:L211 or S211 or consent of instructor. Explore the different stages of scientific investigation by performing research using molecular biology and genetic techniques. Design and execute research projects under supervision of the instructor in a teaching laboratory setting on problems including mutant isolation, gene cloning, gene expression, protein localization, protein structure-function, cell division, cell differentiation, etc. A maximum of 12 credit hours between L305 and L490 may count toward graduation.

L311 Genetics (3 cr.) P: L211 or S211. Analysis of the mechanisms of inheritance, including developmental processes that lead to the construction of whole organisms and to the transmission to their offspring of specific genetic traits. Includes the principles of genetics and the analysis of mutations affecting development. Credit given for only one of L311 or S311.

S311 Genetics, Honors (5 cr.) P: L211 or S211. Principles governing the transmission of specific traits to the progeny of prokaryotes and eukaryotes including bacteria, viruses, fungi, higher plants, and animals. Analysis at the level of the individual and population; interactions between genetic constitution and environment; application to the study of development, human genetic diseases, and/or agricultural breeding. Course includes a laboratory. Credit given for only one of L311, S311, or L319.

L312 Cell Biology (3 cr.) P: L211. Current views of the structure and function of cellular organelles and components, with emphasis on the flow of information through the cell, the metabolism that supports cellular functions, and differences among different specialized cells. Current techniques will be stressed. Credit given for only one of L312 or L330.

L313 Cell Biology Laboratory (3 cr.) P:L113 and L211, or CHEM C342, or consent of instructor. R: BIOL L312, CHEM C484. Theory and techniques of experimental cell physiology. Enzyme purification using spectrophotometry, ion-exchange and gel-permeation chromatography, gel electrophoresis. Respiration and photosynthesis analyzed by cell fractionation, oxygen electrode, and radioactive tracer techniques.

L317 Developmental Biology (3 cr.) P: L311 or S311. Analysis of developmental processes that lead to the construction of whole organisms from single cells. Includes the principles of embryology and analysis of mutations affecting development.

L318 Evolution (3 cr.) P: L311 or S311. Provides a rigorous exploration of the theory of evolution-the conceptual core of biology. Topics include origins and history of life; the interplay of heredity and environment in shaping adaptations; molecular, behavioral, and social evolution; patterns of speciation, extinction, and their consequences; methods for inferring evolutionary relationships among organisms. Credit not given for both L318 and S318, or both L318 and L479.

S318 Evolution, Honors (4 cr.) P: L311 or S311. Provides a rigorous exploration of the theory of evolution-the conceptual core of biology. Topics include origins and history of life; the interplay of heredity and environment in shaping adaptations; molecular, behavioral, and social evolution; patterns of speciation, extinction, and their consequences; methods for inferring evolutionary relationships among organisms. Credit not given for both L318 and S318, or both S318 and L479.

Z318 Developmental Biology Laboratory (2 cr.) P: L211, L311. P or C: L317. A laboratory about developing organisms, with emphasis on vertebrate embryology and organogenesis.

L319 Genetics Laboratory (3 cr.) P or C: L311. Experiments with plants, animals, bacteria, and viruses demonstrating fundamental genetic mechanisms. Credit given for only one of L319 or S311.

L321 Principles of Immunology (3 cr.) P: L211, and CHEM C101 or C117. R: L312. An introductory survey of the basic principles of immunology and their practical applications.

L322 Writing Workshop in Biology (3 cr.) N & M P: L211. Development of scientific writing styles and techniques to help students learn about complex phenomena, sharpen thought processes used in evaluating complicated data, and develop skills essential for communicating intricate ideas and concepts. Research reports will be regularly reviewed by the instructor, and in the context of cooperative learning groups.

L323 Molecular Biology Laboratory (3 cr.) P: L211. Manipulation and analysis of genes and genomes. Gene cloning and library screening. Gene amplification and disease diagnosis. Gene mapping and Southern blot analysis of complex genome structure. Credit given for only one of L323, L324, or S211.

L324 Human Molecular Biology Laboratory (3 cr.) P: L211 or consent of instructor. Theory and molecular biology techniques used to study the human genome and human genes. Students isolate DNA from their cells and apply current techniques for DNA fingerprinting of macro- and microsatellites, telomere length estimation, SNP and Alu polymorphism analysis, gene expression analysis, DNA sequencing, and computer analysis. Credit given for only one of L323, L324, or S211.

L331 Introduction to Human Genetics (3 cr.) P: A course in genetics. Principles of human genetics are presented. The emphasis is on new developments in the field afforded by present-day techniques in molecular biology. Among the topics considered are sex inheritance, molecular basis of genetic diseases, oncogenesis, and immune system structure.

L341 Natural History of Coral Reefs (GEOL G341) (4 cr.) N & M P: A 100-level biology course for majors and a course in organism biology/ecology, sedimentology, or stratigraphy; demonstrated proficiency in swimming; students must apply. Four-week summer course introducing principles of biology, ecology, and geology as applied to coral reef ecosystems. Week 1: daily meeting at IUB to provide background; weeks 2-4: field/lab exercises and research projects at tropical marine laboratory; subsequent fall semester: one-day student colloquium at IUB.

M350 Microbial Physiology and Biochemistry (3 cr.) P: L112 and CHEM C341. Intended for majors in microbiology, biology, or chemistry. Introduction to microbial biochemistry and physiology; nutrition, growth composition, and metabolism of selected bacteria.

B351 Fungi (3 cr.) P: L111 and L112. R: Junior or senior standing or consent of instructor. Morphology, life histories, classification, genetics, physiology, development, ecology, medical and economic importance of fungi.

B352 Fungi: Laboratory (2 cr.) P or C: B351. R: Junior or senior standing or consent of instructor. Laboratory and field studies of fungi and their activities.

M360 Microbial Physiology Laboratory (3 cr.) P or C: M350 or consent of instructor. Introduction to techniques for the fractionation, isolation, and purification of cellular components. Analysis of bacterial growth, enzyme purification, chromatographic analysis of proteins and other metabolites, gel electrophoresis and fermentation studies.

B364 Summer Flowering Plants (4-5 cr.) N & M P: One introductory biology course. For those desiring a broad, practical knowledge of common wild and cultivated plants. SS.

B368 Ethnobotany (3 cr.) N & M P:L111. Plants in relation to man with primary emphasis on food plants. Credit given for only one of L370 or B368.

B371 Ecological Plant Physiology (3 cr.) P: College chemistry and L111 and L112. The interrelationships among plant function and temperature, water supply, nutrient level, light quality, light quantity, gases, and other organisms.

B373 Mechanisms of Plant Development (4 cr.) P: L111, L211. Lecture and lab explore the physiological and molecular mechanisms controlling plant growth and development from germination to reproduction. Studies structural and functional relationships with an emphasis on how external stimuli like light, gravity, nutrition, and temperature affect gene activities and physiological processes that control growth.

Z373 Entomology (3 cr.) P: one introductory biology course. Insects, with emphasis on evolution, distribution, behavior, and structure.

Z374 Invertebrate Zoology (3 cr.) P: one introductory biology course. Ecology, evolution, and phylogeny of major invertebrate groups, with emphasis on current controversies and concepts.

M375 Human Parasitology (4 cr.) P: L111 and L112. Junior or senior standing or permission of instructor. Biology of human parasites focusing on their etiology, epidemiology, immunology, diagnosis, and treatment. Major groups of protozoa, helminths, and medically important arthropods covered. Lab presents both live and fixed materials complementing lecture.

Z375 Invertebrate Zoology Laboratory (2 cr.) P: One introductory biology course. Laboratory and field studies of invertebrates, with an emphasis on experiments with living specimens.

L376 Biology of Birds (4 cr.) P: L111 and L112. Avian systematics, distribution, evolution, ecology, and behavior, emphasis on migration and orientation, territoriality, communication, and reproductive behavior. Field trips will concentrate on identification, interpretation of behavior, and research methods. Intended for biology majors.

L377 Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles (3 cr.) P: L111, L112, L113. An extensive study of amphibians and reptiles, including behavior, physiology, ecology, and evolution. Course will include a survey of world diversity, comparative dissections, field exercises, behavioral experiments, and review of the primary literature.

L390 Learning Enhancement in Biology (1 cr.) Additional discussion, learning group, laboratory, or field experiences to accompany another course in biology. Offered as a corequisite for the other course. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours when taken with different corequisite courses.

L410 Topical Issues in Biology (3-5cr.) P:L111, L112, and L113. Topics not related extensively in other courses. The topic will vary depending on the instructor and on student needs. May be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Z406 Vertebrate Zoology (5 cr.) P: L111 and L112, junior or senior standing or consent of instructor. Morphology, evolution, adaptations, and general biology of vertebrates.

M416 Molecular Biology of the AIDS Virus (3 cr.) P: CHEM C341 and BIOL L311. A detailed consideration of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, the causative agent of AIDS). The functions of the HIV genes and how those functions affect pathology and normal cellular mechanisms. For senior biology or biochemistry majors and beginning graduate students.

M430 Virology Lecture (3 cr.) N & M P: L211. R: L311 and L312. Viruses of plants, animals (including humans), and bacteria; emphasis on molecular biology of viral systems. Viruses and human disease such as cancer and AIDS; viruses and their evolution.

L433 Tropical Biology (3 cr.) Field course taught in a tropical area overseas. Topics center on ecology and evolution and may include plants and animals, their interactions in rain forests, seasonally dry forests and mangroves, cloud forests, marine biology, marine/land interface, coral physiology, and reef development. Requires detailed field journal and other projects on areas visited. May not be repeated for credit.

M435 Viral-Tissue-Culture Laboratory (3 cr.) P or C: M430 or consent of instructor. Laboratory techniques in phage, viruses, and tissue culture.

L440 Introduction to Biotechnology (3 cr.) N & M P: L211 or consent of instructor. Lecture will cover topics central to biotechnology and the biotechnological industry including industrial organisms, recombinant DNA techniques, protein isolation and assay, genetic and molecular identification of therapeutic targets, development of therapeutics, bioinformatics, intellectual property, biotechnology companies, and regulatory issues.

M440 Medical Microbiology: Lecture (3 cr.) P: L211. R: M250. Microorganisms as agents of disease; host-parasite relationships; epidemiology; chemotherapy. Credit given for only one of M440 or M200.

M445 Medical Microbiology: Laboratory (3 cr.) P: M255 and M440, which may be taken concurrently. Laboratory methods of isolation and identification of microorganisms from normal and simulated disease conditions of the human.

M460 Biology of the Prokaryotes (3 cr.) P: M250 and M350 or CHEM C483. Nutritional, physiological, and cultural properties of the major groups of nonpathogenic bacteria and their relationships as revealed by modern taxonomic methods.

Z460 Ethology (3 cr.) P: Senior or graduate standing in psychology or biology and consent of instructor. Introduction to the zoological study of animal behavior. Emphasizes both internal and external factors involved in the causation of species-typical behavior of animals (protozoa-primates) in their natural environment.

L465 Advanced Field Biology (3 cr.) R: L473 or equivalent and consent of instructor. Lectures and two to three weeks of fieldwork on various problems of ecosystem structure and dynamics. Quantitative comparisons will be made of ecosystems in several different environments. May be repeated once for credit. SS.

M465 Biology of the Prokaryotes: Laboratory (3 cr.) P: M255. P or C: M460. Isolation and study of members of the major groups of non-pathogenic bacteria. Selected physiological experiments.

Z466 Endocrinology (3 cr.) P: L211. R: CHEM C341. Mechanisms of hormone action from the molecular to the organismal level in vertebrates.

L472 Microbial Ecology (3 cr.) P: Junior standing in biology. Principles of microbial ecology with emphasis on the population, community, and ecosystem ecology of bacteria and fungi.

L473 Ecology (3 cr.) P: L111. R: L318. Major concepts of ecology for science majors; relation of individual organisms to their environment, population ecology, structure and function of ecosystems. Credit not given for both L473 and L479.

L474 Field and Laboratory Ecology (2 cr.) P: L111. R:L473 or concurrent. Introduction to research problems and techniques in the ecology of individuals, populations, and ecosystems.

Z476 Biology of Fishes (4 cr.) P: L111, L112, and L113. An in-depth study of the anatomy, physiology, evolution, behavior, and diversity of fishes. Course includes comparisons among fish taxa and other vertebrate taxa, evaluation of primary literature, dissection and classification techniques, behavioral and ecological experiments, and fieldwork.

L479 Evolution and Ecology (4 cr.) P: L311. Evolution and ecology for science majors. Origin of life; physical environment and the individual; population ecology and population genetics; species interactions; community organization; development, structure, and function of ecosystems. Credit given for only one of L318, S318, L473 or L479.

M480 Microbial and Molecular Genetics (3 cr.) P: L211 and M250-M255 or consent of instructor. Analysis of the molecular genetics of Escherichia coli and its heritable elements. Will include the genetics of other microorganisms as well as molecular cloning.

M485 Microbial and Molecular Genetics Laboratory (3 cr.) P or C: M480. The genetics of Escherichia coli and its viruses. Techniques include transformation, mutation, bacterial recombination, transduction, transposition, molecular cloning, restriction mapping, Southern blotting, and other recombinant DNA techniques.

L490 Individual Study (cr. arr.; 12 cr. max.) P: Overall GPA 2.500 or above and written permission of faculty member supervising research. Must complete a written assignment as evidence of each semester's work. Must present oral report to complete more than 6 credit hours. Section authorization. Maximum of 6 credits allowed for summer internships/research.

L499 Internship in Biology Instruction (3 cr.) P: Consent of departmental chairperson. Supervised experience in teaching undergraduate biology course. May be repeated once for credit.

P451 Integrative Human Physiology (4 cr.) Intended for the junior or senior science major. Course in human physiology designed to introduce the senior undergraduate student to the function of the human body in health, disease, and extreme environments. Emphasizes how the different organ systems work to maintain homeostasis and how organ function is integrated. The content and key concepts are presented in order to provide students insight into the scientific process through problem-solving and exploration of resources. Utilizes experimental inquiry, case-based and problem-oriented methodology with students working in teams and an emphasis on clinical application. The laboratory component is incorporated into the structure of the course.

Return to Top

Courses for a Degree in Biotechnology-B.S.

T310 Biotechnology Lecture (3 cr.) P: L211, M250, M255. C: T315. Application of microbial diversity in biotechnology; synthesis of macromolecules; principles of gene expressions; gene cloning; protein engineering, overexpression and purification; genomics; proteomics; bioinformatics.

T312 Societal Issues in Biotechnology (3 cr.) P: L112 and L211. Consideration of the effects of recent advances in biotechnology on human affairs and the environment.

T315 Biotechnology Laboratory (3 cr.) P: L211, M250, M255. C: T310. Students use a problem-based approach to gene cloning, for example, cloning the gene for an industrially important enzyme, a-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis. In this example, students would purify a-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis and affinity-tagged a-amylase overproduction clone for purification and compare the activity of the purified proteins.

Return to Top

Courses for Programs Outside the Department of Biology

Because these courses are presented as contributions to programs or curricula outside the Department of Biology, they cannot be applied toward requirements for majors in biology nor toward the distribution requirements of the College.

M200 Microorganisms in Nature and Disease (3 cr.) R: High school chemistry and biology. Principles of microbiology, including study of major microbial groups; cultivation, physiology, and genetics; destruction and control of microbial life; activities of microorganisms in nature and disease. For students in programs requiring only one semester of microbiology (not premedical or medical technology students). No credit in this course for students who have already passed M440.

Q201 Biological Science for Elementary Teachers (3 cr.) P: Q200. An introduction to the principles and practice of biology designed especially for prospective elementary education teachers. All major areas of biology will be considered, with a concluding emphasis on the relations between various organisms and their environment. Credit given for only one of Q201, L100, L104, E112, L112.

M215 Microorganism Laboratory (1 cr.) P: M200 concurrently. Introduction to basic techniques and procedures of microbiology laboratories. Emphasis on aspects deemed useful to nursing students. Growth and transfer of living microorganisms, aseptic techniques, and the staining and identification of bacteria. Audio-tutorial format. Enrollment preference given to nursing students.

Return to Top

Related Research Courses

The following courses may be counted in the Department of Biology as equivalent to L490 Individual Study only by application to the department prior to the start of the research experience. A research thesis must be submitted to the Department of Biology at the end of the research experience to complete the equivalency requirement. Note: B.A. students may use 3 credit hours of L490 in the major. B.S. students may use up to 12 credit hours of L490, M450, or C409 in the major.

  • CHEM C409 Chemical Research
  • MSCI M450 Undergraduate Research in Biomedical Sciences

Related Non­College of Arts and Sciences Courses

These courses are acceptable for credit in biology.

Medical Sciences

P416 Comparative Animal Physiology (3 cr.) Intended for junior and senior science majors. Principles of physiology are explored in a comparative animal context. Function of the respiratory, circulatory, excretory, and related systems will be examined. Examples of unusual vertebrate and invertebrate function will be used to illustrate basic and comparative physiological principles.

P417 Neurobiology (3 cr.) P: One introductory biology course and CHEM C118. R: one course in cellular physiology or P416. Physiology of nerves and muscles, including sensory receptors, peripheral and central sensory processing of neural information, coordination of motor output and neurophysiological correlates of behavior.

P418 Laboratory in Comparative Animal Physiology (2 cr.) P or C: P416. Laboratory experiments using a variety of animals to illustrate physiological principles.

P421 Biophysical Principles in Physiology (3 cr.) Intended for junior and senior science majors. Permission of instructor required. This course offers an organ-systems approach to the study of biophysical principles governing human body function. Lectures provide a broad survey of the communication and control systems of the body, defense mechanisms, transport, gas exchange, and balancing of nutrients, water, and electrolytes. Problem-solving skills, critical evaluation of data, and exploration of research and resources in the study of physiology will be emphasized in this course.

P460 Anatomy of the Ear and Vocal Organs (3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Development and structure of face, nasal cavities, mouth, palate, pharynx, larynx, ear, and related portions of respiratory and nervous systems.

Note: A464 will count toward the minimum 25 College of Arts and Sciences credit hours required in the major, even though it is a non­College course.

A464 Human Tissue Biology (4 cr.) Intended for junior and senior science majors. This course analyzes the structure and activities of the cells that makeup the human body. The course begins with an overview of the animal cell, concentrating on aspects of cellular morphology important for biochemical functions. Fundamental types of distinct multicellular tissues, including connective, epithelial, muscular, and nervous tissues are then described at the light and electron microscopic level, emphasizing the functional significance of the structural features. After the basic tissue types are understood, the various organ systems of the body are discussed, again primarily with regard to how their tissue composition and arrangement mediates their diverse functions. Each lecture is followed by a laboratory session devoted to the same topic in which students examine and study the relevant cells, tissues, and organs using the light microscope and electron micrograph preparations.

School of Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA)

E400 Topics in Environmental Studies (3 cr.) P: SPEA E272. For biology majors, Coral Reef Ecology as a "Field Techniques in Ecology" course only.

E455 Limnology (4 cr.) P: College chemistry and biology or permission of instructor. Limnology is the ecology of inland lakes and streams, combining the principles of biology, chemistry, geology, and physics to understand how they function. The effects of human perturbation on aquatic systems will be highlighted in both lectures and laboratory work to aid student understanding of the concepts involved.

Return to Top

Related College of Arts and Sciences Course

This course is acceptable for credit in biology.

Chemistry

C483 Biological Chemistry (3 cr.) N & M P:18 credit hours of chemistry, including C342, or consent of instructor. Introduction to structure, chemical properties, and interrelationships of biological substances. I Sem., SS.

Return to Top

 


Indiana University
Office of Creative Services
Von Lee 319
517 East Kirkwood Avenue
Bloomington, IN 47408-4060

Last updated: 24 October 2014 03 59 56

Submit Questions or Comments
Copyright 2014 The Trustees of Indiana University