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College of Arts
and Sciences (College)
2006-2008
Academic Bulletin

College Programs
College of Arts and Sciences (College) 
Kirkwood Hall 104 
130 S. Woodlawn 
Bloomington, IN 47405  
Local (812) 855-1821 
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East Asian Languages and Cultures

Faculty
Introduction
Major in Language and Culture
Major in East Asian Studies
Double Major
Minor in East Asian Languages
Minor in East Asian Studies
Program for Teacher Certification
Policy on Academic Advising
Policy on Continuing in the East Asian Language Program
Policy on Special Credit
Departmental Honors Program
Prizes
Overseas Study
Placement/Proficiency Examinations
Course Descriptions
East Asian Culture Courses, by Subject Area

Faculty

Chairperson

Robert Eno

Professors

Sumie Jones, Gregory Kasza, Michael Robinson, Richard Rubinger, Natsuko Tsujimura, Robert Campany (Religious Studies), Roger L. Janelli (Folklore and Ethnomusicology), Jean Robinson (Political Science), Lynn Struve (History)

Associate Professors

Stephen Bokenkamp, Thomas Keirstead, Hyo-Sang Lee, Jennifer Liu, Edith Sarra, Yasuko Ito Watt, Laurel Cornell (Gender Studies, Sociology), Charles Greer (Geography)

Assistant Professors

Sara Friedman (Anthropology, Gender Studies), Ho-Fung Hung (Sociology), Scott Kennedy, Scott O'Bryan, Gardner Bovingdon (Central Eurasian Studies), Ethan Michelson (Sociology), Aaron Stalnaker (Religious Studies), Marvin Sterling (Anthropology), Michiko Suzuki, Lin Zou

Senior Lecturer

Sue Tuohy (Folklore and Ethnomusicology)

Lecturer

Zhen Chen

East Asian Librarian

Wen-ling Diana Liu

Academic Advising

Goodbody Hall 202, (812) 855-3493

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Introduction

The Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures (EALC) is a multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural department that aims to provide students with an enhanced understanding of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean languages and cultures. The department offers a wide range of culture courses, open to nonmajors, that deal with virtually every facet of the cultures of East Asia. Language courses in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean are offered from beginning to advanced levels.

Two majors and two minors are offered. The majors differ in the amount of language required and in the specificity and range of culture courses allowed. All majors are required to contact their faculty advisors at least once a semester. There is a language minor in Japanese, Chinese, or Korean, and a minor in East Asian studies, which requires no language training.

As part of the baccalaureate training, students are encouraged to study abroad in China, Japan, or Korea on one of IU's overseas study programs. Students who are returning from East Asia or who have any background in an East Asian language prior to enrolling at IU are required to take a placement exam before enrolling in a language course.

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Major in Language and Culture

Purpose

The major in language and culture emphasizes language training through the third-year level in one of the East Asian languages (Chinese, Japanese, or Korean). In addition to language study, EALC majors take courses on the society's culture, including in-depth study in one of three subject areas, according to the student's primary interest: Literature and Linguistics; Thought, Religion, and Art; or History and Society. (It is also possible to design an individualized subject area in accordance with a student's special interests or goals, depending on course availability, in consultation with the departmental advisor.) This major is intended for students who wish to develop a solid foundation of language skills and knowledge in one of the three culture areas or to prepare for graduate studies.

Requirements

A minimum of 25 credit hours in department-approved courses, including:

  1. Three years of Chinese, Japanese, or Korean language (or the equivalent). The first semester of a first-year language course (i.e., C101, J101, K101) is not credited towards the major.
  2. At least three culture courses (9 credit hours) above the 100 level. Two of these must be at the 300-400 level, chosen from the same subject area. The subjects areas are: Literature and Linguistics; Thought, Religion, and Art; or History and Society. Preferably, these two courses will be on the same East Asian society as the student's language course work. Though it does not count toward the subject area requirement, one semester of fourth-year language may be counted as the third required culture course. For courses by subject area, see the list below.

Students must complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences. Students should also read "Placement/Proficiency Examinations" in this departmental section.

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Major in East Asian Studies

Purpose

The major in East Asian Studies includes two years of language training in one of the three East Asian languages (Chinese, Japanese, or Korean), in addition to course work in aspects of East Asian society and culture. It has been designed as a flexible program for students who want basic language training as well as the opportunity to study a variety of topics and approaches to the culture and history of East Asian countries. This major is suitable for students pursuing careers in business, international relations, cultural exchanges, and other occupations with a focus on East Asia.

Requirements

A minimum of 25 credit hours in department-approved courses, including:

  1. Two years of Chinese, Japanese, or Korean (or the equivalent). The first semester of a first-year language course (i.e., C101, J101, or K101) is not credited towards the major.
  2. At least five culture courses (15 credit hours) above the 100 level, including course work on at least two culture areas (China, Japan, Korea). Three of the culture courses must be at the 300-400 level, selected from among the subject areas listed below.

Students must complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences. Students should also read "Placement/Proficiency Examinations" in this departmental section.

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Double Major

Purpose

Each of the majors described above may be pursued in combination with a major in another department. Students whose broader interests include preparation for such careers as business, law, or telecommunications, and who desire some background in East Asian cultures, may consider a program leading to the double major degree given by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Requirements

Course requirements are the same for the double major as for the single major leading to the standard B.A. degree. A double major within the department is not permitted.

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Minor in East Asian Languages

Students may minor in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean language. A minimum of 15 credit hours in the chosen language is required, including the completion of the third year. At least 6 credit hours must be completed in this department; the remaining credit hours may be earned either by taking course work or by meeting the requirements for special credit. Culture courses may not count toward the language minor.

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Minor in East Asian Studies

Students must complete 15 credit hours from courses taught in the department or cross-listed under East Asian Studies (below), excluding language courses and courses at the 100 level. At least 6 credit hours taken toward the minor must be at the 300 level or above.

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Program for Teacher Certification

A program for secondary teacher certification in modern East Asian languages is jointly administered by the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures and the School of Education. For information and advising, candidates should contact the School of Education advising office, Education 1000, (812) 856-8510.

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Policy on Academic Advising

Students are encouraged to maintain close contact with the departmental academic advisor in planning their courses. Faculty mentoring is available in the department; students are strongly encouraged to choose a mentor (in consultation with the academic advisor).

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Policy on Continuing in the East Asian Language Program

Students wanting to proceed to the next level of an East Asian language must earn a minimum grade of C in their current course. Any student earning a grade less than C and registering for the next semester of an East Asian language will be required to drop the class.

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Policy on Special Credit

Students may earn special credit (maximum of 16 credits) in EALC languages if they place into one of our language courses and meet all the following criteria.

  1. Language competence must be based upon academic work at an accredited American high school.
  2. Language competence must be validated by a proficiency examination administered by EALC.
  3. Students must successfully complete a language course at the placement level with a grade of C or higher.

When a student has fulfilled all three criteria, the student must complete an application for credit in the department office; credit is not given automatically. This credit applies both to graduation credit and toward majors and minors. The first semester of first-year language does not count toward the major. Native or near-native language users are not eligible for special credit.

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Departmental Honors Program

To apply for departmental honors, a student must first complete 15 credit hours in one of our majors. As a rule, the student must have and maintain a grade point average of at least 3.5 in the major and 3.3 overall. Ordinarily the student should submit an application to the department office no later than the second semester of the junior year. With the approval of the director of undergraduate studies, the student may then propose a thesis topic to a faculty member, who will direct the thesis project. While working on the thesis, the student must enroll in H399 Reading for Honors and H499 Honors Thesis. Only H499 will count toward the regular credit hour requirements of the major. The thesis advisor and one other faculty reader appointed by the department will grade the thesis. To qualify for honors at graduation, the thesis must receive a grade of A­ or higher.

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Prizes

James and Noriko Gines Scholarship

For an undergraduate demonstrating outstanding achievement both in an East Asian language and also in preprofessional studies (e.g., business, medicine, or law).

Paul Nutter Memorial Scholarship

For an undergraduate in East Asian languages demonstrating the commitment, persistence, and heart of Paul Nutter.

Yasuda Prize

For undergraduates who have demonstrated excellence in language and culture studies in Japanese.

Uehara Prize

For undergraduates who have demonstrated excellence in East Asian Studies.

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Overseas Study

Students are encouraged to study abroad, particularly on Indiana University overseas study programs, where they can continue to make progress toward their degrees and apply financial aid to program fees. For information about study abroad, contact the Office of Overseas Study, Franklin Hall 303, (812) 855-9304.

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Placement/Proficiency Examinations

Students who have any background in an East Asian language are required to take a placement exam prior to initial enrollment in an EALC language course. Placement exams, as well as proficiency exams to satisfy language requirements, are given prior to classes each semester. Students should contact the departmental office for the scheduled time and place. Within six months, students should take the course they place into. If more than six months pass, students must retake the placement test before registering.

Students who wish to document their language proficiency to satisfy a foreign language requirement must take a proficiency test, which is given on the same schedule as the placement test prior to the start of each semester.

Course work in East Asian languages taken other than at the IU Bloomington campus is subject to review by the department; for language courses, placement or proficiency exams are required for credit toward the major and for class placement.

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Course Descriptions

Chinese Language and Literature

C101 Elementary Chinese I (4 cr.) An introductory course that lays groundwork for the study of modern Chinese. It aims at fostering proficiency in all four language skills (aural understanding, speaking, reading, and writing), and helping students handle simple tasks in daily routines. Basic sentence patterns, vocabulary, and characters are all practiced in meaningful contexts. I Sem.

C102 Elementary Chinese II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in C101, or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of C101. II Sem.

C103 Advanced Elementary Chinese I (4 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. For students with significant speaking and listening abilities, through home exposure or prior overseas experience. Emphasis on developing students' ability to read and write Chinese with commonly used characters, though pronunciation and speaking are also stressed. I Sem.

C104 Advanced Elementary Chinese II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in C103, or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of C103. II Sem.

C201 Second-Year Chinese I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in C102, or equivalent proficiency. Building on the grammar and lexicon from first-year, students will explore the broader cultural context in which language is used, experience more subtle oral and written forms, and learn to use perspectives in addition to the speaker's. I Sem.

C202 Second-Year Chinese II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in C201, or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of C201. II Sem.

C301 Third-Year Chinese (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in C202, or equivalent proficiency. Emphasis on practice in understanding the difference between oral and written expression, building up discourse-level narration skills, and developing reading strategies for coping with authentic texts. I Sem.

C302 Third-Year Chinese II (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in C301, or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of C301. II Sem.

C306-C307 Literary Chinese I-II (3-3 cr.) P: C202, or equivalent proficiency. An introduction to wenyanwen, the written language of traditional Chinese literary and documentary forms, through the study of selected texts of different genres and periods. Texts may range from ancient writings to modern prose influenced by traditional style. This course does not satisfy the College of Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement.

C311 Chinese Language Practice: Humanities (1 cr.) P: Concurrent registration in C301 or C302, or permission of the instructor. For students who want simultaneously to improve their content knowledge and language skills by discussing Chinese literature, arts, music, or other humanities.

C312 Chinese Language Practice: Social Sciences (1 cr.) P: Concurrent registration in C301 or C302, or permission of the instructor. For students who want simultaneously to improve their content knowledge and language skills by discussing Chinese politics, society, economics, or other social sciences.

C320 Business Chinese (2-3 cr.; max. 4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in C301, or equivalent proficiency. For students who want to acquire skills for business interactions with Chinese-speaking communities. Classroom activities such as mock negotiation in international trade, business letter writing, and oral presentation, help students acquire skills for business interactions with Chinese-speaking communities. When taken as an overseas study course, will be taken for 2 credit hours and may be repeated once for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

C330 Mandarin for Dialect Speakers (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in C202 or equivalent proficiency. For students who speak other dialects of Chinese and already know how to read and write. Develops students' ability to speak and comprehend standard modern Chinese. Systematically compares and contrasts the sound and syntactic systems of students' dialects with those of Mandarin.

C401 Fourth-Year Chinese I (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in C302, or equivalent proficiency. Emphasis on understanding and appreciating Chinese literary genres and prose. I Sem.

C402 Fourth-Year Chinese II (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in C401, or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of C401. II Sem.

C425 Teaching Chinese Language (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in C302 or equivalent proficiency, and permission of the instructor. Taught in seminar-practicum format, the course examines contemporary paradigms of foreign language instruction, identifies critical issues in language pedagogy, and explores various techniques of teaching the four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Active participation mandatory.

C431 Readings in Modern Chinese Literature (3 cr.) A & H P: Grade of C or higher in C402, or consent of instructor. Selected readings in modern Chinese plays, stories, and essays.

C450 Chinese Writing and Rhetoric (3 cr.) P: grade of C or higher in C402 or consent of instructor. Practice in reading, writing, and speaking through analysis of modern prose and literary texts. Examination of how Chinese speakers frame discourse, so students may develop their ability to present ideas with precise diction, in appropriate registers, in extended discourse.

C451 Advanced Classical Chinese I (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in C307, or consent of instructor. Selected readings of representative Chinese prose and poetry from the traditional period.

C452 Advanced Classical Chinese II (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in C451, or consent of instructor. Continuation of C451.

Japanese Language and Literature

J101 Elementary Japanese I (4 cr.) An introductory, skills-oriented course emphasizing learning language in context. Development of listening and speaking in simple interactional situations, and controlled reading and writing skills. I Sem.

J102 Elementary Japanese II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in J101, or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of J101. II Sem.

J201 Second-Year Japanese I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in J102, or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of emphasis on communicative skills. Increased attention to reading and writing skills. I Sem.

J202 Second-Year Japanese II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in J201, or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of J201. II Sem.

J301 Third-Year Japanese I (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in J202, or equivalent proficiency. Primary emphasis on reading skills. Conversation stressed in drill sections. I Sem.

J302 Third-Year Japanese II (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in J301, or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of J301. II Sem.

J311 Japanese Language Practice: Humanities (1 cr.) P: Concurrent registration in J301 or J302, or permission of the instructor. For students who want simultaneously to improve their content knowledge and language skills by discussing Japanese literature, arts, music, or other humanities.

J312 Japanese Language Practice: Social Sciences (1 cr.) P: Concurrent registration in J301 or J302, or permission of the instructor. For students who want simultaneously to improve their content knowledge and language skills by discussing Japanese politics, society, economics, or other social sciences.

J401 Fourth-Year Japanese I (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in J302, or equivalent proficiency. Emphasis on advanced reading skills. I Sem.

J402 Fourth-Year Japanese II (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in J401, or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of J401. II Sem.

J421 Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (3 cr.) N & M R: One year of Japanese, or equivalent proficiency. A descriptive survey of issues in Japanese linguistics. Topics include syntax, phonology/phonetics, and semantics/ pragmatics of Japanese.

J425 Teaching Japanese Language (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in J302, or equivalent proficiency, and permission of the instructor. Taught in seminar-practicum format, the course examines contemporary paradigms of foreign language instruction, identifies critical issues in language pedagogy, and explores various techniques of teaching the four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Active participation mandatory.

J431 Readings in Modern Japanese Literature (3 cr.) A & H P: Grade of C or higher in J402, or equivalent proficiency. Selected reading in modern Japanese plays, novels, and essays.

J441 Readings in Japanese Scholarly Materials (3 cr.) S & H P: Grade of C or higher in J402, or equivalent proficiency. Social, political, historical, and other types of writings in modern Japanese prose, excluding belles lettres.

J451 Readings in Japanese Newspapers and Journals (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in J402, or equivalent proficiency. Exploration of the salient features of the academic and journalistic writing style of modern expository Japanese used by prominent thinkers, well-known journalists, and critical essayists of Japan today.

J461-J462 Literary Japanese I-II (3-3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in J302, or equivalent proficiency. A basic outline of the varieties of written Japanese known collectively as bungotai or "literary Japanese." Initial emphasis is on reading and close rhetorical and grammatical analysis of genres from the tenth through fifteenth centuries, with later attention to other periods and texts.

J491 Humanities Topics in Japanese (3 cr.) A & H, CSA P: Permission of instructor. For advanced Japanese language students. Emphasis on a topic, genre, or author in Japanese literature or humanities. Content selected to enhance specific language skills (reading, writing, speaking, or listening). May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

J492 Historical and Cultural Topics in Japanese (3 cr.) S & H, CSA P: Permission of instructor. For advanced Japanese language students. Emphasis on a topic in Japanese history or culture. Content selected to enhance specific language skills (reading, writing, speaking, or listening). May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Korean Language and Literature

K101 Elementary Korean I (4 cr.) This course provides students with basic conversational and grammatical patterns, assuming that the students have no or little previous background knowledge of Korean. The objective of the course is to equip students with communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing at a basic level. I Sem.

K102 Elementary Korean II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in K101, or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of K101. II Sem.

K201 Second-Year Korean I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in K102, or equivalent proficiency. Both spoken and written aspects stressed. I Sem.

K202 Second-Year Korean II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in K201, or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of K201. II Sem.

K301 Third-Year Korean I (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in K202, or equivalent proficiency. Primarily designed to develop and enhance students' reading ability through a variety of written materials; considerable emphasis on writing and conversational skills. Some 200 Chinese characters that are frequently used in Korean newspapers may be taught.

K302 Third-Year Korean II (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in K301, or equivalent proficiency. Designed primarily to develop and enhance students' reading ability through a variety of written materials; considerable emphasis on writing and conversational skills. An additional 200 Chinese characters that are frequently used in Korean journals may be taught.

K401 Fourth-Year Korean I (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in EALC K302, or equivalent proficiency. Emphasis on advanced reading skills, featuring authentic writings such as newspaper editorials, essays, movie scenarios, and TV news.

K402 Fourth-Year Korean II (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in EALC K401, or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of K401, completing the fourth year of Korean language study.

K431 Readings in Modern Korean Literature I (3 cr.) A & H P: Grade of C or higher in K402, or equivalent proficiency. Selected readings from modern Korean literature, excluding Sino-Korean literature. Emphasis on contemporary prose and poetry exemplifying the development of Korean national literature.

K432 Readings in Modern Korean Literature II (3 cr.) A & H P: Grade of C or higher in K402, or equivalent proficiency. Selected readings from modern Korean literature, excluding Sino-Korean literature. Focus on literature of the colonial era (1910-1945).

East Asian Culture

Many of the culture courses offered by the department require no knowledge of Chinese or Japanese. These courses are open to all students of the university regardless of their major and without prerequisites. Some of these courses satisfy the culture studies requirement and distribution requirement.

E100 East Asia: An Introduction (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Basic introduction to China, Japan, and Korea. Intended to help students understand the unique character of each of these three cultures within the general framework of East Asian civilization, comprehend the historical importance of the three countries, and appreciate the crucial role they play in the world today.

E101 The World and East Asia (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Explorations of interactions between East Asia and other regions of the world. Depending on instructor, focus may be on Asian-American experiences, East Asia in world history, mutual perceptions in literary or media images, or political, social, and economic relations in modern times. May be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

E110 Popular Culture in East Asia (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Surveys East Asian popular culture by examining the evolution and contemporary forms of mass culture in the region. Students will study the structure and political, social, and cultural implications of transnational cultural flows between East Asia and the West.

E160 The Daoist Body (3 cr.) A & H, CSA, TFR Daoism, also spelled "Taoism," is commonly known as the "religion of immortality." But of course, Daoists did die. Through Daoist scriptures, images, stories, and meditations, we will explore in this course what the attainment of immortality meant in flesh and blood terms to early Chinese Daoists.

E180 Cross-Cultural Experiences of War: East Asia and the United States (3 cr.) S & H, CSA, TFR This course examines the impact of twentieth century wars on American­East Asian cultural and political relations. We will consider World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War from the viewpoint of ordinary people, soldiers, and civilians, while exploring how their experiences shape mutual perceptions of culture, values, and race.

E201 Issues in East Asian Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Survey and analysis of selected issues in East Asian literature and arts. Topics vary, but are generally on broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

E202 Issues in East Asian Traditions and Ideas (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Survey and analysis of selected issues in thought and religion of general import. Topics vary, but are generally on broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

E203 Issues in East Asian Cultural History (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Survey and analysis of selected issues pertinent to changes in the human condition over time in East Asia. Topics vary, but are generally on broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

E204 Issues in East Asian Society (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Survey and analysis of selected issues in East Asian political, economic, and cultural institutions of society. Topics vary, but are generally on broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

E231 Japan: The Living Tradition (3 cr.) A & H, CSA An introduction into the patterns of Japanese culture: society, history, visual arts, literary masterpieces, performing arts, and living religious traditions.

E232 China: The Enduring Heritage (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Chinese culture and its modern transformations. Intellectual, artistic, and literary legacies of the Chinese people.

E233 Survey of Korean Civilization (3 cr.) A & H, CSA An introduction to the major cultural, social, and political features of Korean society from its prehistorical past to contemporary times. Focuses on how Koreans blended Chinese civilization and, in the twentieth century, institutions from the West and Japan, with indigenous traditions to produce a unique civilization.

E251 Traditional East Asian Civilizations (3 cr.) S & H, CSA A chronological and comparative survey of the traditional civilizations of East Asia through lectures and readings of source materials (in translation) in literature, history, philosophy, and the arts, with emphasis on the interrelationship among the cultures of East Asia from ancient times to the early modern era. Credit given for only one of EALC E251 or HIST H237.

E252 Modern East Asian Civilization (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Contrasting patterns of indigenous change and response to Western imperialism in East Asia during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. China and Japan receive primary consideration; Korea and Vietnam, secondary. Emphasis on the rise of nationalism and other movements directed toward revolutionary change. Credit given for only one of EALC E252 or HIST H207.

E270 Japanese Language and Society (3 cr.) A & H, CSA A survey of Japanese cultural patterns and the structure of Japanese society as reflected in the Japanese language. Comparisons with aspects of American culture and language will be included. Knowledge of Japanese language is not required.

E271 Twentieth-Century Japanese Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Cultural modes in twentieth-century Japan: traditional arts (e.g., tea ceremony, flower arrangement, puppet plays, haiku poetry) and modern arts (e.g., Western-inspired theater, existential fiction, cinema).

E300 Studies in East Asian Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Selected issues and problems of importance to the understanding of East Asian literature or linguistics. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

E301 Chinese Language and Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA The relationship of Chinese language to its culture and society. Four topics emphasized: (1) unique characteristics of Chinese; (2) influence of language structure on thought patterns and social behavior; (3) traditional conception of life as it affects verbal behavior; and (4) interaction between linguistic and other factors in social life.

E302 Geographic Patterns in China (3 cr.) S & H, CSA P: Junior status or one of the following: E100, E251, E256, or GEOG G110. Analysis of national and regional patterns in agricultural modernization and collectivization, cities and urbanization, industrialization, social programs, environmental conservation. Focus on emergence of contemporary patterns from traditional society.

E303 Korean Folk and Elite Cultures (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Introduction to Korean culture and society from earliest times to the present, including oral and written literature, religion, social customs, and performing arts.

E305 Korean Language and Culture (3 cr.) S & H, CSA A survey of cultural, conceptual, and philosophical patterns, and the structure of Korean society, as reflected by the Korean language.

E316 Computer Enhanced Language Learning (3 cr.) An exploration of the use of computer technology in foreign language learning, to equip students with concepts and tools to improve language studies, and an examination of research and findings on the effectiveness of technology in language skill development. Basic computer literacy required.

E321 Traditional Japanese Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Introduction to major works of Japanese literature from its golden age to the early modern period. Studying English translations, students pay special attention to issues of gender, narration, and the connections between literature and the political, cultural, and religious discourses that were part of the texts' originating context.

E322 Modern Japanese Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Introduction to the major works of modern Japanese literature in English translation from the 1890s to the present. Examines issues central to this literature since Japan's opening to the West, such as self/national identity, sexuality, war, and modernity.

E331 Traditional Chinese Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Introduction to Chinese historical and religious writing, narrative prose, and lyrical poetry from roughly 1300 BCE to 1300 CE. Studying English translations, students consider the roles of literature in Chinese history, and the way the written word served to construct Chinese culture.

E332 Chinese Literature since 1300 (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Introduction to major authors, works, and genres from the Yuan Dynasty to modern times. Studying English translations, students examine how literature is related to important political, ideological, and cultural concerns in the process of Chinese modernity, and explore issues of nationalism, revolution, and commercialism in modern literature and post-Mao writing.

E333 Studies in Chinese Cinema (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Critical and historical perspectives on Chinese cinema from the 1930s to the 1990s, including Taiwan and Hong Kong. Lectures and readings on the silent era, melodrama, musical, minority film, adaptation, the fifth generation, ideology, sexuality, urban cinema, and women's cinema.

E350 Studies in East Asian Society (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Selected issues and problems of importance to the understanding of East Asian society. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

E351 Studies in East Asian Thought (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Selected issues and problems of importance to the understanding of East Asian thought and religion. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

E352 Studies in East Asian History (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Selected issues and problems of importance to the understanding of East Asian history. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

E354 Society and Education in Japan (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Survey of social change in Japan, with a focus on educational institutions, patterns of learning, educational thought, and the spread of literacy.

E371 Twentieth-Century Chinese Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Twentieth-century Chinese literature in translation, with readings from Liu O, Mao Tun, Lao She, and selected contemporary authors from China and Taiwan.

E372 Japanese Fiction and Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Exploration of modern Japanese fiction and various forms of culture. Topics will vary depending on the year the course is offered. Some examples are: literature and film; modernity and the self; women writers; history of popular literature and culture. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

E374 Early Chinese Philosophy (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Origins of Chinese philosophical traditions in the classical schools of Confucianism, Taoism, Mohism, and Legalism. Explores contrasting agendas of early Chinese and Western traditions. Credit not given for both E374 and PHIL P374.

E384 East Asian Nationalism and Cultural Identity (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Exploration of the impact of the metaphor of nation and Western nationalism theory on Western literature dealing with modern East Asia. Emphasis on how Western notions of political identity shape and sometimes obscure our understanding of East Asian cultural and political identity.

E385 Asian Americans: Cultural Conflict and Identity (3 cr.) S & H, CSA An examination of the historical, cultural, and racial dynamics underpinning the evolution of contemporary Asian American identity. Students learn not only about cultural theory and how cultural identities are constructed within America's multiethnic and multicultural society, but also about themselves.

E386 United States-East Asian Relations (3 cr.) S & H, CSA We will examine the love-hate relationship between East Asia and the U.S. since 1945. Security, economic, and political ties between the U.S. and the individual East Asian countries, and with the region as a whole are considered. Particular attention is given to the diverse Asian perspectives of the relationship.

E390 Contemporary Chinese Politics (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Analysis of trends and patterns in Chinese politics since 1949, with a focus on ideology and political culture, elites, party and government institutions, the policy-making process, popular political participation, and the relationship between economic and political change. Political evolution of Taiwan is also considered.

E392 Chinese Foreign Policy (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Consideration of the various factors (such as world views, power, domestic politics, and international norms) that may shape China's policies toward different regions of the world (the U.S. and East Asia) and toward international regimes (trade, arms controls, and human rights). Both historical and comparative perspectives are utilized.

E393 China's Political Economy (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Examines key aspects of China's political economy: the obstacles and sources of economic development, the foundations for democratization, the distribution of political power, and the forces affecting national unity. Use of comparative and historical perspectives, with emphasis on the Reform era. Sources range from macro analyses to company case studies.

E394 Business and Public Policy in Japan (3 cr.) S & H, CSA A study of the historical evolution and contemporary dynamics of Japanese business, with emphasis on the role of government policy in regulating and promoting business activity. Topics will include government, business, and postwar economic growth in Japan; labor-management relations; economic interests and political power; and U.S.­Japanese trade relations.

E395 Japan in World Trade and Politics (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Examines Japan's foreign relations. After a brief historical survey, the course covers Japan's contemporary relations with the United States, China, Korea, Russia, and Southeast Asia. Topics include economic as well as military and political relations, which have undergone much change in recent years.

E473 History of Japanese Theatre and Drama (3 cr.) A & H, CSA The social environment, textual content, stage conventions, artistic theories, and associated arts of traditional Japanese theatre and drama, viewed within the context of their historical development c. 1370-1870 and in the present day. Emphasis on Noh, bunraku, and kabuki; some attention to such performing arts as kyögen and köwaka.

Special Courses

E495 Individual Readings (1-3 cr.) Repeatable with permission of undergraduate advisor. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

E496 Foreign Study (East Asian Exchange Programs) (cr. arr.) P: Acceptance into an East Asian student exchange program. Report due at the end of each semester. Arrangements for credit made in advance in consultation with the East Asian Student Exchange Committee.

E497 Overseas Study Tour (3 cr.) A & H, CSA P: Permission of instructor. For students who want to learn firsthand about the customs, culture, and language of an East Asian country in a course which includes a structured tour setting. Students will meet and study throughout the semester, both before and after the tour, which is a mandatory part of the class.

E498 Internship in East Asian Languages and Cultures (1-3 cr.) P: At least junior standing, 15 credits of department course work, and project approved by faculty supervisor. Selected career-related work in a cooperating institution or business. Evaluation by faculty supervisor and employer. Does not count toward major. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

H399 Reading for Honors (15 cr. max.) P: Approval of departmental honors advisor. Readings for the superior students in preparation for work on a research project (H499). Number of credits and texts must be approved by instructor. I Sem., II Sem.

H499 Honors Thesis (3 cr.) P: H399 and approval of the appropriate honors advisor of the department. Ordinarily taken under the supervision of the tutor who guided the student in H399. A specialized research project.

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East Asian Culture Courses, by Subject Area

Literature and Linguistics

EALC C425 Teaching Chinese Language
EALC C431 Readings in Modern Chinese Literature A & H
EALC C450 Chinese Writing and Rhetoric
EALC E300 Studies in East Asian Literature
EALC E301 Chinese Language and Culture A & H, CSA
EALC E305 Korean Language and Culture S & H, CSA
EALC E321 Traditional Japanese Literature A & H, CSA
EALC E322 Modern Japanese Literature A & H, CSA
EALC E331 Traditional Chinese Literature A & H, CSA
EALC E332 Chinese Literature since 1300 A & H, CSA
EALC E333 Chinese Cinema A & H, CSA
EALC E371 Twentieth-Century Chinese Literature A & H, CSA
EALC E372 Japanese Fiction and Culture A & H, CSA
EALC E473 History of Japanese Theatre and Drama A & H, CSA
EALC J421 Introduction to Japanese Linguistics N & M
EALC J425 Teaching Japanese Language
EALC J431 Readings in Modern Japanese A & H, CSA
EALC J451 Readings in Japanese Newspapers and Journals
EALC J491 Humanities Topics in Japanese A & H, CSA
EALC K431 Readings in Modern Korean Literature I A & H
EALC K432 Readings in Modern Korean Literature II A & H
CMLT C365 Japanese-Western Literary Relations A & H, CSA
CMLT C375 Chinese-Western Literary Relations A & H, CSA
THTR T468 Non­Western Theatre and Drama A & H, CSA

Thought, Religion, and Art

EALC E303 Korean Folk and Elite Cultures A & H, CSA
EALC E351 Studies in East Asian Thought A & H
EALC E374 Early Chinese Philosophy A & H, CSA
FINA A360 Topics in East Asian Art A & H, CSA
FINA A464 Early Chinese Art and Archaeology S & H, CSA
FINA A466 Early Chinese Painting S & H, CSA
FINA A467 Later Chinese Painting S & H, CSA
FOLK F305 Asian Folklore/Folklife/Folk Music A & H, CSA
REL R350 East Asian Buddhism A & H, CSA
REL R357 Religions in Japan A & H, CSA
REL R369 The Taoist Tradition A & H, CSA
REL R450 Topics in the Buddhist Tradition A & H
REL R452 Topics in East Asian Religions A & H, CSA
REL R469 Topics in Taoism and Chinese Religion A & H, CSA

History and Society

EALC E302 Geographic Patterns in China S & H, CSA
EALC E350 Studies in East Asian Society S & H
EALC E352 Studies in East Asian History S & H
EALC E354 Society and Education in Japan S & H, CSA
EALC E384 East Asian Nationalism and Cultural Identity S & H, CSA
EALC E385 Asian Americans: Cultural Conflict and Identity S & H, CSA
EALC E386 United States-East Asian Relations S & H, CSA
EALC E390 Contemporary Chinese Politics S & H, CSA
EALC E392 Chinese Foreign Policy S & H, CSA
EALC E393 Chinese Political Economy S & H, CSA
EALC E394 Business and Public Policy in Japan S & H, CSA
EALC E395 Japan in World Trade and Politics S & H, CSA
EALC J441 Readings in Japanese Scholarly Materials S & H
EALC J492 Historical and Cultural Topics in Japanese S & H, CSA
HIST G357 Premodern Japan S & H, CSA
HIST G358 Early Modern Japan S & H, CSA
HIST G369 Modern Japan S & H, CSA
HIST G372 Modern Korea S & H, CSA
HIST G380 Early China S & H, CSA
HIST G382 China: The Age of Glory S & H, CSA
HIST G383 China: The Later Empires S & H, CSA
HIST G385 Modern China S & H, CSA
HIST G387 Contemporary China S & H, CSA
POLS Y333 Chinese Politics S & H, CSA
POLS Y334 Japanese Politics S & H, CSA

Other courses that may count toward the majors:

CMLT C257 Asian Literature and the Other Arts A & H, CSA
CMLT C265 Introduction to East Asian Poetry A & H, CSA
CMLT C266 Introduction to East Asian Fiction A & H, CSA
CMLT C291 Studies in Non­Western Film A & H, CSA
EALC C401-C402 Fourth-Year Chinese I-II
EALC E201 Issues in East Asian Literature A & H, CSA
EALC E202 Issues in East Asian Traditions and Ideas A & H, CSA
EALC E203 Issues in East Asian Cultural History S & H, CSA
EALC E204 Issues in East Asian Society S & H, CSA
EALC E231 Japan: The Living Tradition A & H, CSA
EALC E232 China: The Enduring Heritage A & H, CSA
EALC E233 Survey of Korean Civilization A & H, CSA
EALC E251 Traditional East Asian Civilization S & H, CSA
EALC E252 Modern East Asian Civilization S & H, CSA
EALC E270 Japanese Language and Society A & H, CSA
EALC E271 Twentieth-Century Japanese Culture A & H, CSA
EALC E316 Computer Enhanced Language Learning
EALC E497 Overseas Study Tour A & H, CSA
EALC J401-J402 Fourth-Year Japanese I-II
EALC K401-K402 Fourth-Year Korean I-II
FINA A262 Introduction to Japanese Art and Culture S & H, CSA
HIST H208 American-East Asian Relations S & H, CSA

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