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College of Arts
and Sciences (College)
2006-2008
Academic Bulletin

College Programs
College of Arts and Sciences (College) 
Kirkwood Hall 104 
130 S. Woodlawn 
Bloomington, IN 47405  
Local (812) 855-1821 
Fax (812) 855-2060 
Contact College
 

Jewish Studies

Faculty
Introduction
Major in Jewish Studies
Area Certificate in Jewish Studies
Minor in Hebrew
Minor in Yiddish Studies
Jewish Studies Honors Program
Overseas Study
Course Descriptions
Courses by Areas of Specialization Including Cross-Listed Courses

Faculty

Director

Professor Steven Weitzman (Jewish Studies, Religious Studies)

Associate Director

Jeffrey Veidlinger (Jewish Studies, History)

Director of the Institute for Jewish Culture and the Arts

Alvin H. Rosenfeld (Jewish Studies, English)

Distinguished Professor

Susan Gubar (English)

Dr. Alice Field Cohn Chair in Yiddish Studies

Dov-Ber Kerler (Jewish Studies, Germanic Studies)

Chancellor's Professor

Michael Morgan (Jewish Studies, Philosophy)

Irving M. Glazer Chair in Jewish Studies

Steven Weitzman (Jewish Studies, Religious Studies)

Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Chair in Jewish Studies

Shaul Magid (Jewish Studies, Religious Studies)

Lou and Sybil Mervis Chair in the Study of Jewish Culture

Judah Cohen (Jewish Studies, Folklore and Ethnomusicology)

Pat M. Glazer Chair in Jewish Studies

Mark Roseman (Jewish Studies and History)

Rudy Professor

Jeffrey C. Isaac (Political Science)

Professors

James S. Ackerman (Emeritus, Religious Studies), Jack Bielasiak (Political Science), Paul Eisenberg (Emeritus, Philosophy), Henry Fischel (Emeritus, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures), Jeffrey C. Isaac (Political Science), Irving Katz (Emeritus, History), Dov-Ber Kerler (Jewish Studies and Germanic Studies), Michael Morgan (Jewish Studies, Philosophy), Mark Roseman (Jewish Studies, History), Alvin Rosenfeld (Jewish Studies, English), Bronislava Volkova (Slavic Languages and Literatures), Dror Wahrman (History)

Associate Professors

JoŽlle Bahloul (Jewish Studies, Anthropology), J. Albert Harrill (Religious Studies), Stephen Katz (Jewish Studies), Nancy Levene (Religious Studies), Shaul Magid (Jewish Studies, Religious Studies), Herbert J. Marks (Comparative Literature), Dina Spechler (Political Science), Jeffrey Veidlinger (Jewish Studies, History), Steven Weitzman (Jewish Studies, Religious Studies)

Assistant Professors

Judah Cohen (Jewish Studies, Folklore and Ethnomusicology), Halina Goldberg (Musicology), Chaya Halberstam (Religious Studies), Matthias Lehmann (Jewish Studies, History), Miryam Segal (Jewish Studies, Comparative Literature)

Lecturer in Hebrew

Ayelet Weiss

Academic Advising

Carolyn Lipson-Walker, Goodbody Hall 325, (812) 855-0453

E-mail

iujsp@indiana.edu

Web

www.indiana.edu/~jsp

Phone/fax

(812) 855-0453; (812) 855-4314

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Introduction

The Jewish Studies Program (JSTU) has as its objective the study of Jewish civilization from antiquity to the present and its interaction with and impact on world civilization. There is broad agreement that the various facets of Jewish culture-literature, history, religion, philosophy, languages, and other constituent features of Judaism-comprise one of the richest complexes within the whole of recorded cultural history. Our program draws on the many disciplines necessary to study the multifaceted Jewish experience, thus bringing a variety of approaches to the study of Jewish civilization. The contributing departments include Anthropology, Comparative Literature, English, Folklore and Ethnomusicology, Germanic Studies, History, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, Philosophy, Political Science, and Religious Studies. Modern and biblical Hebrew language courses and Hebrew literature and culture courses, taught within the Jewish Studies Program, offer students a way to understand Jewish culture and its historical experience through literary analysis of texts and artifacts. Because of the interdisciplinary nature of the Jewish Studies Program, students enrolled in the B.A. or area certificate programs have the opportunity to structure course work individually, according to their specific areas of interest.

Students in the Jewish Studies Program can pursue either a B.A. in Jewish studies or an area certificate in Jewish studies. Students, in addition, may complete a minor in Hebrew or a minor in Yiddish studies (through Germanic Studies). These programs are open to students from all academic and personal backgrounds.

We encourage students to see the Jewish studies advisor in their first or second semester. Students may call (812) 855-0453 to make an appointment.

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Major in Jewish Studies

Purpose

Students with a B.A. in Jewish Studies will have concentrated on major aspects of the Jewish experience: they will understand the long history of the Jewish people, its connection over millennia to diverse cultures, and the formative influences of Jews on world civilization. In acquiring such knowledge, students will relate Jewish thought and tradition to the surrounding world and will enrich their understanding of world societies and cultures.

Requirements

Students must complete the following:

  1. Two semesters of modern Hebrew (JSTU H100-H150), Biblical Hebrew, (JSTU B100-B150), or Yiddish (GER Y100-Y150).
  2. REL R245 Introduction to Judaism or HIST H251 Introduction to Jewish History: From the Bible to Spanish Expulsion. REL R245 or HIST H251 must be taken on the Bloomington campus. Only one of these courses may be counted toward the Jewish Studies major.
  3. HIST H252 Introduction to Jewish History: From Spanish Expulsion to the Present. This course must be taken on the Bloomington campus.
  4. Area of specialization. Four courses in one of three areas of specialization: Language and Literature; History and Society; or Religion and Thought. Credit acquired through language testing or through transfer credit from universities other than The Hebrew University (via IU Overseas Study Program) will not exceed the equivalent of two courses in the student's area of specialization.
  5. Two additional courses must be completed outside the student's chosen area of specialization.
  6. A student must complete a minimum of 12 credit hours of course work in Jewish Studies on the IU Bloomington campus. A maximum of three courses may be credited toward the major from language testing or transfer credit from universities other than The Hebrew University (via IU Overseas Study Program).
  7. Students cannot receive Jewish Studies credit for REL R152 Religions of the West if REL R245 Introduction to Judaism is offered during the same semester.

Students must also complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Area Certificate in Jewish Studies

Purpose

The area certificate program gives students pursuing degrees outside the College of Arts and Sciences, or pursuing B.S. or B.A. degrees within the College of Arts and Sciences, an opportunity to gain a broad-based knowledge of Jewish Studies. Students in the School of Journalism may complete their second concentration by completing the Jewish Studies area certificate. Students in the Kelley School of Business may work toward a global studies and languages field specialization or arts and social services field specialization by completing the Jewish Studies area certificate. Students in the Jacobs School of Music may complete the area certificate along with a Bachelor of Music or as an outside field with a Bachelor of Science in Music.

Requirements

Students must complete a minimum of eight courses with a minimum grade of C- distributed as follows:

  1. Two courses in each of the three major areas of Jewish Studies: Language and Literature; History and Society; and Religion and Thought.
  2. Two additional courses chosen, in any combination, from these three major areas.
  3. Students wishing to participate in the area certificate program must register with the advisor in Jewish Studies. Appointments may be arranged by calling (812) 855-0453.
  4. A student must complete a minimum of 10 credit hours of course work (language testing is not acceptable) in Jewish Studies on the Bloomington campus. A maximum of three courses may be credited toward the area certificate from either language testing or from transfer credit from universities other than The Hebrew University (via IU Overseas Study Program).
  5. Students cannot receive Jewish Studies credit for REL R152 Religions of the West if REL R245 Introduction to Judaism is offered during the same semester.

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Minor in Hebrew

Requirements

Students must complete the following:

  1. Six courses in Hebrew language and/or literature (modern or biblical Hebrew) for a minimum of 20 credit hours. (Students transferring first year language course credit may be eligible to complete the minor with a minimum of 18 credit hours.)
  2. At least four courses must be Hebrew language courses.
  3. At least two courses must be on or above the 300 level. These two upper-level courses, which cannot be fulfilled through language testing or transfer credit, must be related in content to Hebrew but need not be language courses per se. These two upper-level courses cannot be counted toward either the Jewish Studies major or the area certificate in Jewish Studies. Students interested in pursuing study of courses related to biblical Hebrew might also (with the approval of the Jewish Studies advisor) choose to take upper-level courses in rabbinic and biblical literature taught by Jewish Studies faculty.
  4. A minimum cumulative GPA of a 2.300 is required in the minor.
  5. At least three of the courses must be completed on the Bloomington campus. Up to three courses may be credited toward the minor from language testing and transfer credit or study abroad.
  6. Each student's course work must be approved by the Jewish Studies advisor to assure a coherent program of study.

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Minor in Yiddish Studies

Students may complete the minor through the Department of Germanic Studies.

Requirements

Students must complete the following:

  1. GER Y150 (4 cr.)
  2. GER Y200 (3 cr.)
  3. GER Y250 (3 cr.)
  4. Six additional credits chosen from GER Y300/CMLT C377; GER Y350/ CMLT C378; GER Y495; or HIST D304 Jews of Eastern Europe (3 cr.)

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Jewish Studies Honors Program

Requirements

  1. Majors in Jewish Studies must maintain a minimum overall GPA of 3.500 and a minimum Jewish Studies GPA of 3.500.
  2. A student must apply to the honors advisor, Carolyn Lipson-Walker, for admission into the honors program.
  3. In addition to completing the requirements for the Jewish Studies major, honors students must successfully complete two courses: first enrolling in JSTU H399 Readings for Honors in Jewish Studies (3 credit hours) and then completing the honors thesis with the course JSTU H499 Honors Thesis (3-6 credit hours). A grade of A- or higher must be earned in both courses to graduate with honors.
  4. A thesis director of the student's choice (from among the Jewish Studies faculty) will serve as mentor throughout H399/H499. Students must fill out the appropriate honors thesis contract and obtain the thesis director's signature as well as the approval of the honors advisor before registering for JSTU H399.
  5. JSTU H399 is typically taken in the next-to-last semester before graduation in the spring. Under the close direction of the thesis director, the honors candidate completes preliminary reading and research and a 2-3 page thesis prospectus and bibliography.
  6. In the final semester before graduation, the student enrolls in JSTU H499 and completes a 25≠50 page thesis, representing a significant proportion of original research. The thesis is defended before a committee made up of the thesis director and two other Jewish Studies faculty members of the student's choosing (in consultation with the thesis director).

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Overseas Study

The experience of living and studying in Israel is both broadening and culturally stimulating. Jewish Studies students are encouraged to study at The Hebrew University's Rothberg International School in Jerusalem during their junior year and/or to participate in the three-week summer archaeological field school at Tel Beth Shemesh. Courses at the Rothberg School at The Hebrew University are conducted in English and include classes in Judaica and in subjects of a more general nature taught by outstanding scholars. Fall and full-year students participate in an eight-week ulpan (intensive Hebrew course) in the summer prior to the academic year on The Hebrew University campus. Spring semester-only students begin with a three-week ulpan). All students continue studying Hebrew during the regular semester. Although prior Hebrew study is recommended, it is not required. Students attending the Rothberg School and the Tel Beth Shemesh archaeological field school can earn direct IU credit and can fulfill senior residency requirement hours. Students interested in either the area certificate, major or Hebrew minor should meet with the Jewish Studies advisor before leaving for Israel.

The Jewish Studies Program also sponsors "The Jewish Experience in Modern Germany," a spring course/two-week travel program. Information and application forms for The Hebrew University, the Tel Beth Shemesh program, and "The Jewish Experience in Modern Germany" may be obtained from the Office of Overseas Study, Franklin Hall 202 (812) 855-9304 or from their Web site: www.indiana.edu/~overseas.

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Course Descriptions

Hebrew and Israeli Culture

B100 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew I (4 cr.) An accelerated introduction to biblical Hebrew. No prior knowledge of Hebrew required. Introduces grammar, morphology, and syntax. Students acquire a sizeable vocabulary to learn how to read original biblical materials. I Sem.

B150 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in B100 or equivalent proficiency. A continuation of B100 that builds the student's knowledge of the fundamentals of biblical Hebrew. II Sem.

B200 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in B150 or equivalent proficiency. A continuation of B150. Advances student's skill to read and understand biblical narrative, law, prophecy, and poetry. I Sem.

B250 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II (3 cr.) P: Grade of C in B200 or equivalent proficiency. Continues to build the skills necessary for reading various literary genres in the Bible while training the student to do formal textual exegesis. Introduction to scholarly tools necessary for translating and interpreting biblical text. II Sem.

C240 Contemporary Israeli Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Through literature and other media (essay, film, music), this course examines a number of Israeli cultural, social, and political phenomena: the Holocaust in the Israeli imagination, Labor and the Israeli body, Jewish ethnicity, the Israeli Arab, and the creation of new national holidays. Students develop methods of "reading" these artifacts of Israeli culture with the help of approaches from the fields of literary and cultural studies.

C340 The Kibbutz in Fact and Fiction (3 cr.) A & H, CSA A survey of the representation of kibbutz ideology and community in Hebrew fiction and anthropological and sociological studies. Compares early representations of the kibbutz with its recent transformations to acquaint students with the impact of this unique social system in Israeli society and culture.

H100 Introduction to Elementary Hebrew I (4 cr.) Introductory course that lays groundwork for the study and use of modern (Israeli) Hebrew≠ reading, writing and conversing. No previous knowledge of Hebrew required. I Sem.

H150 Introduction to Elementary Hebrew II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H100 or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of H100. Development of basic reading, writing, and conversing in modern Hebrew. II Sem.

H190 Intensive Elementary Hebrew (6 cr.) An intensive course in elementary modern Hebrew, combining Ulpan with standard language instruction techniques. The course covers the equivalent of one full year of elementary Hebrew in one term, and is open to those desiring to acquire all facets of language communication, morphology, phonology, and syntax. Credit given for only one of JSTU H190, or JSTU H100-H150.

H200 Intermediate Hebrew I (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H150 or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of H150; second year of modern Hebrew. Development of skills of reading, writing, and conversing in modern Hebrew on an intermediate level.

H250 Intermediate Hebrew II (3 cr.) Grade of C or higher in H200 or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of H200. Development of the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in modern Hebrew on an intermediate level. II Sem.

H296 Foreign Study in Hebrew (1-6 cr.) P: Acceptance into an overseas study program. Credit for foreign study in Hebrew language or literature when no specific equivalent is available among departmental offerings. Does not count toward credit for major, area certificate, or minor.

H300 Advanced Hebrew I (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H250 or equivalent proficiency. In this third year course in the modern Hebrew language sequence, students will further develop reading, writing, and speaking skills. Emphasis on reading comprehension and conversation, as well as grammar and syntactical structures. The language of instruction and discussion is Hebrew. I Sem.

H350 Advanced Hebrew II (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H300 or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of H300. Further development of advanced reading, writing, and conversing skills in modern Hebrew. II Sem.

H365 Advanced Hebrew Conversation and Composition (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H350 or equivalent proficiency. A full summation of modern Hebrew, with review of grammar and vocabulary. The course aims to enrich students' vocabulary, reading and writing skills, comprehension, and free expression. Emphasis will be on vocabulary, usage, and pronunciation. Writing practice and review of grammar will be integrated with conversation and readings of selections from literary and nonliterary texts.

H375 Introductory Readings in Hebrew Literature (in Hebrew) (3 cr.) A & H P: Grade of C or higher in H350 or equivalent proficiency. Reading, in the original Hebrew, of selected poetry and prose from among the chief writers of modern Hebrew literature. Emphasis on familiarization with the diverse styles, forms, and themes of modern Hebrew literature. Discussion and analysis in Hebrew.

H396 Foreign Study in Hebrew (1-6 cr.) P: Acceptance into an overseas study program. Credit for foreign study in Hebrew language or literature when no specific equivalent is available among departmental offerings. Does not count toward credit for major, area certificate, or minor.

H497 Individual Readings in Hebrew (1-4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H350 or equivalent proficiency. Extensive readings of Hebrew texts and scholarly works grouped according to periods or specific themes in language, literature, or intellectual movements adapted to specific individual programs. Readings, assignments, and discussion in Hebrew.

J203 Arts and Humanities Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) A & H Selected arts and humanities topics and issues in Jewish studies. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

J204 Social and Historical Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) S & H Selected social and historical topics and issues in Jewish studies. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

J303 Arts and Humanities Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) A & H Selected arts and humanities topics and issues in Jewish studies. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

J304 Social and Historical Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) S & H Selected social and historical topics and issues in Jewish studies. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

J403 Arts and Humanities Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) A & H Selected arts and humanities topics and issues in Jewish studies. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

J404 Social and Historical Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) S & H Selected social and historical topics and issues in Jewish studies. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

L380 Modern Hebrew Literature in English (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Nineteenth- and twentieth-century fiction, poetry, essays, under such headings as assimilation (ideal or aberration?); ghetto and world; secularism versus tradition; ethnicity, land, and universalism; nation, religion, state; utopias and revolutions; nostalgia, self-hate, rejuvenation; portrayal of anti-Semitism in literature. No knowledge of Hebrew necessary. Readings and lectures in English.

L385 Recent Hebrew Literature in English (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Fiction, poetry, and essays, with relevance to contemporary issues, such as the past (burden or asset?); the meeting of Europe and Near East; the kibbutz; ideal and reality; Jews, Arabs, Canaanites; diaspora and center; the personal and the collective; inwardness or realism; wars, holocausts, peace. No knowledge of Hebrew necessary. Readings and lectures in English.

L390 Biblical Themes in Modern Hebrew Literature (3 cr.) A & H An examination of how modern Hebrew literature, read in English translation, has perceived and reinterpreted narratives of the Hebrew Bible. Among the issues to be examined are the contemporary individual, social, and historical factors contributing to the process of "rewriting" the Bible in the image of our times. No knowledge of Hebrew necessary. Readings and lectures in English.

L395 S. Y. Agnon and the Jewish Experience (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Intensive study of the fictional work (in English translation) of S. Y. Agnon. Among the themes explored are religion and secularism; tradition versus modernity and change; love, marriage, and divorce; nostalgia for the past and life in the present; Israel and the diaspora. No knowledge of Hebrew necessary. Readings and lectures in English.

Special Topics and Seminars

H495 Individual Readings in Jewish Studies (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Designed for advanced Jewish Study students who wish to concentrate on a particular area of Judaica previously introduced to them in other courses. Arrangements are made between the student and professor prior to registration. A student must have course authorization with the Jewish Studies advisor prior to registration. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Honors Courses

H399 Readings for Honors in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) P: Approval of instructor and honors advisor. Independent guided readings in preparation for the honors thesis (H499) in Jewish Studies.

H499 Honors Thesis (3-6 cr.) P: Approval of program honors committee. Guided research culminating in an honors thesis written under the direction of a faculty member and reviewed in oral examination by three faculty members.

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Courses by Areas of Specialization Including Cross-Listed Courses

  I. Language and Literature
 II. History and Society
III. Religion and Thought

Note: Although JSTU-J 203, J204, J303, J304, J403, and J404 courses are listed under both Language and Literature and History and Society, the area of specialization fulfilled by each of these courses will depend upon the specific topic.

I. Language and Literature

College of Arts and Sciences
E103 Topics Course (topics relating to Jewish Studies) (3 cr.) A & H, TFR
  Topics: The Bible and its Interpreters; Who Wrote the Bible?
S103 Freshman Seminar in Arts and Humanities (3 cr.) A & H, TFR
  Topic: Genesis and Myth

Comparative Literature
C301 Special Topics in Comparative Literature (3 cr.) A & H
  Topics: Poetics of Biblical Narrative; Reading the Prophets
C377 Topics in Yiddish Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
  Topics: Fantasy, Realism, and Fiction in Early Modern and Modern "Classic" Yiddish Literature
C378 Topics in Yiddish Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
  Topics: History and Sociology of Yiddish; Yiddish in America
C 400 Studies in Comparative Literature (3 cr.) A & H
  Topic: Job, from the Bible to Kafka; The Poetics of Biblical Narrative
C405 Senior Seminar in Comparative Literature (3 cr.-6 cr. max) A & H P: at least one 300 level CMLT course or consent of instructor
  Topics: The Bible in Western Literature; Job, from the Bible to Kafka; Prophecy and Poetry

English
L241 American Jewish Writers (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
L367 Literature of the Bible (3 cr.) A & H
L375 Studies in Jewish Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
  Topics: Literature of the Holocaust; American Jewish Drama; American Jewish Writers; Jewish American Responses to the Holocaust
L460 Seminar: Literary Form, Mode, and Theme (3 cr.)
  Topic: The Poetics of Biblical Narrative

Germanic Studies
N350 Dutch Culture: The Modern Netherlands (3 cr.) S & H, CSB
  Topic: Anne Frank: Her Diary in Perspective
Y100 Beginning Yiddish I (4 cr.)
Y150 Beginning Yiddish II (4 cr.) P: Y 100 or consent of instructor
Y200 Intermediate Yiddish I (3 cr.) P: Y 150 or consent of instructor
Y250 Intermediate Yiddish II (3 cr.) P: Y 200 or consent of instructor
Y300 Topics in Yiddish Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
  Topics: Fantasy, Realism, and Fiction in Early Modern and Modern "Classic" Yiddish Literature
Y350 Topics in Yiddish Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
  Topics: History and Sociology of Yiddish; Yiddish in America
Y495 Individual Readings in Yiddish Studies: Language, Literature, Culture (1-3 cr.)

Hutton Honors College
H203 Interdepartmental Colloquia (3 cr.) A & H, TFR P: consent of the Hutton Honors College or Jewish Studies advisor
  Topic: The Bible and its Interpreters
H303 Interdepartmental Colloquia (3 cr). A & H P: consent of the Hutton Honors College (or JS advisor)
  Topics: The American Jewish Experience; American Jewish Writers; Literature of the Holocaust; Poetics of Biblical Narrative

Freshman Seminar
S103 Freshman Seminar in Arts and Humanities (3. cr.) A & H, TFR
  Topic: Popular Representations of the Holocaust

Jewish Studies
B100 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew I (4 cr.)
B150 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in B100 or equivalent proficiency.
B200 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in B150 or equivalent proficiency.
B250 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in B200 or equivalent proficiency.
C240 Contemporary Israeli Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
C340 The Kibbutz in Fact and Fiction (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
H100 Introduction to Elementary Hebrew I (4 cr.)
H150 Introduction to Elementary Hebrew II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H 100 or equivalent proficiency.
H190 Intensive Elementary Hebrew (6 cr.)
H200 Intermediate Hebrew I (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H 150 or equivalent proficiency.
H250 Intermediate Hebrew II (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H 200 or equivalent proficiency.
H300 Advanced Hebrew I (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H 250 or equivalent proficiency.
H350 Advanced Hebrew II (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H 300 or equivalent proficiency.
H365 Advanced Hebrew Conversation and Composition (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H 350 or equivalent proficiency
H375 Introductory Readings in Hebrew Literature (in Hebrew) (3 cr.) A & H P: Grade of C or higher in H350 or equivalent proficiency.
H497 Individual Readings in Hebrew (1-4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H 350 or equivalent proficiency.
J203 Arts and Humanities Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) A & H
J303 Arts and Humanities Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) A & H
  Topic: Midrash and the Art of Interpretation
J403 Arts and Humanities Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) A & H
L380 Modern Hebrew Literature in English (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
L385 Recent Hebrew Literature in English (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
L390 Biblical Themes in Modern Hebrew Literature (3 cr.) A & H
L395 S.Y. Agnon and the Jewish Experience (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

Slavic Languages and Literatures
R345 Jewish Characters in Russian Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

West European Studies
W406 Special Topics in West European Studies (3 cr.) A & H, CSB
  Topic: Anne Frank: Her Diary in Perspective

II. History and Society

Anthropology
E332 Jewish Women: Anthropological Perspectives (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
E334 Jews in Moslem Societies (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
E371 Modern Jewish Culture and Society (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
E400 Undergraduate Seminar (3 cr.)
  Topics: Ethnicities in Israel; Israeli Society and Culture; The Jewish Family; Jewish Women; Migrations and Diasporas

College of Arts and Sciences
E104 Topics in Social and Historical Studies (3 cr.) S & H, TFR (topics relating to Jewish Studies)
  Topic: Blacks and Jews
S103 Freshman Seminar in Arts and Humanities (3 cr.) A & H, TFR
  Topic: Popular Representations of the Holocaust

Comparative Literature
C377 Topics in Yiddish Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
  Topics: Fantasy, Realism, and Fiction in Early Modern and Modern "Classic" Yiddish Literature
C378 Topics in Yiddish Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
  Topics: History and Sociology of Yiddish; Yiddish in America

English
L241 American Jewish Writers (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
L375 Studies in Jewish Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
  Topics: Literature of the Holocaust; American Jewish Drama; American Jewish Writers; Jewish-American Responses to the Holocaust

Fine Arts
A200 Topics in Art History (3 cr.) CSA
  Topic: Introduction to Jewish Art

Folklore and Ethnomusicology
F358 Jewish Folklore/Folklife/Folk Music (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

Germanic Studies
N350 Dutch Culture: The Modern Netherlands (3 cr.) S & H, CSB
  Topic: Anne Frank: Her Diary in Perspective
Y300 Topics in Yiddish Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
  Topics: Fantasy, Realism, and Fiction in Early Modern and Modern "Classic" Yiddish Literature
Y350 Topics in Yiddish Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
  Topic: History and Sociology of Yiddish; Yiddish in America
Y495 Individual Readings in Yiddish Studies: Language, Literature, Culture (1-3 cr.)

History
B200 Issues in Western European History (3 cr.) S & H (when Jewish history topic)
B300 Issues in Western European History (3 cr.) S & H (when Jewish history topic)
B303 Issues in Modern European History (3 cr.) S & H (when Jewish history topic)
B315 European Anti-Semitism Since Enlightenment (3 cr.) S & H
B321 Modern Jewish History: From Expulsion to Revolution (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
B322 Jews in the Modern World (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
B323 History of the Holocaust (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
B324 Zionism and the State of Israel (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
B325 Christian-Jewish Relations (3 cr.) S & H
B400 Issues in Western European History (3 cr.) S & H (when Jewish history topic)
C300 Issues in Ancient History (3 cr.) S & H
  Topic: Three Cultures in the Medieval Mediterranean: Interactions between Muslims, Christians and Jews
D304 Jews of Eastern Europe (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
H251 Introduction to Jewish History: From the Bible to Spanish Expulsion (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
H252 Introduction to Jewish History: From Spanish Expulsion to the Present (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
H259 American Jewish History (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
J300 Seminar in History (3 cr.) S & H (when Jewish history topic)
  Topics: Jews and Cosmopolitanism in Modern Europe; The Jews of Spain: Jewish Life under Christianity and Islam; Perpetrators of the Holocaust; Uneasy Neighbors: Polish-Jewish Relations in the 20th Century
J400 Seminar for History Majors (3 cr.) S & H
  Topics: Anti-Semitism and Jewish Responses; Jewish Cultural History of the Modern Era; Jewish Emancipation

Hutton Honors College
H303 Interdepartmental Colloquia (3 cr). P: consent of Hutton Honors College (or JS advisor); A & H
  Topics: The American Jewish Experience; American Jewish Writers; Literature of the Holocaust

Freshman Seminar
S103 Freshman Seminar in Arts and Humanities (3. cr.) A & H, TFR
  Topic: Popular Representations of the Holocaust

Jewish Studies
C240 Contemporary Israeli Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
C340 The Kibbutz in Fact and Fiction (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
J203 Arts and Humanities Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) A & H
J204 Social and Historical Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) S & H
J303 Arts and Humanities Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) A & H
J304 Social and Historical Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) S & H
  Topic: Professional Leadership and the Jewish Community
J403 Arts and Humanities Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) A & H
J404 Social and Historical Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) S & H
L380 Modern Hebrew Literature in English (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
L385 Recent Hebrew Literature in English (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
L395 S.Y. Agnon and the Jewish Experience (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

Political Science
Y352 The Holocaust and Politics (3 cr.) S & H, CSA

Religious Studies
R345 Religious Issues in Contemporary Judaism (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
R421 Judaism and Gender: Philosophical and Theological Perspectives (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

Slavic Languages and Literatures
R345 Jewish Characters in Russian Literature (3 cr) A & H, CSA

West European Studies
W406 Special Topics in West European Studies (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
  Topic: Anne Frank: Her Diary in Perspective

III. Religion and Thought

College of Arts and Sciences
E103 Topics in Arts and Humanities (topics relating to Jewish Studies) (3 cr.) A & H, TFR
  Topics: The Bible and its Interpreters; Who Wrote the Bible?
S103 Freshman Seminar in Arts and Humanities (3 cr.) A & H, TFR
  Topic: Genesis and Myth

Comparative Literature
C301 Special Topics in Comparative Literature (3 cr.) A & H
  Topics: Poetics of Biblical Narrative; Reading the Prophets
C405 Senior Seminar in Comparative Literature (3 cr.) A & H P: at least one 300 level CMLT course or consent of instructor
  Topic: The Bible in Western Literature; Job, from the Bible to Kafka; Prophecy and Poetry

English
L367 Literature of the Bible (3 cr.) A & H
L460 Seminar: Literary Form, Mode, and Theme (3 cr.)
  Topic: The Poetics of Biblical Narrative

Hutton Honors College
H203 Interdepartmental Colloquia (3 cr.) P: consent of Hutton Honors College; A & H, TFR
  Topic: The Bible and its Interpreters
H303 Interdepartmental Colloquia (3 cr.) P: consent of Hutton Honors College (or JS advisor); A & H
  Topic: Poetics of Biblical Narrative

Jewish Studies
J303 Arts and Humanities Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) A & H   Topic: Midrash and the Art of Interpretation L390 Biblical Themes in Modern Hebrew Literature (3 cr.) A & H

Philosophy
P205 Modern Jewish Philosophy (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
P305 Topics in the Philosophy of Judaism (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
  Topics: Alienation and Community: Judaism, Philosophy, Religious Thought and Literature in Europe, 1900-1940; Alienation and Redemption in Early Twentieth Century European Culture and Jewish Thought; Emil Fackenheim and the Holocaust; Emmanuel Levinas: Ethics as First Philosophy; Franz Rosenzweig and Emmanuel Levinas; Judaism and Contemporary Philosophy; Philosophy and Religious Thought after the Holocaust; Judaism, Philosophy, and Religious Thought in Europe,1900-1940; Responses to the Holocaust: Philosophy, Religion, Ethics, Film, Politics and Historiography
P401 History of Philosophy: Special Topics (3 cr.) A & H
  Topic: Continental Rationalism: Spinoza
P490 Readings in Philosophy (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. May be repeated. In agreement with instructor, intensive readings related to one or a group of philosophers who explore in their writings Jewish themes and topics.

Religious Studies
R152 Religions of the West (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
  (This course not credited for Jewish Studies if REL-R 245 is being taught during same semester)
R201 Honors Proseminar in Religion (3 cr.) A & H P: Freshmen or sophomores who may want to enter an honors program or consent of instructor.
  Topic: The Book of Genesis and its Reworking in Western Culture
R202 Topics in Religious Studies (3 cr.) A & H   Topic: Hell and Heaven in Judaism
R210 Introduction to the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
R245 Introduction to Judaism (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
R300 Studies in Religion (3 cr.) A & H
  Topics: Dilemmas of Modern Judaism; History of God; Issues in the Study of the Hebrew Bible; Readings in Biblical Archaeology I; Fieldwork in Biblical Archaeology I; Fieldwork in Biblical Archaeology II
R307 Messianism and Messiahs in Comparative Perspective (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
R310 Prophecy in Ancient Israel (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
R311 Narrative in the Hebrew Bible (3 cr.) A & H
R317 Judaism in the Making (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
R325 Paul and his Influence in Early Christianity (3 cr.) A & H
R341 Introduction to Jewish Mysticism (3 cr.) A & H, CSA P: Previous course in Judaism or consent of instructor
R342 Religious Thought in Medieval Judaism (3 cr.) A & H
R345 Religious Issues in Contemporary Judaism (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
  Topics: Alienation and Community: Judaism, Philosophy, Religious Thought and Literature in Europe, 1900-1940; Alienation and Redemption in Early Twentieth Century European Culture and Jewish Thought; Emil Fackenheim and the Holocaust; Emmanuel Levinas: Ethics as First Philosophy; Franz Rosenzweig and Emmanuel Levinas; Hasidism and Existentialism; Judaism and Contemporary Philosophy; Philosophy and Religious Thought after the Holocaust; Judaism, Philosophy, and Religious Thought in Europe,1900-1940; Responses to the Holocaust: Philosophy, Religion, Ethics, Film, Politics and Historiography
R360 Comparative Study of Religious Phenomena (3 cr.) A & H
  Topic: Women and Religion
R410 Topics in Ancient Israelite Religion (3 cr.) A & H P: R210.
  Topics: King David in Myth and History; The Poetics of Biblical Narrative; The Sabbath in Literature and Liturgy
R420 Ancient Mediterranean Religions (3 cr.) A & H
R421 Judaism and Gender: Philosophical and Theological Perspectives (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
R427 The Bible and Slavery (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
R430 Topics in the History of Christianity (3 cr.) A & H
  Topic: The Bible and Slavery; Jews and Christians
R445 Topics in the History of Judaism (3 cr.) A & H P: Course on Judaism or consent of instructor
  Topic: Dead Sea Scrolls, Talmud
R474 Capstone Seminar in Religion (3 cr.) A & H
  Topics: Bible and its Interpreters; Mysticism in Religious Traditions

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