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College of Arts and Sciences 2006-2008 Online Bulletin Table of Contents

 

 

College of Arts
and Sciences (College)
2006-2008
Academic Bulletin

College Programs
College of Arts and Sciences (College) 
Kirkwood Hall 104 
130 S. Woodlawn 
Bloomington, IN 47405  
Local (812) 855-1821 
Fax (812) 855-2060 
Contact College
 

Special Courses and Programs

Arts and Sciences Career Services (ASCS)
Direct Admit Program
Experimental Courses (COLL)
Foreign Study (COLL)
Freshman Interest Groups Program (COLL)
Groups Student Support Services Program (COLL)
Hutton Honors College (COLL or HON)
Individual Readings and Research (COLL)
Intensive Freshman Seminars
Initiative for Maximizing Student Diversity (IMSD) Scholars Program (formerly MEDIC-B)
Living Learning Centers
McNair Scholars Program
Special Skills Courses
The Topics Program

Arts and Sciences Career Services (ASCS)

Located within the Career Development Center at 625 N. Jordan Avenue, Arts and Sciences Career Services assists freshmen through seniors with career planning and placement-related decisions. ASCS offers the following courses to help students develop skills.

Course Descriptions

Q275 Professional Portfolio Development (1 cr.) Students create a professional portfolio, an educational tool used for reflection and the practical pursuit of graduate studies and/or career placement. Students incorporate their personal academic experience into a tangible record of their accomplishments in order to communicate the value of their liberal arts education with outside constituents. S/F grading.

Q294 Basic Career Development (2 cr.) P: Freshman or sophomore standing. Development and integration of self-assessment, career planning, and academic work. Students design and produce an individual career action plan. Through self-assessment instruments, they develop their understanding of their personal values, interests, skills, and personality in relation to their vocational options, academic process, and career projections. S/F grading.

Q299 Job Search Strategies for Liberal Arts Students (2 cr.) P: Sophomore, junior, or senior standing. R: Q294. Emphasis on identifying each individual's marketable skills, locating job possibilities, writing resumes and correspondence, and interviewing for jobs. Stresses the value of the arts and sciences degree in the competitive labor market. Ordinarily taught as an eight-week course. Credit given for only one of the following: Q299, Q400, Business X420, and SPEA V352. S/F grading. Requires special fee.

Q398: Internship: Theory Into Practice (1‑3 cr.) Provides opportunity to receive academic credit for a part-time or full-time internship experience that applies classroom concepts to the world of work. Requires approval from Arts and Sciences Career Services, learning contract, employer evaluations, weekly journal, reflective paper, and evaluation of internship site. S/F grading. Offered spring, summer, and fall. Course may be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credit hours.

W499 Work Assignment: Off-Campus (0 cr.) Offers students the opportunity to integrate academic studies with professional work experience in an internship or cooperative education assignment off-campus. Approval required from Arts and Sciences Career Services.

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Direct Admit Program 

Incoming freshmen with strong high school records and an interest in majoring in one or more College of Arts and Sciences departments may apply for direct admission into the College of Arts and Sciences. For more information, send e-mail to dap@indiana.edu.

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Experimental Courses (COLL)

Courses that are experimental in content or teaching technique are offered through the experimental curriculum designated by the prefix “X.” Their purpose is to enrich the College curriculum by providing imaginative, innovative, and interdisciplinary teaching experiments that may be subsequently absorbed into the regular College curriculum. These courses may be counted toward an undergraduate degree in the College of Arts and Sciences as electives inside the College. They do not fulfill distribution, foreign language, or major requirements. For additional information about current offerings, consult the online Schedule of Classes.

Course Descriptions

X101 Experimental Topics (1-3 cr.) Imaginative, innovative, and interdisciplinary courses designed to enrich the college curriculum. A student may count up to a total of 5 hours of credit in experimental topics courses (X101, X211, X311) with different topics toward graduation.

X112 Traditions and Cultures of Indiana University (2 cr.) An online examination of the culture of a research university as told through the storied traditions of IU Bloomington. Students will learn about the history of American higher education by examining how the campus has changed since its 1820 founding-in terms of its demography, programs, and buildings. Certain unique treasures of IUB (the Gutenberg Bible, Little 500, the Indiana Memorial Union, the Kinsey Institute) will be used to illustrate issues related to information technology, student activism, commercialization, and academic freedom.

X211 Experimental Topics (1-3 cr.) Imaginative, innovative, and interdisciplinary courses designed to enrich the college curriculum. A student may count up to a total of 5 hours of credit in experimental topics courses (X101, X211, X311) with different topics toward graduation.

X311 Experimental Topics (1-3 cr.) Imaginative, innovative, and interdisciplinary courses designed to enrich the college curriculum. A student may count up to a total of 5 hours of credit in experimental topics courses (X101, X211, X311) with different topics toward graduation.


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Foreign Study (COLL)

F200 Foreign Study (0-8 cr.) P: approval of an assistant dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. This course listing may be used for course work from overseas study programs (including transfer credit from non-IU programs), when the content of the course is within the general area of arts and sciences but does not fall clearly within the discipline of any particular department in the College. May be repeated up to the limit of 8 credit hours.

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Freshman Interest Groups Program (COLL)

To support the academic transition of first-year students, Indiana University offers the Freshman Interest Groups (FIGs) Program. FIGs are groups of no more than 20 first-semester freshmen who co-enroll in two or three courses together, usually live near each other in the residence centers, and take X111-the FIGs Seminar-together. The FIGs Seminar is a 1 credit hour course designed to acquaint students with academic, intellectual, and cultural campus resources, as well as sharpen study skills and integrate material from FIGs courses. FIGs provide a common academic frame of reference for students and consist of courses that help fulfill distribution and degree requirements or are thematically linked. A wide range of FIGs are offered the first semester of each year, and all freshmen are invited to participate. Students admitted to the university will receive detailed information about the FIGs program during spring prior to their freshman year.

Course Description

X111 Freshman Interest Group (1 cr.) S/F grading. Designed to help Freshman Interest Groups (FIGs) students make the academic transition to Indiana University, this course helps students sharpen study skills; introduces campus academic, cultural, and student service resources; and assists students in integrating course content from FIGs courses. Students must be enrolled in the FIGs program.

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Freshman Seminars (COLL)

Freshman Seminars (S103, S104, S105) are open to freshmen only. Each seminar is limited to 20 students. See course descriptions under “Hutton Honors College” in this bulletin.

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Groups Student Support Services Program (COLL)

The Groups Student Support Services Program is jointly funded and sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education and Indiana University. The program offers a variety of services, including personal counseling, academic counseling, tutoring, enrollment in specialized courses, and activities that foster academic enrichment. The Groups Program provides whatever reasonable support is needed toward the attainment of the bachelor's degree at Indiana University for individuals who are first-generation college students, are from officially determined low-income families, or are physically disabled.

Course Description

X113 Groups Student Success Seminar (1 cr.) This course is designed to help students make a smooth transition to their college education by focusing on leadership development and course content related to study skills as an integrated unit. Cultural/intellectual outings and networking opportunities will be a part of the course. X113 will be co-taught by accomplished sophomore, junior, or senior Groups students.

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Hutton Honors College (COLL or HON)

Indiana University offers the Edward L. Hutton Honors College Program in an effort to present challenging educational opportunities to superior students. Ordinarily, enrollment in Hutton Honors College courses is limited to those who have been formally admitted to the Hutton Honors College. For further information, contact the Hutton Honors College, 324 N. Jordan Avenue, (812) 855-3555.

Course Descriptions

Courses below carry the prefix “COLL.”

S103 Freshman Seminar in Arts and Humanities (3 cr.) A & H, TFR P: Freshman standing and consent of the Hutton Honors College or the Intensive Freshman Seminar Program. Introduction to college-level projects chosen from arts and humanities fields. Students will learn how scholars frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches in a small-class experience with a faculty member.  Writing and related skills are stressed. Topics will vary. Open only to freshmen. Credit given for only one of COLL S103 or COLL E103.

S104 Freshman Seminar in Social and Historical Studies (3 cr.) S & H, TFR P: Freshman standing and consent of the Hutton Honors College or the Intensive Freshman Seminar Program. Introduction to college-level projects chosen from social and historical studies fields.  Students will learn how scholars frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches in a small-class experience with a faculty member.  Writing and related skills are stressed.  Topics will vary. Open only to freshmen. Credit given for only one of COLL S104 or COLL E104.

S105 Freshman Seminar in Natural and Mathematical Sciences (3 cr.) N & M, TFR P: Freshman standing and consent of the Hutton Honors College or the Intensive Freshman Seminar Program. Introduction to college-level projects chosen from natural and mathematical science fields. Students will learn how scholars frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches in a small-class experience with a faculty member. Writing and related skills are stressed. Topics will vary. Open only to freshmen. Credit given for only one of COLL S105 or COLL E105.

Courses below carry the prefix “HON.”

H200 Interdepartmental Colloquia (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of Hutton Honors College. Honors seminar. Topics will vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

H203 Interdepartmental Colloquia (3 cr.) A & H, TFR P: Consent of Hutton Honors College. Honors seminar focusing on topics in the arts and humanities. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

H204 Interdepartmental Colloquia (3 cr.) S & H, TFR P: Consent of Hutton Honors College. Honors seminar focusing on topics in social and historical studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

H205 Interdepartmental Colloquia (3 cr.) N & M, TFR P: Consent of Hutton Honors College. Honors seminar focusing on topics in the natural and mathematical sciences. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

H211 Ideas and Experience I (3 cr.) A & H, TFR P: Completion of the English composition requirement and consent of Hutton Honors College. Honors seminar focused on the intellectual heritage of the West. Acquaints students with great works from different historical periods, cultural settings, and disciplines. Selected works by writers such as Homer, Plato, Virgil, Augustine, Dante, Boccaccio, Machiavelli, Descartes, Voltaire, and Galileo will be read.

H212 Ideas and Experience II (3 cr.) S & H, TFR P: Completion of the English composition requirement and consent of Hutton Honors College. Honors seminar focused on the sources of modern thinking in the works of authors such as Rousseau, Kant, Goethe, Wordsworth, Stendhal, Darwin, Marx, Dickens, Dostoyevsky, Nietzsche, Freud, Weber, Veblen, Einstein, Kafka, Sartre, and Camus.

H299 Honors Tutorial (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of Hutton Honors College. Open to Hutton Honors College students who wish to pursue independent reading or individual or group research outside of existing departments or departmental courses. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

H300 Interdepartmental Colloquium (1-3 cr.) P: Sophomore or junior standing and consent of Hutton Honors College. May be repeated with different topics up to a maximum of 9 credit hours.

H303 Interdepartmental Colloquia (3 cr.) A & H P: Consent of Hutton Honors College. Honors seminar focusing on topics in arts and humanities. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

H304 Interdepartmental Colloquia (3 cr.) S & H P: Consent of Hutton Honors College. Honors seminar focusing on topics in social and historical studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

H305 Interdepartmental Colloquia (3 cr.) N & M P: Consent of Hutton Honors College. Honors seminar focusing on topics in natural and mathematical sciences. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

H400 Interdepartmental Colloquium (1-3 cr.) P: Junior or senior standing and consent of Hutton Honors College. May be repeated with different topics up to a maximum of 9 credit hours.

H488 C.I.C. Traveling Scholar Program (0 cr.) S/F grading. Students from other Committee on Institutional Cooperation (C.I.C.) institutions participating in the C.I.C. Traveling Scholar Program for Honors Undergraduates must enroll in this noncredit course in order to register for other classes at Indiana University Bloomington.

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Individual Readings and Research (COLL)

X495 Individual Readings and Research (1‑6 cr.) Independent study that cannot be accommodated through a department reading number is arranged through a faculty member willing to work closely with a student to direct a project. Proposals and recommendations of the faculty director must be presented to the College of Arts and Sciences office prior to registration.

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Initiative for Maximizing Student Diversity (IMSD) Scholars Program (formerly MEDIC-B)

The IMSD (Initiative for Maximizing Student Diversity) Scholars Program is funded by the National Institutes of Health and is sponsored by Indiana University. The program offers a variety of services including personal and academic counseling, tutoring, and activities that foster academic enrichment for 20 underrepresented minority students who are interested in pursuing education and careers in biomedical research. One of the most exciting aspects of the IMSD program is the opportunity for scholars to engage in paid research internships under the guidance of faculty mentors from areas in which they hope to pursue graduate study. IMSD scholars attend national conferences, where they make formal presentations of their research to faculty and peers, and attend academic seminars and workshops. IMSD scholars also receive guidance regarding the graduate school application process.

For additional information, contact the IMSD Scholars Program Office, (812) 856-1302; e-mail imsd@indiana.edu; or visit Jordan Hall 220 or the IMSD Scholars Program Web site at www.indiana.edu/~imsd.

Intensive Freshman Seminars

Intensive Freshman Seminars is a unique residential program open to all entering freshmen at Indiana University Bloomington that provides a bridge to a successful college career. For three weeks before the fall semester begins, students may enroll in one class chosen from a wide range of topics and taught by regular faculty, live in a centrally located residence hall, and become familiar with the IU computing and library systems. Students develop close and lasting friendships through the Intensive Freshman Seminar Program.

All seminars:

  • Count as 3 credits toward any IUB degree.
  • Allow one-on-one interaction with an outstanding faculty member.
  • Are limited to 20 students.
  • Emphasize active learning strategies through the seminar format.
  • Are designed to hone skills in reading, writing, and critical thinking-the foundations for more advanced work.
  • Include an introduction to the university's extensive computing services and world-renowned library resources.

Courses offered as Intensive Freshman Seminars change every year and are available only to matriculating students who elect to take part in the three-week Intensive Freshman Seminar Program prior to beginning the fall semester. For more information on the IFS program and courses offered, contact the IFS office at Maxwell Hall 120, (812) 855-3839.

Also see the course descriptions for Freshman Seminars (COLL S103, S104, S105) under “Hutton Honors College” in this bulletin.

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Living Learning Centers

Collins Living Learning Center
Global Village

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Collins Living Learning Center (LLC)

A residential academic program located in the Collins Quadrangle, the Collins Living-Learning Center offers academic opportunities for students interested in exploring a variety of academic disciplines.

Course Descriptions

L100 Collins Seminar (1-3 cr.) Topical or “hands-on” introductions to specific disciplines. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

L102 Supplementary Component in Environmental Learning (1 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Supplementary course that connects academic content with environmental projects. May be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours.

L110 Collins Seminar (3 cr.) A & H Topical or “hands-on” introductions to specific disciplines. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

L120 Collins Seminar (3 cr.) S & H Topical or “hands-on” introductions to specific disciplines. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

L130 Collins Seminar (3 cr.) N & M Topical or “hands-on” introductions to specific disciplines. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

L200 Collins Colloquium (1-3 cr.) Interdisciplinary courses on subjects not normally covered by individual departments. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

L210 Collins Colloquium (3 cr.) A & H Interdisciplinary courses on subjects not normally covered by individual departments. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

L220 Collins Colloquium (3 cr.) S & H Interdisciplinary courses on subjects not normally covered by individual departments. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

L230 Collins Colloquium (3 cr.) N & M Interdisciplinary courses on subjects not normally covered by individual departments. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

L300 Collins Symposium (1-3 cr.) The arts, sciences, and professions in their larger contexts. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

L310 Collins Symposium (3 cr.) A & H The arts, sciences, and professions in their larger contexts. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

L320 Collins Symposium (3 cr.) S & H The arts, sciences, and professions in their larger contexts. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

L330 Collins Symposium (3 cr.) N & M The arts, sciences, and professions in their larger contexts. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

L400 Independent Group Study (1-3 cr.) Groups of two or more students may put together their own course of study on a topic of common interest, under the supervision of an appropriate faculty member. This course may be repeated with different topics, for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (For Collins residents only.)

L402 Independent Study in Local Environmental Stewardship (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor and junior/senior status. Independent research project in environmental issues. May be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours.

Q199 Residential Learning Workshop (1 cr.) Small discussion groups led by undergraduate students of the Living-Learning Center will consider the topics of community, cooperation, and interactive learning as well as the structure and operation of the center in relation to the university as a whole. Students will complete a project contributing to the purpose of the center. Does not count toward the 100 credit hour requirement of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Q299 Peer Instructor Workshop (1 cr.) Trains undergraduate peer instructors to prepare and teach Q199 Residential Learning Workshop at the Collins Living-Learning Center. Does not count toward the 100 credit hour requirement of the College of Arts and Sciences.

S103 Collins Living-Learning Center Freshman Seminar (3 cr.) A & H, TFR Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of S103 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Topics curriculum. Freshman seminars are open to freshmen who will learn how scholars from the arts and humanities distribution area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of COLL E103, COLL S103, CLLC S103, or GLLC S103.

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Global Village (GLLC)

The goal of the Global Village Living-Learning Center is to create a cosmopolitan, multidisciplinary, multicultural, multinational, and multilingual community of domestic and international students preparing for global living and careers.

Course Descriptions

G100 Global Village Seminar (1-3 cr.) P: Permission of Global Village director. Introduction to a topic or issue of international dimension not normally covered by individual departments. Often interdisciplinary. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a total of 6 credit hours.

G110 Global Village Seminar (3 cr.) A & H P: Permission of Global Village director. Introduction to a topic or issue of international dimension not normally covered by individual departments. Often interdisciplinary. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a total of 6 credit hours.

G120 Global Village Seminar (3 cr.) S & H P: Permission of Global Village director. Introduction to a topic or issue of international dimension not normally covered by individual departments. Often interdisciplinary. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a total of 6 credit hours.

G130 Global Village Seminar (3 cr.) N & M P: Permission of Global Village director. Introduction to a topic or issue of international dimensions not normally covered by individual departments. Often interdisciplinary. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a total of 6 credit hours.

G200 Global Village Colloquium (1-3 cr.) P: Permission of Global Village director. Intermediate consideration of a topic or issue of international dimension not normally covered by individual departments. Often interdisciplinary. May be repeated with different topics for a total of 6 credit hours.

G210 Global Village Colloquium (3 cr.) A & H P: Permission of Global Village director. Intermediate consideration of a topic or issue of international dimension not normally covered by individual departments. Often interdisciplinary. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a total of 6 credit hours.

G220 Global Village Colloquium (3 cr.) S & H P: Permission of Global Village director. Intermediate consideration of a topic or issue of international dimension not normally covered by individual departments. Often interdisciplinary. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a total of 6 credit hours.

G230 Global Village Colloquium (3 cr.) N & M P: Permission of Global Village director. Intermediate consideration of a topic or issue of international dimension not normally covered by individual departments. Often interdisciplinary. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a total of 6 credit hours.

G291 Study Abroad: Before You Go (1 cr.) P: Permission of Office of Overseas Study. Academic preparation for studying abroad. Refinement of goals and concerns, pre-departure matters, life in the host country, strategies for recognizing and overcoming challenges, and integrating study and personal experiences with post-travel educational goals.

G300 Global Village Symposium (1-3 cr.) P: Permission of Global Village director. Advanced consideration of a topic or issue of international dimension not normally covered by individual departments. Often interdisciplinary. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a total of 6 credit hours.

G310 Global Village Symposium (3 cr.) A & H P: Permission of Global Village director. Advanced consideration of a topic or issue of international dimension not normally covered by individual departments. Often interdisciplinary. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a total of 6 credit hours.

G320 Global Village Symposium (3 cr.) S & H P: Permission of Global Village director. Advanced consideration of a topic or issue of international dimension not normally covered by individual departments. Often interdisciplinary. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a total of 6 credit hours.

G330 Global Village Symposium (3 cr.) N & M P: Permission of Global Village director. Advanced consideration of a topic or issue of international dimension not normally covered by individual departments. Often interdisciplinary. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a total of 6 credit hours.

Q199 Introduction to the Global Village (1 cr.) P: Residence in the Global Village Living-Learning Center. Small discussion groups led by undergraduate Village residents consider topics relevant to the purpose and operation of the Center, community living, and the relation of the Village to the university. Introduction to campus international resources. Students complete a project that contributes to the Village's purpose. Does not count toward the 100 credit hour requirement of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Q299 Peer Instructor Workshop (2 cr.) P: Permission of Global Village director. Required workshop for Global Village residents preparing to teach Q199. Does not count toward the 100 credit hour requirement of the College of Arts and Sciences.

S103 Global Village Living-Learning Center Freshman Seminar (3 cr.) A & H, TFR Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of S103 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Topics curriculum. Freshman seminars are open to freshmen who will learn how scholars from the arts and humanities distribution area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of COLL E103, COLL S103, CLLC S103, or GLLC S103.

S104 Global Village Living-Learning Center Freshman Seminar (3 cr.) S & H, TFR Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of S104 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Topics curriculum. Freshman seminars are open to freshmen who will learn how scholars from the social and historical studies distribution area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of COLL E104, COLL S104, LAMP S104, or GLLC S104.

S105 Global Village Living-Learning Center Freshman Seminar (3 cr.) N & M, TFR Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of S105 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Topics curriculum. Freshman seminars are open to freshmen who will learn how scholars from the natural and mathematical sciences distribution area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of COLL E105 or COLL S105 or GLLC S105.

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McNair Scholars Program

The McNair Scholars Program at Indiana University, funded by the U.S. Department of Education, prepares low-income, first-generation, and minority undergraduates for graduate study at the doctoral level. Each year, McNair scholars participate in academic year and summer activities that include research and teaching experiences. The program offers a variety of services, including personal and academic counseling, tutoring, and activities that foster academic enrichment. One of the most exciting aspects of the McNair program is the opportunity for scholars to engage in paid research internships under the guidance of faculty mentors from areas in which they hope to pursue graduate study. McNair Scholars attend national conferences where they make formal presentations of their research to faculty and peers, attend academic seminars and workshops, and have an opportunity to participate in an undergraduate teaching internship. McNair Scholars receive guidance regarding the graduate school application process and fellowships, graduate assistantships, and loans; attend a Graduate Record Exam preparation course; and visit other campuses to learn about graduate school life.

Students from any College of Arts and Sciences major are eligible to apply to the McNair Scholars Program. For additional information and eligibility requirements, contact the McNair Scholars Program Office at 803 E. Eighth Street, (812) 855-1135.

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Special Skills Courses (COLL)

C101 Introduction to Chess (1 cr.) An introduction to chess including the rules, strategies, and history of the game. S/F grading.

Q175 Welcome to the College (1 cr.) This course is highly recommended for directly admitted freshmen and transfer students. With guest speakers, campus visits, and online resources, students are introduced to valuable tools at Indiana University and taught how to use these resources most effectively. S/F grading

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The Topics Program (COLL)

The Topics Program introduces students to the way scholars from different distribution areas frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Students can use E103 or S103 to satisfy one course in the Arts and Humanities distribution area, E104 or S104 to satisfy one course in the Social and Historical Studies distribution area, and  E105 or S105 to satisfy one course in the Natural and Mathematical Sciences distribution area. Other Topics-Qualified courses are offered with departmental headings and with distribution credit as indicated. For a listing of all courses that can satisfy the Topics requirement, see “Appendix III” in this bulletin. For updates of Topics courses, see the College Web site at www.indiana.edu/~college/topics/.

Freshman Seminars are open to freshmen only. Each seminar is limited to 20 students. See course descriptions for Freshman Seminars (COLL S103, S104, S105) under “Hutton Honors College” in this bulletin.

Course Descriptions

E103 Topics in Arts and Humanities (3 cr.) A & H, TFR Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of E103 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Topics curriculum. The curriculum is open to freshmen and sophomores, who will learn how scholars from the arts and humanities distribution area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of E103 or S103.

E104 Topics in Social and Historical Studies (3 cr.) S & H, TFR Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of E104 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Topics curriculum. The curriculum is open to freshmen and sophomores, who will learn how scholars from the social and historical studies distribution area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of E104 or S104.

E105 Topics in Natural and Mathematical Sciences (3 cr.) N & M, TFR Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of E105 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Topics curriculum. The curriculum is open to freshmen and sophomores, who will learn how scholars from the natural and mathematical sciences distribution area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of E105 or S105.

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