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College of Arts and Sciences 2006-2008 Online Bulletin Table of Contents

 

 

College of Arts
and Sciences (College)
2006-2008
Academic Bulletin

College Programs
College of Arts and Sciences (College) 
Kirkwood Hall 104 
130 S. Woodlawn 
Bloomington, IN 47405  
Local (812) 855-1821 
Fax (812) 855-2060 
Contact College
 

Student Information

Program Planning and Counseling Guidelines
Academic Regulations
Academic Standing of Students
Special Opportunities for Students
Student Records

Program Planning and Counseling Guidelines

The experience of faculty and staff advisors and of successful students suggests the following guidelines for effective planning of undergraduate programs

Requirements
Advisors
Student Responsibility
Suggested Program for Arts and Sciences Freshmen
Students with Learning Disabilities

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Requirements

Students should be thoroughly familiar with the sections in this bulletin entitled General Requirements for Bachelor's Degrees and Academic Regulations and with the sections on completing fundamental skills, distribution, culture studies, and major concentration requirements.

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Advisors

Students should seek an appointment with an advisor in their major department well before the dates established by the university calendar for registration for future classes. In such conferences, students should, as a minimum objective, make certain that they understand the requirements for successful completion of the area requirements and that they have made an appropriate plan for the next semester. (See “Online Degree Progress Report” section in this bulletin.)

The Health Professions and Prelaw Center assists students planning to seek admission to the Indiana University Schools of Law, Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing, and the Health Professions Program in the IU School of Medicine. It is located in Maxwell Hall 010, (812) 855-1873.

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Student Responsibility

Students should understand that the responsibility for making an appropriate academic program and for meeting every degree requirement rests with them; academic advisors are obligated only to assist students in meeting this responsibility. Students are responsible for monitoring their degree progress. Students needing clarification of any of the requirements for their degree program or of any information on their Degree Progress Report are urged to obtain that clarification from their academic advisor, or from the recorder’s office in the College. Requests for exceptions to departmental or College requirements may be granted by written approval from the respective department and the Office of Undergraduate Academic Affairs, Kirkwood Hall 012.

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Suggested Program for Arts and Sciences Freshmen

Students should complete their mathematics and English composition fundamental skills and one Topics course during their freshman year. The following program is suggested only as a general guide. Students should see their advisor before determining a schedule.

First Semester
English Composition or Mathematics requirement (3-4 cr.)
Foreign Language (3-5 cr.)
One Topics course
and/or other distribution or Culture Studies requirement (6 cr.)
Elective or course in major (3 cr.)

Second Semester

English Composition or Mathematics requirement (3-4 cr.)
Foreign Language (3-5 cr.)
One Topics course and/or other distribution or Culture Studies requirement (6 cr.)
Elective or course in major (3 cr.)

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Students with Learning Disabilities

Students with a learning disability, hearing impairment, speech impairment, or any other disability that may affect their ability to fulfill a requirement of the College should contact the Office of Disability Services for Students, Franklin Hall 096, (812) 855-7578, prior to registering. Requirements will not be waived for students with disabilities; however, some modifications may be made within specific courses. Students seeking such modifications should do so early in their academic career to ensure timely progress to degree completion.

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Academic Regulations

Change of Major
Grading System
Amended FX Policy (Extended-X) Policy
Matriculation Date
Pass/Fail Option
Incompleted Courses
Withdrawals from Courses
Grade Appeals and Retroactive Changes
Addition of Courses
Absences from Scheduled Classes
Absences from Final Examinations
Transcripts

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Change of Major

In order to change their major, students must contact the advisor in the department in which they wish to become a major. The advisor will submit a Major or School Change Request to the College Recorder’s Office for processing.

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Grading System

Grades are awarded on the following basis:

A 4.0 Excellent
A-
B+
B
3.7
3.3
3.0
Good
B-
C+
C
2.7
2.3
2.0
Average
C-
D+
D
1.7
1.3
1.0
Poor
D-
F
0.7
0.0
Unsatisfactory

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Amended FX Policy (Extended-X) Policy

The College of Arts and Sciences calculates FX grades as grades of F (D–X grades as grades of D–, DX grades as grades of D, D+X grades as grades of D+, C–X grades as grades of C–, CX grades as grades of C, etc.) for internal purposes and degree requirements. This calculation will apply to all categories of academic standing, including but not limited to: good standing, probation and dismissal, class rank, and all grade point average requirements in the degree, including cumulative, semester, and major concentration.

A student may use the Amended FX (Extended-X) Policy for purposes of the university transcript. This option applies only to course work taken at IU, not transfer courses. Students wishing to pursue this option should read the text of the policy in each semester’s Enrollment and Student Academic Information Bulletin provided by the Registrar’s Office and should in addition contact the College Recorder’s Office, Kirkwood Hall 001, (812) 855-1821.

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Matriculation Date

Students who matriculate in the summer of a year are considered to be fall matriculants for degree and policy purposes.

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Pass/Fail Option

During the four years of their undergraduate program, students in good standing (not on probation) may enroll in a maximum of eight elective courses to be taken with a grade of P (Pass) or F (Fail). The Pass/Fail option is open for a maximum of two courses per academic year, including summer sessions. For the Pass/Fail option, the academic year is defined as beginning with the start of the fall semester and ending with the end of the second summer session. The course selected for Pass/Fail must be an elective (i.e., it cannot fulfill requirements other than the minimum 122 hours required for the degree, and the requirements for credit hours at the 300-400 level). It may not be used to satisfy any of the College of Arts and Sciences’ general education requirements, nor may it be counted as a part of the student’s concentration area, nor may it be counted toward completion of a minor or certificate program. The course or courses may be used to meet the requirement for courses at the 300-400 level.

During the freshman year, students may elect to take the School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation activity courses on a Pass/Fail basis in addition to the two other courses permitted.

Decisions to take courses Pass/Fail must be made no later than the end of the third week of the semester. For summer sessions, the decision to elect to take a course Pass/Fail must be made no later than the fifth day of the first summer session and the tenth day of the second summer session. See the Enrollment Bulletin (Office of the Registrar) for deadline dates, including deadlines for eight-week sessions.

A grade of P is not counted in computing grade point averages; a grade of F is counted. A grade of P cannot be changed subsequently to any other letter grade.

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Incompleted Courses

A grade of I (Incomplete) may be given only when the work of the course is substantially completed and when the student’s work is of passing quality. A grade of I may not be given when a student has taken the final exam, or completed the final paper or project for the course. When an I is assigned, a record must be maintained in the office of the department in which the grade was given. The record will include a statement of the reason for recording the I, an adequate guide for its removal, and a suggested final grade in case the instructor should leave campus for an extended time.

The time allowed for the removal of an I may not exceed one calendar year from the date of its recording, although the dean of the student’s college or school may authorize adjustment of this period in exceptional circumstances.

To complete a course in which a student received a grade of I, the student should consult with the instructor. The student should not reenroll in the course.

By assigning an I, an instructor implicitly authorizes and requires the I to be changed to an F at the end of one calendar year if that instructor does not act to remove the I. The registrar will automatically change the I to an F at the end of this time period. Both the student and the instructor in whose course the student received the I will be notified of this change of grade.

These regulations do not apply to research and reading courses in which completion of the work of the course is not necessarily required at the end of the semester and the grade R (Deferred) is given. Once a student has graduated, nothing in these regulations shall prohibit the I from remaining on the record.

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Withdrawals from Courses

The College permits withdrawal from courses with the automatic grade of W (Withdrawal) until the end of the eighth week of classes during the regular academic year, until the end of the fourth week of classes for eight-week courses, and until the end of the first two weeks of classes during a summer session. See the Enrollment Bulletin for deadline dates.

Petitions for withdrawal after the periods specified above will not be authorized by the dean except for urgent reasons beyond the student’s control related to extended illness or equivalent distress. The desire to avoid a low grade is not an acceptable reason for withdrawal from a course.

If students withdraw with the dean’s consent, their grade in the course shall be W if they are passing at the time of withdrawal and F if they are not passing. As with all grades, instructors will assign the appropriate grade. The grade will be recorded on the date of withdrawal. Failure to complete a course without authorized withdrawal will result in a grade of F. The grade of W may not be assigned for a course when a student has taken the final exam, or completed the final paper or project for the course.

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Grade Appeals and Retroactive Changes

Appeals of grades should be resolved with the instructor who assigned the disputed grade. If the student and instructor cannot resolve the matter, the student should discuss it further with the chair of the department offering the course. Appeals unresolved at the department level may be referred to the academic assistant deans. Appeals of grades or requests for other actions after the conclusion of a course should be made as soon as possible. Such requests will not be considered after one calendar year from the end of the semester in which the course in question was taken. Note that grades of I (Incomplete) or W (Withdrawal) may not be assigned for a course when a student has taken the final exam, or completed the final paper or project for the course.

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Addition of Courses

No course may be added by an undergraduate student after the first week of a semester or summer session unless the instructor of the course approves and the request is approved by both the chairperson of the department in which the course is offered and the dean of the school in which the student is enrolled.

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Absences from Scheduled Classes

Illness is usually the only acceptable excuse for absence from class. Other absences must be explained to the satisfaction of the instructor, who will decide whether omitted work may be made up. The names of students who are excessively absent are to be reported by their instructor to the dean of students.

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Absences from Final Examinations

A student who fails to attend the final examination of a course and who has a passing grade up to that time may be given a grade of I. The Committee on Absence of the Division of Student Affairs reviews excuses concerning absences from final examinations and informs instructors of its decisions. Students scheduled for more than three examinations in one day may have their examination schedule adjusted if they notify the instructor or department of the course scheduled for the fourth (and additional) final examination of the day. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of the date and time of the final examination for each of his or her classes before officially enrolling. See the Enrollment Bulletin (Office of the Registrar) each semester for further information.

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Transcripts

Complete information on transcripts can be found in the Enrollment Bulletin. Requests for transcripts must be made in person or in writing to the Office of the Registrar, Franklin Hall 100, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405-7104 (or via e-mail to: registrar@indiana.edu).

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Academic Standing of Students

Candidates for Bachelor's Degrees in Good Standing
Class Standing
Academic Probation
Dismissal
Readmission
Restart Policy

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Candidates for Bachelor's Degrees in Good Standing

Students are considered to be candidates in good standing for an Indiana University bachelor’s degree when they have been regularly admitted by the Office of Admissions, when their academic grade point average is not less than a 2.000 (C) for the last semester’s work, and when their cumulative grade point average is at least 2.000 (C).

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Class Standing

Class standing is based on the number of credit hours completed toward graduation:
      Freshman, fewer than 26 credits
      Sophomore, 26 to 55 credits
      Junior, 56 to 85 credits
      Senior, 86 or more credits

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Academic Probation

Students are on academic probation when their cumulative grade point average is below 2.000 (C). They are also on probation for the duration of the regular semester following one in which they failed to attain at least a 2.000 (C) grade point average. Students on academic probation must comply with such restrictions as the Office of the Dean of Students or the dean of their school may deem necessary.

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Dismissal

Students are dismissed from the College of Arts and Sciences when, in the judgment of the Scholarship and Probation Committee, they have ceased to make adequate progress toward their degree. Students who fail to attain a minimum grade point average of 2.000 (C) in any two semesters and who have a cumulative grade point average below 2.000 (C) are dismissed automatically. (Note that these students will have been placed on probation at least once before dismissal.)

Whether or not students have been placed on probation before, the Scholarship and Probation Committee may dismiss students if their record reveals any of the following:

        •    failing or near failing performance in any semester;
        •    failure to make adequate progress toward completion of major requirements;
        •    failure to make any progress toward completion of degree requirements in any semester;
        •    a cumulative grade point average below 2.000 (C).


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Readmission

The Scholarship and Probation Committee considers petitions for readmission from students who have been dismissed. A student dismissed for the first time must petition to continue as a student in the College. A student dismissed for the second time may not be admitted for the next regular semester but is eligible to submit a petition for readmission after a period of at least one regular semester. Third dismissals are generally considered final. Students should contact the College Recorder’s office (Kirkwood Hall 001) for further information concerning eligibility to petition.

In order for petitions for readmission to be considered and accepted by the committee, students eligible to submit them must do so before June 20 for the fall semester, October 1 for the spring semester, and March 1 for a summer session.

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Restart Policy

Students who have been away from Indiana University for at least five years, and who earned grades that make it impossible or very difficult to return to a College of Arts and Sciences degree program, may petition for a “restart.” Under a restart, the College of Arts and Sciences will establish a new degree record for the student that will consist of courses previously taken that were completed with a minimum grade of C. Note that all Indiana University course work will remain on the student’s permanent record (the university transcript); this policy will affect only the student’s College of Arts and Sciences record.

Students will be eligible for consideration for this policy if it has been a minimum of five years since full-time or continuous part-time enrollment. Students will need to provide evidence that would indicate a significant change in their ability to succeed in academic work. Reevaluation of fundamental skills may be necessary before the student can proceed. Students should petition for a restart as part of the readmission process. They are held to the deadlines listed above for submission of readmission petitions.

Students should contact the Office of Undergraduate Academic Affairs, Kirkwood Hall 012, to begin the petition process and to discuss the details of this policy.

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Special Opportunities for Students

 

Basic Skills/Special Skills
Career Development Center
Credit by Examination
Dean's List
Degrees Awarded with Distinction
Departmental Honors Programs
Experimental Courses
Foreign Study
Groups Program
Honors College
Individualized Major Program
Initiative for Maximizing Student     Diversity (formerly MEDIC-B)
Intensive Freshman Seminars (IFS)
Language Placement Tests
Living Learning Centers
McNair Scholars Program
Military Science and Aerospace Studies
Overseas Study Programs
Pass/Fail Option
Phi Beta Kappa
Science Courses for Non-Science Majors
Second Bachelor's Degree
Special Skills Courses

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Basic Skills/Special Skills

The College of Arts and Sciences takes seriously its obligation to help students achieve scholastic success. There are “Basic Skills” sections in English and mathematics to help students with deficient backgrounds in these areas to fulfill the fundamental skills requirements. Finally, the College sponsors “Special Skills” courses in such areas as campus resources and career development to help students gain maximum academic benefit from their other course work.

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Career Development Center

The Career Development Center houses four interrelated programs, which provide an array of services designed to assist undergraduate students in making informed academic and career decisions. The Career Development Center, located at 625 N. Jordan Avenue, is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Visit the office Web site at www.indiana.edu/~career.

Career Counseling Services (CCS) provides assistance to students who are in the process of selecting a major and/or exploring career options. In addition to scheduled counseling appointments, freshmen and sophomores may obtain career planning assistance by enrolling in an eight-week, 2 credit hour course titled Q294 Basic Career Development.

The Student Employment Office (SEO) serves as a central location for finding part-time or temporary employment while at IU. Positions listed with SEO include both work-study and non-work-study jobs and include opportunities both on and off campus. All positions listed with SEO are accessible online 24 hours a day. SEO also sponsors an annual Camp Day in February and the IU Student Jobs Fair twice each year, bringing together students seeking part-time jobs and employers with job openings.

Arts and Sciences Career Services (ASCS) assists freshman through senior students with career exploration, planning, and development, as well as with job/internship search information and support. Students can meet one-on-one with an ASCS counselor to explore their personal profiles, career choices, and plans, or to discuss job and internship search issues such as resume and cover letter writing, interviewing, career research, and the graduate school application process. Freshman and sophomore students are encouraged to enroll in Q294 Basic Career Development. This 2 credit, eight-week course is designed to help students in their career self-assessment and in learning about their academic and professional options and choices. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors are encouraged to enroll in Q299 Job Search Strategies for Liberal Arts Students. This 2 credit, eight-week course is designed to help students develop an effective plan for postgraduate success. In addition, ASCS sponsors nine career fairs, an on-campus recruiting program, online job and internship listings, Web resume books, and a resume referral service to help students design and develop a professional portfolio to market themselves, and Q398 Internship: Theory Into Practice, a variable- credit course for students interested in earning academic credit for internship experiences.

The Career Resource Library (CRL) houses a variety of resources and a technology center designed to assist students in choosing a major or graduate school program; identifying and researching career options; investigating internship opportunities, summer job options, and full-time employment leads; researching potential employers; improving job search techniques and interviewing skills; and writing effective resumes, cover letters, and graduate school applications. The CRL is open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

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Credit by Examination

Students may receive credit for certain courses by successful performance on SAT II Subject Tests, College Board Advanced Placement Tests, and examinations offered by academic departments while at Indiana University. The appropriate department of the university reviews the College Board Advanced Placement Tests in order to make recommendations about advanced standing. Students who believe that they are prepared for advanced study or that they are eligible for special credit because of superior preparation or independent study are urged to accelerate their college programs in this manner. Credit will be recorded simply with the grade of S (Satisfactory) unless the examination clearly merits an A grade and the department requests the use of a grade other than S. Failure to pass the examination carries no penalty. Students may thus graduate early, or they may use the time gained to take courses beyond those ordinarily required for an undergraduate degree.

Special Note:  Students who pass departmentally administered examinations may be eligible for credit. Fees for special credit/credit by examination are waived for undergraduate students enrolled in an IU degree-seeking program for at least 12 credit hours in either the fall or spring semesters. Regular credit-hour rates apply for graduate students and undergraduate students enrolled in fewer than 12 credit hours.

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Dean's List

Each regular semester (excluding summer sessions), the College of Arts and Sciences will recognize those students whose semester GPA qualifies them for the Dean’s List. Students who qualify will be notified of this honor. Eligibility requirements include completion of at least 12 graded credit hours in each semester under review, and earning a minimum of a 3.700 semester GPA.

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Degrees Awarded with Distinction

The College recognizes outstanding performance in course work by awarding bachelor’s degrees with three levels of distinction: Distinction, High Distinction, and Highest Distinction. Students must have a minimum of 60 graded credit hours at Indiana University to be considered for distinction degrees.

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Departmental Honors Programs

Outstanding students can pursue independent study and research during their junior and senior years through honors programs in most departments of the College of Arts and Sciences. Ordinarily, students will apply for admission to an honors program in the second semester of their sophomore year or in the first semester of their junior year. Students must have a minimum College of Arts and Sciences grade point average of 3.300 and the approval of the department chairperson or departmental honors committee for admission and must maintain this minimum average to be graduated with honors. A potential candidate for honors should consult as soon as possible with the departmental honors advisor or the chairperson of the department about requirements. Programs vary somewhat among departments but generally include the following:

  1. Participation in some phase of honors course work (seminars, tutorials, and courses of independent study) each semester of the last two years.
  2. An independent project of research, study, or creative achievement, culminating in a paper, laboratory problem, field research problem, or creative effort. Students wishing to earn honors in two different departments must complete a distinct body of work for each honors notation.
  3. A comprehensive examination, given in the last semester of the senior year, covering the work of the concentration group. It may be oral or written or both, as the department desires. One faculty member outside the student’s major field is always asked to participate.

Enrollment in Reading for Honors is ordinarily done under the course number 399 for juniors and 499 for seniors. The number of credit hours earned under these two course numbers is determined by the departmental honors committee, but it normally should not exceed a maximum total of 15 credit hours. Although the university and its undergraduate schools have specific requirements for graduation, substitutions within the spirit of these requirements may be made to the benefit of the individual student.

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Experimental Courses

The College offers a number of experimental courses. These are listed under Special Courses and Programs.

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Foreign Study

See “Foreign Study” in this bulletin.

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Groups Program

The Groups Student Support Services Program provides whatever reasonable support is needed to attain the bachelor’s degree at Indiana University for individuals who are first-generation college students, are from officially determined low-income families, or are physically disabled. It is jointly funded and sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education and Indiana University. The program offers a variety of services including personal counseling, academic counseling, tutoring, enrollment in specialized courses, and activities that foster academic enrichment. For more information, see the Groups Web site at www.indiana.edu/~groups; call (812) 855-0507; or visit Maxwell Hall 200.

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Hutton Honors College

Indiana University offers the Edward L. Hutton Honors College Program in an effort to present challenging educational opportunities to superior students. The Hutton Honors College has designed a variety of introductory honors experiences for qualified students. In addition to providing the entering student with special sections of traditional departmental courses, the Hutton Honors College offers innovative seminar experiences and arranges independent reading programs. Specially chosen honors advisors aid first-year students in planning their individual programs. Students in the Hutton Honors College follow no rigid program and may choose to earn a general honors notation and/or an honors degree in their discipline. A general honors education complements formal departmental or school honors programs that lead to distinctive degrees with honors. Students should contact the Hutton Honors College, 324 N. Jordan Avenue, (812) 855-3555, for further information.

The Hutton Honors College offers the following opportunities to superior students:

Recognition in General Honors 
Many IU schools and departments offer honors programs of their own for their undergraduate majors, and many Hutton Honors College students pursue these programs. They may also, if they choose, earn a General Honors notation on their official transcript and diploma. In order to earn this designation, students must successfully complete the following general requirements of the Hutton Honors College and be in good standing in the Hutton Honors College:

  1. Each student must complete, with a minimum grade point average of 3.400, a general honors curriculum consisting of a minimum of 21 credit hours of honors courses approved by the Hutton Honors College, including at least two Hutton Honors College “H” courses.
  2. Each student must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.400 at graduation.


Honors Seminars and Special Sections
Freshman honors seminars are 3 credit hour discussion classes typically limited to 20 freshman students, who explore how scholars frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches in a small-class experience with a faculty member. More advanced seminars (H300 and H400) offer opportunities for study and research on specialized topics. Many departments reserve special introductory sections or seminars for entering students with superior scholastic records, such as Chemistry S117-S118, Economics S201-S202, Mathematics S212, and Psychological and Brain Sciences P106. The Hutton Honors College faculty also teach honors seminars in their various disciplines.

Honors Tutorial (H299)  
Honors tutorials are individually arranged programs of directed reading and research. Freshmen or sophomores who wish to engage in intensive study growing out of an undergraduate seminar or to pursue a clearly defined research interest may enroll in H299 for 1-3 credit hours under the tutelage of a faculty sponsor. Applications for a tutorial, accompanied by the recommendation of the prospective faculty tutor, should be submitted to the Hutton Honors College for approval before the semester in which the project is to be undertaken.

Grants and Internships  
Juniors and seniors may be eligible for undergraduate grants in support of academic research, creative activity, international experiences, study projects, or professional internships during the regular academic year or the summer. These are designed to meet expenses not normally anticipated in planning an undergraduate program and may be used to support various needs. Applications are normally submitted during the spring semester both for summer grants and grants for the following fall, and during the fall semester for the following spring semester.

A number of internship grants are also available for students who wish to engage in a controlled undergraduate teaching program or some equivalent experience in their major area of study. These grants are meant to support a close faculty-student relationship in which the student is treated as a junior colleague. Academic credit may also be considered when appropriate. Any senior writing an honors thesis may also apply for a Hutton Honors College Thesis Award.

Course Listings  
For course listings, refer to “Hutton Honors College” in the “Special Courses and Programs” section of this bulletin.

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Individualized Major Program

See alphabetical listing in this bulletin for more information.

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Initiative for Maximizing Student Diversity (formerly MEDIC-B)

See "Initiative for Maximizing Student Diversity" in this bulletin.

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Intensive Freshman Seminars (IFS)

See “Intensive Freshman Seminars” in this bulletin.

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Language Placement Tests

Students who wish to continue at Indiana University a foreign language begun in high school or at another university must take a foreign language placement test. Contact the Evaluation Services and Testing office at (812) 855-1595 or foreign language departments for more information.

Special Credit as a Result of Placement Tests  
Students placing at the second semester may be eligible for special credit for the first semester. Students placing at the third semester may be eligible for special credit for both the first and second semesters. Students who are eligible for such credit in French, German, Hebrew, Italian, or Spanish will automatically receive credit if the placement test is taken at Indiana University or if the student’s CEEB test score is sent to Indiana University. For special credit in other foreign languages and for special credit above the first-year level, students should check directly with the foreign language departments and read the information below. See also “Special Note” under “Credit by Examination.”

Students placing at the fourth semester, fifth semester, or beyond may be eligible for special credit for semesters beyond the first-year credit mentioned above. This credit is not automatic, however, and is awarded only after completion of a foreign language course at the placement level with a minimum grade of C–, or a higher minimum grade specified by departments (contact individual departments for details). The grade for special credit will be S (Satisfactory). It is the student’s responsibility to check directly with the language department regarding policies for special credit in each language, and to request that the language department send information regarding a student’s special credit to the Office of the Recorder, College of Arts and Sciences, Kirkwood Hall 001.

International Students  
Students whose native language is not English may demonstrate required proficiency in their language, with permission of the College. They may not, however, earn credit for any courses at the first- or second-year level in their native language; departmental policies vary with regard to granting credit for third- and fourth-year courses in such cases.

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Living-Learning Centers

Living-Learning centers (LLC) are residential-academic programs located in residence halls. Students may choose between two living-learning centers associated with the College: Collins Living-Learning Center, located in the Collins Quadrangle; and the Global Village, located in Foster-Martin. Membership in these centers is based on an application available from Residential Programs and Services and from most university offices.

Prospective members of the Collins Living-Learning Center should be interested in accepting responsibility for affairs of the center, such as governance, curriculum planning, and programming. They should also be interested in exploring a variety of academic disciplines through the CLLC experimental curriculum. Collins LLC students must enroll in at least one Collins course during each of their freshman and sophomore years; all new students also enroll in a 1 credit hour workshop in residential learning. Most courses may be counted toward graduation requirements.

The goal of the Global Village Living-Learning Center is to create a cosmopolitan, multidisciplinary, multicultural, multinational, and multilingual community of domestic and international students preparing for global living and careers. The Village provides opportunities for foreign language and cultural practice and is especially appropriate for students preparing for overseas study. In addition to its own seminars, the Village offers introductory courses from several departments in its classrooms and informal, internationally themed special activities. There are abundant opportunities for student governance and leadership development.

Students majoring in any discipline or school are eligible to apply for membership in either program, and current university students may apply to transfer to a center at the beginning of any semester. For additional information, contact the director of Collins LLC at (812) 855-9815, or the director of the Global Village at (812) 855-4552, or visit these LLC Web sites: www.indiana.edu/~llc (Collins), or www.indiana.edu/~college/global (Global Village). Courses are listed in this bulletin under “Special Courses and Programs.”

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McNair Scholars Program

See “McNair Scholars Program” in this bulletin.

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Military Science and Aerospace Studies

Qualified men and women may elect to earn credits leading to a commission as a second lieutenant in the United States Army or Air Force. Credits earned in Army ROTC and Air Force ROTC may be applied toward the 122 credit hour total required for  graduation. More specific information may be obtained from the offices of the particular ROTC units in which the student is interested: Military Science (Army), 814 E. Third Street, (812) 855-7682; and Aerospace Studies (Air Force), 814 E. Third Street, (812) 855-4191.

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Overseas Study Programs

Indiana University Programs  
Indiana University grants direct credit for more than 85 university-sponsored overseas study programs for a full academic year, semester, or summer abroad. Some programs require a strong foreign language background and permit students to attend regular courses in the host university. Others, especially summer programs, provide intensive language instruction as part of the program. Many programs offer courses in English on comparative or international topics. Students may participate in some summer programs as early as their freshman year. Academic year and semester programs normally require junior or senior standing.

Programs are open to all College of Arts and Sciences majors, and financial aid is applicable to program costs. Students are encouraged to explore the range of opportunities for study abroad early in their university career.

Credits earned in Indiana University programs may be applied to university degree requirements in most cases and satisfy the senior residency requirements at the student’s home campus. Course work taken on IU semester programs satisfies a Culture Studies A requirement while course work taken on academic year programs satisfies the entire culture studies requirement. Students who have completed a substantial amount of course work at another campus of Indiana University may consult an academic assistant dean in the Office of Undergraduate Academic Affairs, Kirkwood Hall 012, about their eligibility for a College of Arts and Sciences degree.

Indiana University’s overseas study programs include:

Academic Year
Britain (Canterbury)
France (Aix-en-Provence)
Germany (Freiburg)
Italy (Bologna)
Japan (Nagoya)
Spain (Madrid)

One Semester
Argentina (Buenos Aires)
Australia (Adelaide, Canberra, Perth, Sydney, Wollongong)
Austria (Vienna)
Belize (Chau Hiix, Crooked Tree)
Brazil (Bahia, São Paulo)
Britain (London)
Chile (Santiago, Valparaiso)
China (Hong Kong, Nanjing)
Costa Rica (Monteverde)
Czech Republic (Prague)
Denmark (Copenhagen)
Dominican Republic (Santiago)
Ecuador (Quito)
Egypt (Cairo)
France (Aix-en-Provence, Paris, Rennes, Rouen)
Germany (Freiburg, Reutlingen)
Ghana (Legon)
Greece (Athens)
Hungary (Budapest)
India (Hyderabad)
Ireland (Dublin)
Israel (Jerusalem)
Italy (Bologna, Florence, Milan, Rome)
Japan (Nagoya, Tokyo)
Mexico (Monterrey)
Netherlands (Maastricht, Rotterdam)
Peru (Lima)
Russia (St. Petersburg)
South Africa (Cape Town)
South Korea (Seoul)
Spain (Alicante, Barcelona, Madrid, Salamanca, Seville)
Thailand (Khon Kaen)

Summer
Australia (Melbourne)
Austria (Graz)
Britain (London)
Canada (Quebec)
Denmark (Copenhagen)
Dominican Republic (Santo Domingo)
France (Paris)
Greece (Athens, Paros)
Guyana (Georgetown)
Ireland (Dublin)
Israel (Beth Shemesh)
Italy (Florence, Venice)
Mexico (Cuernavaca, Guanajuato)
Netherlands (Amsterdam, Maastricht)
Netherlands Antilles (Bonaire)
Russia (St. Petersburg)
Senegal (Dakar)
Spain (Barcelona, Salamanca)

Intersession
Costa Rica (field sites)

Information on overseas study programs, both those sponsored by Indiana University and those arranged through other institutions, is available from the Overseas Study Information Center in Franklin Hall 303 on the Bloomington campus, (812) 855-9304; the overseas study coordinators on the other Indiana University campuses; and on the Web at www.indiana.edu/~overseas.

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Pass/Fail Option

Students wishing to explore new subject areas without the risk of harming their grade point average may consider the Pass/Fail option. See “Pass/Fail Option” under “Academic Regulations.”

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Phi Beta Kappa

The Society of Phi Beta Kappa, founded in 1776 at the College of William and Mary in Virginia, is the oldest academic Greek-letter society in existence. Throughout its history, Phi Beta Kappa has held as its primary objective the recognition of excellence in the academic performance of undergraduate students who are candidates for degrees in the liberal arts and sciences in U.S. colleges and universities. There are at present 270 chapters of Phi Beta Kappa. Indiana University’s chapter, Gamma of Indiana, was established in 1911.

Members are chosen by faculty electors of Indiana University’s chapter from among senior degree candidates and recent graduates of the College of Arts and Sciences whose academic records have placed them among the top 10 percent of their class.

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Science Courses for Non-Science Majors

These courses are specially designed for the non-science major; they challenge the liberal arts student to understand modern science and scientific concepts and methods. During any academic year, courses of this type are available in astronomy, the biological sciences, chemistry, mathematics, physics, and psychological and brain sciences.

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Second Bachelor's Degree

In certain cases the dean may admit bachelor’s degree holders to candidacy for a second bachelor’s degree. When such admission is granted, the candidates must earn at least 26 additional credit hours in residence and meet the requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences and of the department in which they are candidates. Students may also be admitted to candidacy for a simultaneous second degree. In the case of simultaneous conferral of the first and second undergraduate degrees, 26 additional residency hours for the second degree are not required. Students currently pursuing an undergraduate degree in the College of Arts and Sciences should consult their academic advisor regarding the approval process. All other students seeking second degree candidacy should schedule an appointment with the advisor in the Office of Undergraduate Academic Affairs, (812) 855‑1647, Kirkwood Hall 012. Some students will be required to submit an appropriate Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score as part of the admission process. This requirement applies to international students from countries where English is not the language of instruction, who have not otherwise been admitted to the university in undergraduate status, and who are applying to the university for admission directly into a second undergraduate degree program in the College. Students with a bachelor’s degree who wish to further their education should consider becoming qualified for admission to a graduate program.

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Special Skills Courses

See “Special Skills Courses” in this bulletin.

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Student Records

Release of Information in Student Records  
An implicit and justifiable assumption of trust is placed in the College of Arts and Sciences as custodian of personal data submitted by students entering the College or generated during their enrollment. This mutual relationship of trust between the College and the individual student requires that such data be held in confidence.

Public Information  
Upon request of a third party, certain information is made available to the public by the registrar’s office.

Confidentiality of Records 
Indiana University, in compliance with the General Education Provisions Act, Section 438, titled Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, provides that all student records are confidential. Confidential academic information is released by the College of Arts and Sciences only to the student, and to person(s) whom the student authorizes in writing to be appropriate recipients of the information. Students may review their records upon request and may ask for deletions or corrections of the record in a hearing process described in detail in the Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities, and Conduct distributed at fall registration, available online at www.dsa.indiana.edu/Code/, or available in the office of the Division of Student Affairs, Franklin Hall 108.

References, recommendations, and other similar documents may carry a voluntary waiver relinquishing the student’s right to review this specific material. The student may also release the record to others by signing a written release available in the offices that maintain records. Further details regarding the provisions of the Privacy Act and a list of offices where student records are kept may be found in the Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities, and Conduct.

Undergraduate Status Update Form 
As do students from all other units of the university, College of Arts and Sciences undergraduates who have been away from the university for two sequential regular semesters must fill out a brief informational form regarding their activities while away from the university system. The form is available from the College Web site www.indiana.edu/~college, or students may contact the College Recorder’s Office (Kirkwood Hall 001).

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Office of Creative Services
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517 East Kirkwood Avenue
Bloomington, IN 47408-4060

Last updated: 20 December 2014 06 38 18

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