IU Bulletins HomeBloomington Campusred
Indiana University

IUB Bulletins Home

Search College of Arts and Sciences (College) Bloomington Campus Supplement

Request College of Arts and Sciences (College) Bloomington Campus Supplement— Print Bulletin

College of Arts and Sciences (College) Bloomington Campus Supplement: Table of Contents

 

 

College of Arts
and Sciences (College)
Bloomington Campus
Supplement— 2006–2008

http://www.indiana.edu/~college/
College of Arts and Sciences (College) 
Kirkwood Hall 104 
130 S. Woodlawn 
Bloomington, IN 47405  
Local (812) 855-1821 
Fax (812) 855-2060 
Contact College
 

Changes and Additions to Departmental Requirements and Course Descriptions

Departments, Programs, and Course Descriptions

African American and
  African Diaspora Studies

American Studies
Apparel Merchandising and Interior
  Design

Biology
Chemistry
Classical Studies
Cognitive Science
Communication and Culture
Computer Science
Criminal Justice
East Asian Languages and Cultures
Economics
English
Environmental Science
Fine Arts
Folklore and Ethnomusicology
French and Italian
Geography
Geological Sciences
Germanic Studies
Human Biology
India Studies
International Studies Program
Jewish Studies
Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Latino Studies
Leadership, Ethics, and
  Social Action Program

Mathematics
Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Psychological and Brain Sciences
Religious Studies
Russian and East European Institute
Second Language Studies
Slavic Languages and Literatures
Sociology
Speech and Hearing Sciences
Statistics
Telecommunications
Theatre and Drama

African American and African Diaspora Studies

Course Description

A330 African American Cinematic Experience (3 cr.) A & H Examines the historical and contemporary portrayals of African Americans in Hollywood and in independent narrative film focusing on the social and political functions of film, its legitimization of race, and its oppositional formations, interventions, and practices. Considers how film mediates and interrogates race and social relations in American society.

Return to Top

American Studies

Introduction
Major in American Studies
Honors Program
Course Descriptions

Introduction

The American Studies Program (AMST) provides students with an opportunity to pursue the study of American cultures from an interdisciplinary perspective. Courses are designed to examine significant aspects of U.S. institutions, policy, media, and cultural expressions by drawing on a wide range of resources from the social sciences and humanities. Because of its interdisciplinary nature, American Studies attracts students with diverse interests who wish to know more about the United States in a comparative, international context.

Return to American Studies

Major in American Studies

Requirements  
Students must complete 30 credit hours in American studies. 15 credit hours must come from American studies core courses.

In consultation with the director, students design an individual concentration (minimum of 15 credit hours) that provides focus and purpose to their remaining course work in the major and that provides solid background for their senior seminar topic. The concentration will be built from concentration courses offered through American studies and from pertinent joint-listed and cross-listed course offerings in other programs, departments, and units. At least 6 credit hours counted toward the concentration must be at the 300 level or higher.

Students pursuing a B.A. in American studies must demonstrate advanced language competency in a single foreign language—equivalent to a third year of study. This may require students to take an additional two semesters of a foreign language beyond the standard College requirements, including at least one course at the 300 level or above that studies a foreign language literature. The language chosen for study must pertain directly to American studies and requires the approval of the director of the American Studies Program.

Required Core Courses
A100 Democracy in the Americas (3 cr.)
A200 Comparative American Identities (3 cr.) A & H
A350 Topics in Interdisciplinary American Studies (3 cr.)
A351 American Studies in Transnational Contexts (3 cr.) A & H
A450 Senior Seminar in American Studies (3 cr.)

Concentration Courses
A201 U.S. Movements and Institutions (3 cr.) A & H
A202 U.S. Arts and Media (3 cr.) A & H
A298 Special Topics in Arts and Humanities for American Studies (3 cr.)
   A & H

A299 Special Topics in Social and Historical Studies for American Studies (3    cr.) S & H
A300 The Image of America in the World (3 cr.) S & H
A398 Advanced Topics in Arts and Humanities for American Studies (3 cr.)
   A & H

A399 Advanced Topics in Social and Historical Studies for American Studies (3    cr.) S & H
A401 Readings in American Studies (1–3 cr.)
A402 Service Learning in American Studies (1–3 cr.)

Additional concentration courses are offered in other departments and programs and are cross-listed in American Studies. For a list of courses, please consult the American Studies Program, Ballantine Hall 521, (812) 855-7718, amstug@indiana.edu, or consult the program Web site at www.indiana.edu/~amst.

Return to American Studies

Honors Program

Students pursuing an honors degree in American studies must maintain a GPA of 3.500 or above in the major and a GPA of 3.300 overall in the College. In addition to the major requirements, honors students must complete A451 Honors Senior Seminar in American Studies (3 cr.), and A452 Honors Thesis in American Studies (3 cr.), and the language requirement for a total of 42 credit hours.

Return to American Studies

Course Descriptions

A300 The Image of America in the World (3 cr.) S & H  An exploration of the history and present significance of “America”—an idea and a nation—in the larger world. Focuses on the image, status, and reputation of the United States abroad, and on the importance of America’s “moral” global prestige to the course of international affairs and domestic politics.

A397 Foreign Studies in American Studies (1–6 cr.)  Credit for foreign study in American studies when no specific equivalent is available among program offerings. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

A398 Advanced Topics in Arts and Humanities for American Studies (3 cr.) A & H  Advanced study and analysis of a single, closely focused American Studies topic within arts and humanities. Topics vary from semester to semester. Focuses on refinement of students’ skills in writing, interdisciplinary interpretation, analytical reasoning, discussion, and research related to the study of fine arts, literature, film, and popular culture. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

A399 Advanced Topics in Social and Historical Studies for American Studies (3 cr.) S & H  Advanced study and analysis of a single, closely focused American studies topic within social and historical studies. Topics vary from semester to semester. Focuses on the refinement of students’ skills in writing, interdisciplinary interpretation, analytical reasoning, discussion, and research related to the study of public policy, political, economic, and social realities. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

A450 Senior Seminar in American Studies (3 cr.) P: A350 and A351, or permission of instructor. The capstone course in the major. Early readings and discussions invite critical reflection on the design of interdisciplinary work, its motives, and the standards of coherence and of evidence that may govern its evaluation. Students develop a senior project, which may take the form of a traditional senior thesis or of a substantial video essay, Web site, multimedia project, performance piece, installation, etc. Students pursuing creative projects (e.g., a fictional film as opposed to a video documentary) must complement their creative work with considerable critical reflection on its purpose, stakes, design, and limits.

A451 Honors Senior Seminar in American Studies (3 cr.)  P: A350 and A351, or permission of instructor. For honors students only. Introduction to various approaches in American studies scholarship, illustrated by the work of professors in the program, in preparation and training for the writing of an honors thesis.

A452 Honors Thesis in American Studies (3 cr.) P: A451. For honors students only. Students develop and write an honors thesis under the direction of an American studies faculty member. An oral examination of the thesis is conducted by three faculty members.

Return to American Studies

Return to Top

Apparel Merchandising and Interior Design

Interior Design—B.S.

Purpose
This curriculum emphasizes the relationships between the aesthetic, behavioral, and technological concerns in the creation of responsive interior environments. Career opportunities are available in commercial and residential interior design firms, architectural firms, facilities management, retail furniture establishments, government and community agencies, and private design studios. Majors in this program can also prepare for advanced degrees in related areas of design, such as architecture, facilities management, or environmental design.

Requirements
Interior design majors must complete a total of 42 AMID credit hours, including H168, H263, H264, H265, H268, H271, H272, H277, H335, H373, H374, H469, H475, and H476; plus selected courses outside AMID, including Fine Arts A102, and any two of the following three courses: F100, F101, and F102.

The interior design major requires four academic years to complete. Only students who successfully transfer interior design courses from another institution or campus to IU Bloomington can complete the major in less than four academic years. See “Transferred Credit” and “Transferred Credit Review.”

Transferred Credit
All interior design courses transferred from another institution or campus must be evaluated by an appropriate faculty member in the Department of Apparel Merchandising and Interior Design before they may be applied toward a major in interior design. See “Transferred Credit Review.”

Transferred Credit Review
Courses in interior design that have been transferred to IU Bloomington from another institution or campus are not counted as part of an interior design major unless they have been reviewed and accepted by an appropriate member of the interior design faculty.

For a review of transferred lecture credit, the student must provide the course title, course description, textbook title, and syllabus. For a review of transferred studio credit, the student must provide the course title, course description, textbook title, syllabus, problem statements, and a portfolio of representative work for each course for which transfer credit is desired. The portfolio should include both preliminary and finished work and be as complete as possible. Slides or photographs of three-dimensional objects are acceptable.

Course Descriptions

H211 Fashion Design I: Conceptualization (1 cr.) P or C: H207. Exploration of aesthetic and/or historical inspiration and foundation for developing a fashion line. Development of design philosophy and concepts leading to a fashion line for senior project.

H263 Design Methods (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H168, or permission of instructor. Introduction to the basic techniques of design research and evaluation, emerging trends in design thinking, and state-of-the-art design methodologies. Credit given for only one of H263 or H363. II Sem.

H268 Architectural Theories and Concepts (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H168, or permission of instructor. Study of the philosophical, theoretical, historical, and conceptual ideas that have guided architecture and design since the late nineteenth century. Credit given for only one of H268 or H368. I Sem.

H271 Interior Design I—Three-Dimensional Interior Design (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H168, and consent of instructor. Fundamentals of drawing and rendering in two and three dimensions, presentation methods, and design practices. I Sem.

H335 Lighting Interior Spaces (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H263, H264, H268, H272, and H277. C: H373. Introduction to the general principles, factors, and techniques of interior lighting, including planning, analysis, calculation methods, aesthetics, cost of projection, hardware, codes, and presentation methods. Field trips required. Credit not given for both AMID H335 and THTR T335. I Sem.

H373 Interior Design III—The Dwelling (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H263, H264, H268, H272, and H277, and consent of instructor. Design of dwellings for individuals and groups in a variety of contexts. Integration of social, technical, spatial, and environmental factors. Lab fee required. I Sem.

H374 Interior Design IV—The Workplace (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H263, H268, H335, and H373. Design of work spaces for a variety of individuals and organizations. Integration of organizational, ergonometric, technical, spatial, and environmental factors. Lab fee required. II Sem.

H469 Professional Practices in Interior Design (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H263, H268, and H374. C: H475. Survey of business procedures and practices and of professional values and standards for interior designers. I Sem.

H475 Interior Design V—Comprehensive Design (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H263, H264, H268, and H374. C: H469. Interdisciplinary team approaches to solution of comprehensive design problems utilizing contemporary design methods and procedures. Lab fee required. I Sem.

H476 Interior Design VI—Special Populations (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H263, H264, H268, H469, and H475. Design of habitats and work spaces for special populations. Lab fee required. II Sem.

Return to Top

Biology

Major in Biotechnology—B.S.

Purpose
The B.S. in biotechnology is designed for students who wish to pursue careers in the fields of biotechnology or biomedical sciences. It is also a basis for further graduate training in biotechnology, the biological and biomedical sciences, and related professional fields, such as medicine, business, and patent law. The program provides fundamental training in basic scientific principles as well as knowledge of specific techniques and applications used in biotechnology. Graduates will be expected to have acquired the following: knowledge of the principles of biology, microbiology, cell and molecular biology, biochemistry, and bioanalytical chemistry; practical laboratory skills in many of these areas with emphasis on techniques used in modern biotechnology; a firm foundation in scientific integrity and proper scientific procedures; an appreciation of the broader ethical, environmental, and societal issues involved in biotechnology; and exposure to career opportunities in biotechnology through independent research, internships, and seminar series.

Requirements
Students must complete the following fundamental skills and distribution requirements:

  1. Writing, same as for B.A. degree. Intensive Writing requirement, fulfilled by major.
  2. Mathematics, fulfilled by major.
  3. Foreign language, three semesters in the same language or equivalent proficiency. Culture studies courses are not required.
  4. Topics course, one course—students are advised to choose a course that will serve as one of the required arts and humanities or social and historical studies courses listed below.
  5. Arts and humanities, two courses.
  6. Social and historical studies, two courses.
  7. Natural and mathematical sciences, fulfilled by major.

Major Requirements
Students must meet the following with a minimum grade of C– in each course and a minimum major grade point average of C (2.000):

  1. Mathematics M211 (or M119 and M120) and one of the following statistics courses: Liberal Arts and Management Program L316, Psychological and Brain Sciences K300, Mathematics K300, SPEA K300, Psychological and Brain Sciences K310, Mathematics K310. (Note that although SPEA K300 fulfills the statistics requirement, credit hours for this course count outside the College of Arts and Sciences).
  2. Biology L112, L211, M250, M255, T301, T310, T312, T315, and T322.
  3. Chemistry A314 and A316, C117, C118 or N330, C341, C342, C343, C484, and C485.
  4. Physics P201 and P202.
  5. At least four of the following courses for a minimum of 12 credit hours: Biology L312, L313, M350, M360, M430, M435, M440, M445, M460, M465, M480, M485, L490; Chemistry C318, C361, C432, C443, C481, C487.

Students must also meet the degree requirements for the B.S. degree in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Students who wish to complete a business minor or the Liberal Arts and Management Program (LAMP) certificate as part of their degree program are advised that they may need to take some of the relevant courses in the summer or in an additional semester. The College of Arts and Sciences allows students to take 22 credit hours outside the College that will count toward graduation. This should also be taken into account when considering the business minor or the LAMP certificate.

Course Descriptions

L211 Molecular Biology (3 cr.) N & M  P: L112 and CHEM C117. Structure and function of DNA and RNA. DNA replication, mechanisms of mutation, repair, recombination, and transposition. Mechanisms and regulation of gene expression. The genetic code, transcription, and translation. Introduces bacteriophages, plasmids, and the technology of recombinant DNA. Credit given for only one of L211 or S211.

T301 Seminar in Biotechnology (1 cr.) P: Consent of director. Outside speakers from the biotechnology industry present students with the latest research developments, information about career opportunities, and internship possibilities. Students will write a paper on each seminar, discussing what they have learned and how this knowledge affects their career decisions. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

T322 Biotechnology Writing and Communication (3 cr.) P: Completion of the English composition requirement, and BIOL L211 or M255 or CHEM C343. Students learn oral and written scientific communications as appropriate in biotechnology. Topics include figures and tables, technical talks, reading and writing scientific publications, and writing industrial-style documents, including standard operating procedures and study protocols. Peer and instructor review will aid learning.

Z476 Biology of Fishes (3 cr.) P: L111, L112, and L113. An in-depth study of the anatomy, physiology, evolution, behavior, and diversity of fishes. Course includes comparisons among fish taxa and other vertebrate taxa, evaluation of primary literature, dissection and classification techniques, behavioral and ecological experiments, and fieldwork.

Return to Top

Chemistry

Major in Chemistry—B.A.
Major in Biochemistry—B.A.
Major in Chemistry—B.S.
Major in Biochemistry—B.S.
Course Descriptions

Return to Top

Major in Chemistry—B.A.

Purpose
This major is designed for students planning to do work in other fields, including medicine, dentistry, law, optometry, and business.

Requirements
Students must complete the following course work with a minimum grade of C– in each course:

  1. 27 credit hours of course work including C117 (or C105-C125), C341, C342, C343, and C360 or C361 or C362.
  2. 11 elective credit hours in chemistry. The following courses may not be used to fulfill the 27 credit hour requirement: C103, C107, G207, C240, G307, C371, C372, Y398, C400, C401, G407, C409, and G499.
  3. Physics P201 and P202.
  4. Mathematics M119 or M211.

Students must also complete the degree requirements for the B.A. degree in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Recommendations
Mathematics M211 is strongly recommended, and M212 is highly desirable for students planning to work in many other fields.

Return to Chemistry

Major in Biochemistry—B.A.

Purpose
This major is designed for students planning to attend medical or dental school, but who cannot meet all requirements for the B.S. in biochemistry and who do not plan to pursue graduate work or to seek employment in industry.

Requirements
Students must complete the following course work with a grade of C– or higher in each course:

  1. C117 (or C105-C125), C341, C342, C343, C484, C485, and C487 or B487.
  2. A minimum of 8 credit hours selected from the following: A314, A315, N330, C344, C360, C361, C362, C372, C430, C437, C460, C481.
  3. Biology L112.
  4. Mathematics M119 or M211.
  5. Physics P201 or P221.

Students must also complete the degree requirements for the B.A. degree in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Recommendations
Mathematics M211 is strongly recommended, and M212 is highly desirable for students planning to work in other fields. Biology L211 is recommended.

Return to Chemistry

Major in Chemistry—B.S.

Purpose
The B.S. in chemistry is designed to prepare students for graduate work and for jobs in industry as well as for medical and dental schools.

Requirements
Students must complete the following fundamental skills and distribution requirements:

  1. Writing, same as B.A. degree.
  2. Foreign language, 3 credit hours of any foreign language at the second-year level.
  3. Arts and humanities, two courses.
  4. Social and historical studies, two courses.
  5. Natural and mathematical sciences, fulfilled by major.

Major Requirements
Students must complete the following course work with a minimum grade of C– in each course:

  1. 45 credit hours of chemistry, including A315, A318 or C317-C318, N330, C341, C342, S343, C361, C362, P364, and either C483 or C484. The following courses may not be counted in the 45 credit hours required for the major: C103, C240, G307, and G499.
  2. At least 6 of the remaining credit hours must be in lecture courses at the 400 level or above.
  3. At least 4 of the remaining credit hours must be in laboratory courses.
  4. Mathematics M211 and M212, and one of M303 or M311 or M343.
  5. Physics P221 and P222.
  6. Biology L112.

Students must also complete the requirements and procedures listed in this supplement under “General Requirements for Bachelor's Degrees.”

Recommendations
Mathematics M311 is recommended over Mathematics M303 or M343.

Return to Chemistry

Major in Biochemistry—B.S.

Purpose
The B.S. in biochemistry is designed for students planning to attend medical or dental school, to do graduate work in biochemistry, or to seek employment in industry.

Requirements
Students must complete all of the following fundamental skills and distribution requirements:

  1. Writing, same as B.A. degree.
  2. Foreign language, 3 credit hours of any foreign language at the second-year level.
  3. Arts and humanities, two courses.
  4. Social and historical studies, three courses.
  5. Natural and mathematical sciences, fulfilled by major.

Major Requirements
Students must complete all of the following course work with a grade of C– or higher in each course:

  1. 45 credit hours of chemistry, including A314, A316, N330, C341, C342, S343, C361-C362 or C361-C481, C484, C485 and C487 or B487. The following courses may not be counted in the 45 credit hours required for the major: C103, C240, G307, and G499.
  2. At least 5 of the remaining credit hours must be in lecture courses at the 400 level or above.
  3. At least 4 of the remaining credit hours must be in laboratory courses.
  4. Mathematics M211 and M212.
  5. Physics P221 and P222.
  6. Biology L112 and at least one of the following: L311, L312, M250-M255, M430.

Students must also complete the requirements and procedures listed in this supplement under “General Requirements for Bachelor's Degrees.”

Recommendations
Chemistry C481 is recommended over Chemistry C362. Biology L211 is also recommended.

Return to Chemistry

Course Descriptions

C100 The World as Chemistry (3 cr.) N & M  For non-science majors, the chemistry of everyday life: fuels, plastics, drugs, water, air, and living systems. Lectures illustrated by demonstrations, films, and molecular models. Readings include articles from current newspapers and magazines. Prerequisite: Curiosity.

C101 Elementary Chemistry I (3 cr.) N & M  Usually taken concurrently with C121. Introduction to chemistry. The two sequences, C101-C121 and C102-C122, usually satisfy programs that require only two semesters of chemistry. Admission to advanced courses on the basis of C101-C121 and C102-C122 is granted only in exceptional cases. May be taken in preparation for C117 by students with deficiencies in chemistry. Credit given for only one of C101 or C103.

C102 Elementary Chemistry II (3 cr.) N & M P: C101. Usually taken concurrently with C122. Continuation of C101. The chemistry of organic compounds and their reactions followed by an extensive introduction to biochemistry.

C103 Introduction to Chemical Principles (5 cr.) N & M Taken in preparation for C117 by students with deficiencies in chemistry. Content includes applications of measurement and chemical formula/equation conversions; modern view of the atom; and solution processes that relate to chemical reactions. Emphasis of lectures and discussion sections will be problem-solving strategies. Credit given for only one of C101-C121, or C103.

C107 Frontiers of Chemical Research (1 cr.) P: One semester of college-level chemistry or consent of instructor. A freshman seminar featuring talks and demonstrations by various faculty about current research in analytical, biological, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry.

C117 Principles of Chemistry and Biochemistry I (5 cr.) N & M P: Chemistry and math placement examinations and consent of department. Introduction to the basic principles of chemistry and biochemistry with their applications to physiological (biochemical) functions. An integrated lecture-laboratory course covering basic principles of chemistry and biochemistry. Credit given for only one of the following: C105-C125, S105-S125, C117, or S117.

S117 Principles of Chemistry and Biochemistry I, Honors (5 cr.) N & M P: Chemistry and math placement examinations and consent of department. For students with unusual aptitude or preparation. An integrated lecture-laboratory course covering basic principles of chemistry and biochemistry. Credit given for only one of the following: C105-C125, S105-S125, C117, or S117.

C118 Principles of Chemistry and Biochemistry II (5 cr.) N & M P: C117 or C105-C125 and consent of department. Introduction to the basic principles of chemistry and biochemistry with their applications to physiological (biochemical) functions. An integrated lecture-laboratory course covering basic principles of chemistry and biochemistry. Second semester of a two-semester sequence. Credit given for only one of the following: C106-C126, S106-S126, C118, S118, N330, or S330.

S118 Principles of Chemistry and Biochemistry II, Honors (5 cr.) N & M P: Consent of instructor. R: S117 or S105-S125. For students with unusual aptitude or preparation. An integrated lecture-laboratory course covering basic principles of chemistry and biochemistry. Second semester of a two-semester sequence. Credit given for only one of C106-C126, S106-S126, C118, S118, N330, or S330.

C121 Elementary Chemistry Laboratory I (2 cr.) P or C: C101. Introduction to the techniques and reasoning of experimental chemistry. Credit given for only one of C101-C121 or C103.

C122 Elementary Chemistry Laboratory II (2 cr.) P: C101, C121. P or C: C102. Continuation of C121. Emphasis on organic and biochemical experimental techniques.

G201 Service Learning in Chemistry (1 cr.) P: C117. C: Current enrollment in another chemistry course. Students will work within the community to foster interest, knowledge, and appreciation in the sciences. Assignments will include the preparation and execution of demonstrations and in class lessons at the primary and secondary school levels. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

G207 Chemical Scholarship and Presentation (1 cr.) P: C341 or S341; sophomore standing; chemistry or biochemistry majors. Involves the preparation of scientific oral presentations and poster presentations. Assignments include the making of slides, using presentation software, handling of scientific data correctly, and presentation skills. Students will give presentations as the final assignment. Not repeatable for credit.

C240 Preparation for Organic Chemistry (1.5 cr.) P: C117 or C106, or permission of instructor. To develop a standard and comprehensive preparation for the study of organic chemistry. Review of electronic structure, periodicity, bonding, Lewis structures, pKa’s, simple nomenclature and molecular geometry; problem-based approach to developing skills necessary for success in organic chemistry. Course will not count toward chemistry minor or majors.

G307 Chemical Career Planning (1 cr.) P: Junior standing; chemistry or biochemistry major. Focuses on writing resumes, personal statements, and cover letters. Content includes interviewing skills, discussion of graduate programs and careers in chemistry, personal assessment, job searching strategies, labor market trends, and principles of career planning. Not repeatable for credit.

A314 Biological and Environmental Chemical Analysis (2 cr.) P: C341, S341, or R340 and MATH M119 or M211. Theory and application of analytical techniques including statistical treatment of data, spectroscopy, separation methods, electroanalytical methods, radioisotopes, and immunological methods. Credit given for only one of A314, A318, or C317-C318.

A315 Chemical Measurements Laboratory (2 cr.) P: A318 or C317-C318 or A314. Application of analytical techniques and instrumentation to qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis. Theory, instrumentation, and data analysis will be covered. Credit given for only one of A315 or C315.

C315 Chemical Measurements Laboratory I (3 cr.) P: A318 or C317-C318 or A314. Experimental work in related areas of chemical analysis, instrumentation, and elementary physical chemistry. Credit given for only one of A315 and C315.

A316 Bioanalytical Chemistry Laboratory (2 cr.) P: A318 or C317-C318 or P or C: A314. Laboratory experiments involve the application of analytical techniques and instrumentation to chemical analysis of biological samples. Methods include spectroscopy, immunoassays, chromatography, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry.

C317 Equilibria and Electrochemistry (2 cr.) P or C: C341 or S341, and MATH M211 or M215. Treatment of analytical data; chemical equilibrium; aqueous and non-aqueous acid-base titrimetry; complex-formation titrations; gravimetric analysis; redox titrations; electrochemical theory; potentiometry; voltammetry; coulometry. Credit given for only one of A314, A318, or C317-C318.

A318 Analytical Chemistry (4 cr.) P or C: C341, S341 or R340, and MATH M211. Theory and application of three major areas of analytical chemistry: spectrochemistry, separations, and electrochemistry. Topics include ultraviolet, infrared, luminescence, and X-ray spectroscopy, flame and electrical discharge techniques, mass spectrometry, chromatography; electrophoresis, potentiometry, coulometry, and voltammetry. Credit given for only one of A318, A314, or C317-C318.

C318 Spectrochemistry and Separations (2 cr.) P or C: C341 or S341, and MATH M211 or M215. Ultraviolet, visible, infrared, and luminescence spectrophotometry; flame and electrical discharge techniques; X-ray and mass spectrometric methods; phase equilibria and extractions; counter current distribution; gas, thin-layer liquid, and high-performance liquid chromatography. Credit given for only one of A314, A318, or C317-C318.

N330 Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry (5 cr.) P: C342, S342, or R340. P or C: C343. An integrated lecture-laboratory course covering structure and bonding of inorganic compounds, including transition metal coordination compounds, organometallic compounds, and bioinorganic complexes. Further topics will include nuclear chemistry, reaction mechanisms, and catalysis. Credit given for only one of N330, S330, C118, S118, C106-C126, or S106-S126.

S330 Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry, Honors (5 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. R: S342. For students with unusually good aptitude or preparation. An integrated lecture-laboratory course covering structure and bonding of inorganic compounds, including transition metal coordinate compounds, organometallic compounds, and bioinorganic complexes. Further topics will include nuclear chemistry, reaction mechanisms, and catalysis. Credit given for only one of N330, S330, C118, S118, C106-C126, or S106-S126.

R340 Survey of Organic Chemistry (3 cr.) P: C117 or C106 or permission of instructor. A survey of classes, structure, and reactivity of carbon-based compounds with an emphasis on those found in biological systems. Credit given for only one of R340, C341, or S341, and credit given for only one of R340, C342, or S342.

C341 Organic Chemistry I Lectures (3 cr.) N & M P: C117 or C106. Chemistry of carbon compounds. Nomenclature; qualitative theory of valence; structure and reactions. Syntheses and reactions of major classes of monofunctional compounds. Credit given for only one of C341, S341, or R340.

S341 Organic Chemistry I Lectures, Honors (3 cr.) N & M P: C117 or S117, and consent of instructor. For students with unusually good aptitude or preparation. Chemistry of carbon compounds. Nomenclature; qualitative theory of valence; structure and reactions. Syntheses and reactions of major classes of monofunctional compounds. Credit given for only one of C341, S341, or R340.

C342 Organic Chemistry II Lectures (3 cr.) N & M P: C341. Syntheses and reactions of polyfunctional compounds, natural and industrial products; physical and chemical methods of identification. Credit given for only one of C342, S342, or R340.

S342 Organic Chemistry II Lectures, Honors (3 cr.) N & M P: C341 or S341, and consent of instructor. Special course for students with unusually good aptitude or preparation, covering same subject matter as C342. Credit given for only one of C342, S342, or R340.

C343 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory (2 cr.) P: C341. R: C342 concurrently. Laboratory instruction in the fundamental techniques of organic chemistry and the use of general synthetic methods. Credit not given for both C343 and S343.

S343 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory, Honors (2 cr.) P: C341 or S341. P or C: C342 or S342. Special course for students with unusually good aptitude or preparation, covering same subject matter as C343. Credit not given for both S343 and C343.

C344 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (2 cr.) P: C342 and C343. Preparation, isolation, and identification of organic compounds; emphasis on modern research methods. Credit not given for both C344 and S344.

S344 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory, Honors (2 cr.) P: S342, S343. Special course for students with unusually good aptitude or preparation, covering same subject matter as C344. Credit not given for both S344 and C344.

C360 Introductory Physical Chemistry (3 cr.) N & M P: C117 or C106; N330 strongly recommended. MATH M119, PHYS P201; or equivalents. Elements of thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, molecular quantum states and spectroscopy. For students not intending to specialize in physical sciences. Credit given for only one of the following C360, C361/C362, or S361/S362.

C361 Physical Chemistry of Bulk Matter (3 cr.) N & M P: C117 or C106; N330 strongly recommended. MATH M212 or M216, and PHYS P202 or P222. Thermodynamics laws, free energy and chemical potentials, gases and dilute solutions, phase transitions, colligative properties, chemical equilibria, ionic solutions, chemical kinetics and transport processes, current topics. Credit given for only one of the following: C361, S361, or C360.

S361 Physical Chemistry of Bulk Matter, Honors (3 cr.) N & M P: S106 or S118 or consent of instructor, and MATH M212 or M216. P or C: P 222. Thermodynamics laws, free energy and chemical potentials, gases and dilute solutions, phase transitions, colligative properties, chemical equilibria, ionic solutions, chemical kinetics and transport processes, current topics. For students with unusually good aptitude or preparation. Credit given for only one of the following: C360, C361, or S361.

C362 Physical Chemistry of Molecules (3 cr.) N & M P: C117 or C106; N330 strongly recommended. MATH M212 or M216, and PHYS P202 or P222. Quantum states and spectroscopy of molecules, statistical thermodynamics, and elementary kinetic theory, current topics. Credit given for only one of the following: C362, S362, or C360.

S362 Physical Chemistry of Molecules, Honors (3 cr.) N & M P: S106 or S118, or consent of instructor, and Math M212 or M216. P or C: PHYS P222. Quantum states and spectroscopy of molecules, statistical thermodynamics, and elementary kinetic theory, current topics. For students with unusually good aptitude or preparation. Credit given for only one of the following: C360, C362, or S362.

C364 Introduction to Basic Measurements (3 cr.) P: C361 or S361. Graduated laboratory practice relating elementary principles of measurement technologies to current research applications. Credit given for only one of C364 or P364-P464.

P364 Basic Measurements in Physical Chemistry (2 cr.) P: C361 or S361. Experiments in this laboratory course will revolve around concepts explored in physical chemistry such as heats of fusion, heat capacities, bomb calorimetry, transport properties, chemical kinetics, and basic spectroscopy. Credit given for only one of P364-P464 or C364.

C372 Chemical Informatics II: Molecular Modeling (2 cr.) P: C341. Molecular modeling and computational chemistry; application of quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics to derive structural and energetic information about molecules; conformational analysis; quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) and related methods for drug design.

Y398 Professional Practice in Chemistry (1–6 cr.) P: Approval of the Department of Chemistry. Designed to provide opportunities for students to receive credit for career-related, full-time work. Evaluation by employer and director of undergraduate studies. Course credit may count as elective hours in the B.S. in chemistry and B.S. in biochemistry degree requirements. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

G407 Chemistry Senior Seminar (1 cr.) P: G207 or instructor permission; senior standing; chemistry or biochemistry major. Students will present seminars based on current literature or their C409 research project; assignments will include surveying assigned journals. Focuses will include coverage of recent important developments, further experience in making scientific presentation, and encouragement of good literature reading habits. Not repeatable for credit.

C409 Chemical Research (1–3; 10 cr. max.) P: Approval of research director and department. For outstanding students. Cannot be substituted for any chemistry course. May not be used to satisfy upper-level laboratory hour requirement in a B.S. major; may not be used in fulfillment of chemistry major hours in a B.A. major. A written research thesis is required.

G410 Chemical Research Capstone (2 cr.) P: Approval of research director and department; Two semesters of C409. For outstanding students. May be used to satisfy upper-level laboratory hour requirements in the B.S. major; may not be used in fulfillment of chemistry major hours in a B.A. major. A written research thesis with oral presentation is required.

C430 Inorganic Chemistry (3 cr.) N & M P: C106 or C118, or S106 or S108, or N330 or S330, and C342 or S342. R: C362. Structure and bonding of inorganic compounds; survey of chemistry of non-metal and metal elements, coordination compounds, organometallic compounds, mechanisms and reactions.

C432 Spectroscopic Methods in Inorganic Chemistry (3 cr.) P: C360 or C361. Chemical applications of group theory and the elucidation of structure and bonding in inorganic molecules and complexes by vibrational, nuclear magnetic resonance, Mossbauer and electronic absorption spectroscopy.

C437 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (2 cr.) P: C343 or S343 and C430 on Bloomington campus. Synthesis, characterization, and study of chemical and physical properties of inorganic and organometallic compounds.

C443 Organic Spectroscopy (3 cr.) P: C342 and C362. Elucidation of molecular structures by use of IR, UV, NMR, mass spectroscopy, and other methods.

C460 Nuclear Chemistry (3 cr.) N & M P or C: C360, C361, S361, or graduate standing. Fundamentals of nuclear behavior; nuclear properties, radioactive decay, and nuclear reactions; applications of nuclear phenomena, biological effects of radiation, nuclear analytical techniques, tracers, radioisotope dating, nuclear power, and the origin of the chemical elements.

P464 Advanced Measurements in Physical Chemistry (2 cr.) P: P364. C: C362. The tools of designing experiments in modern physical chemistry will be explored in this laboratory course. Students will work through the layers involved in physical experiments from its genesis through data analysis. Components of the class include electronics, computer interfacing, vacuum and laser technology, particle or photon detection, and computations. Credit given for only one of P364-P464 or C364.

C481 Physical Biochemistry (3 cr.) P: C361 and C484. Physical chemistry of biological macromolecules; structure and conformation of proteins and nucleic acids; thermodynamics and kinetics of biochemical reactions.

C483 Biological Chemistry (3 cr.) N & M P: C342 or R340. R: Both C342 and N330 strongly recommended. Introduction to structure, chemical properties, and interrelationships of biological substances. Credit given for only one of C483 or C484-C485.

C484 Biomolecules and Catabolism (3 cr.) N & M  P: C342 or S342. Structure and function of cellular components and the generation of phosphate-bond energy. Credit given for only one of C484-C485 or C483.

C485 Biosynthesis and Physiology (3 cr.) N & M  P: C484. Biosynthetic pathways, expression of genetic information, molecular physiology. Credit not given for both C485 and C483.

B487 Biochemistry Laboratory (2 cr.) P: C343 and C484. P or C: C485. Laboratory instruction in the fundamental techniques of protein biochemistry, including assay methods; separation of macromolecules by electrophoresis and chromatography; isolation, purification, analysis of enzymes, and methods for probing protein-ligand interactions. Credit given for only one of B487-B488 or C487.

C487 Biochemistry Laboratory (3 cr.) P: C343 and C484. Laboratory instruction in the fundamental techniques of biochemistry, including assay methods; separation of macromolecules by electrophoresis and chromatography; isolation, purification, and analysis of enzymes; recombinant DNA procedures; polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Credit given for only one of C487 or B487-B488.

B488 Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory (2 cr.) P: B487 and P or C: C485. Laboratory instruction in the fundamental techniques of nucleic acid chemistry, including assay methods, nucleic acid purification strategies, recombinant DNA procedures; transformations, protein expression systems, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methodologies, and methods of genomic analysis. Credit given for only one of B487-B488 or C487.

C497 Special Laboratory Projects in Chemistry (1–3 cr.) P: consent of instructor. Laboratory projects in chemistry or biochemistry as determined by instructor and student. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

C498 Special Topics in Chemistry (1–3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor; section authorization required. Topics in chemistry and biochemistry vary with each offering of this course.

G499 Internship in Chemical Instruction (1–3 cr.) P: Consent of department. Supervised experience in teaching an undergraduate chemistry course. May not count credit hours toward hours in the major.

Related Research Courses
The following courses may be counted in the Department of Chemistry as equivalent to C409 Chemical Research only by application to the department (Undergraduate Office, CH 021) prior to the start of the research experience. A research thesis must be submitted to the Department of Chemistry at the end of the research experience to complete the equivalency requirement.

Note: B.A. students may not use any research course in fulfillment of the chemistry major credit hours; B.S. students may not count MSCI M450 in the minimum 25 College of Arts and Sciences credit hours required in the major subject area out of the total of 45 chemistry credit hours required for the major.

• BIOL L490 Individual Study
• MSCI M450 Undergraduate Research in Biomedical Sciences

Return to Chemistry

Return to Top

Classical Studies

Course Descriptions

G305 Greek Tragedy (3 cr.) A & H P: One of G250, G302, or G308. One play of Sophocles and one of Euripides in the light of the social and cultural background.

G306 Greek Oratory (3 cr.) A & H P: One of G250, G302, or G308. Selected readings in the Greek orators, such as Lysias and Demosthenes, with some discussion of the development of prose artistry and rhetorical theory.

G307 Selected Works of Plato (3 cr.) A & H P: One of G250, G302, or G308. An introduction to the works of Plato, emphasizing the figure of Socrates.

G406 Homer (3 cr.) A & H P: One of G250, G302, or G308. Introduction to the Homeric dialect and epic style and study of Homer’s place in Greek culture through readings from the Iliad or Odyssey.

G407 Greek Historians (3 cr.) A & H  P: One of G250, G302, or G308. Selections from Herodotus and Thucydides, with attention to the authors’ literary style, their conception of history and the causation of events, and their portrayal of individuals and states.

G410 Greek Prose Authors (3 cr.) A & H P: One of G250, G302, or G308. Advanced reading material taken from such historians, orators, and philosophers as Thucydides, Demosthenes, Isocrates, Plato, and Aristotle.

G411 Greek Comedy (3 cr.) A & H P: One of G250, G302, or G308. Aristophanes and Menander; emphasis on the cultural background and the development of comic drama at Athens.

L407 Roman Lyric and Elegy (3 cr.)  P: One of L304, L305, L307, L308, L309, or L310. Introductory study of Roman lyric and elegiac poetry, with selections from Catullus, Horace, Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid. Emphasis on interpretation of individual poems and on their place in the ancient traditions of lyric and elegy.

L408 Roman Comedy (3 cr.) P: One of L304, L305, L307, L308, L309, or L310. Introductory study of ancient Roman comedy, with selections from Plautus and Terence. II Sem.

L409 Readings in Medieval Latin (3 cr.) P: One of L304, L305, L307, L308, L309, or L310. Survey of the secular and religious literature of the Middle Ages; discussion of the later development of the Latin language; selections from such authors as Gregory of Tours, Isidore of Seville, Paul the Deacon, Matthew Paris, and Bernard of Cluny.

L410 Advanced Prose Composition (3 cr.) P: One of L304, L305, L307, L308, L309, L310, or consent of instructor. Exercises in composition requiring control of principal features of Latin syntax.

L423 Roman Satire (3 cr.) P: One of L304, L305, L307, L308, L309, or L310. Representative satires of Horace, Persius, and Juvenal with emphasis on their literary qualities and on the historical development of Roman satire. Authors will be studied against the social and cultural background of their times.

L424 Silver Age Historians (3 cr.) P: One of L304, L305, L307, L308, L309, or L310. Selections from Suetonius and Tacitus illustrating the characteristics of silver Latin prose and the authors’ methods of depicting government and society in the early empire. Particular attention given to Tacitus’s literary technique.

L426 Rhetoric and Oratory (3 cr.) P: One of L304, L305, L307, L308, L309, or L310. History of Roman rhetoric and oratory; emphasis on Cicero and Quintilian.

L427 Virgil’s Eclogues and Georgics (3 cr.) P: One of L304, L305, L307, L308, L309, or L310. Virgil’s earlier work; emphasis on the development of his poetic technique and on the poet’s role in the new order of Augustus.

L428 Advanced Study of Virgil’s Aeneid (3 cr.) P: One of L304, L305, L307, L308, L309, or L310. Extensive reading in the Aeneid, with special attention to the poetic art of Virgil. Detailed study of Latin epic poetry.

L429 Roman Letters (3 cr.) P: One of L304, L305, L307, L308, L309, or L310. Selected letters of Cicero, Pliny, or Seneca, illustrating the art of letter writing in Rome and reflecting the personal interests and activities of the writers as well as the social and political conditions of their times.

L430 Lucretius (3 cr.) P: One of L304, L305, L307, L308, L309, or L310. Extensive reading in the text of De Rerum Natura and consideration of Epicureanism as a philosophical and social movement.

L432 Livy (3 cr.) P: One of L304, L305, L307, L308, L309, or L310. Readings from Livy’s Roman history with discussion of the author’s methods and values.

C419 The Art and Archaeology of Pompeii (3 cr., undergrad.; 4 cr., grad.) A & H P: One of C102, C206, or FINA A206. Survey of the archaeological evidence of the best-preserved ancient city, noting its importance to our knowledge of everyday life in the first century A.D.

C420 Topography and Monuments of Athens (3 cr.) A & H P: One of C101, C206, or FINA A206. An archaeological survey of the major monuments of ancient Athens from the prehistoric through the Roman eras. Topics include basic architectural forms and their political, social, and religious functions; Athenian democracy, political patronage, and building programs; and the integration of historical sources and the archaeological record.

C421 Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome (3 cr.) A & H P: One of C102, C206, or FINA A206. Study of the remains and knowledge of the physical fabric of ancient Rome, from its foundations through the high empire. It is the purpose of the course not only to introduce the student to the city and its monuments, but also through the monuments to provide a better understanding of the history of the city, its statesmen, and authors.

C422 Greek Sculpture (3 cr.) P: One of C101, C206, or FINA A206. Analytical survey of ancient Greek sculpture from the Archaic through the Classical periods (c. 600–323 B.C.). Topics include the origins and techniques of Greek sculptures; free-standing and architectural sculpture in religious, funerary, and public contexts; lost “masterpieces” of ancient Greek art; and the problems of Roman copies.

C423 Ancient Painting (3 cr.) P: C205. Minoan/Mycenaean palace painting; Hellenistic paintings in Macedonia; Etruscan and Lucanian tomb painting; Greek vases from Athens to Southern Italy and the public buildings and houses of the Roman world; Fayum portraits in Egypt and Roman catacombs.

Return to Top

Cognitive Science

Major in Cognitive Science—B.A.
Major in Cognitive Science—B.S.
Course Descriptions

Return to Top

Major in Cognitive Science—B.A.

Requirements   
In addition to the degree requirements for the B.A. degree in the College of Arts and Sciences, including the requirement for a minimum of 25 College of Arts and Sciences credit hours in the major subject area, students must complete the following:

  1. CORE: The four-course sequence: Q240, Q250, Q270, and Q320. (NOTE: Credit will not be given for both COGS Q260 and Q320.) For COGS Q320, students may substitute either COGS Q351 and CSCI C212 or CSCI B351 and CSCI C212. Students choosing to use CSCI substitutes must plan enough COGS courses to meet the minimum hours required for a COGS major. See advisor for details.
  2. CONCENTRATION: Three courses in one of the following areas: cognition, computation, foundations, informatics, language, logic, and neuroscience. Of these three courses, at least two must be at or above the 200 level, and at least one at or above the 300 level.
    The following courses are preapproved for the seven concentrations:
    Cognition: Psychological and Brain Sciences P325, P329, P330, P335, P350, P424, P435, P438, P443; Speech and Hearing Sciences S302, S378.
    Computation: Computer Science A321, C211, C212, C241, C311, C335, C341, C343, B351/Q351 (or their honors equivalents).
    Foundations: Philosophy P310, P312, P320, P360, P366.
    Informatics: Informatics I200, I210 (or Computer Science A201), I211 (or Computer Science A202), I300, I320; Computer Science A346.
    Language: Linguistics L303, L306, L307, L308, L310, L325, L430, L490; Psychological and Brain Sciences P438; Speech and Hearing Sciences S201, S290, S302, S307, S319, S333, S378, S420, S433, S436.
    Logic: Philosophy P250, P251, P350, P352.
    Neuroscience:
    Cognitive Science Q301; Psychological and Brain Sciences P326, P407, P410, P411, P423, P426.
    In addition to these preapproved concentrations, other specialized concentrations may be designed by individual students and submitted for approval to the cognitive science undergraduate curriculum committee.
  3. BREADTH: Three ADDITIONAL courses from at least two different departments, outside of the concentration area. Courses from those departments included on the list at the end of this section are preapproved. The cognitive science undergraduate curriculum committee must approve courses not on the list on an individual basis.
  4. SENIOR SEMINAR: Students must complete COGS Q400 Senior Seminar in the Cognitive and Information Sciences.

Return to Cognitive Science

Major in Cognitive Science—B.S.

Requirements   Students must complete the following fundamental skills and distribution requirements:

  1. Writing, same as B.A. degree.
  2. Mathematics: three courses, with at least one course at the 300 level or above, from the following: MATH M118, M119, M120, any 200 level or higher (includes PSY K300 and equivalent statistics courses).
  3. Foreign Language: three semesters in the same language, or equivalent proficiency.
  4. Arts and Humanities: two courses (includes COLL E103 or Honors equivalent).
  5. Social and Historical Studies: two courses (includes COLL E104 or Honors equivalent).
  6. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: two courses (includes COLL E105 or Honors equivalent).

Major Requirements

  1. CORE: The four-course sequence: Q240, Q250, Q270, Q320. (Note: Credit will not be given for both COGS Q260 and Q320.) For COGS Q320, students may substitute either COGS Q351 and CSCI C212 or CSCI B351 and CSCI C212. Students choosing to use CSCI substitutes must plan enough COGS courses to meet the minimum hours required for a COGS major. See advisor for details.
  2. CONCENTRATION: Three courses in one of the following areas: cognition, computation, informatics, language, logic, and neuroscience. Of these courses, at least two must be at or above the 200 level, and at least one at or above the 300 level.
    The following courses are preapproved for the six concentrations:
    Cognition: Psychological and Brain Sciences P325, P329, P330, P335, P350, P424, P435, P438, P443, Speech and Hearing Sciences S302, S378.      
    Computation: Computer Science A321, C211, C212, C241, C311, C335, C341, C343, B351/Q351 (or their Honors equivalents).
    Informatics: Informatics I200, I210 (or Computer Science A201), I211 (or Computer Science A202), I300, I320; Computer Science A346.
    Language: Linguistics L303, L306, L307, L308, L310, L325, L430, L490; Psychological and Brain Sciences P438; Speech and Hearing Sciences S201, S290, S302, S307, S319, S333, S378, S420, S433, S436.
    Logic: Philosophy P250, P251, P350, P352.
    Neuroscience: Cognitive Science Q301; Psychological and Brain Sciences P326, P407, P410, P411, P423, P426.
    In addition to these preapproved concentrations, other specialized concentrations may be designed by individual students and submitted for approval to the cognitive science undergraduate curriculum committee.
  3. COGS: Q301 Brain and Cognition.
  4. COMPUTATION: Two courses from approved list of courses at the 200-level and above from the Department of Computer Science.
  5. BREADTH: Three ADDITIONAL courses from at least two different departments outside of the concentration area. Courses from those departments included on the list at the end of this section are preapproved. The cognitive science undergraduate curriculum committee must approve courses not on the list on an individual basis.
  6. SENIOR SEMINAR: Students must complete Q400 Senior Seminar in the Cognitive and Information Sciences.
  7. RESEARCH: At least 6 credit hours from any combination of COGS Q493, Q495, and Q499.

Courses Related to Cognitive Science
The following courses in other departments are considered to lie within the scope of cognitive science. Those marked with an asterisk (*) are preapproved to meet concentration requirements. Note that courses taken in the School of Informatics will be outside hours for College of Arts and Sciences students. See advisor for additional breadth course options.

Computer Science
*A201 Introduction to Programming I (4 cr.) N & M
*A202 Introduction to Programming II (4 cr.) N & M
*A321 Computing Tools for Scientific Research (4 cr.) N & M
A247 Network Technologies and Administration (4 cr.)
A304 Introductory C++ Programming (2 cr.)
A306 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ (2 cr.)
*A346 User-Interface Programming (3 cr.)
*C211 Introduction to Computer Science (4 cr.) N & M
*H211 Introduction to Computer Science, Honors (4 cr.) N & M
*C212 Introduction to Software Systems (4 cr.) N & M
*H212 Introduction to Software Systems, Honors (4 cr.) N & M
*C241 Discrete Structures for Computer Science (3 cr.) N & M
*H241 Discrete Structures for Computer Science, Honors (3 cr.) N & M
*C311 Programming Languages (4 cr.) N & M
*H311 Programming Languages, Honors (4 cr.) N & M
*C335 Computer Structures (4 cr.) N & M
*H335 Computer Structures, Honors (4 cr.) N & M
B401 Fundamentals of Computing Theory (3 cr.) N & M
*C343 Data Structures (4 cr.) N & M
*H343 Data Structures, Honors (4 cr.) N & M
*B351 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence and Computer Simulation (3 cr.)
   N & M (cross-listed as COGS Q351)

School of Informatics
I101 Introduction to Informatics (3 cr.)
*I200 Information Representation (3 cr.)
*I210 Information Infrastructure I (4 cr.)
*I211 Information Infrastructure II (4 cr.)
*I300 Human Computer Interaction (3 cr.)
*I320 Distributive Systems and Collaborative Computing (3 cr.)

Linguistics
L103 Introduction to the Study of Language (3 cr.) S & H
L210 Topics in Language and Society (3 cr.) S & H
*L303 Introduction to Linguistic Analysis (3 cr.) N & M
*L306 Phonetics (3 cr.) N & M
*L307 Phonology (3 cr.) N & M
*L308 Morphology (3 cr.) N & M
*L310 Syntax (3 cr.) N & M
*L325 Semantics (3 cr.) N & M
*L430 Language Change and Variation (3 cr.) S & H
L431 Field Methods (3 cr.)
L432 Advanced Field Methods (3 cr.)
*L490 Linguistic Structures (3 cr.)

Philosophy
P100 Introduction to Philosophy (3 cr.) A & H
P105 Thinking and Reasoning (3 cr.) A & H
*P250 Introductory Symbolic Logic (3 cr.) N & M
*P251 Intermediate Symbolic Logic (3 cr.) N & M
*P310 Topics in Metaphysics (3 cr.) A & H
*P312 Topics in the Theory of Knowledge (3 cr.) A & H
*P320 Philosophy and Language (3 cr.) A & H
*P350 Logic of Sets (3 cr.)
*P352 Logic and Philosophy (3 cr.) A & H
*P360 Introduction to Philosophy of Mind (3 cr.) A & H
*P366 Philosophy of Action (3 cr.) A & H

Psychological and Brain Sciences
P101/P151 Introductory Psychology I (3 cr.) N & M
or P106 General Psychology, Honors (4 cr.) N & M
P201 An Introduction to Neuroscience (3 cr.) N & M
P211 Methods of Experimental Psychology (3 cr.) N & M
*P325 Psychology of Learning (3 cr.) N & M
*P326 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 cr.)
*P329 Sensation and Perception (3 cr.) N & M
*P330 Perception/Action (3 cr.) N & M
*P335 Cognitive Psychology (3 cr.) N & M
P346 Neuroscience (3 cr.)
P349 Cognitive Neuroscience (3 cr.)
*P350 Human Factors/Ergonomics (3 cr.) N & M
P405 Elementary Mathematical Psychology (3 cr.) N & M
*P407 Drugs and the Nervous System (3 cr.)
*P410 Development of the Brain and Behavior (3 cr.)
*P411 Neural Bases of Learning and Memory (3 cr.)
P417 Animal Behavior (3 cr.) N & M
*P423 Human Neuropsychology (3 cr.)
*P424 Laboratory in Sensation and Perception (3 cr.)
*P426 Laboratory in Behavioral Neuroscience (3 cr.)
P429 Laboratory in Developmental Psychology (3 cr.)
P433 Laboratory in Neuroimaging Methods (3 cr.)
*P435 Laboratory in Human Learning and Cognition (3 cr.)
*P438 Language and Cognition (3 cr.) N & M
*P443 Cognitive Development (3 cr.)
P444 Developmental Psychobiology (3 cr.)
P448 Social Judgment and Person Perception (3 cr.)

Speech and Hearing Sciences
*S201 Speech Anatomy and Physiology (3 cr.) N & M
*S290 Spoken Language Computer Interfaces (3 cr.) N & M
*S302 Acoustics for Speech and Hearing Sciences N & M
*S307 Cognitive and Communicative Aspects of Aging (3 cr.) N & M
*S319 Mathematical Foundation for Speech and Hearing Sciences (3 cr.)
   N & M
*S333 Survey of Children’s Language Development (3 cr.)
*S378 Introduction to Psychoacoustics (3 cr.)
*S420 Phonological Acquisition and Disorders in Children (3 cr.)
*S433 Childhood Language (3 cr.) N & M
*S436 Language Disorders in Children (3 cr.)

Return to Cognitive Science

Course Descriptions

Q240 Philosophical Foundations of the Cognitive and Information Sciences (4 cr.) A & H Foundational introduction to the cognitive and information sciences. The primary themes are: (1) causal issues such as functional and computational architecture (e.g., modularity, effectiveness, and implementation, analog/digital), neuroscience, and embodied dynamics; and (2) semantic issues such as meaning, representation, content, and information flow. The role of both themes in logic, perception, computation, cognition, and consciousness. Throughout, an emphasis on writing, analysis, and exposition.

Q360 Autonomous Robotics (3 cr.)  P: Two semesters of computer programming or consent of instructor. Introduction to the design, construction, and control of autonomous mobile robots. Includes basic mechanics, electronics, and programming for robotics, as well as the applications of robots in cognitive science. Credit given for only one of Q360 or CSCI B355.

Return to Cognitive Science

Return to Top

Communication and Culture

Course Descriptions

C208 Image Cultures (3 cr.) A & H Offers an interdisciplinary and historical context for understanding contemporary western “image culture” by addressing the notion of the “image” in a wide range of its theoretical, critical, and practical contexts, uses, and history. Examines the claim that our culture is more imagistic than others historically, asking how the roles of images have changed over time in relation to other modes of signification.

C335 Production as Criticism (3 cr.) A & H Provides conceptual and hands-on experience for researching, writing, and producing different genres of video programs using VRA camcorders and editing systems. This course emphasizes conceptual processes from the original script to the completed video. Lab fee required. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

C391 Media Audiences (3 cr.) A & H Studies audiences in the context of film, television, new media, and other media forms. Topic varies, but may include a focus on theories of spectatorship, historical reception studies, ethnographic and/or empirical audience studies, global or transnational audiences, internet communities, performance theory, fan cultures, and subcultures. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Return to Top

Computer Science

Course Descriptions

A321 Computing Tools for Scientific Research (4 cr.) N & M C: MATH M118 or higher required; MATH M211 recommended. Introduction to computer-based tools useful for analysis and understanding of scientific data. Basic methods of computation, data processing, and display systems such as Matlab combined with elementary practical C/C++ programming. Techniques to support customized scientific research tasks, with particular emphasis on biological, neural, and behavioral sciences. Lecture and laboratory.

C322 Object Oriented Software Methods (4 cr.) P: C212. Design and implementation of complex software systems and applications exploiting the object-oriented paradigm. Selection and effective utilization of object-oriented libraries and interfaces.

B355 Autonomous Robotics (3 cr.) P: Two semesters of computer programming or consent of instructor. Introduction to the design, construction, and control of autonomous mobile robots. This course covers basic mechanics, electronics, and programming for robotics, as well as the applications of robots in cognitive science. Credit given for only one of B355 or COGS Q360.

H498 Honors Seminar (1–6 cr.) P: Junior or senior major in CS or INFO with GPA at least 3.300 or permission of instructor. A survey of faculty research in computer related fields with different professors discussing their research each week. Total credit in H498 may not exceed 6 hours.

Return to Top

Criminal Justice

Course Descriptions

P210 Service Learning Experience in Criminal Justice (1 cr.) C: Enrollment in an approved criminal justice course and approval of instructor. Students work with community groups related to criminal justice issues. Requirements typically include training, weekly meetings with a community group, related readings, and written reflective statements. Credit will not count toward requirements of the major or the minor. Students may complete no more than a maximum of 6 credit hours for any combination of P210, P281, and P481.

P281 Internship Transfer Hours in Criminal Justice (1–3 cr.) Designed for students who want to transfer internship credit hours completed at another institution. Students currently enrolled at IU Bloomington cannot register for this class. Credit will not count toward requirements of the major or the minor. Students may complete no more than a maximum of 6 credit hours for any combination of P210, P281 and P481.

P474 Law, Crime, and Justice in Post-Soviet Russia (3 cr.) S & H  Interdisciplinary course examines how the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government are being influenced by the forces of transition. Analysis of Russian crime, including corruption, patterns of interpersonal violence, human trafficking, and drug use. Last section focuses on the Russian criminal justice system, including juvenile justice, policing, and prisons.

P481 Field Experience in Criminal Justice (3 or 6 cr.) P: Junior standing, completion of core requirements, and approval of project. Field experience with directed readings and writing. Credit will not count toward requirements of the major or the minor. Students may complete no more than a maximum of 6 credit hours for any combination of P210, P281, and P481.

Return to Top

East Asian Languages and Cultures

Course Descriptions

C111 Elementary Business Chinese I (1–3 cr.) Language practice with focus on business applications. Business-related vocabulary, dialogue, and grammar practice using business world situations and contexts.

C301 Third-Year Chinese I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in C202, or equivalent proficiency. Emphasis on practice in understanding the difference between oral and written expression, building up discourse-level narration skills, and developing reading strategies for coping with authentic texts. I Sem.

C302 Third-Year Chinese II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in C301, or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of C301. II Sem.

E374 Early Chinese Philosophy (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Origins of Chinese philosophical traditions in the classical schools of Confucianism, Taoism, Mohism, and Legalism. Explores contrasting agendas of early Chinese and Western traditions. Credit given for only one of E374, PHIL P374, or REL R368.

J301 Third-Year Japanese I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in J202, or equivalent proficiency. Primary emphasis on reading skills. Conversation stressed in drill sections. I Sem.

J302 Third Year-Japanese II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in J301, or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of J301. II Sem.

Return to Top

Economics

Interdepartmental Major in Economics and Mathematics
Course Descriptions

Return to Top

Interdepartmental Major in Economics and Mathematics

Purpose
The interdepartmental major in economics and mathematics is designed to enable students to model economic questions mathematically, and to analyze and solve those models.

Requirements
Students must meet the following course requirements. Any course may be replaced by the honors equivalent.

  1. Economics: E201, E202, E321, E322 and at least three additional economics courses numbered above E322, including at least one at the 400 level. E370, E496, and Y398 cannot be used to meet this requirement.
  2. Mathematics: M211-M212 or M213, M301 or M303, M311 and at least two courses, including one at the 400 level, from one of the following mathematics areas: analysis (M312, M413, M414, M415, M420); differential equations (M343, M344, M441, M442); applied mathematics (M371, M447, M448, M451, M471, M472); or probability and statistics (M366*, M463, M464, M465, M466, M467, M468).
    *Note: M366 has a prerequisite of M360; see requirement 3 below. For students who qualify for honors, Mathematics S499 may replace the second course in a mathematical area with approval of the Department of Mathematics.
  3. Statistics: the sequence Mathematics M360-M366, or Economics E370, or Mathematics M365.

Special Considerations

  1. No more than 3 credit hours of Honors Thesis (Economics E499 or Mathematics S499) may be counted toward the major.
  2. It is recommended that students planning to pursue a Ph.D. in economics consult with the Department of Economics concerning classes in the areas of analysis, econometrics, and statistics.
  3. It is recommended that students in actuarial studies take Mathematics M360, M366, M371, M463, M464, and one course from M466, M467, or Economics E471. It is recommended that these students also consult with the Department of Economics concerning relevant seminar courses. Students should consult the actuarial studies section of the Department of Mathematics entry in the 2006–08 College of Arts and Sciences Bulletin.

Return to Economics

Course Descriptions

E303 Survey of International Economics (3 cr.) S & H P: E201 and E202. Basis for and effects of international trade, commercial policy and effects of trade restrictions, balance of payments and exchange rate adjustment, international monetary systems, and fixed versus flexible exchange rates. Not recommended for economics majors. Only 6 credit hours from E303, E331, and E332 may be counted toward a major in economics.

E304 Survey of Labor Economics (3 cr.) S & H P: E201 and E202. Economic problems of the wage earner in modern society; structure, policies, and problems of labor organizations; employer and governmental labor relations.

E305 Money and Banking (3 cr.) S & H P: E201 and E202. Monetary and banking system of the U.S. The supply and control of money. The impact of money on the U.S. economy. Topics in the application of Federal Reserve monetary policy. Analytical treatment of the Federal Reserve system and the commercial banking industry.

E309 Topics in Economics (3 cr.) S & H P: E201 and E202. Study of a topic area in economics. Topics will vary. Intended primarily for non-majors wanting exposure to economics beyond the introductory level. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. Only 3 credit hours may count toward the major or minor in economics.

S322 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory: Honors (3 cr.) S & H P: E202 and E321. Designed for students of superior ability. Covers same core material as E322 and substitutes for E322 as a prerequisite for other courses. Credit given for only one of S322 or E322.

E337 Economic Development (3 cr.) P: E321. Characteristics of economically underdeveloped countries. Obstacles to sustained growth; planning and other policies for stimulating growth; examination of development problems and experience in particular countries.

E341 Economics of Labor Market (3 cr.) P: E321. R: E370. Analysis of the functioning of labor markets with theoretical, empirical, and policy applications in determination of employment and wages in the U.S. economy.

E344 Health Economics (3 cr.) P: E321. R: E370 or equivalent is strongly recommended. Systematic introduction to health economics and economics of health care, emphasis on basic economic concepts such as supply and demand, production of health, information economics, choice under uncertainty, health insurance markets, Medicare and Medicaid, managed care, government intervention and regulation. Survey course with some topics in some depth.

E359 Economic History of the United States (3 cr.) S & H P: E321. Economic development and institutional change in the U.S. from colonial times to the present. Timing, pace, and sources of economic growth; structural change; economic activity; industrialization; government intervention; and income distribution.

E364 Environment and Resource Economics (3 cr.) S & H P: E321. Basic theory of common property resources applied to environment and resource conservation problems. Topics include economic efficiency, equity, measurement problems, and policy formulation.

E370 Statistical Analysis for Business and Economics (3 cr.) N & M P: E201 and MATH M118 or similar course emphasizing probability concepts. R: MATH M119 and E202. Lectures emphasize the use of basic probability concepts and statistical theory in the estimation and testing of single parameter and multivariate relationships. In computer labs, using Microsoft Excel, each student calculates descriptive statistics, probabilities, and least squares regression coefficients in situations based on current business and economic events. Credit given for only one of the following: ECON E270, S270, E370, S370, CJUS K300, MATH/PSY K300, K310; SOC S371; STAT S300, or SPEA K300. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

S370 Statistical Analysis for Business and Economics: Honors (3 cr.) N & M P: E201 and MATH M118 or similar course emphasizing probability concepts. R: MATH M119 and E202. Designed for students of superior ability. Covers same core material as E370 and substitutes for E370 as a prerequisite for other courses. Credit given for only one of the following: ECON E270, S270, E370, S370, CJUS K300, MATH/PSY K300, K310; SOC S371; STAT S300, or SPEA K300.

E390 Undergraduate Seminar in Economics (3 cr.) P: E321. Additional prerequisites may be required depending on the seminar topic. Intensive study of a topic area in economics. Topics will vary. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

E391 Undergraduate Readings in Economics (1–3 cr.) P: E321, E322, E370; undergraduate economics major; minimum GPA in economics courses of 3.000. Additional prerequisites may be required by the faculty mentor. Independent readings and research by special arrangement with an economics faculty mentor and the director of undergraduate studies. A research paper or other substantial writing assignments are usually required. A maximum of 3 credit hours in E391 may count toward the major in economics.

E425 Financial Economics (3 cr.) P: E321. R: E370 strongly recommended but not required. Modern financial markets; theories and empirical evidence. Present value, modern portfolio theory, risk and return, the capital asset pricing model, arbitrage pricing theory, the efficient markets hypothesis, bubbles, noise and market anomalies, options and derivative securities, and the economic function of derivatives.

E427 Seminar in Experimental Economics (3 cr.) P: E321 and E370 or consent of instructor. R: E327. Focuses on the use of laboratory experimental methods in applied microeconomics. Specific application areas will include the analysis of resource allocation mechanisms for both private and public goods and individual choice under uncertainty using both human and nonhuman subjects.

E471 Economic Theory and Practice I (3 cr.) P: E370 and either MATH M119 or M211 or consent of instructor. Emphasis is on the probability and statistical theory underpinning the classical linear regression model. Special topics include finite and asymptotic properties of point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing and model building. Several software packages are used in computer lab applications.

E472 Economic Theory and Practice II (3 cr.) P: E471. Emphasis is on the matrix formulation and computer estimation methods for single and multiple equation models using economic and business data. Attention is given to the assumptions required for testing sets of coefficients and model structures. Special topics include heteroscedasticity, multicollinearity, errors in variables, simultaneity, time-series analysis, limited dependent variables, sample selection, and alternatives to least-squares estimation.

E490 Advanced Undergraduate Seminar in Economics (3 cr.) P: E321. Additional prerequisites may be required depending on the seminar topic. Advanced intensive study of a topic area in economics. Topics will vary. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

Return to Economics

Return to Top

English

Major in English
Minor in Creative Writing
Course Descriptions

Major in English

Requirements   Students must complete 30 credit hours in English above the 100 level, including L202, L371, and one 300-level course from the department’s list of approved courses for each of four periods in the history of literatures in English—beginnings through the sixteenth century; sixteenth through eighteenth centuries; the nineteenth century; 1900 to the present. The following courses are not approved for inclusion in the major or minor: W202, W205, and courses completed through Independent Studies. Students may substitute 3 credit hours from the related courses listed at the end of this section.

Students must also complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Requirements for the Major in English with a Concentration in Creative Writing  Students must complete 30 credit hours in English above the 100 level, including the following:

1. ENG L202 and L371.
2. At least one approved 300-level course in each historical period from the following list:
            Beginnings Through the 16th Century
            16th Through 18th Centuries
            The 19th Century
            1900 to the Present
3. At least 12 hours, of which at least 6 hours must be at the 300 level or above, chosen from courses on the following list (at least one of the courses must be either W381 or W383):
            W203 Creative Writing
            W301 Writing Fiction
            W303 Writing Poetry
            W311 Writing Creative Nonfiction
            W401 Advanced Fiction Writing
            W403 Advanced Poetry Writing
            W381 The Craft of Fiction
            W383 The Craft of Poetry

Students must also complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Recommendations   The department recommends that majors considering graduate work in English take elective courses in a variety of periods of English and American literature. Especially recommended are courses in Chaucer (L305); Shakespeare (L313-L314); Milton (L318); the major figures of nineteenth-century American literature (L351-L352); and 400-level senior seminars. For advice in planning a course of study, students should consult their departmental advisor and the department’s pamphlet, “Designing an English Major.” Each semester, the department publishes detailed descriptions of courses to be offered the following semester.

Foreign Language Recommendations   Students who expect to do graduate work in English are advised to take substantial work in two foreign languages. Graduate schools commonly require French, German, or Latin.

Return to English

Minor in Creative Writing

Requirements  15 credit hours in English above the 100 level, including
1. 12 credit hours selected from L202, W203, W301, W303, W311, W401, W403.
2. W381 or W383.
3. A minimum of 6 credit hours must be taken at the 300–400 level.
4. At least 9 credit hours of the minor must be taken on the Bloomington campus.

Note: Courses completed through Independent Studies are not automatically approved for inclusion in the minor.

A student may complete both the English minor and the minor in creative writing as long as different courses are chosen to complete each minor. Students majoring in English are not eligible for the Creative Writing minor.

Return to English

Course Descriptions

W203 Creative Writing (3 cr.) P: English major or W103 or permission of the director, Creative Writing Program. Exploratory course in the writing of poetry and/or fiction. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Does not satisfy the English composition requirement.

G405 Studies in English Language (3 cr.) Topics will vary from semester to semester.

L351 American Literature 1800–1865 (3 cr.) A & H Study of a range of texts from the formative period of the republic to the end of the Civil War. Special attention paid to the shifting definitions and constructions of U.S. American national and cultural identity, as affected by issues of race, environment, transatlantic exchanges, scientific discourse, and the emergence of women writers.

L352 American Literature 1865–1914 (3 cr.) A & H Surveys American literature through the development of realism, regionalism, naturalism, and the beginnings of modernism. Considers literature’s relation to social and cultural phenomena of this era, such as urbanization, industrialization, immigration, racial tensions, labor strife, changing gender roles, and the spread of mass media and consumer culture.

L354 American Literature since 1914 (3 cr.) A & H Provides an understanding of the pivotal literary innovations and cultural changes between the wars. Literary movements such as naturalism, realism, and modernism may be the subject of focus, as might changes in race and gender relations, labor politics, immigration policies, regionalism, and the increasing shift from agricultural to urban economics.

L355 American Fiction to 1900 (3 cr.) A & H Survey of a range of literary fiction in nineteenth-century America, examining a variety of forms including the novel, sketch, short story, as well as modes (Gothic, romance, sentimental, adventure). Attention will be paid to the historical, cultural, and political contexts in which canonical and lesser-known authors wrote.

L357 Twentieth-Century American Poetry (3 cr.) A & H Examination of the general trends and important contributions found in the work of major and minor American poets.

L358 American Literature, 1914–1960 (3 cr.) A & H Survey of literary expressions centered mainly in the first half of the twentieth century. Attention may be given to such literary movements as modernism and the Beats, as well as literature written by women and various ethnic populations.

L359 American Literature, 1960–Present (3 cr.) A & H Examination of a range of literary forms and developments after the start of the Vietnam War. Special attention may be given to postmodernism, women’s literature, ethnic literature, 1960s protest literature, and radical revisions of genres, forms and narrative strategies in the age of computerization.

L360 American Prose (Excluding Fiction) (3 cr.) A & H  Examines—but is not limited to—such non-fiction genres as the personal or political essay, science writing, journalism exposé, history, biography, film criticism, memoir, travel and speech writing. The instructor may focus on a particular genre or period.

L369 Studies in British and American Authors (3 cr.) A & H Studies in single authors (such as Wordsworth and Melville), groups of authors (such as minority writers), and periods (such as American writers of the l920s). Topics will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Return to English

Return to Top

Environmental Science

Introduction
The B.S. in Environmental Science (B.S.E.S.) is a joint degree program between the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs. The interdisciplinary B.S.E.S. program considers the environment as a scientific entity. Students preparing for professional employment or graduate study in environmental science or in one of the traditional sciences should consider this degree.

While it is possible to divide environmental science into numerous subdisciplines or systems such as the atmosphere, the biosphere, the hydrosphere, and the lithosphere, these subsystems are interdependent components of a single large system. It follows that the problems encountered in the environmental sciences are inherently interdisciplinary; hence, a scientist working in this field is required to possess both a breadth of knowledge and a specific set of skills and expertise. The overall organization of the B.S.E.S. degree program reflects this philosophy with a broad core curriculum, a concentration area, and a senior research project providing advanced hands-on experience. The B.S.E.S. degree program is intended to instill an appreciation of the integrated nature of the discipline and supply a level of expertise in one area. Recognition of these areas of expertise comes in the form of a concentration designation: General, Atmospheric Science, Ecosystem Science, Hydrology and Water Resources, Mathematical Modeling, Surficial Processes, or Pollution Control Technologies and Remediation.

Major in Environmental Science—B.S.

Purpose
The B.S. in environmental science is designed to provide a scientific background with both breadth and depth to prepare students for professional science-related employment and/or advanced study at the graduate level. Students must complete a set of fundamental skills and distributions requirements, a core curriculum, and a concentration in a particular branch of environmental science.

Fundamental Skills and Distribution (variable credit hours depending on course selection)

  1. Writing: English Composition (ENG W131, W231) and Intensive Writing (IW); senior research thesis within major fulfills IW requirement.
  2. Mathematics: Major fulfills requirement.
  3. Public speaking: Select one course from CMCL C121, C122, C205, C223, C225, C228, C229, or THTR T115 or T120.
  4. Foreign language: Student must complete the study of a single foreign language through the second semester of the first year of college-level course work. All or part of the requirement may be fulfilled by performance on placement examinations.
  5. One Topics/Freshman Seminar course from Arts and Humanities or from Social and Historical Studies; the course chosen for this requirement may be used in partial fulfillment of requirement 6 below if the course selected carries the Arts and Humanities designation.
  6. Arts and Humanities: Two courses chosen from “Appendix II: Approved Distribution Courses” in this supplement; COLL E103 may fulfill one of these two courses.
  7. Social and Historical Studies: One course with an emphasis on economics or political science, selected from ECON E201, E202, E364, POLS Y103, or Y313.
  8. Social and Historical Studies: One course with an emphasis on public policy, selected from SPEA V263, V371, V376, V499, or V472.
  9. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: Major fulfills requirement.

Core Requirements (61–63 credit hours)

  1. Biology: BIOL L111 and either BIOL L473 or SPEA E432.
  2. Chemistry (one of the following sequences):*
            a. CHEM C117, C118, and C341 or
            b. CHEM C117, R340, A314 and A316 or
            c. CHEM C117, R340, and N330
            *SPEA E464 may be used in place of CHEM C341 or R340, and CHEM C341 may be used in place of CHEM R340. Students who did not earn at least a B– in high school chemistry should contact the B.S.E.S. program director and the Department of Chemistry Undergraduate Placement Office to determine the appropriate starting course.
  3. Computing: CSCI A202, or GEOG G250, or SPEA E325. Any one of these three courses may be selected.
  4. Environmental Science overview: SPEA E262.
  5. Atmospheric Science: GEOG G304.
  6. Geological Science: GEOL G225.
  7. Field experience: GEOL G329 is offered at the IU Geological Field Station in Montana and should be taken during the summer following the fourth semester of enrollment. Students with certain needs can substitute two of the following courses for G329: BIOL L465 Advanced Field Biology, GEOG G350 Instrumentation and Field Methods in Atmospheric Science, SPEA E442 Habitat Analysis—Terrestrial, and SPEA E443 Habitat Analysis—Aquatic.
  8. Mathematics: MATH M211 (or M119 and X201), M212, and either MATH M343 or SPEA E426.
  9. Physics: PHYS P221 and P222.
  10. Statistics: MATH K300 or GEOG G488 or MATH M365 or SPEA K300.
  11. Environmental science senior research: Guided by a faculty member, each student undertakes a project closely related to his or her concentration (see below). Completion of a written thesis and an oral presentation are required; the thesis may be used to fulfill the College’s intensive writing requirement if the guidelines for this requirement are met. Students should enroll in 3 credit hours in the appropriate course within the faculty supervisor’s department (BIOL L490, CHEM C409, CSCI Y390, GEOG G450, GEOL G410, INFO I460, MATH M490, PHYS S406, SPEA E490) or other courses as appropriate given the affiliation of the faculty advisor.

Concentration (minimum of 18 credit hours)
Whereas the core curriculum provides each student with a solid background in the basic subjects pertinent to the environmental sciences, the concentration is aimed at preparing students for graduate study or professional employment in specific fields. A partial list of the available topics includes atmospheric sciences, applied ecology, earth-system science, energy production, environmental toxicology, global environmental change, surface-groundwater systems, numerical modeling, and oceanic sciences. Additional or alternative topics can be defined in order to fit specific needs or opportunities. Programs include 18 credit hours of course work selected by students in consultation with a faculty advisor, active in the field in which they have chosen to concentrate, and two additional faculty members. Each program is then approved by the B.S.E.S. Program Committee.

Return to Top

Fine Arts

Major in Studio—B.F.A.

Purpose
This program is designed to meet the needs of exceptional students who desire intensive studio experience within the context of the liberal arts. They must have demonstrated superior ability and motivation in a particular studio discipline.
Admission to the B.F.A. program in any studio area is subject to a portfolio review, judgment of grades, and a personal interview with the faculty of that area. Applications are not usually considered until students have had at least two studio courses on the Bloomington campus.

Requirements
Students must complete at least 62 credit hours in studio and at least 12 credit hours in art history, including the following:

  1. F100, F101, and F102 (9 cr.).
  2. S200 (3 cr.).
  3. Three additional studio courses at the 200 level (at least 9 cr.), including at least one course in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional disciplines (Note: The two-dimensional studio disciplines are graphic design, painting and drawing, photography, digital art, and printmaking. The three-dimensional disciplines are ceramics, fibers, metalworking and jewelry design, and sculpture.)
  4. Additional credit hours, prescribed by the director of the area in which the degree is taken, to total 62 credit hours of studio work, including both two-dimensional and three-dimensional disciplines.
  5. Final portfolio review (G400).
  6. Art history courses A101 or A160, and A102.
  7. Two courses in art history at the 300–400 level.

Students must complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Recommendations
Students should plan the distribution of their programs within the areas offered under the guidance of area advisors.

Residence Requirement
At least 40 credit hours of studio and 6 credit hours of art history must be completed in residence on the Bloomington campus.

Transferred Credit
All art history and studio courses transferred from another institution or campus must be evaluated by an appropriate faculty member in the School of Fine Arts before they may be applied toward a major in fine arts. See “Transferred Credit Review” in the 2006–2008 College of Arts and Sciences Bulletin.

Course Descriptions

N130 Digital Imagery for Nonmajors (3 cr.) Lecture course introduces nonmajors to the fundamental practice of creating art imagery using digital software. Demonstrations and optional hands-on lab sessions emphasize technical production in Photoshop and Illustrator. Art projects created in Photoshop and lecture topics focus on aesthetic approaches and issues facing artists working in contemporary digital imaging.

D210 Digital Art: Survey and Practice (3 cr.) A & H Beginning class on digital media’s role in the world of art production and reception. Class emphasizes learning to use digital media to produce original, creative art work. Topics include digital imaging, communicative art and interactivity. Credit given for only one of D210 or T230.

D310 Interactive Multimedia (3 cr.) P: D210 or T230, and portfolio review. A study of the principles and fundamental techniques for creating multimedia projects that explore their potential for critical artistic expression. The course will examine issues specific to onscreen interaction and time-based media. Tools such as Flash, Dreamweaver, and other supporting programs will be covered. Credit given for only one of D310 or T330.

D317 Video Art (3 cr.) A & H P: F100, F101 or F102 or D210, or portfolio review. Exploration of the medium of video as an aesthetic expression. Time and sound are elements incorporated into visual composition’s traditional concerns. Emphasis on technical command of video camera and digital editing procedures in conjunction with development of a visual sensitivity. Readings and a research project are required. Credit given for only one of D317 or T320.

D318 3D Computer Graphics (3 cr.) P: Consent of the instructor. Hands-on studio course exploring the technical development of three-dimensional computer graphics for state-of-the-art display systems. Students will investigate user-interface design, create 3D graphical environments, and explore the parallel drives toward content creation and visual aesthetics. Credit given for only one of D318 or T340.

D410 Advanced Multimedia (1–6 cr.) P: D310 or T330, and permission of instructor. A broad range of aesthetic and conceptual issues related to digital material and electronic interactivity. Students are encouraged to develop art projects using digital multimedia, video, hypertext or the incorporation of object-based media. Dialogue of timely issues through readings, screenings, Web sites, and gallery visits. May be repeated for a combined maximum of 20 credit hours in D410 and T430.

D411 B.F.A. Digital Art Seminar (1 cr.) P: Admission into the B.F.A. program in digital art. Weekly or biweekly seminar that includes critiques of student work, discussion of special topics, assigned readings, multimedia lectures, visiting artist lectures, and special research projects. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours.

D412 B.F.A. Digital Art (1–6 cr.) P: Admission into the B.F.A. program in digital art. Directed, advanced study and production of a body of work leading to B.F.A. exhibition. Students meet independently with instructor and in group critiques to maintain a dialogue and provide technical advice. May be repeated for a maximum of 60 credit hours.

D417 Digital Video (1–6 cr.) P: D317 or T320. Advanced study of video’s potential in contemporary fine art practice. Students will create a new visual vocabulary using the latest technology including high-definition video systems and interactive DVD authoring. Covers special effects and animation programs that allow artists to further explore the aesthetics of time-based media. May be repeated for a combined maximum of 20 credit hours in D417 and T420.

D418 Computer Graphical Environments (1–6 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Students develop 3D graphic environments to visualize and conceptualize creative constructs for virtual environments, explore art and spatial simulation, including animation, interaction, lighting and design. Dialogue of timely issues is encouraged based on readings, videos, CD-ROMs and visits to galleries, Web sites and alternative spaces. May be repeated for a combined maximum of 20 credit hours in D418 and T440.

D419 Special Topics in Digital Art (3 cr.) P: D210 or T230, and permission of instructor. Special topics in computer-related art production. May be repeated for a combined maximum of 6 credit hours in D419 and T338.

S455 Practice and History of Graphic Design (3 cr.) P: S250, S351, S352, and consent of instructor. Examines the history of graphic design with a focus on Western Civilization and comparisons to other cultures. Design projects and reports by students provide graphic design experience and reflection on the historical topics covered.

Return to Top

Folklore and Ethnomusicology

Course Descriptions

F121 World Arts and Cultures (3 cr.) S & H Surveying the customary arts of the world’s peoples offers a means of comprehending the human condition today. This course explores how culture is made manifest, especially in such media as landscapes, architecture, material culture, and expressive performances. A sampling of world arts, it also provides an introduction to folklife studies.

F330 Folk Culture and Related Fields (3 cr.) S & H Studies of folk culture in relationship to other fields. Focuses on such interdisciplinary topics as folk culture in relationship to language, literature, psychology, history, religion, sociology, musicology, or anthropology. May be repeated with a different topic for a total of 6 credit hours.

Return to Top

French and Italian

Course Descriptions

F251 Service Learning Practicum in French Teaching (1 cr.) P: F200. Students develop and teach basic French lessons in area elementary schools under the guidance of their instructor. Requirements include four school visits, five planning meetings, and four written reflective statements. S/F grading. No credit for French major.

M311 Italian Film and Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSB Study of Italian cinema and culture, taught either as a survey course or with a focus on a particular topic in Italian culture, such as gender, politics, sports, or other social issues. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Taught in English. No credit in Italian.

Return to Top

Geography

Major in Geography—B.A.
Course Descriptions

Major in Geography—B.A.

Purpose
The B.A. degree is intended to provide a strong liberal arts degree focusing on the major subject areas of geography, while maintaining a great deal of flexibility. The flexibility allows students to focus on particular concentration areas and/or to choose a second major.

Requirements
Students must complete the following:

  1. A minimum of 25 credit hours in geography, of which at least 9 credit hours must be at the 300 or 400 level and at least 3 additional credit hours must be at the 400 level
  2. One course each in physical geography (either G107 or G109), human geography (either G110 or G120), and two courses in geographic methodology (to be selected from G235, G237, G250, G336, G338, G350, G436, G438, or G488)

Students must complete the B.A. degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Recommendations
Students ordinarily select one of the following concentration areas and identify a faculty member or members associated with that concentration area to be their advisors. Faculty names are listed below with the appropriate specialties.

  1. Atmospheric Science  Complete G304 and G350; select from G235, G250, G336, G339, G405, G431, G433, G434, G451, G470, and G475; additionally G450, G460, G477, and G489. (Brown, Caylor, Pryor, Robeson, Schmid)
  2. Human-Environment Interaction  Select from G304/G305 and G306/G315 and at least one 400-level course. Courses within this concentration include: G208, G235, G237, G304, G305, G306, G307, G315, G336, G341, G405, G421, G434, G440, G450, G451, G460, and G475. Other recommended courses include: G250, G336, G338, G350, and G488. (Black, Brown, Caylor, Pryor, Robeson, Schmid)
  3. Geographic Information Science  G235, G237, G250, G336, G338, G436, G438, G439, G450, G460, and G488. (Evans, Odland, Rahman, Robeson)
  4. International Studies  Select courses from G210, G235, E302, G306 (when it has a regional focus), G317, G323, G324, G326, G425, G427, G428, G450, and G460. (Biles, Knudsen, Odland)
  5. Human Geography  Select courses from G210, G235, G237, G302, G306 (when appropriate), G314, G316, G317, G320, G338, G415, G450, G460, and G488. (Biles, Black, Grubesic, Knudsen, Odland)
  6. Sustainable Systems  Select courses from G208, G302, G305, G315, G320, G332, G406, G411, G415, G442, G450, G460, and G489 (Black, Brown, Caylor, Evans, Odland, Pryor, Robeson)

Return to Geography

Course Descriptions

H107 Physical Systems of the Environment, Honors (3 cr.) N & M Designed for students with unusual aptitude and motivation. Covers same core material as G107 and substitutes for G107 as a prerequisite for other courses. Credit given for only one of H107 or G107.

H120 World Regional Geography, Honors (3 cr.) S & H Designed for students with unusual aptitude and motivation. Covers same core material as G120 and substitutes for G120 as a prerequisite for other courses. Credit given for only one of H120 or G120.

G220 Topics in Geography (3 cr.) Examination of a topic from a range of geographic perspectives. Topics will vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Only 3 credit hours may be applied to the geography major.

G339 Weather Analysis and Forecasting (3 cr.) N & M P: G109 or G107 or consent of instructor. Analysis and interpretation of meteorological data with a focus on forecasting applications for the mid-latitudes. Students learn the practical skills that weather forecasters use.

G433 Advanced Synoptic Meteorology and Climatology (3 cr.) N & M P: G339 or G304 or consent of instructor. Analysis and prediction of synoptic scale weather systems, emphasizing the mid-latitudes. Other topics include severe weather and atmospheric/oceanic teleconnections.

G451 Water Resources: Semi-Arid Environments (3 cr.) N & M P: G107 or G109 and at least one 300-level physical/biological science course or consent of instructor. Investigates the hydro-micrometeorological and human dynamics of semi-arid ecosystems/environments.

Return to Geography

Return to Top

Geological Sciences

Course Descriptions

G104 Evolution of the Earth (3 cr.) N & M Earth’s history interpreted through 4.5 billion years. Deductive approach to understanding the significance of rocks and fossils and reconstructing the plate-tectonic origin of mountains, continents, and ocean basins. A survey of events in earth’s evolution relevant to contemporary environmental concerns. Two lectures and one laboratory each week. Credit given for only one of G104, S104, or G112.

S104 Honors Evolution of the Earth (3 cr.) N & M Earth’s history interpreted through 4.5 billion years. Deductive approach to understanding the significance of rocks and fossils and reconstructing the plate-tectonic origin of mountains, continents, and ocean basins. A survey of events in earth’s evolution relevant to contemporary environmental concerns. Two lectures and one laboratory each week. Credit given for only one of S104, G104, or G112.

G112 Historical Geology (3 cr.) N & M P: G111 or consent of instructor. Principles of interpreting earth history from geological data. Geologic time, biological evolution, plate tectonics, and ancient environments. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. One required field trip. Credit given for only one of G112, G104, or S104. II Sem.

G426 Field Techniques in Basin Analysis (1–3 cr.) P: G334. R: G323. Instruction in sedimentological techniques including facies, paleocurrent and provenance analysis; measured sections, facies mapping and approaches to regional study of sedimentary basins in the field. Application of these techniques to actual field problems in basin analysis. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

Return to Top

Germanic Studies

Course Description

K400 Topics in Scandinavian Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSB Topics dealing with literature in Norway and other Scandinavian countries. Discussions incorporate literary criticism, biography, and adaptations on film and stage in the Nordic nations. Lectures in English. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Return to Top

Human Biology

Major in Human Biology—B.A.
Major in Human Biology—B.S.
Certificate in Human Biology
Course Descriptions

Director
Whitney M. Schlegel (Biology)

Distinguished Professor
Ellen D. Ketterson (Biology, Human Reproduction and Sexuality Area of Concentration Leader)

Chancellor’s Professors
Robert J. Meier (Emeritus, Anthropology), Bernice Pescosolido (Sociology, Human Health and Disease Area of Concentration Leader)

Arnold and Maxine Tanis Chair of History and Philosophy of Science
Elisabeth A. Lloyd (History and Philosophy of Science, Biology)

Professors
Kevin D. Hunt (Anthropology, Human Origins and Survival Area of Concentration Leader), Elisabeth A. Lloyd (Tanis Chair of History and Philosophy of Science, Biology), Jane D. McLeod (Sociology), Michael J. Wade (Biology)

Associate Professors
Erik P. Bucy (Telecommunications), James H. Capshew (History and Philosophy of Science), Joseph A. Near (Pharmacology and Toxicology, Neural Science), Marla R. Sandys (Chair, Criminal Justice), Whitney M. Schlegel (Biology)

Assistant Professors
Vivian Nun Halloran (Comparative Literature), Colin R. Johnson (Gender Studies), Frederika A. Kaestle (Anthropology), Phillip L. Quirk (Research Assistant Professor, Pharmacology and Toxicology), Heather L. Reynolds (Biology, Human Environment and Ecology Area of Concentration Leader)

Lecturers
Amy K. Berndtson (Biology), Pamela L. Hanratty (Biology)

Faculty Emeriti
Robert J. Meier (Chancellor’s Professor Emeritus, Anthropology), Craig E. Nelson (Biology)

Center and Institute Faculty
Kenneth D. Pimple (Director of Teaching Research Ethics Programs and Assistant Scholar—Poynter Center for the Study of Ethics and American Institutions, Affiliate Faculty IU Center for Bioethics)

Academic Advising: (812) 855-2250 by appointment
E-mail: humbio@indiana.edu
Web Site: www.indiana.edu/~humbio

Introduction
Many of the complex issues our society faces, from global epidemics and the rising cost of health care to environmental problems like peak oil or global warming, involve both biological and social components. The B.S. and B.A. degrees and the Certificate in Human Biology (HUBI) provide students the opportunity to gain an appreciation for the complexity of humanity by exploring the social, cultural, and ethical consequences of biological issues. A multi-disciplinary perspective is essential for understanding the science behind these issues and helping to find real solutions to these twenty-first century problems. In the Human Biology curriculum, students study cases from the perspectives of different disciplines, work with team members to generate and present cases, participate in experiential learning environments such as community service, peer instruction, and original research, and communicate their work to a larger community using various media.

The Human Biology program is designed around a core sequence of four interdisciplinary three-credit courses, each paired with a one-credit seminar course. In addition to the core curriculum, students take foundation courses, constituting breadth of study, and courses in a single area of concentration, allowing for more in-depth study in their area of interest. Each area of concentration includes courses from both the physical/biological perspective and the social science and humanities perspective.

The four areas of concentration are:

Human Health and Disease
This area of specialization concentrates on the biological basis for disease as well as the social and cultural implications of health and society.

Human Reproduction and Sexuality
This concentration focuses on human reproduction and sexuality both from a biological standpoint and from a psychological and social perspective.

Human Environment and Ecology
This concentration addresses humans as organisms, interfacing with their environment and the resulting effects of this interaction on the human condition.

Human Origins and Survival
This area emphasizes the biological basis of human origins, variation, and physiological adaptation through the study of genetics and evolutionary processes, as well as the role of health, disease, and medicine in cultural and evolutionary adaptations.

For a list of approved area of concentration courses, see the Human Biology advisor or the Human Biology Program Web site at www.indiana.edu/~humbio.

Major in Human Biology—B.A.

Purpose
The B.A. degree in human biology is designed to provide students with a strong foundation in science while exploring their personal interests about the human condition. Students who elect to pursue a B.A. in human biology might have interests in multiple areas of study, such as the social aspects of health issues—social services, gender studies, education, ethics and law, journalism, environmental policy, or resource management. The B.A. degree allows for more breadth in a student’s course work and the possibility for double majoring. Students can also elect to fulfill the requirements necessary for medical, dental, optometry, allied heath sciences, and graduate school programs.

Major Requirements
In addition to the requirements for the B.A. degree in the College of Arts and Sciences, students must complete 40 credit hours from the following:

  1. Human Biology Core Courses (all required): B101, B201, B301, and B401.
  2. Human Biology Seminar Courses (all required): B102, B202, B302, and B402.
  3. Foundation Courses: One course (minimum 3 credit hours) in each of the four areas of concentration (see above). At least two of the four foundation courses must be at the 300 level or above.
  4. Area of Concentration Courses: 12 additional credit hours in one area of concentration. Within the area of concentration, courses must be selected in accordance with the following criteria:
    1. At least one course must be selected from the physical/biological science perspective list.
    2. At least one course must be selected from the social science and humanities perspective list.
    3. One course must be a 300–400 level laboratory (or lecture/lab) course.

Recommendations
Human Biology Program students are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the opportunities available at IU Bloomington to complement their area of concentration by seeking internships, working in research laboratories, attending seminars, or becoming human biology peer instructors.

Return to Human Biology

Major in Human Biology—B.S.

Purpose
The B.S. degree in Human Biology is designed to provide students with a strong foundation in the different perspectives of human biology while they focus their course work in their specific Area of Concentration. Many human biology B.S. degree students are preparing for a graduate education or professional school in medicine, dentistry, optometry, allied health sciences, business, or law. Students can also prepare for careers in the life science industries or pursue original research with their specialization in the sciences. B.S. students will gain a strong quantitative and ethical science background while developing problem-solving skills using the case-based, team-based approach of the Human Biology Program’s core courses.

Requirements
Students must complete the following fundamental skills and distribution requirements:

  1. Writing (English Composition and Intensive Writing): same as the general requirements for the B.A. degree.
  2. Foreign Language: three semesters in the same language, or equivalent proficiency.
  3. Mathematics: one of MATH M118, M119, or M211.
  4. Arts and Humanities: two courses.
  5. Social and Historical Studies: two courses.
  6. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: fulfilled by major.
  7. Topics: one course.
  8. Culture Studies: one course from List A.

Major Requirements

  1. Human Biology Core Courses (all required): B101, B201, B301, and B401.
  2. Human Biology Seminar Courses (all required): B102, B202, B302, and B402.
  3. Foundation Courses: One course (minimum 3 credit hours) in each of the four areas of concentration (see above). At least two of the four foundation courses must be at the 300 level or above.
  4. Area of Concentration Courses: 27 additional credit hours in one area of concentration. Within the area of concentration, courses must be selected in accordance with the following criteria:
    1. At least 18 credit hours must be from courses on the physical/biological science perspective list. Students must take courses in at least two different departments.
    2. At least 9 credit hours must be from courses on the social science and humanities perspective list. Students must take courses in at least two different departments.
    3. Four courses must be laboratory (or
          lecture/lab) courses—one at the
          100–200 level, and three courses at the
          300–400 level.
  5. One quantitative analysis course from the following list: MATH/PSY K300, CJUS K300, SOC S371, or ECON E370.
  6. One ethics course from the following list: PHIL P140, PHIL P242, REL R373 or ENG L240.

Recommendations
Human biology students are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the opportunities available at IU Bloomington to complement their Area of Concentration by seeking internships, working in research laboratories, attending seminars, or becoming human biology peer instructors.

Return to Human Biology

Certificate in Human Biology

Purpose
The Certificate in Human Biology provides a broad and rigorous introduction to the biological sciences and relates these sciences to the problems raised by relationships of human beings to one another and to their environment. This distinctive program is designed to meet societal demand for students with broad biological knowledge and a scientific approach to problem-solving, who also possess an understanding of the social and cultural issues facing them as scientists. What is the biological basis of life, diversity, and disease? What is the biological basis of human behavior? How does the social construct of our society influence science and our understanding of what it means to be human? These are samples of the types of broad questions that can be explored within the Certificate in Human Biology.

Requirements
A student may earn a certificate as part of completing the bachelor’s degree and in addition to completing requirements for a major. Students should contact the Human Biology Program advising office to apply for the certificate. Students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.700 at the time of admission and must maintain this GPA to graduate with the certificate. Additionally, in order to complete the certificate, students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.000 in courses taken for the certificate. Students will also be required to complete exit surveys and to develop an electronic portfolio that demonstrates the connections students have made between the courses they complete as part of the certificate and their goals for career and further study after graduation.

The certificate requires 27–28 credit hours as follows:

  1. Biology L112 Introduction to Biology: Biological Mechanisms (3 cr.)
  2. Biology L211 Molecular Biology (3 cr.)
  3. Medical Sciences M131 Disease and the Human Body (3 cr.)
  4. Anatomy A215 Basic Human Anatomy (5 cr.)
  5. Physiology P215 Basic Human Physiology (5 cr.) or Biology P451 Integrative Human Physiology (4 cr.)
  6. Biology L350 Environmental Biology (3 cr.) or Anthropology B370 Human Variation (3 cr.)
  7. Psychological and Brain Sciences P201 An Introduction to Neuroscience (3 cr.) or P315 Developmental Psychology (3 cr.) or P326 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 cr.)
  8. Religious Studies R373 Religion, Ethics, and Medicine (3 cr.)
  9. Biology B480 Human Biology E-portfolio Capstone (1 cr.)

Return to Human Biology

Course Descriptions

B480 Human Biology E-portfolio Capstone (1 cr.) In this capstone course, students will create an electronic portfolio to document and reflect on their academic course work and extracurricular activities and relate their work to their future studies or careers. Open to senior students who have applied for the Certificate in Human Biology.

B490 Undergraduate Research in Human Biology (1–12 cr.) P: Minimum overall GPA of 2.500, and written permission of supervising faculty member. Introduction to research methods and scientific investigation in a student’s area of concentration. A student is required to complete a written assignment as evidence of each semester’s work, and to present an oral report if approved for more than 3 hours of credit.

Return to Human Biology

Return to Top

India Studies

Major in India Studies
Certificate in India Studies
Minor in India Studies
Course Description

Major in India Studies

Purpose
The India studies major is designed primarily for undergraduate students in the College of Arts and Sciences at the Bloomington campus. The major may also be of interest to students in the various professional schools. The program offers regular work in beginning, intermediate, and advanced modern standard Hindi and classical Sanskrit. Students interested in instruction in other South Asian languages should consult the India Studies Program director. The India Studies Program, together with cognate programs in Central Asian, West Asian, and East Asian studies, also makes possible advanced work in Buddhist studies and Islamic studies with a focus on India.

Requirements
Students must complete the following:

  1. A second major (B.A.) in a department of the College of Arts and Sciences. (Students completing a simultaneous second degree program in the College or through another school should check with the advisor for details.)
  2. Two semesters (a minimum of 10 credit hours) of modern standard Hindi, Classical Sanskrit, or an appropriate substitute—Arabic, Persian, Tibetan, a sequence of courses in Indo-Anglian literature or a semester/year course of study in India—all of which must be approved in advance by the director of the India Studies Program and must fulfill the 10 credit hour language requirement.
  3. A minimum of 15 credit hours of India studies courses, including the following:
    1. I310
    2. At least one course at the 300 level from the Literary and Performance Studies group
    3. At least one course at the 300 level from the Philosophical and Religious Studies group
    4. At least one course at the 300 level from the Social, Political, and Historical Studies group
    5. One additional course at the 300 level chosen from any one of the three groups
  4. One course (3 credit hours) at the 400 level in India studies

See the India Studies Advising Office, 825 E. Eighth Street, for a listing of courses in each group.

Students must also complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Note: With the approval of both departments and the College, one course may be cross-listed in both majors. A minimum of 25 College of Arts and Sciences credit hours must be taken in each major subject area.

Return to India Studies

Certificate in India Studies

The undergraduate Certificate in India Studies requires 24 credit hours, including the core course for India studies, I310 An Introduction to India; two courses each from the three areas of specialized work in India studies (i.e., two courses from the Literary and Performance Studies group, two courses from the Philosophical and Religious Studies group, and two courses from the Social, Political, and Historical Studies group), with the remainder of the units coming from interdisciplinary electives in any of the areas of specialization. See the India Studies Advising Office, 825 E. Eighth Street, for a listing of courses in each group. Of the total 24 credit hours, at least 15 credit hours must be taken from courses at the 300 level or above. It should be noted that under certain circumstances, other courses that include some aspect of the study of India may, by special arrangement and with the permission of the director of the India Studies Program, be counted towards the certificate program. The first two years of language instruction in Hindi or Sanskrit, however, do not count towards completion of the certificate.

Finally, it should be noted that only four courses from a student’s major may be double-counted toward the Certificate in India Studies.

The India Studies Program encourages work in elementary, intermediate, and advanced Hindi and Sanskrit. All students in the certificate program are strongly urged to study either Hindi or Sanskrit (and preferably both) and to begin the study of the languages at the earliest possible opportunity. Students in the program should also consider the possibility of studying in India and should consult about this possibility with the Office of Overseas Study, Franklin Hall 303, (812) 855-9304 (www.indiana.edu/~overseas). India also has a rich English-medium cultural tradition (in such areas as Indo-British literature, drama, and Third World studies, among others), so students may choose to focus their work on these English language traditions.

Return to India Studies

Minor in India Studies

Requirements
15 credit hours, chosen in consultation with the director, including:

  1. I310
  2. At least one course from the Literary and Performance Studies group
  3. At least one course from the Philosophical and Religious Studies group
  4. At least one course from the Social, Political, and Historical Studies group
  5. At least 9 credit hours at the 300 level or above

See the India Studies Advising Office, 825 E. Eighth Street, for a listing of courses in each group.

Only two courses from a student’s major may be counted toward the India Studies minor.

All students in the minor program are strongly urged to study either Hindi or Sanskrit (and preferably both) and to begin the study of the languages at the earliest possible opportunity. The first two years of language instruction in Hindi and Sanskrit, however, do not count toward completion of the minor. India also has a rich English-medium cultural tradition (in such areas as Indo-British literature, drama, and Third World studies, among others), so students may choose to focus their work on these English language traditions.

Return to India Studies

Course Description

I310 An Introduction to India (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Geared toward those majoring in India Studies and those with an interest in India. Designed to familiarize students with the art, culture, religion, history, economics, politics, media, and contemporary issues of India.

Return to India Studies

Return to Top

International Studies Program

Major in International Studies
Minor in International Studies
Honors Track
Overseas Study
Course Descriptions

Faculty

Director: Professor Daniel Knudsen

Academic Advising: Tracy Bee, Woodburn Hall 333, (812) 856-1816,
E-mail:  intl@indiana.edu;
Web Site: www.indiana.edu/~intlweb/

Introduction
The major in international studies (INTL) provides an intellectual foundation that enables students to communicate, collaborate, and work across national, cultural, linguistic, and socioeconomic boundaries. It fosters competencies that students need in order to function successfully in a global environment and involves foreign language study as well as overseas experience.

The major is broadly constructed to allow flexibility as well as depth. Students explore the major by taking three introductory courses chosen from the following thematic areas: Culture and the Arts; Global Health and Environment; Global Integration and Development; Human Rights and Social Movements; International Communication; and Nations, States, and Boundaries. They also are required to focus on one thematic area by taking three additional courses in that area.

Students must choose a regional concentration area with the approval of the international studies advisor in consultation with the director of the program. This area can be perceived in one of two ways (students must select one): 1) an area defined geographically (either broadly defined, such as the Pacific Rim, or with a concentrated focus, such as Egypt or Germany); or, 2) an area defined linguistically, religiously and/or ethnically (such as the Jewish diaspora). Normally, the regional concentration chosen should relate to the student’s language study.

Major in International Studies

Requirements
Students must complete a minimum of 32 credit hours including the following:

  1. Three courses chosen from I100, I201–I206; one of the three must introduce the chosen thematic concentration.
  2. Three courses (at least 9 credit hours) at the 300–400 level from a single thematic concentration.
  3. Three courses (at least 9 credit hours) at the 300–400 level from a regional concentration area.
  4. Foreign language proficiency beyond the College’s general requirement for B.A. degrees. Students may pursue the study of a single foreign language through six semesters; they may study one foreign language through four semesters and study a second foreign language through two semesters; or they may study one foreign language through four semesters, study the first semester of a second foreign language, and study the first semester of a third foreign language. Non-native speakers of English may petition the International Studies Program for exemption from third-year language study. See advisor for details about procedure and necessary documentation.
  5. An overseas/international experience approved in advance by the director of the program.
  6. I400 (3 cr.).
  7. ASCS Q299 Job Search Strategies for Liberal Arts Students (2 cr.) or an equivalent course approved by the advisor.

Note: Students may need at least 38 credit hours to complete the requirements listed above, including foreign language proficiencies, and may need more than 38 credit hours to complete the overseas/international experience requirement.

Students must complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Return to International Studies

Minor in International Studies

Students should develop their minor in consultation with the International Studies Program academic advisor and their departmental advisors in their majors.

Requirements 
The minor comprises at least 15 credit hours of College of Arts and Sciences course work including the following:

  1. I100 (3 cr.).
  2. Two introductory level International Studies courses from the following thematic concentrations (6 credit hours):
        a.  Culture and the Arts
        b. Global Health and Environment
        c. Global Integration and Development
        d. Human Rights and Social Movements
        e. International Communication
        f. Nations, States, and Boundaries
  3. Students must choose one thematic concentration in which they wish to focus and must take the international studies introductory-level course for that particular thematic concentration. Additionally, students must take a minimum of two elective courses (6 credit hours) from the thematic concentration that they chose. These elective courses must be 300/400-level courses.
  4. If students choose course work outside the College in partial fulfillment of their concentrations, they will need to take additional College of Arts and Sciences course work in the concentration to bring the minimum total of College of Arts and Sciences hours in the minor to 15.

Return to International Studies

Honors Track

Requirements
Outstanding students majoring in international studies who are interested in departmental honors should submit an application form to the program director no later than the second semester of the junior year. To be eligible for the honors track, a student must first complete 15 credit hours in the international studies major.

The student must have and maintain a grade point average of at least 3.500 in the major and 3.300 overall. Before submitting the application, the student should identify a tentative thesis topic and also identify an honors thesis director, who will advise the student during research and writing. The director of the International Studies Program will provide guidance with this process, if needed. While taking required course work, students will research and write an honors thesis or produce an in-depth creative project that integrates the student’s thematic and regional concentration course work and international experience in either a substantive original paper or performance, as appropriate. The thesis or project must be defended before an International Studies Honors Committee and must receive a grade of A– or higher.

In summary, students must

  • Maintain a 3.500 GPA in International Studies Program course work
  • Maintain a 3.300 GPA overall
  • Complete all requirements for the major and degree
  • Apply for departmental honors no later than the second semester of the junior year
  • Take I415 and an honors section of I400 sequentially
  • Research, write, and defend an honors thesis or complete an in-depth creative project, which earns an A– or higher

Return to International Studies

Overseas Study

Students who major in international studies are required to have international experience to graduate. The typical way to fulfill this requirement is study abroad. Indiana University overseas study programs allow International Studies Program students to make progress toward their degrees and apply financial aid to program fees.

For information about study abroad, contact the Office of Overseas Study, Franklin Hall 303, (812) 855-9304 (www.indiana.edu/~overseas).

Return to International Studies

Course Descriptions

I201 Culture and the Arts: International Perspectives (3 cr.) A & H Introduction to approaches and issues in the study of culture and the arts internationally. Central to the course is the theoretical concept of the arts as forms of cultural expression, representation, and transformation.

I202 Health, Environment, and Development (3 cr.) S & H Introduces students to pressing environmental and health changes around the world, such as deforestation, global climate change, HIV/AIDS, and the resurgence of tuberculosis. Focuses on problems that are interrelated with each other and with economic development, that cross national borders in their causes or impacts, and that require a multinational or global effort to solve.

I203 Global Integration and Development (3 cr.) S & H Focuses on the interaction between social, political, and economic forces and human development conditions at global, national, and sub-national scales; introduces major theoretical perspectives on the structure, function, and governance of markets, as well as a substantial part of the literature on economic development.

I206 Nations, States, and Boundaries (3 cr.) S & H Introduction to the development of the modern state and notions of nationalism that shape the world’s political identities, dominate international relations, and also define stateless people’s positions, as well as the role of international institutions in mediating and regulating relations among the states.

Return to International Studies

Return to Top

Jewish Studies

Course Descriptions

H196 Foreign Study in Hebrew (1–6 cr.) P: Acceptance into an overseas study program. Credit for foreign study in Hebrew language or literature when no specific equivalent is available among departmental offerings. Does not count toward credit for major, certificate, or minor.

H480 Modern Hebrew Literature in Hebrew (3 cr.) A & H, CSA P: Grade of C or higher in any Hebrew course above H350 (such as H365, H375, H485, or H497), or equivalent. A survey of nineteenth- and twentieth-century fiction, poetry, essays in the original Hebrew under such headings as assimilation, ghetto, and world; secularism versus tradition; ethnicity, land, and universalism; nation, religion, state; utopia and revolution; nostalgia, self-hate, rejuvenation; portrayal of anti-Semitism in literature.

H485 Recent Hebrew Literature in Hebrew (3 cr.) A & H, CSA P: Grade of C or higher in H350 or equivalent proficiency. Extensive readings of Hebrew texts and scholarly works grouped according to periods or specific themes in language, literature, or intellectual movements adapted to specific individual programs. Readings, assignments, and discussions in Hebrew.

H496 Foreign Study in Hebrew (1–6 cr.) P: Acceptance into an overseas study program. Credit for foreign study in Hebrew language or literature when no specific equivalent is available among departmental offerings. Does not count for major, certificate, or minor.

H497 Individual Readings in Hebrew (1–4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in H350 or equivalent proficiency. Extensive readings of Hebrew texts and scholarly works grouped according to periods or specific themes in language, literature, or intellectual movements adapted to specific individual programs. Readings, assignments, and discussion in Hebrew. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

P300 Professional Leadership and the Jewish Community (3 cr.) Designed to introduce students to the demography, sociology, and structure of contemporary American Jewry, and to the wide range of agencies serving the community, as well as the most effective steps to begin a career within them. Through guest presentations by professional and lay-leaders in the field, along with a practicum experience, students learn about current challenges and trends in Jewish studies-related professions.

Return to Top

Latin American and Caribbean Studies

Course Descriptions

L305 Spanish and Portuguese across the Curriculum (1 cr.) P: Language proficiency in target language equivalent to completion of fourth semester, or consent of instructor. C: Host course specified each semester. Offers the opportunity to improve the Spanish or Portuguese language skills of conversation, reading, writing, and comprehension. Class is to be taken concurrently with a host course that offers a Spanish and Portuguese across the Curriculum section. Discussions and assignments related to the host course will be performed in the studied language. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

M101 Elementary Yucatec Maya I (4 cr.) Introduction to Yucatec Maya language and culture. Yucatec Maya is an indigenous language of Mexico spoken by close to 1 million people; basic grammatical structure and vocabulary; conversational drills; and lessons on historical and cultural context.

M102 Elementary Yucatec Maya II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in M101 or equivalent proficiency. The second semester of Yucatec Maya emphasizes vocabulary-building, simple conversation, beginning writing, and common grammatical patterns.

Q101 Elementary Quechua I (4 cr.) Introduction to Quechua, spoken by over 13 million people across the Andean Nation of South America; basic grammar and vocabulary; an introduction to the culture and history of the Andean region.

Return to Top

Latino Studies

Course Descriptions

L104 Latinas in the United States (3 cr.) S & H Focuses on the experiences of Latinas, women of Latin American heritage in the United States. Although many believe Latinas arrived only recently, thousands of Latinas can trace their ancestry in territories that later became part of the United States as early as the sixteenth century. Examines how Latinas’ experiences and cultural expressions are shaped by intersections of race, gender, and class.

L325 Latinos on the Internet (3 cr.) CSA An intensive inventory, analysis, and critique of Latino-oriented Web-based materials as well as materials targeted to the general population to discover how well they suit the needs and preferences of the Latino population and how they might be improved.

L380 Latino Education across the Americas (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Overview of important patterns and issues in Latino education. Includes study of major Latin American educational trends and traditions. Focus on the cultural contexts of Latino education; challenges faced by Latinos in contemporary U.S. schools; and strategies for improving Latino educational achievement. Credit not given for both L380 and EDUC H380.

Return to Top

Leadership, Ethics, and Social Action

Method
Minor in Leadership, Ethics, and Social Action

Method

Community engagement contributes to all aspects of the university’s mission. As a pedagogical method, service learning furthers students’ critical thinking, improves their mastery of academic material, and examines the relationship between theory and practice. It also strengthens students’ sense of social and ethical responsibility, deepens their understanding of the context of social issues, and encourages them to participate in communities beyond campus. Service learning also can make faculty and student research more rigorous, as well as more responsive to public concerns. Finally, service learning reinvigorates the university’s commitment to using its resources for the public good. Reflection on the experience of community service is a crucial element of this pedagogy.

Important Advising Notes: Students should contact the advisor for the program early in their degree program to complete the minor application by spring of the sophomore year, and to receive information about course availability and sequencing, as well as program announcements and opportunities. Call (812) 855-6308 to make an appointment or e-mail lesa@indiana.edu to inquire.

It is advisable to complete the first three requirements in the first and second years of the undergraduate program.

To obtain departmental consent to participate in the Capstone Seminar in the fall semester, students are expected to complete the other requirements listed below (1–4) before undertaking a capstone project. To prepare to submit a project proposal for the Capstone Seminar in the fall, a 1 credit LESA L405 seminar in the spring semester is required. Students should expect the capstone process to involve at least a one-year time commitment (spring of the junior year and fall of the senior year). Contact the advisor for more information.

When planning for overseas study, please arrange a program for any spring other than the spring of the junior year, and any summer and/or fall semester other than fall of the senior year, to avoid the two semesters which will be taken up with capstone work.

Return to Leadership, Ethics, and Social Action Program

Minor in Leadership, Ethics, and Social Action

Requirements
Students must complete the following (minimum of 16 credit hours):

  1. LESA L105 (3 cr.).
  2. One course on ethics chosen from PHIL P140, POLS Y105, or REL R170.
  3. One course on social organization chosen from ANTH E105, ANTH E200, HIST A307, HIST A347, SOC S215, or SOC S217.
  4. A civic engagement seminar will be chosen from junior-level courses in a variety of departments. Students will research and write about a community issue or policy. Consult the LESA advisor for the current list of choices when preparing to register.
  5. LESA L405, LESA Capstone Seminar, 1 credit in the spring of the junior year and 3 credits during the fall of the senior year.

Substitutions for some of the above courses are available. Consult the LESA advisor for more information.

Return to Top

Mathematics

Major in Mathematics—B.A.

Requirements
Majors must complete the following:

  1. M211-M212, M211-M213, or M211-S212.
  2. M301 or M303, and M311.
  3. Five additional courses representing at least two of the eight areas of mathematics listed below. Of these, two courses must be 400-level “M” courses. If courses are chosen from only two areas, the two 400-level “M” courses must occupy distinct areas:
    • Algebra and Number Theory: M403, M404, M405, M409, M453
    • Analysis: M312, M413, M414, M415
    • Applied Mathematics: M348, M371, M447, M448, M451, M471, M472
    • Differential Equations: M343, M344, M441, M442
    • Geometry and Topology: M321, M420, M435
    • Logic: M391, M482
    • Mathematics Education and History: T336, M380, T403
    • Probability and Statistics: M360, M365, M366, M463, M464, M466,    M467, M468

For any mathematics course not listed above, the department will determine whether it will count toward the conditions in number 3.

At most, one course from mathematics education and history may count toward the five required courses.

With approval of the Department of Mathematics, one course outside of mathematics that has significant mathematical content may count toward the five required courses as long as conditions in number 3 are still satisfied. Computer Science A201 or C211 is recommended.

Recommendations
In addition to studying mathematics courses, all majors are strongly encouraged to study in depth another discipline that uses mathematics.

Majors are also strongly encouraged to take a computer programming course.

Majors interested in professional work or graduate study should take additional mathematics courses at the 300 and 400 levels.

Return to Top

Near Eastern Languages and Cultures

Course Descriptions

K100 Introduction to Kurdish I (4 cr.) Basic communication skills in Kurdish taught using the Kurmanji Kurdish dialect. Functional knowledge of sentence structures and vocabulary.

K150 Introduction to Kurdish II (4 cr.) P: K100 or equivalent proficiency. A continuation of K100. Familiarity with the grammar of Kurmanji Kurdish will be strengthened through readings, conversation, and an introduction to Kurdish music, literature, and popular culture.

N204 Topics in Middle Eastern Culture and Society (3 cr.) S & H Analysis of selected Middle Eastern cultural or social issues. Topics will vary. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

N205 Topics in Middle Eastern Literature (3 cr.) A & H Selected works of Middle Eastern literature in relation to a single cultural problem or theme. Topics will vary. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

N305 Issues in Middle Eastern Literature (3 cr.) CSA Selected works of Middle Eastern literature in relation to a singular cultural problem or theme. Topics will vary. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

Return to Top

Philosophy

Course Description

P374 Early Chinese Philosophy (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Origins of Chinese philosophical traditions in the classical schools of Confucianism, Taoism, Mohism, and Legalism. Explores contrasting agendas of early Chinese and Western traditions. Credit given for only one of P374, EALC E374, or REL R368.

Return to Top

Physics

Major in Physics—B.S.

Requirements
Students must complete the following fundamental skills and distribution requirements:

  1. Writing, same as B.A. degree.
  2. Mathematics, major fulfills requirement.
  3. Foreign language, 3 credit hours at or above the second-year level (or equivalent proficiency) in one language. French, German, or Russian is recommended for students who wish to pursue a graduate degree.
  4. Arts and humanities, two courses for 6 credit hours minimum.
  5. Social and historical studies, two courses for 6 credit hours minimum.
  6. Natural and mathematical sciences, major fulfills requirement.

Culture courses are not required, but two courses are recommended as electives or to satisfy the distribution requirement.

Students must also complete the major requirements for Program I or Program II listed below.

Requirements
Program I: Physics
Students must complete the following course work with a minimum grade of C– in each course and a minimum grade point average of C (2.000) in the courses overall:

  1. At least 35 credit hours of physics, including P221, P222, and P301; upper-level lecture courses P331, P441, and P453; and laboratory courses P309 and P451. P201-P202 may be substituted for P221-P222 with permission from the physics advisor.
  2. At least 20 credit hours in mathematics and computer science, including M211 (or S211 or M215), M212 (or S212 or M216), M311, and M343 (or honors equivalents).
  3. 9 credit hours in biological and physical sciences, outside of the Departments of Physics, Mathematics, and Computer Science. At least 6 of the 9 credit hours must be in the same department.

Students must also complete the requirements and procedures listed under “General Requirements for Bachelor’s Degrees” in this supplement.

Recommendations
The following courses are recommended:

  1. Physics P332, P340, P442, and P454 for students planning to pursue a graduate degree in physics; alternative programs (such as those with more emphasis on electronics, optics, biophysics, or environmental physics) should be discussed with the physics advisor.
  2. Mathematics M344. Physics P321 covers the material of M312. P321 is recommended although M312 can be substituted with permission. Students should also consider M301 (or M303), M415, M441, and M442.
  3. Chemistry C117 and one of C118, R340, or C341 (or honors equivalents), preferably taken in the freshman or sophomore year. Alternative courses from the natural and physical sciences should be discussed with the physics advisor.

It is also recommended that students be fluent in at least one scientific programming language. Computer Science A201 and A202 may be appropriate for students with no prior programming experience.

Requirements
Program II: Applied Physics
Students must complete the following course work with a minimum grade of C– in each course and a minimum grade point average of C (2.0) in the courses overall:

  1. At least 35 credit hours of physics, including P221, P222, and P301; upper-level lecture courses P331, P441; laboratory courses P309, P350, and one of P400, P451, or P460. It is recommended that students take both P400 and P451.
    Students are strongly encouraged to take the honors sections of P221-P222. General Physics P201-P202 may be substituted for P221-P222 only with permission of the physics advisor.
  2. At least 20 credit hours of mathematics, including M211-M212, M311-M312 (Physics P321 may be substituted for Mathematics M312), and M343 or honors equivalents.
  3. At least 4 credit hours in computer science, including A201 or both A304 and A306. C211 or H211 may be substituted only with permission of the physics advisor.
  4. 9 credit hours in biological and physical sciences, outside of the Departments of Physics, Mathematics, and Computer Science. At least 6 of the 9 credit hours must be in the same department.
  5. 2 credit hours of internships with industry or at a national laboratory, S407. These internships would normally take place during the summers between the sophomore and junior year (1 credit) and between the junior and senior year (1 credit). Placement will be organized through the department in cooperation with the student and the student’s faculty mentor.
  6. 1 credit hour of Applied Physics Thesis S409

Recommendations
The following courses are recommended:

  1. Physics P314, P321, P332, P340, P410-P411, P442, P453, P454 for students planning to pursue a graduate degree in applied physics; alternative programs (such as those with more emphasis on electronics, optics, medical physics, biophysics, accelerator physics, or environmental physics) should be discussed with the physics advisor.
  2. Mathematics M301 (or M303), M344, M415, M441-M442.
  3. Business courses chosen with the advice of the physics advisor for those students interested in entrepreneurial and management skills in scientific environments.
  4. Alternative courses from the natural and physical sciences should be discussed with the physics advisor.

Course Descriptions

S406 Research Project (1–6 cr.) P: Consent of instructor or supervisor. Research participation in group or independent project under the supervision of a faculty member in departmental research areas; or topic agreed upon between the student and supervisor. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

S407 Applied Physics Internship (1 cr.) P: Consent of instructor or supervisor. Internship in industry or national laboratory, arranged between the student, the student’s faculty mentor, and an internship supervisor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. S/F grading.

S409 Applied Physics Thesis (1–4 cr.) P: S407 and consent of instructor. Under the supervision of a faculty member, students prepare a written thesis that presents previous research work. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

Return to Top

Political Science

Major in Political Science
Minor in Political Science
Course Description

Return to Top

Major in Political Science

Requirements
Students must complete 30 credit hours in political science, including:

  1. Y205. It is strongly recommended that Y205 be taken in the first 9 credit hours of course work in political science.
  2. At least 15 credit hours of 300- and 400-level political science courses, excluding Y480, Y481, Y484, Y496, and Y499.
    1. At least one course in American politics or public policy, law, and administration
          (Y301–Y320, Y324–Y326, Y349, Y373, Y394)
    2. At least one course in comparative politics or international relations
          (Y332–Y348, Y350–Y372, Y374–Y376, Y407)
    3. At least one course in political theory and methodology (Y379, Y381–Y388, Y395, Y405, Y406)
  3. One Y490 Senior Seminar.

No more than 6 credit hours of 100-level courses and 9 combined credit hours of Y200 and Y401 (courses with variable topics) may be included in the 30 credit hours. Note: Y200 and Y401 may be repeated only once for credit.

Students must complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

The department encourages students to consider internships, overseas study, and service learning as complements to their major in political science.

Return to Political Science

Minor in Political Science

Requirements
Students must complete the following:

  1. A total of 18 credit hours in political science, of which at least 9 must be at the 300 or 400 level.
  2. Y205. It is strongly recommended that Y205 be taken in the first 9 credit hours of course work in political science.
  3. At least two courses in one of the following blocks of courses and at least one course from one of the other two blocks:
    1. American politics, public policy, law, and administration (Y301–Y320, Y324–Y326, Y349, Y373, Y394)
    2. Comparative politics or international relations (Y332–Y348, Y350–Y372, Y374–Y376, Y407)
    3. Political theory and methodology (Y379, Y381–Y388, Y395, Y405, Y406)
  4. Only 3 hours of credit in Y481 may be counted toward the minor.
  5. At least 6 credit hours of the above courses must be taken in residence at the Bloomington campus.

Return to Political Science

Course Description

Y336 South East Asian Political Systems (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Covers the governmental organization, and the political behavior and traditions, of countries in the South East Asian region. Addresses regional issues of political and economic development, and international issues regarding the relationship of the region to the rest of the world

Return to Political Science

Return to Top

Psychological and Brain Sciences

Major in Psychology—B.A.
Major in Psychology—B.S.
Major in Neuroscience—B.S.
Interdepartmental Major in Psychology and Speech and Hearing Sciences
Minor in Psychology
Neuroscience Certificate
Course Descriptions

Introduction
The Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences (PSY) offers a major in psychology leading to the B.A. or B.S. degree, a B.S. degree in neuroscience, and course work for undergraduates who wish to satisfy distribution requirements. As a science, psychology seeks to understand the basic principles by which living organisms adapt their behavior to the changing physical and social environments in which they live. The breadth of the discipline, with its links to the humanities, mathematics, and other social and natural sciences, encourages the development of broad problem-solving skills through exposure to research methodology and statistical analysis and contributes to the development of communicative skills. Psychological knowledge, techniques, and skills obtained in the B.A. and B.S. programs are applied in many careers and provide background for students entering graduate work in psychology and related areas, as well as the professions of medicine, dentistry, law, and business.

Major in Psychology—B.A.

Purpose
The B.A. program provides a broad coverage of modern scientific psychology and of the strategies and tactics by which knowledge is acquired in this field. The B.A. program offers the student considerable flexibility in choosing courses, and it requires sufficient background in science and psychology to enable good students to qualify for demanding graduate programs.

Requirements
Students must complete the following courses in psychology:

  1. One of the following entry-level sequences:
        a. P155 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (2–3 cr.) or
        b. P151 (3 cr.), P152 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (2–3 cr.) or
        c. P106 (4 cr.) and P199 (1 cr.) or
        d. P101 (3 cr.), P102 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (2–3 cr.)
  2. PSY K300, K310, or a substitute approved by the undergraduate advisor
  3. All of the following foundational courses: P304, P335, P346
  4. Two advanced courses chosen from P337, P349, P405, P407, P409, P410, P411, P413, P416, P417, P423, P425, P430, P434, P437, P438, P440, P442, P443, P444, P446, P447, P448, P457 (if appropriate topic), P459, P460, P466, P495
  5. One elective course chosen from P303, P315, P316, P319, P320, P323, P324, P325, P326, P327, P329, P330, P336, P340, P350, P357, P375, P434
  6. One capstone course or appropriate substitute: P402, P404, P421, P424, P426, P429, P433, P435, P436, P493, P494, or P499
  7. Mathematics M118, or M119, or M120, or a 200-level mathematics course, or the equivalent, completed with a C– or higher
  8. A one-semester course in biology
  9. One additional course completed with a C– or higher selected from one of the following departments: Anthropology (B200 Bioanthropology only), Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics (in addition to the course used to satisfy requirement number 7 listed above), and Physics

Students must also complete the degree requirements for the B.A. degree in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Required Outside Concentration
A single outside concentration is required of all majors in psychology. The outside concentration must consist of 12 credit hours at any level or of three courses above the 100 level, taken in one department. The following disciplines are frequently chosen as outside concentrations by psychology majors: animal behavior, anthropology, biology, business, chemistry, cognitive science, computer science, criminal justice, history and philosophy of science, linguistics, mathematics, philosophy, or sociology. Students can fulfill this requirement by completing an optional minor, offered by many departments. (See individual departments’ sections in this supplement or in the College of Arts and Sciences Bulletin for specific required courses.)

Recommendations
Majors should take at least one course in chemistry or physics, one in mathematics, and one in biology (see requirements above). Students should have a sound foundation in mathematics for study in statistics, measurement, and theoretical methods. Those planning graduate work in psychology should include P459. Consult the undergraduate advisors or the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences home page (www.indiana.edu/~psych) for listings of courses and model curricula useful for advanced work in various areas of psychology or for particular vocations.

We recommend that students take P199 Planning Your Psychology Career in the spring of their sophomore year. This course can be used for career guidance and provides students with invaluable information at an appropriate time.

Return to Psychological and Brain Sciences

Major in Psychology—B.S.

Purpose
The B.S. program in psychology is designed for career-oriented and highly motivated students. The program emphasizes breadth of preparation in science and development of math and computer skills, and it requires more advanced courses and laboratory work in psychology than the B.A. program. The student who graduates with a B.S. in psychology should be well prepared for graduate training in psychology and related fields, for professional schools, and for jobs (not necessarily in psychology) that use scientific training and quantitative techniques.

Requirements
Students must complete the following fundamental skills and distribution requirements:

  1. Writing, same as B.A. degree.
  2. Mathematics, two courses from the following: M118, M119, M120, 200 level or higher (not including K310)
  3. Computer science courses (or a demonstration of skills with the approval of the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences). This requirement may also be satisfied by the completion of at least 5.5 credit hours from the following list of courses: CSCI A111, A112, A113, A114, A201, or A202.
  4. Foreign language, 3 credit hours at or above the second-year level (or equivalent proficiency) in one language.
  5. One Topics course (COLL E103, E104, or approved equivalents).
  6. Arts and Humanities, three courses (could include COLL E103 or equivalent from number 5 above).
  7. Social and Historical Studies, three courses, exclusive of psychology courses (could include E104 or equivalent from number 5 above).
  8. Natural and mathematical sciences: must include Biology L112-L113 (6 cr.) and one of the following combinations:
        a. Two mathematics courses beyond the two fundamental skills             courses listed above or
        b. Physics P201-P202 (or P221-P222) or
        c. Chemistry C101-C121 and C102-C122 (or C117, C341, or R340) or
        d. One additional course in biology (L111, L211, L311, L312, L473, or          L479) and one other course from the mathematics, physics, and          chemistry courses listed above.

Major Requirements

  1. One of the following entry-level sequences:
        a. P155 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (2–3 cr.) or
        b. P151 (3 cr.), P152 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (2–3 cr.) or
        c. P106 (4 cr.) and P199 (1 cr.) or
        d. P101 (3 cr.), P102 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (2–3 cr.)
  2. K300, K310, or a substitute approved by the undergraduate advisor
  3. All of the following foundational courses: P304, P335, P346
  4. Three advanced courses from P337, P349, P402, P405, P407, P409, P410, P411, P413, P416, P417, P423, P425, P430, P434, P437, P438, P440, P442, P443, P444, P446, P447, P448, P457 (if appropriate topic), P459, P460, P466, P495
  5. Two capstone courses or appropriate substitutes from P402, P404, P421, P424, P426, P429, P433, P435, P436, P493, P494, or P499

Required Outside Concentration
A single outside concentration is required of all majors in psychology. The outside concentration must consist of 12 credit hours at any level or of three courses above the 100 level, taken in one department. The following disciplines are frequently chosen as outside concentrations by psychology majors: animal behavior, anthropology, biology, business, chemistry, cognitive science, computer science, criminal justice, history and philosophy of science, linguistics, mathematics, philosophy, or sociology. Students can fulfill this requirement by an optional minor, offered by many departments. (See individual departments’ sections in this supplement or in the College of Arts and Sciences Bulletin for specific required courses.)

Recommendations
We strongly recommend that students fulfill the entry-level sequence and all foundational courses (P346, P335, P304) by the end of the second year of studies.

Students should consult with the psychological and brain sciences undergraduate advisor for additional information on the above requirements. See also the departmental information available at www.indiana.edu/~psych.

We recommend that students take P199 Planning Your Psychology Career in the spring of their sophomore year. This course can be used for career guidance and provides students with invaluable information at an appropriate time.

Return to Psychological and Brain Sciences

Major in Neuroscience—B.S.

Purpose 
The B.S. in Neuroscience is designed for students who have an interest in the interdisciplinary field of neuroscience and who are interested in pursuing graduate training in neuroscience, attending medical school, or obtaining a research-related position in biotechnology, the life sciences, or the pharmaceutical industry. The major provides interdisciplinary training in basic scientific principles in the life and physical sciences that are necessary for an understanding of nervous system function, as well as training in the fundamental principles of neuroscience, and opportunities for more advanced training in specific topics in the field. Thus, students will gain a depth of understanding in neuroscience, from the cellular and molecular bases of nervous system function, to a systems-level approach to the study of brain-behavior relationships.

Requirements 
Students must complete the following fundamental skills and distribution requirements:

  1. Writing, English Composition and Intensive Writing
  2. Mathematics, fulfilled by major requirements
  3. Foreign Language, three semesters in the same language, or equivalent proficiency
  4. One Topics course (COLL E103, COLL E104, or approved equivalents)
  5. Arts and Humanities, two courses (could include COLL E103 or equivalent from number 4 above)
  6. Social and Historical Studies, two courses (could include COLL E104 or equivalent from number 4 above)
  7. Natural and Mathematical Sciences, fulfilled by major requirements

Major Requirements
Students must complete the following courses:

  1. Introductory courses: PSY P101 or PSY P151 or PSY P106 or PSY P155, PSY P326 or PSY P346, BIOL L112 or BIOL H112, CHEM C117, CHEM C341 or CHEM R340, CHEM C343, PHYS P201, PHYS P202.
  2. Mathematics courses: MATH M211 (or both MATH M119 and MATHM120) and PSY (MATH) K300.
  3. Basic non-neuroscience courses: Select three courses from CSCI A321, CHEM C342, BIOL L211, BIOL L312, MATH M212, MATH M301 or MATH M303.
  4. Advanced neuroscience courses: Select four courses from PSY P337, PSY P349, PSY P407, PSY P409, PSY P410, PSY P411, PSY P423, PSY P437, PSY P466, PSY P457 (any topic with P326 as a prerequisite), BIOL L410 seminars as appropriate, or any graduate-level neuroscience course (PSY N500, N501)
  5. Laboratory courses: Select one from PSY P426, PSY P433, or a neuroscience laboratory using one of the following for enrollment: PSY P493, PSY P494, PSY P499, BIOL L490, CHEM C409, PHYS S406.

Return to Psychological and Brain Sciences

Interdepartmental Major in Psychology and Speech and Hearing Sciences

Requirements
Students must take a minimum of 40 credit hours. At least 12 credit hours must be completed at or above the 300 level in psychology, and at least 12 credit hours must be completed at or above the 300 level in speech and hearing sciences.

Students must also complete the degree requirements for the B.A. in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Psychology

  1. One of the following entry-level sequences:
        a. P151 (3 cr.), P152 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.) and P211 (2–3 cr.) or
        b. P106 (4 cr.), and P199 (1 cr.) or
        c. P101 (3 cr.), P102 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (2–3 cr.)
  2. PSY K300 or K310 or a substitute approved by the undergraduate advisor.
  3. 3 credit hours from P303, P325, P326, P327, P329, P330, P335, P337, P340, P346, P349, P350, P357 (depending on topic), P402 (depending on topic), P405, P407, P410, P411, P413, P416, P417, P423, P437, P438, P444, P459.
  4. 3 credit hours from P304, P315, P316, P319, P320, P323, P324, P336, P357 (depending on topic), P375, P402 (depending on topic), P425, P430, P434, P442, P446, P447, P448.
  5. Advanced laboratory: one from P421, P424, P426, P429, P435, P436, P493-P494, P495, or P499. (Another 400-level course may be substituted for this requirement by permission of the undergraduate advisor.)
  6. One additional course in psychology numbered 300 or above.

Speech and Hearing Sciences

  1. S111
  2. S275, S319, S333
  3. S201 or S375
  4. At least three courses from S307, S378, S420, S436, S444, S474, S478

Other Requirements
The following courses must be completed with a minimum grade of C–:

  1. Mathematics M118, or M119, or M120, or a 200-level mathematics course
  2. A one-semester course in biology
  3. Linguistics L103 or L303

Return to Psychological and Brain Sciences

Minor in Psychology

Requirements
Students must complete 15 College of Arts and Sciences credit hours including:

  1. P155, or P101 and P102; or P151 and P152; or P106.
  2. Psychology K300 or K310 or another approved College statistics course; or P211.
  3. Any two additional courses in psychology at the 300 or 400 level.
  4. In addition, students must complete mathematics M118, or M119, or a 200-level mathematics course with a minimum grade of C–.

All courses must be completed with a C– or higher, and minor courses must average a minimum of 2.000 overall to earn a minor.

Students whose major department requires a minor should consult with their advisor about additional or other requirements.

Return to Psychological and Brain Sciences

Neuroscience Certificate

Purpose
A student may earn a certificate as part of completing the bachelor’s degree and in addition to completing requirements for a major. Through course work and lab experiences in this interdisciplinary certificate program, students will develop an in-depth understanding in neuroscience, from the cellular and molecular bases of nervous system function, to a systems-level approach to the study of brain-behavior relationships.

Requirements
Students must complete a minimum of nine courses (three required basic courses, three advanced neuroscience courses, two labs, one elective) for a minimum total of 24 credit hours. Students must complete each course required for the certificate with a grade of C– or higher, with an overall GPA of 2.000 for all required courses.

Required Basic Courses (All Required)

  • PSY P101 Introductory Psychology (3 cr.) or P151 Introduction to Psychology I for Majors (3 cr.) or P106 General Psychology, Honors (4 cr.)
  • PSY P326 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 cr.) or PSY P346 Neuroscience (3 cr.)
  • Biology L112 Introduction to Biology: Biological Mechanisms (3 cr.) or H112 Integrated Freshman Learning Experience II (5 cr.)

Advanced Neuroscience Courses (Any Three)

  • PSY P337 Clinical Neuroscience (3 cr.)
  • PSY P349 Cognitive Neuroscience (3 cr.)
  • PSY P407 Drugs and the Nervous System (3 cr.)
  • PSY P409 Neural Bases of Sensory Function (3 cr.)
  • PSY P410 Development of the Brain and Behavior (3 cr.)
  • PSY P411 Neural Bases of Learning and Memory (3 cr.)
  • PSY P423 Human Neuropsychology (3 cr.)
  • PSY P437 Neurobiology of Addictions (3 cr.)
  • PSY P444 Developmental Psychobiology (3 cr.)
  • PSY P466 Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology (3 cr.)
  • PSY P457 Topics in Psychology, seminars as appropriate (1–3 cr.)
  • Biology L410 Topical Issues in Biology, seminars as appropriate (3–5 cr.)
  • Cognitive Science Q301 Brain and Cognition (3 cr.)

Lab Courses (Any Two)

  • PSY P426 Laboratory in Behavioral Neuroscience (3 cr.)
  • PSY P493 Supervised Research I (2–3 cr.), in approved laboratory
  • PSY P494 Supervised Research II (2–3 cr.), in approved laboratory
  • PSY P499 Honors Thesis Research (1–12 cr.), in approved laboratory
  • Biology L490 Individual Study (1–12 cr.), in approved laboratory
  • Chemistry C409 Chemical Research (1–5 cr.), in approved laboratory
  • Physics S406 Research Project (1–6 cr.), in approved laboratory

Elective Courses (Any One)

Note that some of the elective courses have prerequisites that are not included in the “Required Basic Courses” listed above. Those prerequisites not included in the certificate are indicated below in parentheses.

Psychology

  • P303 Health Psychology (3 cr.)
  • P329 Sensation and Perception (3 cr.)

Biology

  • L111 Introduction to Biology: Evolution and Diversity (3 cr.)
  • L211 Molecular Biology (3 cr.)
  • L311 Genetics (3 cr.) (P: L211)
  • L312 Cell Biology (3 cr.) (P: L211)
  • L317 Developmental Biology (3 cr.) (P: L211, L311)
  • L321 Principles of Immunology (3 cr.) (P: L211; C101 or C117)
  • L331 Introduction to Human Genetics (3 cr.) (P: A course in genetics)
  • P451 Integrative Human Physiology (4 cr.)
  • Z466 Endocrinology (3 cr.) (P: L211)

Chemistry

  • C101-C102 Elementary Chemistry I and II (3-3 cr.), C103 Introduction to Chemical Principles (5 cr.)
  • C117-C118 Principles of Chemistry and Biochemistry I and II (5-5 cr.)
  • C121-C122 Elementary Chemistry Lab I and II (2-2 cr.) or C125-126 Experimental Chemistry I and II (2-2 cr.)
  • C341 Organic Chemistry I Lectures (3 cr.) (P: C117 or C106) and C343 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory (2 cr.)
  • C342 Organic Chemistry II Lectures (3 cr.) (P: C341) and C344 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (2 cr.) (P: C343)
  • C483 Biological Chemistry (3 cr.) (P: R340 or C342)
  • C485 Biosynthesis and Physiology (3 cr.) (P: C484)

Medical Sciences

  • P416 Comparative Animal Physiology (3 cr.)
  • A464 Human Tissue Biology (4 cr.)
  • P417 Neurobiology (3 cr.) (P: One introductory biology course and Chemistry C118. R: One course in cellular physiology or P416.)

Return to Psychological and Brain Sciences

Course Descriptions

P101 Introductory Psychology I (3 cr.) N & M Introduction to psychology; its methods, data, and theoretical interpretations in areas of learning, sensory psychology, and psychophysiology. Equivalent to IUPUI B105 and P151, Credit given for only one of P101, or P151, or P106. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P102 Introductory Psychology II (3 cr.) S & H P: P101 or P151. Continuation of P101. Developmental, social, personality, and abnormal psychology. Equivalent to IUPUI B104 and P152. Credit given for only one of P102, P152, or P106. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P106 General Psychology, Honors (4 cr.) N & M P: Consent of instructor or Hutton Honors College. Intensive introduction to psychology. Lectures and demonstrations, laboratory exercises, and student projects. Combines material from P101 and P102 and P211, or P151 and P152 and P211. Credit given only for only one of P106, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P151 Introduction to Psychology I for Majors (3 cr.) N & M Introduction to psychology for majors: its roots, methods, data, and theory. Major topics will include experimental methodology, neural science, learning and memory, sensation, perception, and cognition, with particular emphasis placed on experimental design and quantitative analyses. Credit not given for both P151 and P101.

P152 Introduction to Psychology II for Majors (3 cr.) S & H Introduction to psychology for majors. Continuation of P151. Presents major theoretical issues, research methods, and findings in social psychology, developmental psychology, individual differences, and psychopathology. Credit not given for both P152 and P102.

P155 Introduction to Psychological and Brain Sciences (3 cr.) N & M An introduction to psychological and brain sciences for psychology majors. Introduces students to the history of psychology and its place in science, to the experimental method, and to the broad range of topics studied by psychological scientists. Credit given for only one of P101, P106, P151, or P155.

P199 Planning Your Psychology Career (1 cr.) P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152 (P152 can be taken concurrently with P199). Intended for psychology majors only. Where do you want to be 10 years from now? How can you get there? Information for undergraduate majors to help them intelligently organize their undergraduate studies. Information about what psychologists do, professional and practical issues in career choice, course selection, intern/research experience, and planning a course of study.

P201 An Introduction to Neuroscience (3 cr.) N & M P: P155 or P101 or P151, or P106. Introduction to recent findings in behavioral neuroscience as they relate to human behavior. Topics may include neural bases of learning and memory, sex differences in the brain, cerebral hemispheric differences, and behavioral consequences of brain damage and neurosurgery. Does not fulfill area requirements for psychology major.

P204 Psychological and Biological Bases of Human Sexuality (3 cr.) N & M P: P155, P101, P106, or P151. Introduction to recent findings in the study of human sexual behavior, with emphasis on the interaction between psychological, social, and biological factors. Topics include sexual differentiation and development, the physiology of sexual response, sexual orientation, and patterns of sexual behavior. Does not fulfill area requirements for psychology major.

P211 Methods of Experimental Psychology (2–3 cr.) P: P155 or P101 or P106 or P151. Design and execution of simple experiments, treatment of results, search of the literature, and preparation of experimental reports. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

K300 (MATH K300) Statistical Techniques (3 cr.) P: MATH M118 or M119. Introduction to statistics; nature of statistical data; ordering and manipulation of data; measures of central tendency and dispersion; elementary probability. Concepts of statistical inference and decision: estimation and hypothesis testing. Special topics include regression and correlation, analysis of variance, non-parametric methods. Credit given for only one of the following: K300, K310; CJUS K300; ECON E370 or S370; SOC S371; or SPEA K300. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P303 Health Psychology (3 cr.) N & M P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152. Focuses on the role of psychological factors in health and illness. Through readings, lecture, and discussion, students will become better consumers of research on behavior-health interactions and develop a broad base of knowledge concerning how behaviors and other psychological factors can affect health both positively and negatively.

P304 Social Psychology and Individual Differences (3 cr.) S & H P: P101 or P106 or P151 or P155 or equivalent. A foundations course illustrating how psychological questions and problems can be addressed from the social, group, and individual differences level of analysis. Credit given for only one of P304 or P320.

K310 (MATH K310) Statistical Techniques (3 cr.) P: MATH M119 or equivalent. Introduction to probability and statistics; elementary probability theory, conditional probability, independence, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion. Covers concepts of statistical inference and decision; estimation and hypothesis testing; Bayesian inference; and statistical decision theory. Special topics include regression and correlation, time series, analysis of variance, non-parametric methods. Credit given for only one of the following: K300, K310; CJUS K300; ECON E370 or S370; SOC S371; or SPEA K300. I Sem., II Sem.

P315 Developmental Psychology (3 cr.) S & H P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P106, or P151 and P152. An introduction to how and why behavior changes over time. The theories and methods used to study behavioral change in both human and nonhuman models. Topics include development in perception, movement, language, cognition, and social/emotional behavior. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P316 Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence (3 cr.) S & H P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106. Development of behavior in infancy, childhood, and youth; factors that influence behavior. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P319 Psychology of Personality (3 cr.) S & H P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106. Methods and results of scientific study of personality. Basic concepts of personality traits and their measurements, developmental influences, and problems of integration. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P320 Social Psychology (3 cr.) S & H P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106. Principles of scientific psychology applied to the individual in social situations. Credit given for only one of P304 or P320. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P323 Industrial/Organizational Psychology (3 cr.) S & H P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106. The application of psychological data and theory to the behavior of individuals within organizational settings. Special emphasis on critical assessment of applied techniques.

P324 Abnormal Psychology (3 cr.) S & H P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106. A first course in abnormal psychology with emphasis on forms of abnormal behavior, etiology, development, interpretation, and final manifestations. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P325 Psychology of Learning (3 cr.) N & M P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106. Facts and principles of animal and human learning, especially as treated in theories attempting to provide frameworks for understanding what learning is and how it takes place. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P326 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 cr.) P: P155, or P101, or P151, or P106 and one of the following: BIOL L100, L111, L112, A215, P215, or equivalent. An examination of the cellular bases of behavior, emphasizing contemporary views and approaches to the study of the nervous system. Neural structure, function, and organization are considered in relation to sensory and motor function, motivation, learning, and other basic behaviors. Credit given for only one of P326 or P346.

P327 Psychology of Motivation (3 cr.) N & M P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106. R: P211. How needs, desires, and incentives influence behavior; research on motivational processes in human and animal behavior, including ways in which motives change and develop. I Sem., II Sem.

P329 Sensation and Perception (3 cr.) N & M P: P155 or P101 or P151 or P106. R: MATH M026 or M119 or introductory physics. Basic data, theories, psychophysics, illusions, and other topics fundamental to understanding sensory and perceptual processes. I Sem., II Sem.

P330 Perception/Action (3 cr.) N & M P: P155 or P101 or P151 or P106. Roboticists know that actions like catching a fly ball are exceedingly complex, yet people perform them effortlessly. How perceptual information is generated by and used in guiding such actions is covered, as are issues of motor coordination and control. Classes include laboratories on analysis of optic flow and limb movements.

P335 Cognitive Psychology (3 cr.) N & M P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106. Introduction to human cognitive processes, including attention and perception, memory, psycholinguistics, problem solving, and thinking. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P336 Psychological Tests and Individual Differences (3 cr.) N & M P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106; and K300 or K310. Principles of psychological testing. Representative tests and their uses for evaluation and prediction. Emphasis on concepts of reliability, validity, standardization, norms, and item analysis.

P337 Clinical Neuroscience (3 cr.) P: P326. Psychological disorders such as depression and autism exact a huge toll in human suffering and social costs. This course surveys the role of disturbed neural mechanisms on the development of psychological disorders. Methods for investigating the relationship between a disorder and proposed mechanisms will be critically evaluated.

P340 Human Memory (3 cr.) N & M P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106; and K300. R: P335. Research, theory, and data on human memory and information-processing models of memory.

P346 Neuroscience (3 cr.) P: P155, or P101, P106, or P151 or equivalent.A survey of contemporary neuroscience, examining the neural basis of behavior with approaches including molecular, cellular, developmental, cognitive, and behavioral neuroscience. Sensory and motor function, learning and memory, and other behaviors are considered using anatomical, physiological, behavioral, biochemical, and genetic approaches, providing a balanced view of neuroscience. Credit given for only one of P346 or P326.

P349 Cognitive Neuroscience (3 cr.) P: P326 or P346. An overview of the field of cognitive neuroscience. The neural basis of cognition is studied by considering the impact of neuropsychological case studies, neuroimaging (ERP and fMRI), and behavioral investigations on our understanding of sensory-motor systems, learning, memory, emotion, and spatial behavior.

P350 Human Factors/Ergonomics (3 cr.) N & M P: P155 or P101 or P151 or P106. Theories and data of experimental psychology applied to the problems of the interaction of people and technology.

P356 Teaching Internship (2 cr.) P: Undergraduate major in Psychological and Brain Sciences; minimum grade point average of 3.500 in psychology; and permission of the instructor. Supervised experience in assisting in an undergraduate course. Discussion of good teaching practices. Students will complete a project related to the aims of the course in which they are assisting. S/F grading.

P357 Topics in Psychology (3 cr.) P: P101 or P106 or P151 or P155 or equivalent. Introduction to fundamental issues, integrative approaches, and real-world applications of psychology. Examples include investigating a topic from a developmental, cognitive, individual difference, and neuroscience perspective; or addiction from a clinical, developmental, social, and neuroscience point of view.

P375 Intimate Relationships (3 cr.) P: P155 or P102 or P152. Focuses on the social psychology of relationships, including marriage, divorce, human sexuality, jealousy, communication, and friendships.

P402 Honors Seminar (3 cr.) P: Approval of departmental honors committee or consent of instructor. Students may enroll in one of several seminars led by various instructors. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

P404 Computer and Statistical Models in Psychology (3 cr.) This laboratory course provides an introduction to elementary mathematical, statistical, and computer models in psychology. Students learn to use computer spreadsheet packages to program formal models and to apply the models to analyze data obtained in psychological experiments.

P405 Elementary Mathematical Psychology (3 cr.) N & M P: P155 or P101 or P151 or P106; MATH M118 and M119. R: MATH M360. Survey of mathematically oriented psychological theories and their applications to learning, perception, psychophysics, decision making, small groups, etc.

P407 Drugs and the Nervous System (3 cr.) P: P326 or P346. Introduction to the major psychoactive drugs and how they act upon the brain to influence behavior. Discussion of the role of drugs as therapeutic agents for various clinical disorders and as probes to provide insight into brain function.

P409 Neural Bases of Sensory Function (3 cr.) P: P326 or P346. Detailed description of the neural systems responsible for vision, touch, hearing, taste, smell, and balance. Similarities and differences in the strategies employed by these systems will be stressed.

P410 Development of the Brain and Behavior (3 cr.) P: P326 or P346. Examination of the interaction of the developing brain with the behavior it mediates. Cellular systems and organismal levels of analysis will all be considered in the organization of structure function relationships in the neural basis of behavior.

P411 Neural Bases of Learning and Memory (3 cr.) P: P326 or P346. Comprehensive survey of theories and data concerned with neural correlates of associative and non-associative forms of learning and memory. Vertebrate and invertebrate model systems and preparations as well as data obtained from the human neuropsychology literature will be studied.

P413 Operant and Pavlovian Conditioning (3 cr.) P: P325 or consent of instructor. Advanced treatment of the history, basic concepts, theory, and experimental literature of contemporary learning. The focus is on the behavior of nonhuman species.

P416 Evolution and Ecology of Learning (3 cr.) P: P325, P417, or consent of instructor. Advanced treatment of history, basic concepts, theories, and experimental literature examining the relation of learning and evolution. Compares ethological, comparative, and general process approaches.

P417 Animal Behavior (3 cr.) N & M P: P155, or P101, or P151, or P106. Methods, findings, and interpretations of recent investigations of animal behavior.

P421 Laboratory in Social Psychology (3 cr.) P: P155, or P151 and P152, or P101 and P102, or P106; P211; K300 or K310, and P320 or P304. Research methodology in the study of social behavior. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P423 Human Neuropsychology (3 cr.) P: P326 or P346 or equivalent. A critical examination of neurological functioning with respect to human and other animal behavior. Assesses the behavioral functions of neural structures and systems through understanding the behavioral consequences of brain damage and through basic experimental study.

P424 Laboratory in Sensation and Perception (3 cr.) P: P155, or P151 and P152, or P101 and P102, or P106; P211; K300 or K310, and P329. The experimental investigation of current and classical problems in sensory psychology and perception.

P425 Behavior Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence (3 cr.) P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106, and P324. A survey of major behavior disorders, with emphasis on empirical research and clinical description relative to etiology, assessment, prognosis, and treatment.

P426 Laboratory in Behavioral Neuroscience (3 cr.) P: P155, or P151 and P152, or P101 and P102, or P106; P211; K300 or K310; and P326 or P346. Experiments with and demonstrations of contemporary approaches in behavioral neuroscience. I Sem., II Sem.

P429 Laboratory in Developmental Psychology (3 cr.) P: P155, or P151 and P152, or P101 and P102, or P106; P211; K300 or K310; and P315 or P316. Research methods in developmental psychology and their application to selected problems in the development of humans and of nonhuman species.

P430 Behavior Modification (3 cr.) P: P324 and P325 or consent of instructor. Principles, techniques, and applications of behavior modification, including reinforcement, aversive conditioning, observational learning, desensitization, self-control, and modification of cognitions.

P433 Laboratory in Neuroimaging Methods (3 cr.) P: P211 or P106; P326 or P346; K300 or acceptable substitute. Laboratory experience in all facets of a neuroimaging experiment, including experimental design, data acquisition, data analysis, data interpretation, and data presentation. Introductory magnetic resonance (MR) physics and the physiology of blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) changes are included.

P434 Community Psychology (3 cr.) P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106; junior or senior standing. R: P324. An ecological orientation to the problems of mental health, social adaptation, and community change.

P435 Laboratory in Human Learning and Cognition (3 cr.) P: P155, or P151 and P152, or P101 and P102, or P106; P211; K300 or K310; and P325 or P335. Experimental study of human learning and cognitive processes. I Sem., II Sem.

P436 Laboratory in Animal Learning and Motivation (3 cr.) P: P155, or P151 and P152, or P101 and P102, or P106; P211; K300 or K310; and P325 or P327. Experimental studies of animal learning and motivation.

P437 Neurobiology of Addictions (3 cr.) N & M P: P101 or P106 or P155, and P346, and two biology courses (e.g., L112, L211). (Concurrent enrollment in P346 and biology courses only with permission of the instructor.) Provides an in-depth look at the neurobiological bases of addictions, from the cellular, molecular, and systems neuroscience levels of analysis.

P438 Language and Cognition (3 cr.) N & M P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106. R: P335. Methods, research, and theory in psycholinguistics. Examination of speech perception, speech production, psychological studies of syntax and semantics, language development, cognitive basis of linguistic theory, neurology of language, and language comprehension and thought.

P440 Topics in Cognitive Psychology (3 cr.) P: P335. A critical examination of an area within cognitive psychology. Topics will vary by semester but could include attention, memory, categorization, imagery, language, thinking, problem solving, or decision making.

P442 Infant Development (3 cr.) P: P315 or P316. Surveys cognitive, socio-emotional, and perceptual motor development during the first two years of life. Emphasis is on theory and research addressing fundamental questions about the developmental process, especially the biological bases for developmental change.

P443 Cognitive Development (3 cr.) P: P315 or P316. Human cognitive development. Topics may include language, problem solving, conceptual growth, perception, and cultural influences.

P444 Developmental Psychology (3 cr.) P: P315 or P316. R: P326 or P346. Survey of phylogenetic and ontogenetic principles from a comparative perspective. Focuses on a broad biological approach to organic and social development.

P446 Group Processes (3 cr.) P: P320 or P304. Social psychological theory and research on the behavior of individuals in groups covering major topics such as group formation and cohesiveness, group performance and decision making, social influence processes in groups, and intragroup and intergroup conflict.

P447 Social Influence Processes (3 cr.) P: P320 or P304. An advanced review of the theoretical and empirical literature in experimental social psychology concerning social influence processes and effects. Topics to be covered include attitude formation and change, persuasion, conformity, compliance, and behavior change.

P448 Social Judgment and Person Perception (3 cr.) P: P320 or P304. Judgments, decisions, and perceptions of a social nature include self-knowledge, judgments of causality, biases and errors of social judgment such as stereotyping, and the relation of thinking and feeling. Principles will be considered in the context of applied areas such as law and psychotherapy.

P457 Topics in Psychology (1–3 cr.) P: Junior or senior standing. Studies in special topics not ordinarily covered in other departmental courses. Topics vary with instructor and semester. May be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credits.

P459 History and Systems of Psychology (3 cr.) P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106; and 6 additional credit hours in psychology. Historical background and critical evaluation of major theoretical systems of modern psychology: structuralism, associationism, behaviorism, Gestalt psychology, and psychoanalysis. Methodological problems of theory construction and system making. Emphasizes integration of recent trends.

P460 Women: A Psychological Perspective (3 cr.) S & H P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106; and 3 additional credit hours in psychology; and junior or senior status. Basic data and theories about the development and maintenance of sex and gender differences in behavior and personality.

P466 Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology (3 cr.) N & M P: P326 or P346. Introduction to the cellular and molecular processes that give the nervous system its unique character. Covers the cell biology of neurons and glia and mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. Examines the genetic and molecular approaches to the biological basis for higher brain functions such as learning and memory.

P493 Supervised Research (2–3 cr.) P: P155, or P151 and P152, or P101 and P102, or P106; P211; K300 or K310. Active participation in research. An independent experiment of modest magnitude, participation in ongoing research in a single laboratory. Students who enroll in P493 will be expected to enroll in P494. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6 credit hours. I Sem., II Sem.

P494 Supervised Research II (2–3 cr.) P: P493. A continuation of P493. Course will include a journal report of the two semesters of work. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6 credit hours. I Sem., II Sem.

P495 Readings and Research in Psychology (1–3 cr.) P: Written consent of instructor, junior or senior standing. May be repeated twice for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

P499 Honors Thesis Research (12 cr. max.) P: Approval of departmental honors committee. May be substituted for advanced laboratory requirement or, given the permission of the departmental honors committee, for certain other requirements in the program for majors. I Sem., II Sem.

Return to Top

Religious Studies

Course Descriptions

Western Religious Traditions
R235 The Liberal Tradition in U.S. Religious History (3 cr.) A & H An examination of the growth of liberal theological expressions, such as rationalism, romanticism, and modernism from the early eighteenth century to the present.

R318 Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Religions (3 cr.) A & H, CSA A survey of the various religions in the ancient Near East (Egypt, Babylon, Persia) and the Greco-Roman worlds. Attention will be paid to ritual, philosophy, and community formation.

R321 African American Religions (3 cr.) A & H Examines the varieties of African American religions, especially Christianity, Islam, Yoruba, Vodun, and Humanism, from the colonial era to the present. Methodologies will also be critically examined.

R324 Race, Religion, and Ethnicity in the United States (3 cr.) S & H A comparative study of the role religious narratives and beliefs have played in the shaping of racial and ethnic boundaries.

R334 New Religious Movements in the Americas (3 cr.) A & H Offers a theoretical and comparative survey of the emergence of religious traditions. Groups may include early Christianity, early Islam, Nichirin Shoshu, Mormonism, Tenrikyo, the Nation of Islam, Scientology, Falun Gong, and the Branch Davidians.

R335 Religion in the United States, 1600–1850 (3 cr.) A & H Development of religious life and thought in the early United States, from the beginnings to 1850.

R336 Religion in the United States, 1850–Present (3 cr.) A & H
Development of religious life and thought in the modern United States, from 1850 to the present.

R337 Evangelical America (3 cr.) A & H Assesses the causes, nature, and implications of evangelical influence from the Great Awakening to the present.

R370 Islam in America (3 cr.) S & H Explores the history and life of Islam and Muslims in the United States, including the ethnic and religious diversity of American Muslims, conflicts about gender relations and women’s issues, debates about Islam’s role in politics, and the spirituality of American Muslims.

R378 Knowing the Will of God in Islam I: Law (3 cr.) A & H Students gain understanding of how Muslims have traditionally interpreted the texts of revelation (Qur’an and Hadith) through the development of practical “hands-on” methods. Designed to resemble classes in theology, jurisprudence, and law in a medieval Islamic college.

R420 Religions of Ancient Rome (3 cr.) A & H A seminar on the extraordinary diversity of ancient Roman religion. Major themes and problems explored include sacrifice, the religious calendar, divination, and the priesthood. Examines the widening scope of religious choice within and outside the “official” cults of the state, including ancient Christianity.

R467 The Life and Legacy of Muhammad (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Explores the ways in which sacred biography is used in various contexts to develop theories of authority and history. Applies theories and methods of textual interpretation to the earliest known biography of the Prophet Muhammad (d. 632 C.E.).

R468 Knowing the Will of God in Islam II: Theology (3 cr.) A & H Develops students’ understanding of the central theological issues in Muslim thought as they were developed by various groups and individuals over the last 1,300 years.

Eastern Religious Traditions
R368 Introduction to Chinese Thought (3 cr.) A & H, CSA An introduction to the early development of Chinese thought, from ancient divination to the religious, ethical, and political theories of classical Confucianism, Mohism, and Daoism. Focuses on debates over human nature and self-cultivation, the nature of the cosmos, and the proper ordering of society. Readings are in English translation. Credit given for only one of REL R368, EALC E374, or PHIL P374.

Critical Issues in Religious Studies
R373 Religion and Bioethics (3 cr.) A & H Examines questions about human nature, finitude, the meaning of suffering, and appropriate uses of medical technology in the face of natural limitations, such as disease and death, that humans encounter. Issues include prenatal/genetic testing, transhumanism, enhancement technologies, cloning, euthanasia, and organ transplantation. Judeo-Christian and cross-cultural perspectives on illness are considered.

R377 Friendship, Benevolence, and Love (3 cr.) A & H By closely reading relevant classic works from Western and East Asian cultures, students examine ideas of friendship, benevolence, and love. Questions include: What are the varieties of love and friendship? Is romantic love uniquely Western? Is compassion for others natural to human beings? Could true benevolence require actions that appear cruel?

R411 Religion and Media (3 cr.) S & H An introduction to recent debates on the nexus between religious experience and communities, and various forms and technologies of mediation. Combines perspectives on religion and ritual with scholarship on media, media consumption, and critical theory. Readings also include an array of ethnographic studies of religiously inspired movements in South Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and the Middle East.

R436 Modernisms and Fundamentalisms (3 cr.) A & H Through cross-cultural examples, students explore the history of contemporary religious ideologies, including modernist movements in Buddhism, Islam, and Roman Catholicism, and fundamental expressions in a variety of traditions.

Return to Top

Russian and East European Institute

Minors in Russian and East European Studies
Minor in Russian and East European Studies
Minor in Russian and East European Studies with Language Certification
Courses Satisfying Distribution Requirements for the REEI Minor

Introduction
The Russian and East European Institute (REEI) offers an interdisciplinary program designed to give undergraduates comprehensive training in the Russian and East European areas. The university offers a wide range of Russian and East European courses in 26 departments in the College of Arts and Sciences and the Schools of Education, Fine Arts, Journalism, Library and Information Science, Public and Environmental Affairs, the Kelley School of Business, and the Jacobs School of Music. The program does not grant an undergraduate major, but students can obtain an undergraduate minor in one of two tracks: a regular minor or a minor with a language certificate. The minor is awarded along with the bachelor’s degree.

Minors in Russian and East European Studies

The minors indicate that students have achieved special competence in the Russian and East European area, successfully completing interdisciplinary area course work. Two minors, described below, are available. The first minor requires a distribution of area courses in three disciplinary groupings. The second minor, in addition to area courses, includes a language certificate. The second minor is particularly useful to those who are planning to undertake graduate study in the Russian or East European field. The minors are awarded to those who earn the bachelor’s degree and complete the requirements below.

Academic Standing
Students must have a minimum grade point average of 3.000 (B) or the permission of the director to enter either undergraduate minor program.

Applications are available from the Russian and East European Institute (REEI) in Ballantine Hall 561.

Return to Russian and East European Institute

Minor in Russian and East European Studies

Requirements
Students must complete 15 credit hours, selected in consultation with the REEI advisor, with a minimum average grade of B, in area-related courses, including a minimum of 3 credit hours each from history, social sciences, and literature/culture distribution groups from the list below. Institute courses R302 and R303 can be used to meet the requirement for any of the distribution groups. 9 of these credit hours must be at the 300 level or above. Courses taken to satisfy the REEI minor requirements may also be used to meet College distribution requirements.

Return to Russian and East European Institute

Minor in Russian and East European Studies with Language Certification

Requirements
Same course requirements as above; in addition, students must complete 6 credit hours beyond the first-year level (with at least a grade of B) of any one of the following languages: Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, Czech, Estonian, Georgian, Hungarian, Macedonian, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Ukrainian, Yiddish, or another area language. Students may be exempted from the 6 credit hour requirement by demonstrating equivalent language knowledge with the approval of an REEI advisor.

Return to Russian and East European Institute

Courses Satisfying Distribution Requirements for the REEI Minor

The following is a list of courses that were offered in the last three years and are expected to be offered again. This list is subject to change. A current list of courses for each semester may be obtained in Ballantine Hall 565. Please consult with the REEI advisor prior to registering for courses to count toward the minor. (REE=Russian and/or East European.)

Group I (Historical)

Central Eurasian Studies

U320 Topics in Central Eurasian Studies (REE Historical Topics) (3–4 cr.)
U324 Romanticism and the Rise of Nationalism (3 cr.)
U333 Finland in the Twentieth Century (3 cr.) S & H
U368 The Mongol Century (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
U394 Islam in the Soviet Union and Successor States (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
U423 Hungary between 1890 and 1945 (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
U427 Hungary from 1945 to Present (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
U469 Modern Mongolia (3 cr.)
U493 Islamic Central Asia: Sixteenth through Nineteenth Centuries (3 cr.) S & H
U494 Central Asia under Russian Rule (3 cr.) S & H

College of Arts and Sciences
E103 Topics in Arts and Humanities: REE Historical Topics (3 cr.) A & H
E104 Topics in Social and Historical Studies: REE Historical Topics (3 cr.) S & H
S104 Freshman Seminar in Social and Historical Studies: REE Historical Topics (3 cr.) S & H

Geography
G120 World Regional Geography: REE Topics (3 cr.) S & H
G427 Russia and Its Neighbors (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
G428 Geography of Europe (3 cr.) S & H, CSB

History
B300 Issues in Western European History (3 cr.) S & H
B323 History of the Holocaust (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
C393 Ottoman History (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
D101 Icon and Axe: Russia through the Ages (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
D200 Issues in Russian and East European History (3 cr.) S & H
D300 Issues in Russian/East European History (3 cr.) S & H
D302 The Gorbachev Revolution and the Collapse of the Soviet Empire (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
D303 Heroes and Villains in Russian History (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
D304 Jews of Eastern Europe (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
D308 Empire of the Tsars (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
D310 Russian Revolution and the Soviet Regime (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
D320 Modern Ukraine (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
D325 Nationalism in the Balkans, 1804–1923 (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
D327 The People vs. The Emperor (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
D329 Eastern Europe in the First Half of the Twentieth Century (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
D330 Eastern Europe in the Second Half of the Twentieth Century (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
D400 Issues in Russian/East European History (3 cr.) S & H
H251 Introduction to Jewish History: From the Bible to Spanish Expulsion (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
H252 Introduction to Jewish History: From Spanish Expulsion to the Present (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
J300 Seminar in History (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) S & H
J400 Seminar in History (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) S & H

Collins Living-Learning Center
L310 Collins Symposium: REE Historical Topics (3 cr.) A & H
L320 Collins Symposium: REE Historical Topics (3 cr.) S & H

Group II (Social Science)
Anthropology
E332 Jewish Women: Anthropological Perspectives (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
E348 Peoples and Cultures of Russia, Ukraine, and Newly Independent States (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
E371 Modern Jewish Culture and Society (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
E382 Memory and Culture (3 cr.) S & H
E387 The Ethnography of Europe (3 cr.) S & H, CSB
E397 Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
E398 Peoples and Cultures of Central Asia (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
E400 Undergraduate Seminar (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.)
E412 Anthropology of Russia and Eastern Europe (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
E455 Anthropology of Religion (3 cr.) S & H

Kelley School of Business
D301 International Business Environment (3 cr.)
D302 International Business: Operating International Enterprises (3 cr.)
D496 Foreign Study in Business (2–6 cr.)

Central Eurasian Studies
U320 Topics in Central Eurasian Studies (REE Social Science Topics) (1–4 cr.)
U374 Environmental Problems and Social Constraints in Northern and Central Eurasia (3 cr.)
U395 Central Asian Politics and Society (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
U498 Religion and Power in Islamic Central Asia (3 cr.)

College of Arts and Sciences
E104 Topics in Social and Historical Studies (3 cr.) (REE Social Science Topics) S & H, TFR
S104 Freshman Seminar in Social and Historical Studies (3 cr.) (REE Social Science Topics) S & H, TFR
X311 Experimental Topics (3 cr.) (REE Social Science Topics)

Criminal Justice
P474 Law, Crime, and Justice in Post-Soviet Russia (3 cr.) S & H
P493 Seminar in Criminal Justice (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.)

Economics
E386 Soviet-Type Economies in Transition (3 cr.)
E390 Undergraduate Seminar in Economics (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.)
S202 Introduction to Microeconomics: Honors (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) S & H

Collins Living-Learning Center
L310 Collins Symposium (REE Social Science Topics) (3 cr.) A & H
L320 Collins Symposium (REE Social Science Topics) (3 cr.) S & H

Gender Studies
G402 Seminar in Gender Studies (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) S & H

Global Village Living-Learning Center
S104 Global Village Living-Learning Center Freshman Seminar (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) S & H, TFR

International Studies Program

I100 Introduction to International Studies (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) S & H
I203 Global Integration and Development (3 cr.) S & H
I300 Topics in International Studies (3 cr.)
I325 International Issues through Foreign Languages (1 cr.)
I400 International Studies Capstone Seminar (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.)

Political Science
Y107 Introduction to Comparative Politics (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) S & H
Y109 Introduction to International Politics (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) S & H
Y200 Contemporary Political Problems (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) S & H
Y210 Honors Seminar (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) S & H
Y332 Russian Politics (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
Y340 East European Politics (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
Y348 The Politics of Genocide (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
Y350 Politics of the European Union (3 cr.) S & H
Y351 Political Simulations (REE Area Topics) (1–3 cr.)
Y352 The Holocaust and Politics (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
Y363 Comparative Foreign Policy (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) S & H
Y368 Russian and Soviet Foreign Policy (3 cr.) S & H
Y375 War and International Conflict (3 cr.) S & H
Y376 International Political Economy (3 cr.) S & H
Y381 Classical Political Thought (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
Y382 Modern Political Thought (3 cr.) A & H, CSB

School of Public and Environmental Affairs
E466 International and Comparative Environmental Policy (3 cr.)
V160 National and International Policy (3 cr.)
V450 Contemporary Issues in Public Affairs (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.)

West European Studies
W304 Model European Union (1–3 cr.)
W405 Special Topics in West European Studies (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) S & H, CSB

Group III (Literature and Culture)
Central Eurasian Studies
U320 Topics in Central Eurasian Studies (REE Literature/Culture Topics) (1–4 cr.)
U370 Uralic Peoples (3 cr.) S & H
U394 Islam in the Soviet Union and Successor States (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
U397 Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
U398 Peoples and Cultures of Central Asia (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
U424 Hungarian Literature from Its Beginnings to 1900 (3 cr.) A & H
U426 Modern Hungarian Literature (3 cr.) A & H

College of Arts and Sciences
E103 Topics in Arts and Humanities (REE Literature/Culture Topics) (3 cr.) A & H
E104 Topics in Social and Historical Studies (REE Literature/Culture Topics) (3 cr.) S & H
S104 Freshman Seminar in Social and Historical Studies (REE Literature/Culture Topics) (3 cr.) S & H

Communication and Culture
C415 Topics in Communication and Culture in Comparative Perspective (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) S & H
C420 Topics in Media History (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) S & H

Comparative Literature
C377 Topics in Yiddish Literature (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
C335 Realism, Naturalism, and Symbolism (3 cr.) A & H, CSB
C340 Women in World Literature (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
C347 Literature and Ideas (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) A & H, CSB
C378 Topics in Yiddish Culture (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
C400 Studies in Comparative Literature (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) A & H

English
L375 Studies in Jewish Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

Fine Arts
A442 Twentieth-Century Art 1900–1924 (4 cr.) CSB
A480 Russian Art (3 cr.) S & H, CSA

Folklore and Ethnomusicology
F312 European Folklore/Folklife/Folk Music (3 cr.) A & H, CSB

Germanic Studies
Y300 Topics in Yiddish Literature (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
Y350 Topics in Yiddish Culture (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
Y495 Individual Readings in Yiddish Studies: Language, Literature, Culture (REE Area Topics) (1–3 cr.)

Hutton Honors College
H203 Interdepartmental Colloquia (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) A & H, TFR
H303 Interdepartmental Colloquia (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) A & H

School of Journalism
J414 International News Gathering Systems (3 cr.)

Collins Living-Learning Center
L310 Collins Symposium (REE Literature/Culture Topics) (3 cr.) A & H
L320 Collins Symposium (REE Literature/Culture Topics) (3 cr.) S & H

Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
N305 Topics in Middle Eastern Studies: Sufism (3 cr.) CSA

Religious Studies
R345 Religious Issues in Contemporary Judaism (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
R445 Topics in the History of Judaism (REE Area Topics) (3 cr.) A & H

Slavic Languages and Literatures
C363 History of Czech Literature and Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
C364 Modern Czech Literature and Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
C365 Seminar in Czech and Central European Literatures and Cultures (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
P223 Introduction to Polish Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
P363-P364 Survey of Polish Literature and Culture I-II (3-3 cr.) A & H, CSA
R123 Masterworks of Russian Short Fiction (3 cr.) A & H, TFR
R223 Introduction to Russian Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
R263 Pushkin to Dostoevsky (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
R264 Tolstoy to Solzhenitsyn (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
R334 Tolstoy and Dostoevsky (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
R345 Jewish Characters in Russian Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
R352 Russian and Soviet Film (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
R353 Central European Cinema (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
R405-R406 Readings in Russian Literature I-II (3-3 cr.) A & H
R407-R408 Readings in Russian Culture, History, and Society I-II (3-3 cr.) A & H
S363-S364 Literature and Culture of the Southern Slavs I-II (3-3 cr.) A & H, CSA

Language Classes
Students completing the undergraduate minor in Russian and East European studies with language certification are required to complete at least 6 credit hours of language study above the first-year level in a related language (Czech, Estonian, Georgian, Hungarian, Macedonian, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Serbian and Croatian, Ukrainian, or Yiddish). The following courses count toward this requirement:

Slavic Languages and Literatures
C201-C202 Intermediate Czech I-II (3-3 cr.)
C301-C302 Advanced Intermediate Czech I-II (3-3 cr.)
G313-G314 Summer Intensive Intermediate Georgian I-II (5-5 cr.)
M201-M202 Intermediate Romanian I-II (3-3 cr.)
P201-P202 Intermediate Polish I-II (3-3 cr.)
P301-P302 Advanced Intermediate Polish I-II (3-3 cr.)
R201-R202 Intermediate Russian I-II (4-4 cr.)
R301-R302 Advanced Intermediate Russian I-II (3-3 cr.)
R325-R326 Advanced Intermediate Oral Russian I-II (2-2 cr.)
R401-R402 Advanced Russian I-II (3-3 cr.)
W303-W353 Intermediate Russian I-II (5-5 cr.)
W304-W354 Intermediate Russian II-Advanced Intermediate Russian I (5-5 cr.)
W305-W355 Advanced Intermediate Russian I-II (5-5 cr.)
W306-W356 Advanced Intermediate Russian II-Advanced Russian I (5-5 cr.)
W307-W357 Advanced Russian I-II (5-5 cr.)
W308-W358 Advanced Russian Syntax and Stylistics I-II (5-5 cr.)
W309-W359 Advanced Russian Syntax and Stylistics III-IV (5-5 cr.)
S201-S202 Intermediate Serbian and Croatian I-II (3-3 cr.)
S301-S302 Advanced Intermediate Serbian and Croatian I-II (3-3 cr.)

Central Eurasian Studies
U211-U212 Intermediate Estonian I-II (3-3 cr.)
U231-U232 Intermediate Hungarian I-II (3-3 cr.)

Germanic Studies
Y200-Y250 Intermediate Yiddish I-II (3-3 cr.)

Return to Russian and East European Institute

Return to Top

Second Language Studies

Course Descriptions

T080 Intensive English Program, Part-Time (First eight weeks) (0 cr.) The Intensive English Program provides instruction at the beginning and intermediate levels for students who are eligible for less than full time.

T085 Intensive English Program, Full-Time (First eight weeks) (0 cr.) The Intensive English Program provides full-time instruction at the beginning and intermediate levels.

T090 Intensive English Program, Part-Time (Second eight weeks) (0 cr.) The Intensive English Program provides instruction at the beginning and intermediate levels for students who are eligible for less than full time.

T095 Intensive English Program, Full-Time (Second eight weeks) (0 cr.) The Intensive English Program provides full-time instruction at the beginning and intermediate levels.

Return to Top

Slavic Languages and Literatures

Course Descriptions

C301 Advanced Intermediate Czech I (3 cr.) P: Grade of B or higher in C202. Development of oral and written fluency and comprehension in Czech language based on morphological, lexical, and syntactical analysis of contemporary textual materials.

C302 Advanced Intermediate Czech II (3 cr.) P: Grade of B or higher in C301. Development of oral and written fluency and comprehension in Czech language based on morphological, lexical, and syntactical analysis of contemporary textual materials.

P366 Polish Film (3 cr.) A & H, CSA An exploration of the post-war history of Polish cinema, made famous worldwide by directors such as Wajda, Kieslowski, and Polanski. Topics of interest include the cinema of moral anxiety (1970s); absurd comedies depicting life under communism; adaptations of literary classics; and new topics and genres in Polish film after 1989.

Q201 Intermediate Macedonian I (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in Q102 or Q312, or equivalent. Continuation of development of proficiency in Macedonian, especially reading, listening, speaking, writing, grammar, and culture.

Q202 Intermediate Macedonian II (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in Q201, or equivalent. Continuation of development of proficiency in Macedonian, especially reading, listening, speaking, writing, grammar, and culture.

R101 Elementary Russian I (5 cr.) Introduction to contemporary Russian and aspects of Russian culture. Intensive drill and exercises in basic structure; development of vocabulary.

R102 Elementary Russian II (5 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in R101 or equivalent. Introduction to contemporary Russian and aspects of Russian culture. Intensive drill and exercises in basic structure; development of vocabulary.

R201 Intermediate Russian I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in R102 or equivalent. Continuation of work in structure and vocabulary acquisition through study of grammar, drills, and readings. Oral practice and written exercises.

R202 Intermediate Russian II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in R201 or equivalent. Continuation of work in structure and vocabulary acquisition through study of grammar, drills, and readings. Oral practice and written exercise.

R301 Advanced Intermediate Russian I (3 cr.) P: Grade of B or higher in R202. C: R325 or consent of department. Morphological, lexical, and syntactic analysis of a broad spectrum of textual materials with special emphasis on meaning. Development of oral and written fluency and comprehension. Remedial grammar and phonetics as required.

R302 Advanced Intermediate Russian II (3 cr.) P: Grade of B or higher in R301. C: R326 or consent of department. Morphological, lexical, and syntactic analysis of a broad spectrum of textual materials with special emphasis on meaning. Development of oral and written fluency and comprehension. Remedial grammar and phonetics as required.

R325 Advanced Intermediate Oral Russian I (2 cr.) C: R301 or consent of the department. Designed primarily for those interested in developing oral fluency. Sections in advanced conversation, recitation, and oral comprehension, supplemented by lab and drill in corrective pronunciation, dictation, and reading. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours by permission of the department.

R326 Advanced Intermediate Oral Russian II (2 cr.) C: R302 or consent of the department. Continuation and advanced treatment of topics covered in R325 as well as topics of current events. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours by permission of the department.

R401 Advanced Russian I (3 cr.) P: Grade of B or higher in R302. Refinement of active and passive language skills, with emphasis on vocabulary building and word usage. Extensive reading, discussion, composition writing. Individualized remedial drill in grammar and pronunciation aimed at preparing students to meet departmental language proficiency standards.

R402 Advanced Russian II (3 cr.) P: Grade of B or higher in R401. Refinement of active and passive language skills, with emphasis on vocabulary building and word usage. Extensive reading, discussion, composition writing. Individualized remedial drill in grammar and pronunciation aimed at preparing students to meet departmental language proficiency standards.

U101 Elementary Ukrainian I (5 cr.) No previous knowledge of Ukrainian required. First semester designed to provide active command of phonology and basic grammatical patterns of Ukrainian.

U102 Elementary Ukrainian II (5 cr.) P: U101 or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of U101, designed to provide active command of phonology and basic grammatical patterns.

W301-W351 Elementary Russian I-II (5-5 cr.) Intensive summer equivalent of R101 and R102.

W302-W352 Elementary Russian II-Intermediate Russian I (5-5 cr.) Intensive summer equivalent of R102 and R201.

W303-W353 Intermediate Russian I-II (5-5 cr.) Intensive summer equivalent of R201 and R202.

W304-W354 Intermediate Russian II-Advanced Intermediate Russian I (5-5 cr.) Intensive summer equivalent of R202 and R301.

W305-W355 Advanced Intermediate Russian I-II (5-5 cr.) Intensive summer equivalent of R301 and R302.

W306-W356 Advanced Intermediate Russian II-Advanced Russian I (5-5 cr.) Intensive summer equivalent of R302 and R401.

W307-W357 Advanced Russian I-II (5-5 cr.) Intensive summer equivalent of R401 and R402. First level of certificate program in Russian. Topic: The lexicon.

W308-W358 Advanced Russian Syntax and Stylistics I-II (5-5 cr.) Intensive Russian at the fifth-year level. Second level of certificate program in Russian. Topic: Syntax.

W309-W359 Advanced Russian Syntax and Stylistics III-IV (5-5 cr.) Intensive Russian at the sixth-year level. Third level of certificate program in Russian. Topic: Stylistics.

Return to Top

Sociology

Major in Sociology

Purpose
The major is designed to acquaint students with basic principles, methods, and findings in sociology and to provide students with an opportunity to discover and to understand the social nature of their world. Provision is made for students who wish to acquire a general background as well as for those who wish to develop particular interests in a subfield of sociology. The major provides a foundation for careers in many professional fields, such as law, social service administration, and business, as well as for graduate training as professional sociologists in government, business, community agencies, research organizations, or universities.

Requirements
Students must complete 27 credit hours of course work as follows:

  1. S100 or S110
  2. One additional course from S101, S105, S201, S210, S215, S217, S220, S230
  3. S370, S371, and S340
  4. Nine credit hours at the 300 or 400 level (excluding S340, S370, and S371).
  5. One 3 credit 400-level Capstone Seminar. The following courses do not qualify as Capstone Seminars: S491, S492, S493, S494, S495, S498, and S499

Students must complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Departmental Honors Program

The honors program in sociology permits outstanding students to pursue important issues and problems in depth. Students must have a 3.300 GPA or higher, and a minimum of a 3.500 GPA in the major to begin the honors program. To graduate with honors in sociology, students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours in sociology, and complete an honors thesis as part of a two-semester honors seminar sequence (S498-S499) and a one-semester graded independent readings course (S495).

Course Descriptions

S498 Honors Thesis Seminar I (3 cr.) P: Consent of honors thesis seminar instructor. Research and preparation of senior honors thesis.

S499 Honors Thesis Seminar II (3 cr.) P: S498 and consent of honors thesis seminar instructor.

Return to Top

Speech and Hearing Sciences

Interdepartmental Major in Speech and Hearing Sciences and Psychology
Course Descriptions

Interdepartmental Major in Speech and Hearing Sciences and Psychology

Requirements
Students must take a minimum of 40 credit hours. At least 12 credit hours must be completed at or above the 300 level in psychology, and at least 12 credit hours must be completed at or above the 300 level in speech and hearing sciences.

Students must also complete the degree requirements for the B.A. in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Speech and Hearing Sciences

  1. S111
  2. S275, S319, S333
  3. S201 or S375
  4. At least three courses from S307, S378, S420, S436, S444, S474, S478

Psychology

  1. One of the following entry-level sequences:
        a. P151 (3 cr.), P152 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (2 cr.) or
        b. P106 (4 cr.) and P199 (1 cr.) or
        c. P101 (3 cr.), P102 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (2 cr.)
  2. PSY K300 or K310 or a substitute approved by the undergraduate advisor.
  3. 3 credit hours from P303, P325, P326, P327, P329, P330, P335, P337, P340, P346, P349, P350, P357 (depending on topic), P402 (depending on topic), P405, P407, P410, P411, P413, P416, P417, P423, P438, P444, P459.
  4. 3 credit hours from P304, P315, P316, P319, P320, P323, P324, P336, P357 (depending on topic), P375, P402 (depending on topic), P425, P430, P434, P442, P446, P447, P448.
  5. Advanced laboratory: one from P421, P424, P426, P429, P435, P436, P493–P494, P495, or P499. (Another 400-level course may be substituted for this requirement by permission of the undergraduate advisor.)
  6. One additional course in psychology numbered 300 or above.
  7. At least three of the required 300-level psychology courses must be designated as “major section only.”

Other Requirements
The following courses must be completed with a minimum grade of C–:

  1. Mathematics M118, or M119, or M120, or a 200-level mathematics course
  2. A one-semester course in biology
  3. Linguistics L103 or L303

Return to Speech and Hearing Sciences

Course Descriptions

S111 Introduction to Phonetics for Speech and Hearing Sciences (3 cr.) N & M Scientific study of speech production, based on the International Phonetic Alphabet. Exercises in transcription.

S201 Speech and Hearing Physiology (3 cr.) N & M Introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the speech mechanism, including respiration, phonation, articulation/resonance, nervous system, and audition.

S275 Human Hearing and Communication (3 cr.) R: S111. Examines human hearing and communication, including the physics of sound, auditory anatomy and physiology, and auditory perception; diagnostic audiology, including hearing assessment and screening; rehabilitative audiology, including an overview of hearing aids, cochlear implants, and educational issues for children with hearing loss.

S433 Childhood Language (3 cr.) N & M R: LING L103 or L303. Develops student knowledge of how language is acquired by young children. Examines data on what young infants and young children know about language at different ages, and considers the kinds of theories that may explain this data. Credit given for only one of S333 or S433.

Return to Speech and Hearing Sciences

Return to Top

Statistics

Introduction
Statistics—B.S.
Course Descriptions

Faculty

Chairperson: Rudy Professor Stanley Wasserman

Chancellor’s Professor of Sociology and of Statistics: J. Scott Long

Rudy Professor of Statistics, of Psychology, and of Sociology: Stanley Wasserman

Professors: Steen Andersson, Lanh Tran, Michael Trosset

Assistant Professor: Chunfeng Huang

Visiting Assistant Professor: Brian S. Marks

Adjunct Faculty: Franklin Acito (Business), Richard Bradley (Mathematics), Jerome Busemeyer (Psychological and Brain Sciences), Juan Carlos Escanciano (Economics), Victor Goodman (Mathematics), Andrew Hanson (Computer Science), Elizabeth Housworth (Mathematics), David Jacho-Chavez (Economics), Kenneth Kelley (Education), John Kruschke (Psychological and Brain Sciences), Yoon Jin Lee (Economics), Russell Lyons (Mathematics), Robert Nosofsky (Psychological and Brain Sciences), Joanne Peng (Education), Christopher Raphael (Informatics), Scott Robeson (Geography), Richard Shiffrin (Psychological and Brain Sciences), Rusty Tchernis (Economics), James Townsend (Psychological and Brain Sciences), Pravin Trivedi (Economics), Konstantin Tyurin (Economics), Alessandro Vespigniani (Informatics)

Academic Advising: Dana G. Fielding, Schuessler Institute 310, (812) 855-7828

Introduction

Statistics is the science of data. Data are numbers with a context; the particular context that gave rise to the numbers is important. In addition to a knowledge of mathematics, statisticians must learn about the scientific disciplines that generate data of interest to understand and explain the observational studies or the statistical experiments in question. For example, statisticians calculate probabilities for DNA paternity tests; design clinical trials to study the effectiveness of new medications; study economic time series data, such as gross domestic product from developing countries in Africa; and develop statistical models of responses from fMRI psychological experiments.

The field of statistics has a coherent body of theory, which students of the field master, as well as methodology designed for applied uses in many disciplines. The department teaches courses in both theoretical and applied statistics.

Return to Statistics

Statistics—B.S.

Purpose
The B.S. in Statistics degree program provides students with an education in the mathematical theory and practical applications of the field of statistics, and prepares students to pursue a career involving statistics.

Requirements

  1. Writing, same as B.A. degree.
  2. Foreign language, 3 credit hours (or the equivalent proficiency) at or above the second-year level.
  3. Arts and Humanities, three courses.
  4. Social and Historical Studies, three courses.
  5. Natural Sciences, three courses (excluding mathematics, computer science, or cognitive science). The courses taken in fulfillment of this natural sciences requirement must be completed with a grade of C– or higher. Appropriate courses taken under the heading “Additional Requirements” below can be used toward fulfillment of this Natural Sciences requirement. Students may not use a Topics course or Freshman Seminar course toward fulfillment of this Natural Sciences requirement.
  6. Topics course, one appropriate course that is also an Arts and Humanities distribution course or a Social and Historical Studies distribution course.
  7. Concentration requirements, at least 33 credit hours of statistics and mathematics courses with a minimum grade of C– in each course and an average of C (2.000) in all concentration courses, including Statistics S320; both Mathematics M211 and M212, or M213; M311; M301 or M303 or S303; M463; M466; M467; M468; M448.
    The requirement of M211 and M212 can be waived for students who attain appropriate scores on advanced placement calculus tests.
  8. Additional requirements, at least 24 credit hours in courses from the natural sciences and/or quantitatively oriented courses from the social sciences. Students must earn a minimum grade of C– in each course. Students can choose suitable courses from the following fields: astronomy, biology, chemistry, economics, environmental studies, geography, geology, physics, psychological and brain sciences, sociology, any other field approved by the mathematics department director of undergraduate studies. These 24 credit hours must include the following:
    1. a concentration of at least 9 credit hours, at least 3 of which are at the 300 or 400 level, in one of the fields in that list;
    2. at least 3 credit hours in each of two other fields in that list; and
    3. approval of the department director of undergraduate studies, in conjunction with department faculty.
  9. Computer proficiency, reasonable proficiency with computer programming demonstrated by taking CSCI A201, MATH M371, or an appropriate substitute approved by the mathematics department director of undergraduate studies.
Students must also complete the requirements and procedures listed in this supplement under “General Requirements for Bachelor’s Degrees.”

Return to Statistics

Course Descriptions

Note: The courses listed below are only the first of a large set of courses in theoretical and applied statistics that the department will create over the next year.

S100 Statistical Literacy (3 cr.) N & M P: MATH M014 or equivalent. How to be an informed consumer of statistical analysis. Experiments and observational studies, summarizing and displaying data, relationships between variables, quantifying uncertainty, drawing statistical inferences. S100 cannot be taken for credit if credit has already been received for any statistics course (in any department) numbered 300 or higher. Credit given for only one of S100 or H100.

H100 Statistical Literacy, Honors (3 cr.) N & M P: MATH M014 or equivalent and permission of the Hutton Honors College. How to be an informed consumer of statistical analysis. Experiments and observational studies, summarizing and displaying data, relationships between variables, quantifying uncertainty, drawing statistical inferences. S100 cannot be taken for credit if credit has already been received for any statistics course (in any department) numbered 300 or higher. Credit given for only one of H100 or S100.

S300 Introduction to Applied Statistical Methods (4 cr.) N & M P: MATH M014 or equivalent. Introduction to methods for analyzing quantitative data. Graphical and numerical descriptions of data, probability models of data, inference about populations from random samples. Regression and analysis of variance. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of the following: S300, CJUS K300, ECON E370 or S370, LAMP L316, MATH K300 or K310, PSY K300 or K310, SOC S371, SPEA K300.

S320 Introduction to Statistics (3 cr.) N & M P: MATH M212 or M301 or M303. Basic concepts of data analysis and statistical inference, applied to 1-sample and 2-sample location problems, the analysis of variance, and linear regression. Probability models and statistical methods applied to practical situations using actual data sets from various disciplines. Credit given for only one of S320 or MATH M365.

S481 Topics in Applied Statistics (3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Careful study of a statistical topic from an applied perspective. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

S482 Topics in Mathematical Statistics (3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Careful study of a statistical topic from a theoretical perspective. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

S490 Statistical Consulting (4 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Development of effective consulting skills, including the conduct of consulting sessions, collaborative problem-solving, using professional resources, and preparing verbal and written reports. Interactions with clients will be coordinated by the Indiana Statistical Consulting Center.

S495 Readings in Statistics (1–3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Supervised reading of a topic in statistics. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

Return to Statistics

Return to Top

Telecommunications

Course Descriptions

T101 Media Life (3 cr.) S & H Examines the role media play in our lives—at work, at school, among family members, friends, and lovers—and analyzes pressing issues in media and society today, such as privacy, globalization, and convergence.

T366 Multiplayer Game Design (3 cr.) P: T206 with a grade of C– or higher, or consent of instructor. Focuses on massive multiplayer online games and virtual worlds. An introduction to the design elements and production requirements necessary to create and maintain online games, study various existing worlds, and lay the groundwork for creating new ones. Students will do hands-on work on a new virtual world.

Return to Top

Theatre and Drama

Major in Theatre and Drama
Double Major Program
Minor in Theatre and Drama
Major in Musical Theatre—B.F.A.
Course Descriptions

Major in Theatre and Drama

Requirements
Students must complete 33 credit hours in theatre and drama, including the following introductory courses. Students are advised to take the courses in a building progression (i.e., T100 should be taken early in the progression of study). See the academic advisor for clarification.

  1. T100 Introduction to Theatre (3 cr.)
    T101 Script Analysis (3 cr.)
    T121 Acting I for Majors (3 cr.)*
    T125 Introduction to Production (3 cr.)
    T230 Costume Design and Technology I (3 cr.)
    T335 Stage Lighting (3 cr.)
    T340 Directing I (3 cr.)
    T370-T371 History of Theatre and Drama I-II (3-3 cr.)
  2. 6 additional credit hours in one of the four following areas of concentration:
    1. Dramatic literature, theatre history, and dramatic theory: T460, T461, T462, T468
    2. Acting, directing, movement, and voice and speech: T220, T300, T301, T302, T319, T325, T410, T419, T421, T422, T442, T443, T445, T448
    3. Scenic design, stagecraft, lighting design, costume design, sound design, and stage management: T130, T323 T326, T329, T347, T425, T426, T428, T430, T433, T434, T435, T438, T447
    4. Playwriting: T453, T454, T458
  3. 15 of the 33 credit hours must be taken in 300- and 400-level courses.

The academic advisor will assign to the appropriate area of concentration any credits earned in theatre and drama courses T390, T399, T483, T490, and T499.

* T120 accepted as a substitute for T121 by petition. Consult advisor for further clarification.

Students must also complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Transfer Students
Transfer students must complete a minimum of 12 credit hours in theatre and drama in residence on the Bloomington campus. At least 6 credit hours must be taken in the student’s area of concentration.

  1. Students who have taken an acting course at another school and wish to take any course of the acting curriculum beyond T120 or T121 must audition for the acting faculty for placement before the beginning of classes in the fall semester. See an academic advisor for date and time.
  2. All courses transferred from another institution or campus outside the State of Indiana College and University system must be evaluated through the Theatre and Drama Advising Office before they may be applied toward the theatre and drama major or minor. Transfer students must submit bulletin descriptions and course syllabi for potential transfer credits during the first semester of study.

Return to Theatre and Drama

Double Major Program

The requirements for a double major in the Department of Theatre and Drama are the same as for a single major.

Return to Theatre and Drama

Minor in Theatre and Drama

Requirements
Students must complete a minimum of 18 credit hours in theatre and drama including:

  1. T100 and T101.
  2. A minimum of one course in each of these three areas:
                Acting and directing: T120
                Design and technology: T125, T230, or T335
                Theatre history and dramatic literature: T370, T371, T460, T461,             T462, or T468
  3. One additional course in one of the four areas of concentration listed in the major. Students are advised to take the courses in the minor in a building progression (i.e., T100 or T120 should be taken early in the progression of study).

Students are advised to plan their minor program of study in consultation with both their major and minor advisors.

The following is a list of courses recommended for theatre and drama minors:

  1. Acting: T220, T319
  2. Directing: T340
  3. Movement: T410
  4. Playwriting: T453, T454, T458
  5. Stagecraft: T225, T425, T435
  6. Scene design: T326, T426
  7. Costuming: T230, T430
  8. Lighting: T335, T438
  9. Sound design: T347, T447
  10. Stage management: T229; T329 or T428
  11. Dramatic literature: T460, T461, T462, T468
  12. Theatre history: T370, T371
  13. Voice and speech: T325

Return to Theatre and Drama

Major in Musical Theatre—B.F.A.

Purpose 
This program is designed to train exceptional students who seek a professional career in musical theatre within the context of an outstanding liberal arts education offered by Indiana University. Admission to the B.F.A. program is by audition, typically prior to the beginning of the freshman year.

Requirements 
Students must complete at least 93 credit hours in theatre, dance, and music:

  1. 64 credit hours in Theatre and Drama, to include:
                T100 Introduction to Theatre (3 cr.)
                T101 Script Analysis (3 cr.)
                T121 Acting I (3 cr.)
                T125 Introduction to Theatrical Production (3 cr.)
                T220 Acting II: Scene Study (3 cr.)
                T230 Costume Design and Technology I (3 cr.)
                T300 Musical Theatre Workshop (3 cr., must be repeated to 15               cr.)
                T305 Voice for Musical Theatre (2 cr., must be repeated to 16               cr.)
                T325 Voice and Speech (3 cr.)
                T335 Stage Lighting (3 cr.)
                T370-T371 History of Theatre and Drama I-II (3-3 cr.)
                T401 Musical Theatre Senior Showcase(3 cr.)
  2. 18 credit hours in dance as approved by advisor from the following courses:
        Ballet (4 cr.): MUS J100 and higher, as appropriate.
        Tap Dance (4 cr.) chosen from:
            HPER E154 Beginning Tap Dance (1 cr.)
            HPER E254 Intermediate Tap Dance (1 cr.)
            HPER E354 Advanced Tap Dance (1 cr.)
        Jazz (4 cr.) chosen from:
            HPER E156 Introduction to Jazz Dance Technique (1 cr.)
            HPER E256 Intermediate Jazz Dance (1 cr.)
            HPER E456 Advanced Jazz Dance (1 cr.)
            MUS J210 Jazz Dance (1 cr.)
            THTR T301-T302 Musical Theatre Dance Styles I-II (3-3 cr.)
  3. 11 credit hours in music, to include:
        MUS P110 Piano Class I, Music Majors (2 cr.)
        MUS T109 Rudiments of Music I (3 cr.), or Z111 Introduction to Music        Theory (3 cr.)
        MUS Z373 The American Musical: Context and Development (3 cr.)
        Cultural Studies in Music: 3 credit hours chosen from:
            AAAD A110 African American Choral Ensemble (2 cr.)
            AAAD A112 Black Music of Two Worlds (3 cr.)
            AAAD A120 Soul Revue (2 cr.)
            AAAD A290 Sociocultural Perspectives of Afro-American Music (3            cr.)
            AAAD A389 Motown (3 cr.)
            MUS Z393 History of Jazz (3 cr.)
            MUS Z394 Black Music in America (3 cr.)
            MUS Z395 Contemporary Jazz and Soul Music (3 cr.)
            MUS Z413 Latin American Popular Music (3 cr.)

Students must also complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Secondary Teacher Certification
Students seeking certification as teachers may combine their professional training in the Department of Theatre and Drama with the professional education requirements (secondary education) of the School of Education. Students should consult the bulletin of the School of Education for requirements of this combined program. For clarification, see advisors in both schools.

Departmental Honors Program
Outstanding students with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.300 are eligible for admission to the honors program in theatre and drama at the end of their sophomore year. Minimum requirements for the honors degree are:

  1. Cumulative GPA of 3.300.
  2. 33 credit hours, to include 9 credit hours of honors course work in theatre and drama at the 300–400 level, 6 of which must be in T399-T499.
  3. A senior project of a creative or research nature, which may be counted as part of the T499 requirements.

Application for admission and the student’s program of courses must be approved by the department’s honors committee.

Policy on Auditing Theatre Courses
Ordinarily students may not audit performance or design and technology courses. With written permission of the instructor, students may audit courses in history, theory, or literature. The audit permission form is available as appropriate from the departmental academic advisor.

Return to Theatre and Drama

Course Descriptions

T100 Introduction to Theatre (3 cr.) A & H Exploration of theatre as collaborative art. Investigation of the dynamics and creativity of theatre production through plays, theatrical space, and cultural context, with particular attention to the roles and interaction of the audience, playwrights, directors, actors, designers, producers, and critics.

T101 Script Analysis for the Theatre (3 cr.) Close analysis and study of both traditional and nontraditional play texts in terms of structure, genre, style, character, themes, language, dramatic action, and dramatic event. Plays are examined from the point of view of the actor, director, designer, producer, critic, scholar, and audience. Required of all theatre majors; should be taken in the freshman year.

T115 Oral Interpretation I (3 cr.) A & H Introduction to theories, methodology, and skills; oral and visual presentation of literature for audiences.

T120 Acting I: Fundamentals of Acting (3 cr.) A & H Introduction to theories and methodology through sensory awareness, physical and vocal exercises, improvisations, and scene study. Credit given for only one of T120 or T121.

T121 Acting I for Majors: Introduction to Acting (3 cr.) A & H P: Major in theatre and drama or departmental approval. An accelerated-level course. Supplementary theories and methodology to expand the introduction to sensory awareness, physical and vocal exercises, improvisation, and scene study. Credit given for only one of T120 or T121.

T125 Introduction to Theatrical Production (3 cr.) Introduction to the methods, practices, and materials used in theatrical design and production. Focuses on stagecraft and theatrical design with introductions to lighting and costuming and an emphasis on scenic design.

T130 Stage Makeup Design (1 cr.)
Introduction to basic theories and skills in stage makeup. Survey covers corrective, period, basic prosthetics, and other effects used in performance.

T220 Acting II: Scene Study (3 cr.) P: T120 or T121; recommendation of T120 or T121 instructor or audition. P or C: T101. Techniques for expressing physical, intellectual, and emotional objectives. Study, creation, and performance from varied dramas.

T229 Stage Management I (3 cr.) P: T100, T101, and T125. Explores the role and function of the stage manager in theatrical production. Provides the basic skills to begin work in the field of stage management. Emphasis on organization, documentation, and dissemination of information.

T230 Costume Design and Technology I (3 cr.) P: T101. Introduction to theories, methodology, and skills for costume design for the theatre, with laboratory component in basic costume technology skills and wardrobe.

T291 Design and Technology Projects in Theatre and Drama (1–3 cr.) P: Approval of instructor. Creation and development of individual student-related projects in design and technology culminating in a portfolio presentation. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

T300 Musical Theatre Workshop (3 cr.) P: Audition and permission of instructor. Focus on synthesizing acting, singing, and dancing into one performance technique. Emphasis will vary according to needs of students. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

T301 Musical Theatre Dance Styles I (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Dance styles of the 1920s through the 1950s are explored and performed, including the works of choreographers Fred Astaire, Hermes Pan, Agnes DeMille, Jerome Robbins, and Gower Champion.

T302 Musical Theatre Dance Styles II (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. A continuation of T301. Dance styles of the 1950s to the present are explored and performed, including the works of choreographers Bob Fosse, Michael Bennett, Bob Avian, and Susan Stroman.

T305 Voice for Musical Theatre (2 cr.) P: B.F.A. major or permission of instructor. Private study of vocal performance focusing on the development of the vocal instrument for musical theatre repertoire. May be repeated for a maximum of 16 credit hours.

T319 Acting III: Advanced Scene Study (3 cr.) P: T101; T220; T325; T410; T220 instructor recommendation or audition. Emphasis on acting skills, breadth of imagination, and depth of performance in a broad variety of styles. Credit given for only one of T319 or T320.

T323 Costume and Character in London Theatre (3 cr.) P: Approval of the department. Overseas theatre studies in London. Experience theatrical character development through costume design. Survey social influences on costume and dress worn by characters through history including contemporary trends and dress. Field trips to such locations as Bath and Stratford.

T325 Voice and Speech (3 cr.) R: Sophomore standing. Introduction to voice production. Emphasizes relaxation, breathing, and the production of vocal sounds; deals with vocal habits and cultural holds through exercises and vocal workouts. Introduction to phonetics and practical work with text while freeing the voice and redeveloping a passion for language.

T326 Scene Design I (3 cr.) P: T101, T125, or permission of instructor. Introduction to process of scene design, scene designer’s responsibilities, scene problem solving, and exploration of visual materials and forms.

T329 Stage Management II (3 cr.) P: T229. An examination of the organizational and logistical aspects of productions of musical events from the perspective of production and stage management. Examining case studies in musical theatre, ballet, modern dance, opera, and concerts, students gain insight into management strategies and develop critical thinking skills.

T335 Stage Lighting (3 cr.) P: T101 and T125, or permission of instructor. Introduction to the process of determining and implementing a lighting design. Analytical skills, concept development, design methods, lighting technology, and practical applications are covered. Lecture and laboratory.

T340 Directing I: Fundamentals of Directing (3 cr.) P: T101, T120 or T121. R: T125, T230, T335. Introduction to theories, process, and skills (text analysis, working with actors, staging, and telling a story), culminating in a final project.

T347 Introduction to Sound Design for the Theatre (3 cr.) P: T101 and T125, or permission of instructor. Within the framework of theatrical environments, this course introduces the student to acoustic principles, audio equipment used in theatrical productions, psycho-acoustical considerations, understanding sound signals and how to manipulate them, computer sound mixing systems, and sound design principles.

T359 Theatre Production Studio (1 cr.) P: T101 and T125; one of T229, T230, T326, T335; and permission of instructor. Intermediate, hands-on production course that teaches the theatre production process within a specific area focus. Students gain proficiency within a specific theatre production area and are engaged in a managerial role in an academic season production, including the development of production documentation. Students gain skills in communication, organization, and coordination. May be repeated in a specific area once (at a higher managerial level), and in multiple areas for a total of 3 credit hours.

T370-T371 History of Theatre and Drama I-II (3-3 cr.) A & H, CSA Worldwide development of theatre and drama from beginnings to present. Study of theatre arts and culture institutions; focus on historical context for plays and performances; emphasis on research methods in theatre history. I: Beginnings to ca. 1700; II: ca. 1700 to present.

T378 Foundations for Teaching Theatre and Drama (3 cr.) P: Approval of theatre education specialist. C: EDUC M303. The accumulation of a range of theatre production and teaching experiences through the building of a portfolio of experiences and resource materials.

T390 Creative Work in Summer Theatre (1–3 cr.) P: Consent of chairperson. Work in summer theatre productions. May be repeated for up to 6 credits.

T399 Reading, Research, Performance for Honors (12 cr. max.) P: Approval of departmental honors advisor.

T401 Musical Theatre Senior Showcase (3 cr.) P: Audition and permission of instructor. Introduction to business and marketing techniques for success in professional theatre. Specific instruction in the audition process culminating in performance for agents and casting directors.

T410 Movement for the Theatre (3 cr.) P: T121 or T120. Introduction to fundamental principles and methods focusing on kinesthetic awareness, posture, flexibility, coordination, relaxation, and physical characterization.

T419 Acting IV: Acting Shakespeare (3 cr.) P: T319 or T320; T319 or T320 instructor recommendation or audition. Exploration of precepts of verse in Shakespeare. Emphasis on skills for heightened language, character development, circumstances, and performance. Continued development of the actor as a dramatic instrument. Credit given for only one of T419 or T420.

T421 Acting V: Acting Style I (3 cr.)
P: T419 or T420, recommendation of T419 or T420 instructor, and permission of T421 instructor. Techniques for performing comedy with an emphasis on verbal and other physical skills; introduction to period and style of plays from Aristophanes to Goldoni.

T422 Acting VI: Acting Style II (3 cr.) P: T421, recommendation of T421 instructor, and permission of T422 instructor. Techniques for performing comedy with an emphasis on verbal and physical skills; introduction to period and style of plays from Sheridan to Coward.

T425 Theatrical Drafting (3 cr.) P: T101 and T125, or permission of instructor. Introduction to drafting methods and skills and the specialized uses for theatrical drafting for productions. Develops students’ graphic communication through standard theatre drafting methods.

T426 Scene Design II (3 cr.) P: T326 or consent of instructor. Work in line, color, and composition using historical conventions as the basis for contemporary scenic statements. Emphasis on period style and presentational forms.

T428 Production and Events Management (3 cr.) P: T229 or consent of instructor. Discussion of the skills necessary to produce and manage theatrical productions and the application of those skills to large events.

T430 Costume Technology II (3 cr.) P: T125 and T230, or permission of instructor. Intermediate costume technology with emphasis on costume crafts (i.e., millinery, mask work) and fabric modification.

T433 Costume Design II (3 cr.) P: T125 and T230, or permission of instructor. Intensive study of costume design in mainstream theatre. Projects in collaborative aesthetics in design and practical application rendering techniques and visual communication. No laboratory/technology component.

T434 Historic Costumes for the Stage (3 cr.) P: T101, T125, and T230, or permission of instructor. Survey of historical costume in western civilization, ancient Mesopotamian cultures through the twentieth century. Taught from socio-historical perspective and applied to performance theory.

T435 Electronics for Theatre (3 cr.) P: T125. Beginning with fundamentals of electricity and electronics, the focus is on power distribution and control in lighting, sound, special effects, and mechanized scenery.

T438 Lighting Design (3 cr.) P: T335. Stage lighting design-concept development, presentation, and implementation are emphasized, along with advanced lighting techniques and approaches. A practicum will be assigned.

T439 CAD for Theatre (2 cr.) Building a working knowledge of current computer-aided design and drafting programs, students work to develop personal styles within the boundaries of accepted standards of drafting techniques. Projects focus on controlling appropriate software to develop useful theatre production graphics.

T442 Directing II: Advanced Directing (3 cr.) P: T340 or permission of instructor. Theory and practice from play selection to performance. Emphasis on rehearsal and performance of varied dramatic material.

T443 Directing III: Directing Style (3 cr.) P: T442. Emphasis on analysis, interpretation, rehearsal, and presentation of plays from a range of styles and periods.

T445 Voice and Dialects (3 cr.) P: T325. Investigation of dialects as a distinctive form of pronunciation, language, structure, and vocabulary identified with a geographical area or social class as it applies to the requirements of theatrical clarity and dramatic interpretation. Working with varied texts using points of resonance, vocal focus, and rhythm to unlock the actors’ expressive tools.

T447 Sound Design I (3 cr.) P: T347 or consent of instructor. Focuses on theatrical design concept development and implementation. Students are exposed to various design challenges and processes for sound design in a range of production styles and approaches.

T448 Voice in Performance (3 cr.) P: T325. A voice class for the performing artist employing the techniques of artists such as Patsy Rodenburg, Cicely Berry, and Kirsten Linklater. Exploration of the life and muscularity of varied texts. Opening the voice to match the music of what one is saying while learning to identify and respect the writer’s intentions through voice and language.

T451 Stage Rigging I (2 cr.) P: T101 and T125, or permission of instructor. Survey of structural engineering terminology and methods as applicable to common rigging practice in the theatre and entertainment industry.

T452 Stage Rigging II (2 cr.) P: T451. Hands-on course designed to familiarize students with the operation and maintenance of typical rigging equipment. Class work includes counterweight system operations, pin-rail operations, rope and knot basics, wire-rope basics, chain hoist basics, and arena-type rigging basics.

T453 Playwriting I (3 cr.) Introduction to principles of dramatic structure. Conferences and peer evaluations. Focus is on the creation and revision of a one-act play.

T454 Playwriting II (3 cr.) Consideration of dramaturgical antecedents and practical and theoretical problems. Creation of a full-length play. Prior playwriting experience helpful, but not required.

T458 Screenwriting (3 cr.) Structural analyses of cinematic models, culminating in the creation of an original full-length narrative screenplay.

T460-T461-T462 Development of Dramatic Art I-II-III (3-3-3 cr.) T460, A & H, CSA;
T461-T462, A & H, CSB
Dramatic art in the Western world from beginnings to the present. Study of dramatic genres, plays in productions, and theatrical approaches to plays of the past. I: Classical to Early Renaissance Drama; II: Late Renaissance to Modern Drama; III: Modern and Contemporary Drama.

T468 Non–Western Theatre and Drama (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Dramatic literature and theatre in one or more of the following areas: China, Japan, Korea, India, or Southeast Asia.

T478 Methods and Materials for Teaching High School Theatre and Drama (3 cr.) P: T378. Methods, techniques, content, and materials applicable to the teaching of theatre and drama in secondary, middle, and junior high schools.

T483 Topics in Theatre and Drama (1–3 cr.) Studies in special topics not ordinarily covered in other departmental courses. May be repeated once for credit if topic differs.

T490 Independent Study in Theatre and Drama (1–6 cr.) P: 12 credit hours in theatre and drama, departmental grade point average of 3.0 or above, consent of instructor. Readings, performances, experiments, and reports in area of student’s special interest. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

T491 Working in the Profession (3 cr.) P: T420. Preparation for a professional theatre career. Topics include auditions, managers, unions, finances, regional theatre, professional courtesy, and realities of the work environment.

T499 Reading, Research, Performance for Honors (12 cr. max.) P: Approval of departmental honors advisor.

Related Courses

In addition to the 33 credit hours of required courses that must be taken in the Department of Theatre and Drama, a student may include one or more of the following related courses as part of the major:

African American and African Diaspora Studies
A384 Blacks in American Drama and Theatre, 1945–present (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
A385 Seminar in Black Theatre (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

Comparative Literature
C311 Drama (3 cr.) A & H

Education
M478 Methods of Teaching High School Speech (3 cr.)

English
L203 Introduction to Drama (3 cr.) A & H
L220 Introduction to Shakespeare (3 cr.) A & H
L308 Elizabethan and Seventeenth-Century Drama (3 cr.) A & H
L313 Early Plays of Shakespeare (3 cr.) A & H
L314 Late Plays of Shakespeare (3 cr.) A & H
L363 American Drama (3 cr.) A & H
L365 Modern Drama: Continental (3 cr.) A & H
L366 Modern Drama: English, Irish, American, and Post-Colonial (3 cr.) A & H

Return to Top

 


Indiana University
Office of Creative Services
Von Lee 319
517 East Kirkwood Avenue
Bloomington, IN 47408-4060

Last updated: 20 December 2014 08 46 10

Submit Questions or Comments
Copyright 2014 The Trustees of Indiana University