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College of Arts and Sciences (College) Bloomington Campus Supplement: Table of Contents

 

 

College of Arts
and Sciences (College)
Bloomington Campus
Supplement 2008–2010

http://www.indiana.edu/~college/
College of Arts and Sciences (College) 
Kirkwood Hall 104 
130 S. Woodlawn 
Bloomington, IN 47405  
Local (812) 855-1821 
Fax (812) 855-2060 
Contact College
 

Changes and Additions to Departmental Requirements and Course Descriptions

Departments, Programs, and Course Descriptions

African American and
  African Diaspora Studies

American Studies Program
Anthropology
Apparel Merchandising and Interior   Design
Asian American Studies
Astronomy/Astrophysics
Biology
Central Eurasian Studies
Chemistry
Classical Studies
Cognitive Science
Communication and Culture
Comparative Literature
Computer Science
Criminal Justice
East Asian Languages and Cultures
Economics
English
Environmental Science
Fine Arts
Folklore and Ethnomusicology
French and Italian
Geography
Germanic Studies
History
History and Philosophy of Science
Human Biology
India Studies
International Studies
Jewish Studies
Linguistics
Mathematics
Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
Physics
Psychological and Brain Sciences
Religious Studies
Slavic Languages and Literatures
Sociology
Spanish and Portuguese
Speech and Hearing Sciences
Telecommunications
Theatre and Drama
West European Studies

African American and African Diaspora Studies

Course Descriptions

A112 Black Music of Two Worlds (3 cr.) A & H, CSA An exploration of the relationships among musics of West and Central African people and their descendents in the United States, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Emphasis placed on the conceptual and aesthetic continuities between musical expression in Old and New World contexts—a uniformity which exists because of shared African cultural ancestry. Credit given for only one of AAAD A112, FOLK E112, or FOLK F112.

A169 Introduction to African American Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Representative African American writings including poetry, short story, sermons, novel, and drama.

A249 African American Autobiography (3 cr.) A & H, CSA A survey of autobiographies written by black Americans in the last two centuries. The course emphasizes how the autobiographers combine the grace of art and the power of argument to urge the creation of genuine freedom in America.

A263 Contemporary Social Issues in the African American Community
(3 cr.) S & H
A seminar, primarily designed for sophomores and juniors, directed toward critical analysis of selected topics germane to the future socioeconomic and political position of African Americans.

A290 Sociocultural Perspective of African American Music (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Survey of cultural, social, and political attitudes that influenced blacks in the development of and participation in blues, jazz, urban black popular music, and “classical” music.

A295 Survey of Hip Hop (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Examines rap music and hip hop culture as artistic and sociocultural phenomena with emphasis on historical, cultural, economic, and political contexts. Topics include the coexistence of various hip hop styles, their appropriation by the music industry, and controversies resulting from the exploitation of hip hop as a commodity for national and global consumption. Credit given for only one of AAAD A295, FOLK E295, or FOLK F295.

A297 Popular Music of Black America (3 cr.) A & H, CSA A chronological survey of Black popular music from 1945–2000: rhythm and blues, soul, funk, disco, hip hop, and their derivative forms. Emphasis placed on the context for evolution and the contributions of African Americans to the development of a multibillion dollar music industry. Credit given for only one of AAAD A297, AAAD A397, FOLK E297, FOLK F397, or MUS M397.

A345 Hip Hop Music and Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA P: Junior or senior standing. Examines rap music as artistic and sociological phenomena with emphasis on its historical and political contexts. Credit given for only one of AAAD A345, AAAD A489, FOLK F345, or FOLK F389.

A352 African American Art II: African American Artists (3 cr.) A & H, CSA A survey of the artistic traditions of the African in the New World, from the period of slavery in North and South America through contemporary African American and expatriate black American artists.

A363 Research on Contemporary African American Problems I (3 cr.)
S & H
A research seminar, primarily designed for juniors and seniors, directed toward critical analysis of selected topics germane to the future socioeconomic and political position of African Americans. Reading and discussion of relevant texts, studies, and articles. Includes theory construction, research design, and data collection.

A388 Motown (3 cr.) A & H, CSA This course surveys the development of Motown Record Corporation, Detroit Era (1959–1972). Through lecture, discussion, guided listening and visual experiences, the course studies the musical works, creative processes, business practices, historical events, media, technology, and sociocultural factors that contributed to Motown’s identity as a unique artistic and cultural phenomenon. Credit given for only one of A388, A389, or FOLK E388.

A392 African American Folklore (3 cr.) A & H, CSA African American culture in the United States viewed in terms of history (antebellum to present) and social change (rural to urban). Use of oral traditions and life histories to explore aspects of black culture and history. Credit not given for both A392 and FOLK F354.

A394 Survey of African American Music (3 cr.) A & H, CSA A chronological survey of sacred and secular African American musical traditions in North America from the African past to the present. Emphasis placed on context for evolution, musical processes and aesthetics, interrelationships among genres and musical change, issues of gender, and music as resistance. Credit given for only one of AAAD A394, FOLK E394, or MUS M394.

A400 Topics in African American Studies (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected African American studies problems and issues of limited scope, approached within an interdisciplinary format. Varied topics that cut across departmental concentration areas. May be repeated for credit if topic differs.

A407 African American and African Protest Strategies (3 cr.) S & H, CSA An examination of the historical roles, structures, the impact of black protest strategies and the origins of black movements to assess their impact on communities in Africa and in the diaspora.

A486 Internship in African American Studies (3 cr.) P: Junior or senior status with 15 credit hours of African American Studies credit, and project approved by instructor. Directed readings, field research, research papers. Certain internship experiences may require research skills. May be repeated once for a total of 6 credits.

A493 Senior Seminar in African American Studies (3 cr.) P: Senior status as African American Studies major. Lecture/discussions on African American studies as an interdisciplinary field of inquiry and scholarship. Students will develop individual or group projects that synthesize their experiences as majors by demonstrating the interrelated nature of the department’s concentration areas.

A495 Individual Readings in African American Studies (3 cr.) A495 must be taken for 3 credit hours. With prior approval, may be repeated for a maximum total of 6 credit hours.

A496 Black Religious Music (3 cr.) A & H, CSA An in-depth investigation of Negro spirituals and gospel music, with some treatment of the traditions of lining-out and shape note singing. Examination of genres will address and integrate both the musical and the sociocultural perspectives. Credit given for only one of AAAD A496 or FOLK E496.

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American Studies Program

Major in American Studies
Required Core Classes
Concentration Courses
Honors Program

Major in American Studies

Requirements Students must complete 30 credit hours in American Studies. 15 credit hours must come from American Studies core courses.

In consultation with the director, students design an individual concentration (minimum of 15 credit hours) that provides focus and purpose to their remaining course work in the major and that provides solid background for their senior seminar topic. The concentration will be built from concentration courses offered through American Studies and from pertinent joint-listed and cross-listed course offerings in other programs, departments, and units. At least 6 credit hours counted toward the concentration must be at the 300 level or higher.

Students pursuing a B.A. in American Studies must complete the equivalent of three years of language study. This may require students to take an additional two semesters of foreign language study beyond the standard College requirements. With the approval of the American Studies program, some study abroad options—specifically, foreign language courses or courses taught in a foreign language—may apply toward fulfillment of the requirement. The language(s) chosen for study must pertain directly to American studies and requires the approval of the director of the American Studies program.

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Required Core Classes

A100 What Is America? (3 cr.) A & H
A200 Comparative American Identities (3 cr.) A & H
A350 Topics in Interdisciplinary American Studies (3 cr.)
A351 American Studies in Transnational Contexts (3 cr.) A & H
A450 Senior Seminar in American Studies (3 cr.)

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Concentration Courses

A201 U.S. Movements and Institutions (3 cr.) A & H
A202 U.S. Arts and Media (3 cr.) A & H
A275 Indigenous Worldviews in the Americas (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
A298 Special Topics in Arts and Humanities for American Studies (3 cr.) A & H
A299 Special Topics in Social and Historical Studies for American Studies
(3 cr.) S & H
A300 The Image of America in the World (3 cr.) S & H
A398 Advanced Topics in Arts and Humanities for American Studies (3 cr.)
A & H
A399 Advanced Topics in Social and Historical Studies for American Studies
(3 cr.) S & H
A401 Readings in American Studies (1–3 cr.)
A402 Service Learning in American Studies (1–3 cr.)

Additional concentration courses are offered in other departments and programs and are cross-listed in American Studies. For a list of courses, please consult the American Studies Program, Ballantine Hall 521, (812) 855-7718, amst@indiana.edu, or consult the program Web site at www.indiana.edu/~amst.

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Honors Program

Students pursuing an honors degree in American studies must maintain a GPA of 3.500 or above in the major and a GPA of 3.300 overall in the College. Honors students must also demonstrate advanced language competency in a single foreign language—equivalent to a third year of study. This may require students to take an additional two semesters of a foreign language beyond the standard College requirements, including at least one course at the 300 level or above that studies a foreign language literature. The language chosen for study must pertain directly to American studies and requires the approval of the director of the American Studies Program.

In addition to the major requirements, honors students must complete A451 Honors Senior Seminar in American Studies (3 cr.), and A452 Honors Thesis in American Studies (3 cr.), and the language requirement for a total of 42 credit hours.

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Anthropology

Major in Anthropology
Minor in Archaeology
Course Descriptions

Major in Anthropology

Requirements Students must complete a minimum of 33 credit hours in anthropology, including:

  1. B200, E200, L200, and P200.
  2. One advanced course (300–400 level) each in three of the four subfields with prefixes “B” for bioanthropology, “E” for social and cultural anthropology, “L” for anthropological linguistics, and “P” for archaeology. Students may substitute A410 for one of these courses.
  3. One course designated as having a methods component. These include A306, A405, A406, A410, E302, E423, E485, B301, B405, P301, P380, P385, P390, P401, P405, P406, P425, P426, and other sections taught under variable title if approved by the advisor. (Methods courses may also count toward the upper-level subfield requirement.)
  4. Remaining credit hours are distributed across advanced courses in any of the four subfields according to student interest. A student may count two additional courses at the 200 level. A105, A303, E105, and E303 do not count toward the major.

Students planning to major in anthropology should begin by taking 200-level courses for introduction to the four subfields. Students must also complete the degree requirements for the College of Arts and Sciences.

Recommendations Each of the four subfields of anthropology has different expectations as to the course work that best complements the interests and skills of students in each subfield. Course work taken in other departments should be selected in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. The senior capstone seminar, A410, is recommended for majors.

Graduate work in anthropology often requires knowledge of one or more foreign languages, and students should plan their undergraduate programs accordingly.

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Minor in Archaeology

Students must complete a minimum of 15 credit hours in anthropology to include

  1. P200 Introduction to Archaeology
  2. One course in archaeological methods: P301, P380, P385, P405, P406, P409, P425, P426 or other course selected in consultation with the advisor. P405 is recommended.
  3. At least one 300–400 level course with P prefix in the archaeology of a particular geographic region. Students may elect to take Classical Studies C412, C413, C414, or C419 as their regional-focus course.
  4. At least one additional course with P prefix at the 300 level or above.
  5. One additional course in anthropology on a topic related to archaeology, selected in consultation with the advisor. ANTH A105 or a College topics course taught by an archaeologist in Anthropology may count toward the minor.
  6. With the approval of the director of undergraduate studies or the academic advisor, up to 5 credit hours from A406, A408, A495, and A496 for projects or work related to archaeology may count toward the minor.

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Course Descriptions

A221 Anthropology of Food (3 cr.) S & H In this course we will examine, across space and time, the significance and meaning of food, its production and consumption in human culture and society. Ideas and practices concerning food are deeply held markers of who we are and how we define ourselves.

B312 Evolutionary Medicine (3 cr.) N & M P: An introductory course in bioanthropology, medical science, psychology, or biology; or instructor consent. Incorporates principles from evolutionary theory into our understanding of various infectious and chronic diseases common to human populations both past and present. Although proximate mechanisms involving physiology and behavior will be discussed, the focus will be to determine why such mechanisms have evolved in the first place.

B340 Hormones and Human Behavior (3 cr.) N & M P: Junior or senior standing, and an introductory course in bioanthropology, medical science, psychology, or biology; or instructor consent. Reviews the roles of hormones in the evolution and expression of human and nonhuman animal behaviors. Emphasis placed on behaviors associated with aggression, stress, mating, and parenting. Particularly relevant for students interested in evolutionary psychology and human health.

E206 Chanting Down Babylon: Protest and Popular Culture in the Afro-Caribbean (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Explores Afro-Caribbean popular culture as a mechanism of political protest against colonialism and its legacies, the failures of local government, and first-world political and economic hegemony. Examines popular culture on the grass-roots level while incorporating mass-media content such as recorded music and film.

E212 The Anthropology of Youth and Adolescence (3 cr.) S & H A broad introduction to the cross-cultural study of adolescence. Examines classic anthropological concerns such as age sets and age grades, generational groups, and rites of passage, as well as current research on youth language, global youth culture, and intergenerational politics.

E309 Problems in African Ethnography (3 cr.) This advanced seminar focuses on the anthropological tradition of fieldwork in African societies. Readings combine ethnographic and theoretical approaches to the study of the continent. Topics range from the history of anthropological thought concerning the continent to a critical analysis of contemporary ethnographic work.

E347 The Anthropology of Contemporary Japan (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Frames in anthropological perspective the history, present, and future of Japanese society. Explores anthropological research on Japanese attitudes toward ethnic and national identity; gender and education; and the wide-ranging impact of Japan’s economic decline on attitudes toward work, play, consumption, and travel overseas.

E393 World Fiction and Cultural Anthropology (3 cr.) Uses literature and anthropology as a means of understanding culture. Ethnographic writing and world fiction—novels, short stories, poems, myths, folktales—are analyzed to reveal aspects of the social, cultural, and political lives of peoples around the world. Colonialism, war, socialism, and immigration are also discussed.

E397 Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (3 cr.) S & H, CSA General anthropological introduction to social institutions and cultural forms of the Arab countries of North Africa and the Near East, Israel, Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan. Topics include ecology, development of Islam and Muslim empires, traditional adaptive strategies, consequences of colonialism, independence and rise of nationstates, impact of modernization, changing conceptions of kinship, ethnicity, and gender. Credit given for only one of E397, CEUS R352, CEUS U397, or NELC N397.

E398 Peoples and Cultures of Central Asia (3 cr.) S & H, CSA General anthropological introduction to societies and cultures of contemporary Muslim successor states of former Soviet Central Asia, Western China (Xinjiang), and Iran and Afghanistan. Topics include ecology, ethnohistory, traditional subsistence strategies, family, kinship, gender, sociopolitical organization, impact of colonial rule of tsarist and Soviet Russia and China, development of modern nation-states in Iran and Afghanistan, and dynamics of current conflicts and future prospects. Credit given for only one of E398, CEUS R316, or CEUS U398.

E456 The Anthropology of Race (3 cr.) Explores race from a cultural anthropological perspective and investigates the history of this idea within the discipline as well as its dissemination in international society. Examines the play between challenges to race as an intellectual paradigm and the resilient status of race-thinking in society at large.

E464 Body, Power, and Performance (3 cr.) A & H Looks at performance in relation to social power by focusing on the body. Examines the extent to which several interdisciplinary readings on performance theory—largely emerging as they have from Western intellectual traditions—speak to embodied/performative negotiations of social power outside “the West.”

E474 The Anthropology of Human Rights (3 cr.) Investigates anthropology’s theoretical and practical engagements with global social justice. Examines a number of texts central to the development of the notion of human rights, and explores several case studies oriented around a range of historical and contemporary human rights issues.

P215 The Archaeology of Sex (3 cr.) S & H Sex is an important part of human experience. This course investigates different aspects of sex and sexuality through time and space examining archaeological evidence for sexual practices and beliefs in the past. Through this review, we interrogate how the material world reflects ideologies and the relation between biology and culture.

P341 Archaeology of the Middle East (3 cr.) S & H, CSA A study of the prehistoric cultures of the Middle East. Examines evidence for daily life, the rise of complex society, early writing, and agriculture, and explores the impact archaeology in this region has on the contemporary world.

P345 Indigenous Archaeology (3 cr.) S & H A global approach to how indigenous people employ archaeology to protect sacred sites and places and to build and manage knowledge about their pasts. Explores indigenous worldviews and how archaeologists and indigenous communities work together in archaeology.

P375 Food in the Ancient World (3 cr.) S & H Examines the theoretical and methodological tools that archaeologists use to study food and foodways in ancient societies from a global anthropological perspective. Reveals how studying food and ancient foodways helps anthropologists gain insight into the economic, historic, and political realities of past peoples.

P430 Archaeology of Violence and Conflict (3 cr.) S & H In this course we will examine how we identify violence and warfare in the past. Second, we will explore how violence has affected societies around the world and through time. We review multidisciplinary literature on violence and ask how and why violent acts and institutions of violence develop and persist.

P440 Archaeology of Space and Place (3 cr.) S & H Reviews broad interdisciplinary literature to evaluate how human experience has been informed and affected by spatial sensibilities. Takes a diachronic and global look at how space impacts politics, society, religion, memory, and identity, with an emphasis on developing critical thinking skills.

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Apparel Merchandising and Interior Design

Course Description

D168 Beginning Interior Design (3 cr.) Focus on critical and analytical ability, reasoned understanding and rational application of design elements and principles, development of vocabulary, attitudes, and skill basic to design and interior design. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of D168 or H168.

D191 Design Studies: Form and Function (3 cr.) A & H In this introductory course, students will learn about the decisions designers make to shape the objects they encounter every day and the effects of those decisions on those of us who interact with them. Features lectures and hands-on projects examining designs as diverse as toothbrushes, iPods, bicycles, and buildings. Credit given for only one of D191 or H191.

D263 Design Methods (3 cr.) P: Grade of C– or higher in H271 or D271, H264 or D264, and D268 or H268. Introduction to the basic techniques of design research and evaluation, emerging trends in design thinking, and state-of- the-art design methodologies. Credit given for only one of D263, H263, or H363.

D264 Digital Architectural Drawing (3 cr.) P: Grade of C– or higher in D168 or H168. C: D268, D271. Basic two-dimensional AutoCAD skills for professional practice of interior design: document and database generation, computer-aided drafting and design. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of D264 or H264.

D268 Architectural Theories and Concepts (3 cr.) P: Grade of C– or higher in D168 or H168. C: D264, D271. Study of the philosophical, theoretical, historical, and conceptual ideas that have guided architecture and design since the late nineteenth century. Credit given for only one of D268, H268, or H368.

D271 Interior Design I—Three-Dimensional Interior Design (3 cr.) P: Grade of C– or higher in D168 or H168. C: D264, D268. Fundamentals of drawing and rendering in two and three dimensions, presentation methods, and design practices. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of D271 or H271.

D272 Interior Design II—Space Design (3 cr.) P: Grade of C– or higher in D264 or H264, D268 or H268, and D271 or H271. C: D263, D277. Introduction to fundamentals of space design for human activity; space standards, programming, and graphic communication. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of D272 or H272.

D277 Materials and Components of Interior Design (3 cr.) P: Grade of C– or higher in D268 or H268, D264 or H264, D271 or H271, and in MATH M118 or M119 or equivalent. C: D263, D272. Provides basic understanding of the appropriate use of materials specified for the interior environment. Particular emphasis placed on the vital role interior designers play in providing for the health, safety, and welfare of those inhabiting interior spaces. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of D277 or H277.

D290 Special Topics in Interior Design (1–3 cr.) P: Consent of department. Selected topics in an area of interior design. Topics will vary. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

D335 Lighting Interior Spaces I (1.5 cr.) P: Grade of C– or higher in D272 or H272, D263 or H263, and D277 or H277. C: D373 and D365. Introduction to the general principles, factors, and techniques of interior lighting, including planning, analysis, calculation methods, and aesthetics in the residential context. Field trips required. Credit given for only one of D335 or H335.

D336 Lighting Interior Spaces II (1.5 cr.) P: Grade of C– or higher in D373 or H373, D335 or H335, and D365 or H365. C: D374. Introduction to the general principles, factors, and techniques of interior lighting, including planning, analysis, calculation methods, and aesthetics in the commercial design context. Field trips required. Credit given for only one of D336 or H336.

D365 Architectural, Interior, and Furniture Design Studies (3 cr.) S & H
P: Grade of C– or higher in D263 or H263, D272 or H272, and D277 or H277. C: D335, D373. A survey of the history of design at three scales: architecture, interiors, and furniture design. The underlying concepts behind historically prominent work, and the commonalities of design at different scales, will be reviewed. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their own visual memory to guide their design thinking and work. Credit given for only one of D365 or H265.

D373 Interior Design III—The Dwelling (3 cr.) P: Grade of C– or higher in D263 or H263, D272 or H272, D277 or H277, and consent of instructor. C: D335, D365. Design of dwellings for individuals and groups in a variety of contexts. Integration of social, technical, spatial, and environmental factors. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of D373 or H373.

D374 Interior Design IV—The Workplace (3 cr.) P: Grade of C– or higher in D335 or H335, D365 or H365, and D373 or H373. C: D336. Design of work spaces for a variety of individuals and organizations. Integration of organizational, ergonometric, technical, spatial, and environmental factors. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of D374 or H374.

D394 Advanced Digital Architectural Drawing (3 cr.) P: Grade of C– or higher in D264 or H264. Advanced CAD visualization for professional design practice: three-dimensional modeling and visualization, image processing, animation, and multimedia presentation. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of D394 or H394.

D469 Professional Practices in Interior Design (3 cr.) P: Grade of C– or higher in D374 or H374. C: D475. Survey of business procedures and practices and of professional values and standards for interior designers. Credit given for only one of D469 or H469.

D475 Interior Design V—Comprehensive Design (3 cr.) P: Grade of C– or higher in D336 or H336, and D374 or H374. C: D469. Interdisciplinary team approaches to solution of comprehensive design problems utilizing contemporary design methods and procedures. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of D475 or H475.

D476 Interior Design VI—Special Populations (3 cr.) P: Grade of C– or higher in D469 or H469, and D475 or H475. Design of habitats and work spaces for special populations. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of D476 or H476.

D480 Readings in Interior Design (1–3 cr.) P: Grade of C– or higher in D168 or H168, 6 additional credit hours in interior design, and consent of department. Review, discussion, and evaluation of current trends and issues in interior design; analysis of research. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in D480 and H480.

F203 Introductory Textile Science (3 cr.) P: R100 or H100. Textile fibers, yarns, fabrication, and finishes, textile processing and properties; selection and care of textiles for human use. Lecture plus laboratory. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of F203 or H203.

F207 Apparel Structure Principles (3 cr.) P: F203 or H203. Fabric manipulation, patterning, and garment-fitting techniques applied to basic apparel construction. Studio class. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of F207 or H207.

F211 Fashion Design I: Conceptualization (1 cr.) P or C: F207 or H207. Exploration of aesthetic and/or historical inspiration for fashion design. Development of design philosophy and concepts leading to a fashion line. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of F211 or H211.

F213 Fashion Illustration (3 cr.) Use of various media to render texture, drapery, and the human figure as found in fashion illustration. Studio class. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of F213 or H317.

F217 Fashion Design II: Interpretation (3 cr.) P: F211 or H211. Fundamental principles and processes of fashion design ideation, including interpreting design concepts and themes, designing and sketching ensembles, and coordinating fabrication, color, and texture. Studio class. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of F217 or H217.

F301 Dress Studies: Cultural Analysis (3 cr.) CSA P: Junior standing. R: One course in cultural anthropology, sociology, or psychology. Dress as a reflection of the physical, social, psychological, and aesthetic environment of various cultures; responses to and uses of dress as an aspect of culture and individual behavior. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in F301 and H401.

F303 Experimental Apparel Structure (3 cr.) P: F207 or H207. Experimental study in design using a variety of fabrics and designer techniques. Studio class. Course fee required. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in F303 or H303.

F305 Fashion Design: Flat Pattern Design (3 cr.) P: F303 or H303. The fundamental principles and processes of pattern development methods. Experimentation with sloper development and pattern drafting to produce original fashion designs. Studio class. Course fee required. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in F305 and H305.

F306 Fashion Design: Tailoring (3 cr.)
P: F303 or H303. Techniques in contemporary and traditional tailoring. Studio class. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of F306 or H306.

F311 Dress Studies: History I (3 cr.) P: F203 or H203. R: One course in European history. Dress in Western civilization relating to social, economic, political, and religious events from early civilization through seventeenth century. II Sem. Odd years only. Credit given for only one of F311 or H311.

F325 Fashion Design: Shape and Foundation (3 cr.) P: F303 or H303. Fundamental principles of design for inner-shaping and foundation; manipulation of a variety of materials and techniques to produce original designs featuring complex super-structures. Studio class. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of F325 or H325.

F326 Fashion Design: Accessories (3 cr.) P: F303 or H303. Fundamental principles and techniques for design of accessories including gloves, hats, handbags, jewelry, and masks; manipulation of a variety of materials to produce original accessory design. Lecture and studio class. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of F326 or H326.

F328 Fashion Design III: Digital Applications (3 cr.) P: Junior standing. CAD applications used to create digital fashion fabrics, fashion lines, and fashion portfolios for the apparel and textile industries. Studio class. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of F328 or H328.

F340 Dress Studies: History II (3 cr.) P: F203 or H203. R: One course in European history. Dress in Western civilization relating to social, economic, political, and religious events in the eighteenth through twenty-first centuries; emphasis on the emergence and evolution of haute couture. Credit given for only one of F340 or H340. Even years only.

F352 Dress Studies: Aesthetics Analysis (3 cr.) P: Junior standing. Aesthetics of dress as a medium of visual communication. Considerations include aesthetic norms, color psychology, elements and principles of design, appearance management strategies, and design process. Credit given for only one of F352 or H352.

F402 Collection Management for Historic Textiles and Costumes (3 cr.)
P: F203 or H203. Curatorial methods and procedures in museum collection management specifically related to historic textiles and costumes. Topics may vary to include accessioning, cataloging, artifact research and identification, exhibition, conservation, computer utilization. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in F402 and H402.

F403 Practicum in Collection Management for Historic Textiles and Costume (1–3 cr.) P: F402 or H402. Individual work in selected area of collection management for historic textiles and costume. Maximum of 6 credit hours given for any combination of the following courses: Y398, R321 or H321, F403 or H403. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in F403 and H403.

F406 Dress Studies: Theory and Analysis (3 cr.) P: Junior standing. Survey of methodologies and research techniques for analysis of fashion diffusion and change. Credit given for only one of F406 or H406.

F408 Fashion Design: Draping (3 cr.) P: F303 or H303. Fashion design through the use of fundamental principles and processes of draping; manipulation of a variety of materials to produce original draped designs. Studio class. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of F408 or H408.

F411 Dress Studies: Behavioral Analysis (3 cr.) S & H P: Junior standing.
R: One course in sociology or psychology. Basic concepts and theories from social psychology are used to study how clothing affects the self and others. Credit given for only one of F411 or H411.

F415 Readings in Textiles and Apparel (1–3 cr.) P: R203 or H203, 6 additional credit hours in textiles and apparel, and consent of department chair. Review, discussion, and evaluation of current trends and issues in apparel or textiles; analysis of research. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in F415 and H415.

F417 Fashion Design IV: Presentation (2 cr.) P: R217 or H217. Planning and presenting a fashion line, development of accompanying research, and preparation of portfolio. Studio class. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of F417 or H417.

R100 Introduction to Retail Design and Merchandising (3 cr.) Introduction to the retail cycle related to the interdisciplinary study of and research in apparel and textiles. Examines social and economic theories underlying the fashion business, retail merchandising principles, consumer behavior, and contemporary retail issues. Credit given for only one of R100 or H100.

R204 Apparel Manufacturing and Quality Analysis (3 cr.) P: R100 or H203. Focuses on the manufacturing and product development stage of the retail cycle. This stage comprises apparel merchandising history, technology, textiles, performance, value, and quality analysis. Credit given for only one of R204 or H204.

R209 Apparel Industries (3 cr.) An examination of the retail cycle and the social and economic factors underlying the fashion business. Retail merchandising principles and contemporary retail issues are examined. Credit given for only one of R209 or H209.

R308 Brand Management and Advertising (3 cr.) P: Junior standing. Strategic marketing communication centered on building and maintaining brand equity, encompassing all stages of the retail cycle. Credit given for only one of R308 or H308.

R309 Strategies in Retail Promotion (3 cr.) P: R100 or H100; R209 or H209. Application of design elements and principles to commercial display and development of creative visual merchandising techniques; various media explored. Credit given for only one of R309 or H309.

R315 Principles of Retail Merchandising (3 cr.) P: Grade of C– or higher in MATH M118 or M119 or equivalent; one course from R100, H100, R209, or H209; or permission of instructor. An examination of the contemporary retail environment as it relates to principles, such as the profit and loss analysis, retail math, markups, markdowns, and turnover. Comprehensive analysis and strategy development using retail merchandising principles are emphasized. Credit given for only one of R315 or H315.

R316 Retail Product Management (3 cr.) P: R209 or H209. Design thinking will be used to study strategic product management in the current retail environment. Function and practices in product distribution, merchandising and retail selling to the end use consumer segments of the retail cycle will be examined as they relate to contemporary retail store management and operations. Credit given for only one of R316 or H316.

R319 Professional Techniques in the Retail Industry (2 cr.) P: One course from R100, H100, R209, or H209. Professional techniques and competencies applicable to careers in the retail industry are explored while students participate in exercises to develop presentation skills and marketing themselves to, and in, a retail organization. Credit given for only one of R319 or H319.

R321 Practicum in the Retail Industry (1–3 cr.) P: R315 or H315. Provides apparel merchandising majors a supervised and coordinated work experience in the apparel industry. Maximum of 6 credit hours given for any combination of the following courses: Y398, R321 or H321, F403 or H403. Credit given for only one of R321 or H321.

R327 Product Development (3 cr.) P: R204 or H204; R315 or H315; junior standing or permission of instructor. Functions and practices of product development; understanding and defining the customer; researching fashion trends from color and fabric to silhouette; identifying how and when to apply trends to targeted customers; practical application of executing concepts into finished products. Credit given for only one of R327 or H327.

R328 Digital Product Development (1–3 cr.) P: Junior standing. Digital applications used to develop product lines, including fabric and material development, print and pattern development, graphics, knits, and woven applications. Credit given for only one of R328 or H328.

R404 International Textiles and Apparel Trade (3 cr.) P: F203 or H203, BUS M300, ECON E202, and junior standing. International factors affecting the United States textile, apparel, and retail industries, including comparative analysis of the economic, political, and social implications of globalization. Credit given for only one of R404 or H404.

R409 Retail Industry Field Seminar (3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor and department chair. Study tour designed as an overview of the retail, apparel, and textile industry, taught through a series of seminars conducted by business professionals outside the Bloomington community. May not be repeated for credit. Credit given for only one of R409 or H409.

R410 Apparel Entrepreneurship (3 cr.) P: Junior standing. Explores the entrepreneurial concept through the use of the entire retail cycle related to the vision of developing a business plan and ultimately opening a retail business selling unit. Credit given for only one of R410 or H410.

R412 Global Sourcing (3 cr.) P: R315 or H315, or junior standing. Issues and strategies of global sourcing in the apparel industry: natural resources, labor issues, factory profiles, quota and duty issues of key sourcing centers. Credit given for only one of R412 or H412.

R413 Planning and Analysis (3 cr.) P: Grade of C– or higher in R315 or H315. Essentials of merchandise buying and planning: consumer trends, market resources and trade practices, seasonal plans, assortment planning and analytic tools for inventory evaluations. Credit given for only one of R413 or H413.

R414 Merchandise Planning (1 cr.) P: Grade of C– or higher in R315 or H315. C: R413. Hands-on knowledge of how merchandising math and planning software are integrated, as well as how computerized data is analyzed and applied, within the retailing industry. Credit given for only one of R414 or H414.

R440 Senior Seminar (1 cr.) P: Senior standing. Contemporary retail industry topics and workplace issues, including leadership and ethics. Credit given for only one of R440 or H440.

R450 Profiling the Apparel Customer (3 cr.) P: Junior standing. In-depth study of customer-driven thinking supported by the understanding and study of retail research, design, branding, marketing and sales strategies.

R490 Special Problems in Retail (1–3 cr.) P: Consent of department. Course work under supervision on problems of special interest. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in R490 and H490.

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Asian American Studies

Faculty
Introduction
Minor in Asian American Studies
Course Descriptions

Faculty

Interim Director Joan Pong Linton (English)

Professors Michael Robinson (East Asian Languages and Cultures)

Associate Professors Yvette Alex-Assensoh (Political Science), Purnima Bose (English), Angela Pao (Comparative Literature), Radhika Parameswaran (Journalism), Samrat Upadhyay (English)

Assistant Professors Gerald Campano (Literacy, Culture, and Language Education), Denise Cruz (English and American Studies), Ilana Gershon (Communication and Culture), Karen Inouye (American Studies), Jennifer Lee* (Sociology), Fernando Ona (Applied Health Sciences), Joel Wong (Counseling and Educational Psychology), Ellen Wu* (History)

* Asian American Studies core faculty

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Introduction

The program in Asian American Studies introduces students to the history, culture, arts, and life experiences of people of Asian descent in the United States, and in other parts of the world. The term Asian American applies to groups from diverse cultural heritages within the United States, including Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, Asian Indian, Pakistani, Vietnamese, Hmong, Cambodian, Burmese, as well as Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander. In attending to these populations, the undergraduate minor aims to foster awareness of Asian American experiences and contributions as part of the multicultural and multiracial history and ongoing development of the American experience, and to locate this experience in a larger global context. Its faculty members undertake a wide range of research and scholarship on issues such as Asian immigration, community development, labor market status, physical and mental health, gender and sexual politics, ethnic and diasporic identities, cultural representations, civil rights, and citizenship. Courses in Asian American Studies provide students the opportunity to deepen their understanding of these issues from an interdisciplinary perspective that includes history, sociology, literature, ethnography and media studies, political science, applied health science, and counseling psychology. Students in Asian American Studies not only learn the traditional skills in critical analysis and research, but also develop domestic and global perspectives as effective and responsible agents in a rapidly changing twenty-first century world.

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Minor in Asian American Studies

Requirements At least 15 credit hours of College of Arts and Sciences course work, including the following:

  1. A101 Introduction to Asian American Studies
  2. A499 Senior Seminar in Asian American Studies
  3. 9 credit hours from Lists A and B (see below). At least 6 credit hours must be at the 300 level or above. At least 6 credit hours must be from list A.
  4. With the approval of the director of the Asian American Studies program, 3 credit hours of A495 Independent Reading and Research in Asian American Studies may be substituted for one AAST course at the 200 or 300 level.
  5. No course taken in fulfillment of the American Studies major or minor can be applied to this minor.
  6. Students who choose course work outside the College in partial fulfillment of the minor will need to take additional College of Arts and Sciences course work to meet the minimum total of 15 credit hours in the College.

List A (Asian America)

  • AAST A300 Topics in Asian American Studies (Topic: Social Problems in the Health and Well-being of Asian America)
  • AMST A298 Special Topics in Arts and Humanities for American Studies (3 cr.) A & H (Topic: Negotiating Asian/American Identities: A Survey in Asian American Literature)
  • AMST A299 Special Topics in Social and Historical Studies for American Studies (3 cr.) S & H (Asian American Topics)
  • EALC E385 Asian Americans: Cultural Conflict and Identity (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
  • EDUC G204 Asian American Mental Health
  • ENG L374 Ethnic American Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA (Asian American topics)
  • HIST A205 Asian American History (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
  • POLS Y200 Contemporary Political Problems (3 cr.) S & H (Topic: Asian American Politics Since the 1960s)
  • SOC S342 Asian American Communities and Identities (3 cr.) S & H, CSA

List B (Asian Diaspora)

  • AMST A398 Advanced Topics in Arts and Humanities for American Studies
    (3 cr.) A & H (Topic: Responses to Empire: Reading Philippine–U.S. Contact)
  • CMCL C314 Communication, Culture, and Social Formations (3 c.) S & H (Topic: Asian/Pacific Islander Families and Diasporas)
  • CMLT C360 Diasporic Literatures (3 cr.) A & H (Topic: Literatures of the Asian Diaspora)

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Course Descriptions

A101 Introduction to Asian American Studies (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Examines the histories, experiences, and cultures that shape the Asian American community. Through articles, books, and film, this course explores the commonalities and the diversity of experiences among Asians in the United States, with particular focus on such issues as immigration, education, community, and identity.

A300 Topics in Asian American Studies (3 cr.) Advanced study of a single focused topic in Asian American studies, with attention to disciplinary and interdisciplinary interpretations, frameworks of theory and practice, and skills in research, analysis, and writing. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

A495 Independent Readings and Research in Asian American Studies
(3 cr.)
P: Consent of instructor and program director. Independent readings or research project in Asian American studies. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

A499 Capstone Seminar in Asian American Studies (3 cr.) P: Consent of the program. A faculty-supervised course of independent research utilizing a specific disciplinary or interdisciplinary approach and culminating in a paper or report. The project may incorporate a practical or service-learning component and the use of diverse media. The report must include a written, analytical component.

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Astronomy/Astrophysics

Course Description

A115 Birth and Death of the Universe (3 cr.) N & M Introduction to cosmology. Traces the ideas describing the origin and evolution of the universe from ancient geocentric cosmologies to the Big Bang cosmology.

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Biology

Major in Biology—B.A.
Major in Microbiology—B.S.
Major in Biotechnology—B.S.
Course Descriptions

Major in Biology—B.A.

Purpose The B.A. degree is designed to provide training in the major subject areas of biology while remaining the most flexible of all biology degrees offered. Minimal chemistry and mathematics requirements allow students to substitute a second major, such as computer science, chemistry, psychology, or an outside field, such as environmental studies or business. However, this degree will not automatically fulfill requirements for entrance to medical, dental, or optometry schools, or to most graduate programs.

Major Requirements Students must complete the following course work with a grade of C– or higher in each course:

  1. L111 Introduction to Biology: Evolution and Diversity (3 cr.), L112 Introduction to Biology: Biological Mechanisms (3 cr.), and L113 Biology Laboratory (3 cr.).
  2. L211 Molecular Biology (3 cr.).
  3. L311 Genetics and Development (3 cr.).
  4. L318 Evolution (3 cr.).
  5. Two additional lecture courses at the 300 or 400 level. L322, T322, L490, and L499 do not count for lecture or laboratory credit.
  6. Two additional laboratory courses at the 300 or 400 level. L322, T322, L490, and L499 do not count for lecture or laboratory credit.
  7. One of the advanced lecture courses and one advanced laboratory (300–400 level) must be taken on the Bloomington campus.
  8. Chemistry C117, C118 or N330, and C341 or R340. For those planning professional school, this sequence is recommended: C117, C341, C342, C343, and N330.
  9. Mathematics M118 or M119 or M211.

Note: L111 and L112 can be taken in either order. L112 and CHEM C117 are prerequisites of L211, which is the prerequisite of L311.

Students must also meet the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, including culture studies.

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Major in Microbiology—B.S.

Purpose The B.S. in microbiology is designed for students who wish to pursue careers as professional microbiologists in health, environmental, governmental, or industrial laboratories. It is also a basis for further professional or graduate training in microbiology and related fields.

Requirements Students must complete the following fundamental skills and distribution requirements:

  1. Writing, same as for B.A. degree.
  2. Mathematics, fulfilled by major.
  3. Foreign language, three semesters in the same language or equivalent proficiency. Culture studies courses are not required.
  4. One Topics course—students are advised to choose a course that will serve as one of the required arts and humanities or social and historical studies courses listed below.
  5. Arts and humanities, two courses.
  6. Social and historical studies, two courses.
  7. Natural and mathematical sciences, fulfilled by major.

Major Requirements Students must complete the following:

  1. Biology L112 and L211.
  2. Microbiology M250 and M255.
  3. Microbiology M350, M360, and M480.
  4. Two of the following lab courses: M435, M445, M465, M485, or T315.
  5. One of the following lecture courses: M430, M440, or M460.
  6. Two of the following additional lecture courses: M430, M440, M460, M375, M416, B351, L312, L321, or T310. Courses used to fulfill requirement 5 above will not apply to requirement 6.
  7. Chemistry C117, C341, C342, C343, and N330 (or C106-126 or C118).
  8. Mathematics M211 or M215 (or M119 and M120).
  9. One of the following statistics courses: Mathematics K310, Psychological and Brain Sciences K300 or K310, Liberal Arts and Management Program L316, or SPEA K300.
    (Note that although SPEA K300 fulfills the statistics requirement, it does not count toward College of Arts and Sciences credit hours if the total hours allowed outside the College have been met.)
  10. Physics P201-P202 or P221-P222.

Students who earn a grade lower than C in any of the following courses—BIOL M250, M255, M350, M360, and M480 — are advised to seek permission from the instructor before enrolling in other upper-level courses required in the microbiology curriculum.

Students must also complete the requirements and procedures listed in this supplement under “General Requirements for Bachelor’s Degrees” except for the culture studies requirement.

Recommendations Because chemistry is a prerequisite for many upper-level microbiology courses, students are urged to begin chemistry as soon as possible. Students should consult the advising office to plan a coherent program.

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Major in Biotechnology—B.S.

Requirements Students must complete the following fundamental skills and distribution requirements:

  1. Writing, same as for B.A. degree. Intensive Writing requirement, fulfilled by major.
  2. Mathematics, fulfilled by major.
  3. Foreign language, three semesters in the same language or equivalent proficiency. Culture studies courses are not required.
  4. One Topics course—students are advised to choose a course that will serve as one of the required arts and humanities or social and historical studies courses listed below.
  5. Arts and humanities, two courses.
  6. Social and historical studies, two courses.
  7. Natural and mathematical sciences, fulfilled by major.

Major Requirements Students must meet the following with a minimum grade of C– in each course and a minimum major grade point average of C (2.000):

  1. Mathematics M211 or M215 (or M119 and M120).
  2. One of the following statistics courses: Mathematics K310, Psychological and Brain Sciences K300 or K310, Liberal Arts and Management Program L316, or SPEA K300.
    (Note that although SPEA K300 fulfills the statistics requirement, it does not count toward College of Arts and Sciences credit hours if the total hours allowed outside the College have been met.)
  3. Biology L112; L211; either M250 and M255, or M430 and M435; T301; T310; T312; T315; and T322.
  4. Chemistry A314 and A316, C117, C341, C342, C343, N330, and C483 or C484.
  5. Physics P201-P202 or P221-P222.
  6. At least four additional courses, chosen from among the following, for a minimum of 12 credit hours: Anatomy A464, Biology L311, L312, L313, L317, L319, L321, L323, L324, L331, M350, M360, M430, M435, M440, M445, M460, M465, M480, M485, L490 (up to 6 cr.), T415, Z318, Z373, Z374, Z375, Z466, Z469; Chemistry C361, C432, C443, C481, C485, C487, Medical Sciences P421.

Students must also meet the degree requirements for the B.S. degree in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Students who wish to complete a business minor or the Liberal Arts and Management Program (LAMP) certificate as part of their degree program are advised that they may need to take some of the relevant courses in the summer or in an additional semester. The College of Arts and Sciences allows students to take 22 credit hours outside the College that will count toward graduation. This allowance should also be taken into account when considering the business minor or the LAMP certificate.

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Course Descriptions

L299 Career Directions in Biology: Jobs for Life Scientists (1 cr.) P: Sophomore standing or above. Intended for biology, biotechnology, and microbiology majors. Focuses on identification of and preparation for life science career paths. Covers career information resources, resumes, cover letters, and application processes. Content includes interviewing skills, discussion of graduate and professional programs, careers in biology, personal assessment, and job search strategies. Not repeatable for credit.

L410 Topical Issues in Biology (2–3 cr.) P: L111, L112, and L113. Topics not related extensively in other courses. The topic will vary depending on the instructor and on student needs. May be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

M416 Biology of AIDS (3 cr.) P: L311 or L312. A detailed examination of the biology of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), its causative agent (HIV), the immune response, and available therapies. For senior biology or biochemistry majors or beginning graduate students.

M440 Medical Microbiology: Lecture (3 cr.) P: BIOL L211. R: BIOL M250, M255. Microorganisms as agents of disease; hostparasite relationships; epidemiology; chemotherapy. Credit given for only one of M440 or M200.

T301 Seminar in Biotechnology (1 cr.) P: Junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor. Outside speakers from the biotechnology industry present students with the latest research developments, information about career opportunities, and internship possibilities. Students will write a paper on each seminar, discussing what they have learned and how this knowledge affects their career decisions. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

T310 Biotechnology Lecture (3 cr.) P: L211. C: T315. Application of microbial diversity in biotechnology; synthesis of macromolecules; principles of gene expressions; gene cloning; protein engineering, overexpression and purification; genomics; proteomics; bioinformatics.

T312 Societal Issues in Biotechnology (3 cr.) P: L112. Consideration of the effects of recent advances in biotechnology on human affairs and the environment.

T315 Biotechnology Laboratory (3 cr.) P: L211. C: T310. Students use a problem-based approach to gene cloning; for example, cloning the gene for an industrially important enzyme, α-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis. In this example, students would purify α-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis and affinity-tagged α-amylase overproduction clone for purification and compare the activity of the purified proteins.

T415 Theory and Applications of Biotechnology Laboratory I (3 cr.) P: One of the following: L319, L323, L324, L373, T315. In-depth application of advanced laboratory techniques currently used in biotechnology. Course is divided into three modules, each emphasizing a specific discipline within biotechnology. General laboratory techniques are taught in all modules.

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Central Eurasian Studies

Minor in Central Eurasian Studies
Minor in Central Eurasian Studies with Language Certification
Course Descriptions

Minor in Central Eurasian Studies

Requirements Students must complete at least 15 credit hours of CEUS or cross-listed courses, selected in consultation with the CEUS director of undergraduate studies, with a minimum GPA of 2.000. A minimum of 6 credit hours must be at the 300 level or above, and at least 8 credit hours of CEUS courses must be taken at the Bloomington campus. No more than 6 credit hours of non-CEUS cross-listed courses will be counted toward the minor.

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Minor in Central Eurasian Studies with Language Certification

Requirements Students must complete at least 15 credit hours of CEUS or cross-listed courses, selected in consultation with the CEUS director of undergraduate studies, with a minimum GPA of 2.000, including:

  1. At least 6 credit hours in a CEUS language beyond the introductory level
  2. At least 6 credit hours in non-language CEUS or cross-listed courses

A minimum of 6 credit hours must be at the 300 level or above, and at least 8 credit hours of CEUS courses must be taken at the Bloomington campus. No more than 6 credit hours of non-CEUS cross-listed courses will be counted toward the minor.

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Course Descriptions

Language Courses
History, Civilization or Other Culture Courses

Language Courses

Azerbaijani
Estonian
Finnish
Hungarian
Iranian
Kazakh
Mongolian
Pashto
Tajik
Tibetan
Turkish
Turkmen
Uyghur
Uzbek

Azerbaijani

T183 Introductory Azerbaijani I (4 cr.) Stresses a communicative/interactive approach. Students learn to handle basic everyday situations, such as greetings, asking for information, buying things, travel, phone calls, and writing letters. A portion of each class day is devoted to cultural aspects of Azerbaijani society. Credit given for only one of T183 or U105.

T184 Introductory Azerbaijani II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T183 or U105, or equivalent proficiency. Continues language learning introduced in T183. Credit given for only one of T184 or U106.

T283 Intermediate Azerbaijani I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T184 or U106, or equivalent proficiency. Uses free discourse, prompted discussions, interviews, team activities, oral presentations, written exercises, video-based discussions, and grammar drills to expand first-year skills. Classes are taught in Azerbaijani with only some grammatical explanations or spot translations in English. Authentic Azerbaijani language materials are used throughout the course. Credit given for only one of T283 or U205.

T284 Intermediate Azerbaijani II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T283 or U205, or equivalent proficiency. Continues skills learned in previous course work. Credit given for only one of T284 or U206.

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Estonian

T103 Introductory Estonian I (4 cr.) Assumes no previous knowledge of Estonian. Emphasizes oral communication with attention to reading, writing, speaking, and listening. With basic vocabulary and structures, students can talk about themselves and immediate surroundings, interact in service encounters, read short texts and write notes. Introduction to Estonian culture. Credit given for only one of T103 or U111.

T104 Introductory Estonian II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T103 or U111, or equivalent proficiency. Uses a communicative approach to introduce Estonian pronunciation and basic grammar (morphology and syntax), and teach vocabulary and structures for everyday conversation. Textbooks, audio- and videotapes, and authentic materials (newspapers, schedules, advertisements, the Internet) used to enhance learning and provide cultural information. Credit given for only one of T104 or U112.

T203 Intermediate Estonian I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T104 or U112, or equivalent proficiency. Builds on skills acquired in introductory courses. First year topics are reviewed in more detail and new topics, such as seasons, holidays, traditions, and customs are added. Longer reading texts are introduced. Video materials train listening comprehension. Development of conversation skills beyond the structured exchanges of the introductory level. Credit given for only one of T203 or U211.

T204 Intermediate Estonian II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T203 or U211, or equivalent proficiency. Finishes covering Estonian structures (morphology and syntax) and develops skills by reading, conversation, discussion, oral presentations, a weekly journal and short essays, and listening. Materials used to introduce Estonian culture include current press sources (print and Internet), short fiction, poetry, documentaries, feature films, and news programs. Credit given for only one of T204 or U212.

T303 Advanced Estonian I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T204 or U212, or equivalent proficiency. Builds students’ confidence as language users via class discussion of newspaper articles, fiction and poetry, class presentations, journal entries, summaries of articles, film and news clips, short essays, TV broadcasts, and audiotape recordings. Focuses on structures of formal written Estonian and different registers of oral production.

T304 Advanced Estonian II (4 cr.)
P: Grade of C or higher in T303 or equivalent proficiency. Consolidates students’ knowledge of Estonian structure, and adds to vocabulary, especially in students’ areas of interest. While speaking, reading, listening, and writing are developed, this course has more emphasis on reading and writing. Independent work and student contribution a must; class is tailored to individual interests.

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Finnish

T101 Introductory Finnish I (4 cr.) An introduction to Finnish for students with no previous knowledge of Finnish language. Emphasizes skills for everyday situations in Finland. Aids understanding of simple spoken Finnish for familiar topics and the main points of brief messages. Students also study Finnish culture and history. Credit given for only one of T101 or U121.

T102 Introductory Finnish II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T101 or U121, or equivalent proficiency. Concentrated practice in Finnish pronunciation, grammar, elementary conversation, reading, and writing. Increase of vocabulary. Credit given for only one of T102 or U122.

T201 Intermediate Finnish I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T102 or U122, or equivalent proficiency. Geared to students who know the basics of Finnish to communicate in situations related to study, work, and leisure, while learning specific issues of Finnish culture and history. Methods are learner centered, communicative and often problem-based. Credit given for only one of T201 or U221.

T202 Intermediate Finnish II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T201 or U221, or equivalent proficiency. Continues and reinforces language skills learned in T201 or U221. Credit given for only one of T202 or U222.

T301 Advanced Finnish I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T202 or U222, or equivalent proficiency. Teaches advanced skills desirable for academia and work. The goal is to communicate effectively in demanding oral and written situations, and to handle both writing and speech on demanding topics. Also widens knowledge of Finnish culture and history.

T302 Advanced Finnish II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T301 or equivalent proficiency. Teaches advanced skills desirable for academic life and work. Teaches effective communication in demanding oral and written situations, and an understanding of writing and speech on demanding topics. Also widens knowledge of Finnish culture and history.

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Hungarian

T141 Introductory Hungarian I (4 cr.) Enables students to converse about basic topics, meet basic communicative needs, and read and write short texts with simple sentence patterns and everyday topics. Students learn to use fundamental Hungarian structures with comfort and confidence while learning about Hungarian lifestyle, society, and culture. Credit given for only one of T141 or U131.

T142 Introductory Hungarian II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T141 or U131, or equivalent proficiency. Daily classes focus on listening to and conducting conversations, intonation exercises, grammar exercises, and writing simple dialogues and essays. Topics include travel, work, housing, shopping, post office, bank, and family. Introduction of important possessive structures and sentences as well as verb conjugations. Credit given for only one of T142 or U132.

T241 Intermediate Hungarian I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T142 or U132, or equivalent proficiency. Helps students converse more fluently about personal and simple academic topics, articulate feelings and opinions, read short literary and scholarly texts, and write for basic personal, business, and academic purposes. Authentic texts and video teach about the lifestyle and socio-historical facts of Hungary. Credit given for only one of T241 or U231.

T242 Intermediate Hungarian II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T241 or U231, or equivalent proficiency. Helps students converse more fluently about personal and simple academic topics, articulate their feelings and opinions, read short literary and scholarly texts, and write for basic personal, business, and academic purposes. Authentic texts and video teach about Hungary. Moderately complex grammatical forms are introduced. Credit given for only one of T242 or U232.

T341 Advanced Hungarian I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T242 or U232, or equivalent proficiency. Assumes four semesters of Hungarian and substantial knowledge of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Enables students to converse about moderately complex personal, social, and academic topics; to read and understand a full range of literary genres; and to write and translate to meet most personal and academic needs.

T342 Advanced Hungarian II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T341 or equivalent proficiency. Students continue to learn how to converse about moderately complex personal, social, and academic topics; read and understand a range of genres; and write and translate for personal and academic needs. Through readings, students extend vocabulary and develop a more academic style for conversation and writing.

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Iranian

T356 Middle Iranian Languages (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Variable title course used to introduce one or more of the following Iranian languages dating from the first to the twelfth centuries: Middle Persian (Pahlavi), Middle Parthian and Manichaean Middle Persian, Sogdian, or Bactrian and Saka. Documents are drawn from manuscripts, manuscript fragments, and/or inscriptions. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

T358 Old Iranian Languages (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Variable title course covers alphabets, grammar, vocabulary, reading, translation, and analysis of texts in one or more of the following Old Iranian languages: Avestan and Old Persian. Examination of religious and sociopolitical documents from the eighteenth to the first centuries B.C.E. through manuscripts and inscriptions. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

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Kazakh

T113 Introductory Kazakh I (4 cr.) No previous knowledge of Kazakh required. Introduction to basic communication skills in Kazakh. Upon finishing, students will be able to use Kazakh in basic communicative contexts. Readings, class discussions, listening activities adapted from Kazakh language media programs. Films and extracurricular activities develop awareness of Kazakh culture. Credit given for only one of T113 or U175.

T114 Introductory Kazakh II (4 cr.) R: Grade of C or higher in T113 or U175, or equivalent proficiency. Continues basic communication skills and basic grammar of T113 needed to master simple to complex sentences. Kazakh language media programs, film viewing, and cultural activities develop awareness of Kazakh culture. Credit given for only one of T114 or U176.

T213 Intermediate Kazakh I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T212 or U176, or equivalent proficiency. Builds on and extends the foundation established in introductory level to improve basic language skills: speaking, reading, writing, listening. Primary goal is to improve communicative competence and to enable learners to handle a variety of immediate everyday situations related to academic life. Credit given for only one of T213 or U275.

T214 Intermediate Kazakh II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T213 or U276, or equivalent proficiency. Students learn to use Kazakh in everyday situations and for purposes related to work and social life. Lessons are in Kazakh only, except for some grammar analogues. Components include grammar structures, small texts, vocabulary, listening activities, and writing exercises. Credit given for only one of T214 or U276.

T313 Advanced Kazakh I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T214 or U276, or equivalent proficiency. Familiarizes students with key parts of life in contemporary Kazakhstan. While improving speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills, students also do occasional translations. Builds on previous knowledge with stimulating and challenging activities, such as listening to narratives and radio interviews, and forges accurate and fluent communication skills.

T314 Advanced Kazakh II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T313 or equivalent proficiency. Further introduction to contemporary Kazakhstan. New vocabulary enables learners to communicate in different situations, purposes, and roles. Listening materials include narratives, radio interviews, “Cenasianet” language programs, Kazakh fiction, and newspapers.

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Mongolian

T161 Introductory Mongolian I (4 cr.) Introduction to Modern Mongolian in the Cyrillic script and to basic Mongolian pronunciation and grammar, along with knowledge of Mongolian culture and traditions. Students learn to conduct everyday conversations and use Mongolian’s main cases and verb tenses in conversation and writing. Credit given for only one of T161 or U141.

T162 Introductory Mongolian II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T161 or U141, or equivalent proficiency. Expands the competencies mastered in T161. Students use the main cases and finite verb tenses, as well as some modals (converbs) and simple compound sentences. Students also learn about Mongolian culture by reading simple folktales. Credit given for only one of T162 or U142.

T261 Intermediate Mongolian I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T162 or U142, or equivalent proficiency. Expands the basic Mongolian conversation, grammar, reading, and writing skills mastered in first year. Introduces the most useful kinds of compound and complex sentences and develops skills to use them in conversation and writing. Furthers knowledge of Mongolian culture and tradition. Credit given for only one of T261 or U241.

T262 Intermediate Mongolian II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T261 or U241, or equivalent proficiency. Expands basic Mongolian conversation, grammar, reading, and writing skills. Introduces the most useful kinds of compounds and complex sentences and voice infixes in conversation and writing. Furthers knowledge of Mongolian culture and tradition. Credit given for only one of T262 or U242.

T361 Advanced Mongolian I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T262 or U242, or equivalent proficiency. Review of compound and complex sentences. Develops a sense of Mongolian literary style through the reading of diverse materials. In-class oral presentations, discussions, and role-play increase fluency. Translation exercises enhance knowledge of Mongolian culture and history.

T362 Advanced Mongolian II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T361 or equivalent proficiency. Development of a sense of Mongolian literary style through the reading of diverse materials; improvement of fluency by oral presentations, class discussions, and roleplaying; practice of formal translation using Internet and newspaper materials. Further develops knowledge of Mongolian culture and literary history.

T363 Classical Mongolian I (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T262 or U242, or permission of instructor. Introduction to classical Mongolian and its relation to living, spoken languages and dialects. Topics include the Mongolian vertical script, its origin, graphemes and allographs, vowel and consonantal graphemes, orthography, punctuation, numbers, a skeletal grammar, word formation, syntax. Format is reading, analyzing, and translating texts in transcription and original script.

T364 Classical Mongolian II (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T363 or permission of instructor. Reading and interpreting various old and new classical Mongolian texts in Uyghur script; grammatical analysis and translation into modern Mongolian and English.

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Pashto

T153 Introductory Pashto I (4 cr.) Introduction to the Pashto language of Afghanistan. By practicing listening, speaking, reading, and writing, students become familiar with the alphabet and sound system, basic structures, and ordinary usage. By the end of the semester, students will have mastered simple sentences and can ask and answer simple questions on familiar topics.

T154 Introductory Pashto II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T153 or equivalent proficiency. Strengthens and improves skills gained in T153. Students move into new topics such as personal information, daily activities, and expanded grammar structures. By the end of the course, students can read simple prose texts, deal with everyday situations, and respond to requests on familiar topics.

T253 Intermediate Pashto I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T154 or equivalent proficiency. Improves communicative skills in order to meet ordinary social situations and express interests and personal needs such as inquiring about one’s surroundings, getting directions, buying food, and going out to eat. By the end of the semester, students can communicate and ask questions about familiar topics using learned grammatical structures.

T254 Intermediate Pashto II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T253 or equivalent proficiency. Improves language skills by extending the scope of topics. Introduces materials concerning various social interactions, current daily life, and Pashtun culture. Extends grammatical and lexical knowledge through the use of a wide variety of stimulating and challenging activities. By the end of the semester, the student can converse with confidence on topics of routine tasks and in social situations.

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Persian

T151 Introductory Persian I (4 cr.) No previous knowledge of Persian required. Introduces basic communication skills in modern standard Persian and familiarizes students with Persian’s sounds, alphabet, and basic grammar. Students learn to read, write, speak, and comprehend simple to moderately complex sentences. Readings, class conversations, media programs, film viewing, and cultural activities introduce Persian cultures. Credit given for only one of T151 or U177.

T152 Introductory Persian II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T151 or U177, or equivalent proficiency. Continues Introductory Persian I. Further work on basic sentence structure to develop greater fluency in pronunciation, reading, and writing. With the aim of a working vocabulary of 700 words, students study compound verbs and other idiomatic expressions. Internet resources used extensively. Credit given for only one of T152 or U178.

T251 Intermediate Persian I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T152 or U178, or equivalent proficiency. Covers a wide range of topics and intermediate to advanced grammar. Credit given for only one of T251 or U277.

T252 Intermediate Persian II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T251 or U277, or equivalent proficiency. Concentrates on complex grammatical structures and vocabulary acquisition with emphasis on reading and writing skills, and fluency in modern colloquial pronunciation (Tehran dialect). Studies texts drawn from modern Iranian publications, authentic materials, and Internet resources. Credit given for only one of T252 or U278.

T351 Advanced Persian I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T252 or U278, or equivalent proficiency. Students examine the classical Persian tradition’s rich legacy of historical, literary, and religious writings and learn the grammatical and lexical differences distinguishing classical from modern Persian. Introduction to basic research tools and reference works. Readings cover the range of classical Persian texts.

T352 Advanced Persian II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T351 or equivalent proficiency. Continues and builds upon skills learned in T351.

T359 Research in Classical Persian Texts (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T352 or permission of instructor. The classical Persian tradition holds a distinguished place in human thought and culture. This course introduces students to aspects of that rich legacy. Students learn to distinguish classical Persian from modern Persian, and master research tools and reference works. Readings reflect a range of classical Persian texts.

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Tajik

T115 Introductory Tajik I (4 cr.) Introduction to the language and culture of the Tajiks of Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. Teaches basic speaking skills: simple greetings and conversation, handling basic survival needs, such as reading signs and short narratives, completing forms, and taking messages. Introduction to the culture of Tajikistan.

T116 Introductory Tajik II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T115 or equivalent proficiency. Continues and expands knowledge from T115.

T215 Intermediate Tajik I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T116 or equivalent proficiency. Uses the communicative approach to enable learners to interact successfully in everyday and workplace situations. Authentic Tajiki language materials include videos, audiotapes, and printed texts. Focused drills present grammatical structures; explanations and paradigms are minimized. Materials also familiarize students about life for Tajiks.

T216 Intermediate Tajik II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T215 or equivalent proficiency. Continues and expands knowledge from T215.

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Tibetan

T171 Introductory Tibetan I (4 cr.) Introduces Tibetan language basics to students with no previous background in Tibetan. Students begin speaking, listening, reading, and writing basic grammar, building vocabulary, and developing idiomatic usage needed in everyday communication. Introduction to Tibetan culture and daily life. Credit given for only one of T171 or U151.

T172 Introductory Tibetan II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T171 or U151, or equivalent proficiency. Further introduction to the basics of Tibetan language through the use of daily written, reading, and audio home assignments. Conversation preparation required. Coffee hours enable students to talk to Tibetan native speakers. Credit given for only one of T172 or U152.

T271 Intermediate Tibetan I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T172 or U152, or equivalent proficiency. Further develops skills in Tibetan for effective communication. Speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills are developed throughout the course with attention to grammar. Special attention to classical Tibetan readings. Credit given for only one of T271 or U251.

T272 Intermediate Tibetan II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T271 or U251, or equivalent proficiency. Further develops skills with basic features of Tibetan language. Materials such as short stories and articles used for writing and reading assignments. Credit given for only one of T272 or U252.

T371 Advanced Tibetan I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T272 or U252, or equivalent proficiency. Expands knowledge of grammar with reading and composition exercises, and translation of general texts from Tibetan into English. Focuses on reading in modern and classical Tibetan.

T372 Advanced Tibetan II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T371 or equivalent proficiency. Further develops advanced skills for academic and professional work. Materials are selected from writings and translations of classical and modern Tibetan. Daily writing and translation assignments. Expands knowledge of Tibetan culture and history.

T476 Readings in Modern Tibetan Texts (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T271 or U251, or equivalent proficiency and consent of instructor. Allows those interested in modern Tibetan language to improve their skills in handling literary Tibetan materials and documents produced in Tibetan areas of the Peoples’ Republic of China and in exile. Credit given for only one of T476 or U488.

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Turkish

T181 Introductory Turkish I (4 cr.) Introduces English-speaking students to Turkish. Builds basic proficiency in modern Turkish for effective communication at beginning level in everyday situations. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are covered in classroom activities and at-home practice. Establishes a solid linguistic and cultural foundation for future studies of Turkish. Credit given for only one of T181 or U161.

T182 Introductory Turkish II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T181 or U161, or equivalent proficiency. Continues learning begun in T181, expanding basic competencies. Students develop communicative skills as they assimilate the basics of Turkish grammar. In addition to the textbook, students use other media, such as short video clips from Turkish television, songs, and newspaper articles. Credit given for only one of T182 or U162.

T281 Intermediate Turkish I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T182 or U162, or equivalent proficiency. Expands communicative skills, grammar, and vocabulary skills. Class activities and homework involve listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Special attention paid to building richer vocabulary, developing competence in the vernacular, and improving reading. Recordings, films, handicrafts, and cartoons used in context. Credit given for only one of T281 or U261.

T282 Intermediate Turkish II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T281 or U261, or equivalent proficiency. Continues skills learned in T281. Credit given for only one of T282 or U262.

T381 Advanced Turkish I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T282 or U262, or equivalent proficiency. Requires written reports after watching Turkish TV news. Class activities improve language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Opportunity to interact with native speakers outside of class.

T382 Advanced Turkish II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T381 or equivalent proficiency. Expands language proficiency using innovative methods described in T381.

T485 Media Turkish I (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T382 or equivalent proficiency. Advances linguistic and cognitive skills needed to understand media language and improves linguistic skills for better comprehension of contemporary language usage. Includes discussion of socio-political issues associated with current media issues.

T486 Media Turkish II (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T485 or permission of instructor. TV recordings of Turkish media via satellite are incorporated to improve listening comprehension and oral fluency.

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Turkmen

T117 Introductory Turkmen I (4 cr.) No previous knowledge of Turkmen required. Follows the communicative approach to enable learners to interact successfully in everyday and workplace situations. Authentic Turkmen language materials used include videos, audiotapes, and printed texts. Focused drills present grammatical structures; explanations and paradigms are minimized. Credit given for only one of T117 or U107.

T118 Introductory Turkmen II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T117 or U107, or equivalent proficiency. Continues course work in Turkmen from T117. Credit given for only one of T118 or U108.

T217 Intermediate Turkmen I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T118 or U108, or consent of department. Follows the communicative approach, enabling learners to interact successfully in everyday and workplace situations. Authentic Turkmen language materials used include videos, audiotaped materials, and printed texts. Focused drills present grammatical structures; explanations and paradigms are minimized. Newspaper materials supply updates on Turkmenistan’s changing life. Credit given for only one of T217 or U207.

T218 Intermediate Turkmen II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T217 or U207, or consent of department. Continuing development of language skills. Additional new grammar concepts. Credit given for only one of T218 or U208.

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Uyghur

T131 Introductory Uyghur I (4 cr.) No previous knowledge of Uyghur required. Introduces basic Uyghur language—the Uyghur script, phonetic rules, and basic grammar of the literary Uyghur language—and Uyghur lifestyle, society, and culture. Daily class activities involve conversations, pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar exercises, simple dialogues and texts. Considerable independent preparation outside of class required. Credit given for only one of T131 or U115.

T132 Introductory Uyghur II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T131 or U115, or equivalent proficiency. Continues previous semester course work. Develops skills in listening, reading, speaking and writing, to begin mastering literary Uyghur language. Uyghur audio and video cassettes and visual materials illustrate contemporary Uyghur cultural life. Opportunity for personal expression through partner and group work. Credit given for only one of T132 or U116.

T231 Intermediate Uyghur I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T132 or U116, or equivalent proficiency. Expands grammatical, lexical, and functional skills. Listening activities involve narratives, interviews from RFA (Uyghur Erkin Asiya Radiosi), and Uyghur TV. Contemporary Eastern Turkestan’s society is introduced to facilitate effective situational communication. Credit given for only one of T231 or U215.

T232 Intermediate Uyghur II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T231 or U215, or equivalent proficiency. Further develops language skills and introduces contemporary Turkestan, its culture and mentality, so students communicate effectively. Also included are translation skills, partner work and discussions, authentic listening and video material. Independent work outside of class is essential. Credit given for only one T232 or U216.

T331 Advanced Uyghur I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T232 or U216, or equivalent proficiency. Students give oral, reading, and writing presentations; participate in class discussions; and practice translation. Excerpts from novels, movies, newspapers, and other media develop knowledge of Uyghur culture.

T332 Advanced Uyghur II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T331 or equivalent proficiency. Students give oral, reading, and writing presentations; participate in class discussions; and practice translation. Excerpts from novels, movies, newspapers, and other media develop knowledge of Uyghur culture.

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Uzbek

T111 Introductory Uzbek I (4 cr.) Introduction to Uzbekistan’s literary language, using Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. Conversation, reading practice, journal writing, newspapers illustrating modern Uzbekistan, Uzbek videos, TV programs, and audiotapes used. Credit given for only one of T111 or U171.

T112 Introductory Uzbek II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T111 or U171, or equivalent proficiency. Continues course work from previous semester. Credit given for only one of T112 or U172.

T211 Intermediate Uzbek I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T112 or U172, or equivalent proficiency. Increases fluency in speaking and develops listening and reading skills. With extensive conversation and reading practice, students extend their vocabulary and grammar fundamentals in the literary language of Uzbekistan. Journals, newspapers and authentic materials supplied via Internet, email, and Oncourse illustrate modern life and language in Uzbekistan. Credit given for only one of T211 or U271.

T212 Intermediate Uzbek II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T211 or U271, or equivalent proficiency. Continues language skills of T211. Credit given for only one of T212 or U272.

T311 Advanced Uzbek I (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T212 or U272, or equivalent proficiency. Increases oral fluency, and develops listening, reading and writing based on literary Uzbek. Enables students to do research in history, culture, and politics. Extensive conversation and reading practice uses journals and newspapers illustrating modern Uzbekistan, Web sites, videos, TV, and audiotapes.

T312 Advanced Uzbek II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in T311 or equivalent proficiency. Increases oral fluency and develops listening, reading, and writing skills to enable students to do research in history, literature, and culture. Extensive conversation and reading practice using newspapers and journals illustrating Uzbek history, literature, and modern life, plus Uzbek videos, TV programs, and audiotapes.

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Return to Central Eurasian Studies

History, Civilization or Other Culture Courses

R191 Introduction to Central Eurasia (3 cr.) S & H P: Open only to freshmen and sophomores or by consent of instructor. Introduction to the history of the traditional Central Eurasian (“Inner Asian”) peoples through lecture and film. Topics include Proto- Indo-Europeans, Silk Road, Attila, steppe empires, Dalai Lama, Manchu and Russian relations, and the re-emergence of Central Eurasia in the late twentieth century. Extensive use of films. Credit given for only one of R191 or U190.

R250 Introduction to the Ancient Near East (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Introduction to ancient Near Eastern and Central Asian cultures. Begins with early farming communities around 8000 B.C. and includes the Bronze Age and Iron Age kingdoms of Assyria, Babylonia, Iran, and Central Asia and the spread of Hellenism. Archaeological and textual information used with visual aids. Credit given for only one of R250, U254, or NELC N245.

R251 Post-Taliban Afghanistan and the War on Terror (3 cr.) S & H, CSA The September 11, 2001, attacks prompted the on-going “War on Terrorism” against Taliban-controlled Afghanistan. This course examines this conflict while focusing on Afghanistan as a multiethnic modern nation-state, ravaged by a century of internal colonialism, and most recently by foreign invasions, proxy wars, and global terrorism.

R270 The Civilization of Tibet (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Introduction to the diverse aspects of Tibetan civilization. Making extensive use of slides and other audiovisual materials, the course covers such topics as Tibet’s literature, art, religion, society, history, and language. Strongly recommended for undergraduates intending to take higher-level courses in Tibetan studies. Credit given for only one of R270 or U284.

R281 Turkish Literature in Translation (3 cr.) Introduction to Turkish literature in translation, including Ottoman court literature, Turkish epic and troubador poetry, and modern and contemporary Turkish literature. No previous knowledge of the Turkish language or its literature is required, but familiarity with Turkish or Middle Eastern literary traditions is helpful.

R291 Inner Asian Religious Beliefs (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Describes the diverse religious beliefs of Inner Asia (oasis Central Asia, Turkic nomads, Mongolia, Tibet), focusing on Islam, Buddhism, and native religions. Topics include world religions on the Silk Road, Islamic and Buddhist conversions, native religions and “shamanism,” revivalist and modernizing movements, Communist and post-Communist liberalization. Credit given for only one of R291 or U292.

R302 Finland in the Twentieth Century (3 cr.) S & H In-depth study of modern Finnish history, stressing Russification; 1905 Revolution; independence; interwar period, the Winter War and the Continuation War; “Finlandization,” economic miracle, and welfare state; changing role of women; Finland as part of Scandinavia; literature, art, and music; and membership in the European Union. Credit given for only one of R302 or U333.

R304 Modern Finnish Literature (3 cr.) Examination of major works of modern Finnish literature in translation. Themes include urbanization, industrialization, independence, the individual and society, alcoholism, “the sixties,” role of women, and influence of fine arts, music, performing arts, and film.

R309 Topics in Baltic-Finnish Studies (3 cr.) Variable title course for topics in Baltic-Finnish studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

R310 Introduction to Central Asian History (3 cr.) S & H Explores Central Asia’s role in world history, in Islam, and as a link between East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, and Eastern Europe. Readings in English translation.

R311 Travelers and Explorers in Central Asia (3 cr.) Charts the exploration of Central Asia from China to Iran in the eighth through the nineteenth centuries. Uses primary sources in English translation to evaluate these travelogues as sources, comparing and contrasting medieval and modern, from insider and outsider perspectives.

R312 Shrine and Pilgrimage in Central Asian Islam (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Surveys religious beliefs and activities involving shrines and pilgrimage to holy places in Muslim Central Asia, from beginning to present. Broadens understanding of how shrines served the religious needs of Central Asian Muslims and the relationship between shrine-centered religious life and “normative” religious practice. Credit given for only one of R312 or U392.

R313 Islam in Soviet Union and Successor States (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Surveys Islam and Muslim communities in areas of the former U.S.S.R. After basic coverage of Islam, Russian expansion, and their interaction, the course focuses on the pressures experienced by and exerted by Islam as a religion and sociocultural system, with attention to religious life’s adaptations to the Soviet and post-Soviet context. Credit given for only one of R313 or U394.

R314 Islamization in Inner Asia (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Examines the distinctive character of Islam in Inner Asia, including religious change and “conversion,” and geographic, ethnic, and political contexts. Explores cases of Islamization, emphasizing indigenous accounts and their significance in Islamic and Inner Asian patterns of religious meaning and ritual.

R315 Politics and Society in Central Asia (3 cr.) S & H, CSA An introduction to Central Eurasia, especially the former Soviet Union, focusing on the 1980s and beyond. Main topics are politics, society, and economy; others include demography, Islam, women, and foreign policy. Credit given for only one of R315 or U395.

R316 Peoples and Cultures of Central Asia (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Anthropology of former Soviet Central Asia and adjacent areas of Iran and Afghanistan. Topics include ecology, ethnohistory, subsistence traditions; kinship, gender, identities; religion; transformations under Russia, Iran, Afghanistan, and the war on terrorism. No previous knowledge presumed; background in anthropology helpful. Credit given for only one of R316, U398, or ANTH E398.

R329 Topics in Central Asian Studies (3 cr.) Variable title course for topics in Central Asian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

R330 Politics in Xinjiang (3 cr.) Exploration of Xinjiang’s politics from 1900 to the present, focusing on Islam, identity politics, immigration, language battles, cultural resistance, the Production and Construction Corps, political economy, and oil.

R331 Grave Robbers, Missionaries, and Spies: Foreign Adventurers in Chinese Turkestan (3 cr.) From the nineteenth to the mid-twentieth centuries, the mysteries of Xinjiang (Chinese Turkestan) lured outsiders: missionaries, archaeologists, treasure hunters, adventurers, scouts, officials, and outright spies. Fortunately, many left readable accounts of their discoveries through which readers can explore both the region’s attraction to outsiders and outsider influence on the region.

R332 History of Xinjiang to 1911 (3 cr.) Introduction to the tumultuous history of Xinjiang, geographically part of Central Asia, but now under Chinese rule. Covers cultural, ethnic, religious, and geopolitical changes to 1911. Topics include ecology and economy; Uyghur, Chinese, Mongol, and Manchu empires; Islamization; the Jadidist movement; and stirrings of nationalism.

R333 Cultures and Civilization of Xinjiang (3 cr.) Surveys Xinjiang (Chinese Turkestan) from prehistory to today: material life, languages, literature, arts, and religion. Considers the “mummy controversy,” Xinjiang on the so-called Silk Road, Islamization, and cultural diversity today. Themes include cultural borrowing, “clash of civilization,” and the politics of multiculturalism.

R340 Introduction to Hungarian Studies (3 cr.) CSA Introduction to major issues in Hungarian studies from the migration to the present. After a geographic survey, explores issues in Hungarian identity, with particular attention to issues of ethnicity, religion, and culture, both high and low.

R342 Roma (Gypsy) History and Culture (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Europe’s largest minority, the so-called “Gypsies,” more properly the Roma, have been killed, hunted, and reviled; yet the exotic flavoring of “Gypsiness” has fascinated writers, artists, and composers. Surveys Roma history and representations. No background in East European studies, music, or film is required; readings are in English.

R349 Topics in Hungarian Studies (3 cr.) Variable title course for topics in Hungarian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

R351 Prophets, Poets, and Kings: Iranian Civilization (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Traces the history of Iranians from ancient times through the Arab conquest to today. Focuses on institutions, religious, secular and ecclesiastic hierarchies, minorities, devotional and communal change, and Iranian influences on Islam. Visual and archaeological aids used. No previous knowledge of subject matter required. Credit given for only one of R351 or U311.

R352 Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Ethnographic survey examines the social institutions and cultural forms in contemporary Middle Eastern societies (i.e., the Arab world, Israel, Turkey, Iran, and Afghanistan). Topics include ecology; Islam; pastoral nomadism; agriculture and cities; colonialism and nation-states; tribalism, ethnicity, and gender; and modernization, oil wealth, labor migration, and social unrest. Credit given for only one of CEUS R352, CEUS U397, ANTH E397, or NELC N397.

R354 Persian Literature in Translation (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Study and analysis of selected readings from Persian literature in English translation. May concentrate on a particular theme, period, or author. Special attention paid to the historical and cultural contexts of the works, as well as problems in translation, critical analysis, and interpretation. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in R354, U372, and NELC N380.

R359 Topics in Iranian Studies (3 cr.) Variable title course for topics in Iranian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours in R359 and U399.

R360 Modern Mongolia (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Examines Mongolia’s turbulent history from independence from China’s last dynasty in 1911 through theocracy, revolution, and communism to today’s market democracy. Also focuses on social, economic, cultural, and demographic changes. No prerequisite. Credit given for only one of R360 or U469.

R361 Mongolia’s Middle Ages (3 cr.) Examination of Mongolia’s “middle ages” between the Mongol world empire and the modern era, 1350 to 1850. Topics include the nobility, Oirats, Buddhist conversion, Manchu-Chinese rule, and Buriats and Kalmyks in Russia. Readings include modern histories and sources in translation.

R362 Mongolian Civilization and Folk Culture (3 cr.) Introduction to Mongolian traditional civilization: material culture (dwelling, clothing, food, warfare, hunting, animal husbandry, crafts, agriculture), social and spiritual life (kinship, wedding, birth, names, childhood, races, medicine, death, folk religion, Buddhism, shamanism, values and taboos, omens), folk arts (music, oral literature, dance). Knowledge of Mongolian not required.

R364 Shamanism and Folk Religion of the Mongols (3 cr.) Examination of shamanism and its role in Mongol communities. Is it a religion? What is its relation to folk beliefs and world religions? Who becomes a shaman or shamaness? What skills, tools, and techniques are necessary? Knowledge of Mongolian not required.

R369 Topics in Mongolian Studies (3 cr.) Variable title course for topics in Mongolian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

R370 Introduction to the History of Tibet (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Survey of Tibet’s history from its beginning to present. Studies facets of Tibet’s history including the Tibetan empire of the seventh to ninth centuries, the impact of Buddhism, Tibet’s relations with neighboring peoples, the rise of the Dalai Lama, and current issues of Tibet. Credit given for only one of R370 or U483.

R371 Tibet and the West (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Examines Western perception of Tibet during the past 700 years and compares Tibetan civilization with popular conceptions that prevailed in the West during corresponding periods. Subjects include Tibet as “Shangri-La,” reflected in such novels and films as Lost Horizon, along with Tibetan perceptions of Westerners and Western civilization. Credit given for only one of R371 or U489.

R372 Sino-Tibetan Relations (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Surveys interaction between Tibet and China from beginnings to the present, touching on political, cultural, economic, and religious links. Areas explored include the rise of Tibet as a dynamic empire competing with Tang China, religious links between Tibetan hierarchs and Chinese rulers, and conflict over Tibet’s incorporation into China. Credit given for only one of R372 or U490.

R373 The Religions of Tibet (3 cr.) A & H Surveys the history of Tibetan religions and their impact on Tibetan society and culture. Considers interactions between religions and politics and how they shaped public lifestyles, inspired movements, and molded identity through the centuries. Coverage is both chronological and thematic. Credit given for only one of R373 or U484.

R379 Topics in Tibetan Studies (3 cr.) Variable title course for topics in Tibetan studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

R382 Cultural History of the Ottoman Empire and Modern Turkey (3 cr.) Introduction to the rich and varied cultures of Turkey, from Ottoman times to present. Considers issues such as literary and vernacular languages, women, Kemal Atatürk, Turkish Islams, education, Kurdish nationalism, and Turkey’s relations with Europe. Turkish films and visual materials used with readings.

R383 Ten Sultans, One Empire: Ottoman Classical Age, 1300–1600 (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Traces the Ottoman Empire from its beginnings to its height under Suleyman the Magnificent. Themes include Turks before the empire, Asia Minor before the Turks, rival principalities, centralization, Ottomans as European and Middle Eastern, economy, society, religion, law, learning, ethnic/cultural diversity, and the “classical age” as a concept.

R389 Topics in Turkish Studies (3 cr.) Variable title course for topics in Turkish studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

R392 Uralic Peoples and Cultures (3 cr.) S & H Surveys the Uralic (Finno-Ugric and Samoyed) peoples of northern Europe and Siberia. Topics include their origins and history, traditional and modern cultures, ethnic and national identity, development and modernization, and political independence and Russian rule. Also covers interrelations among Uralic peoples in the modern era. Credit given for only one of R392 or U370.

R393 The Mongol Century (3 cr.) S & H, CSA In-depth exploration of Chinggis Khan’s Mongol Empire from its origins in the twelfth century in the continent-wide breakdown of the 1330s–1370s. Primary sources (Mongolian, Chinese, Middle Eastern, and European) in translation, including many of the medieval era’s greatest histories and travelogues. Credit given for only one of R393 or U368.

R394 Environmental Problems and Social Constraints in Northern and Central Eurasia (3 cr.) Analyzes environmental and social conditions in the immense region of Northern and Central Eurasia (former Soviet Union). Covers general environmental and political situations; environmental transformation under Soviet rule; environmental and health problems; conclusions on current trends. Credit given for only one of R394 or U374.

R395 Politics of Identity in China and Inner Asia (3 cr.) Challenges the assumption that terms such as “Chinese,” “Taiwanese,” or “Kazakh” represent straightforward concepts. Via theories of identity, and careful attention to the history of China and Inner Asia, explores and explodes the association of identity and descent, language and ethnicity, citizenship and nationality.

R399 Topics in Central Eurasian Studies (1–4 cr.) Variable title course for topics in Central Eurasian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours in R399 and U320.

R411 Ethnic History of Central Asia (3 cr.) S & H A survey of the formation of major ethnic groups inhabiting Central Asia and their traditional cultures. Examines how nomadic migrations, imperial policies, and nationalism have affected inter-ethnic relations as background to current ethnic issues in Central Asia. Credit given for only one of R411 or U496.

R412 Central Asia under Russian Rule (3 cr.) S & H Survey of Russia and Central Asia’s complex relations, covering Russian expansion in the sixteenth century, Russian conquest in the nineteenth century, socio-political developments, and the emergence of modern nations in the 1920s. Themes include mechanism of Empire, dynamics between conqueror and conquered, and colonial administration of Islamic peoples. Credit given for only one of R412 or U494.

R413 Islamic Central Asia, Sixteenth–Nineteenth Centuries (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Surveys Islamic Central Asia from the sixteenth century to the Russian conquest, especially Chinggisid Uzbek states and the “tribal” dynasties, but also East Turkestan to 1755, and nomadic Qasaqs, Qirghiz, Turkmens. Themes include political institutions, legitimation, nomads, and sedentaries; ethnic developments; religion and culture; sources and historiography. Credit given for only one of R413 or U493.

R414 The Yasavi Sufis and Central Asian Islam (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Surveys the Yasavi Sufi tradition, famous for the magnificent shrine complex built by Timur and the collection of Turkic mystical poetry ascribed to Ahmad Yasavi. There is much more to the Yasavi tradition, however, and it is an unparalleled window on the religious history of Islamic Central Asia. Credit given for only one of R414 or U393.

R415 The Naqshbandi Sufi Tradition in Central Asia (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Exploration of Sufism in Central Asia, challenges under Mongol rule, early founding figures, doctrinal profile and practices, and the subsequent history of the Naqshbandi communities in the modern era.

R416 Religion and Power in Islamic Central Asia (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Exploration of the roles of religious figures and institutions in sanctioning, exercising, and/or undermining political authority in Islamic Central Asia. Focuses on the political influence wielded by the local representatives of Islam’s spiritual ideal, especially Sufi shaykhs and how they used their extraordinary socio-economic and political power. Credit given for only one of R416 or U498.

R441 Art and Music of Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Hungary (3 cr.) A & H, CSA The nineteenth and twentieth centuries saw the birth of Hungary’s greatest artists and musicians, the development of national institutions in the arts, and debates over tradition versus innovation and Hungarian folk elements versus integration into Europe’s artistic mainstream. Surveys these major developments in Hungarian visual art and music.

R462 Modern Inner Mongolia (3 cr.) Exploration of Inner Mongolia’s history from 1850 to present. Themes include Inner Mongolia as a bi-ethnic borderland, demography, the “New Schools Movement,” pan-Mongolism, land reform, development, and the environment. Includes issues of ethnicity, state-building, and globalization in both Inner Asian and Chinese contexts.

R493 Nationalism in Central Eurasia (3 cr.) An introduction to nationalism in Central Eurasia, and to its key works and questions. How are nations related? Are nations imagined and invented or ancient and enduring? Are nationalism, communism, and religiosity necessarily opposed? Are indigenous nationalisms more authentic than “official nationalisms”? Is Central Eurasian nationalism a “derivative discourse,” imported from somewhere?

R494 Uralic Linguistics (3 cr.) Studies linguistics of the Uralic language family (Hungarian, Finnish, Estonian, and other languages in Russia), beginning with the proto-Uralic and relationships among Uralic languages. Focus is on topics such as agglutination, vowel harmony, complex locative case systems, and sociolinguistics of Uralic languages in Russia.

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Chemistry

Major in Biochemistry—B.S.
Course Description

Major in Biochemistry—B.S.

Requirements Students must complete all of the following fundamental skills and distribution requirements:

  1. Writing, same as B.A. degree.
  2. Foreign language, 3 credit hours of any foreign language at the second-year level.
  3. Arts and humanities, two courses.
  4. Social and historical studies, two courses.
  5. Natural and mathematical sciences, fulfilled by major.

Major Requirements Students must complete all of the following course work with a grade of C– or higher in each course:

  1. 45 credit hours of chemistry, including A314, A316, N330, C341, C342, S343, C361-C362 or C361-C481, C484, C485 and C487 or B487. The following courses may not be counted in the 45 credit hours required for the major: C103, C107, G201, G207, C240, G307, G407, and G499.
  2. At least 5 of the remaining credit hours must be in lecture courses at the 400 level or above.
  3. At least 4 of the remaining credit hours must be in laboratory courses.
  4. Mathematics M211 and M212.
  5. Physics P221 and P222.
  6. Biology L112, L211, and at least one of the following: L311, L312, M250-M255, M430.

    Students must also complete the requirements and procedures listed in this supplement under “General Requirements for Bachelor’s Degrees.”

Recommendations Chemistry C481 is recommended over Chemistry C362.

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Course Description

G408 Seminar in Green Chemistry (1 cr.) This seminar series focuses on the chemical aspects of sustainable chemistry, a chemical philosophy encouraging the design of products/processes that reduce or eliminate the use and generation of hazardous substances. Invited speakers consider sustainable design from multiple perspectives involving industry, academia, and public policy.

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Classical Studies

Major in Latin or Greek
Major in Classical Civilization: Culture and Literature
Major in Classical Civilization: Art and Archaeology
Minor in Greek
Minor in Latin
Minor in Classical Civilization
Course Description
Cross-listed Courses

Major in Latin or Greek

Requirements Students must complete a minimum of 27 credit hours, including the following:

  1. 18 credit hours of Latin and Greek courses. For majors with a concentration in Latin, any Greek course and Latin courses at or above L250 (with the exception of L300) will apply to this requirement, and at least two of the Latin courses (not including L400 or L495) must be at the 400 level. For majors with a concentration in Greek, any Greek course and Latin courses at or above L200 (with the exception of L300) will apply to this requirement.
  2. One of the following classical civilization courses: C308, C310, C311, C321, C350, C351, C360, C361, C395, C405, C409, C412, C413, C414, C416, C419, C420, C421, C422, C423, C491, or C494. Note: C494 is recommended. One course from the list of cross-listed courses (see below) may be applied to this requirement.
  3. Six additional credit hours of Greek, Latin, or classical civilization courses. L100, L150, L300, and C209 do not apply to this requirement.

Students must also complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Major in Classical Civilization: Culture and Literature

Requirements Students must complete a minimum of 27 credit hours, including the following:

  1. C101, C102, C205, C206, and C494 or H494
  2. One of the following: C308, C310, C311, C350, C351, C360, C361, or History C376, C377, C388, C390.
  3. 9 credit hours of additional course work chosen from the following: C308, C310, C311, C321, C350, C351, C360, C361, C396, C405, C408, C409, C416, C491, or any of the courses cross-listed under Literature and Culture.

A course in Greek or Roman history or CLAS C413 or C414 is recommended.

Students must also complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Major in Classical Civilization: Art and Archaeology

Requirements Students must complete a minimum of 27 credit hours, including the following:

  1. C101, C102, C205, C206, C494 or H494.
  2. One of the following: C308, C310, C311, C350, C351, C360, C361, or History C376, C377, C388, C390.
  3. 9 credit hours of additional course work chosen from the following: C412, C413, C414, C416, C419, C420, C421, C422, C396, C423, or any of the courses cross-listed under Art and Archaeology.

Students must also complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Minor in Greek

Requirements 15 credit hours or more in Greek, including at least 3 credit hours at the 300 or 400 level.

  1. The minor is to be completed with an average grade of C or higher.
  2. With the approval of the director of undergraduate studies, up to 3 credit hours of G495 may be substituted and counted toward the minor.
  3. Students may transfer up to 6 hours of credit from another institution to count toward the minor with the approval of the director of undergraduate studies.

A student majoring in Greek or Latin may not earn a minor in Greek.

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Minor in Latin

Requirements 15 credit hours or more in Latin at or above the 200 level (excluding L300), including at least 6 hours at the 300–400 level (not including L400 or L495).

  1. The minor is to be completed with an average grade of C or higher.
  2. With the approval of the director of undergraduate studies, up to 3 credit hours of L495 may be substituted and counted toward the minor.
  3. Students may transfer up to 6 hours of credit from another institution to count toward the minor with the approval of the director of undergraduate studies.

A student majoring in Greek or Latin may not earn a minor in Latin.

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Minor in Classical Civilization

Requirementss 15 credit hours or more in classical civilization courses.

  1. The minor is to be completed with an average grade of C or higher.
  2. With the approval of the director of undergraduate studies, up to 3 credit hours of conference courses (C495, G495, L495) may be substituted and counted toward the minor.
  3. Students may transfer up to 6 credit hours from another institution to count toward the minor with the approval of the director of undergraduate studies.

Two tracks are available:

Literary and Cultural Emphasis
The following courses are required: C101 or C102, C205 or C405. Any three of the following courses may be counted toward the minor: C308, C310, C311, C321, C350, C351, C360, C361, C396, C405, C408, C409, C416, C491, or any of the courses cross-listed under Literature and Culture. See requirements 1, 2, and 3 above.

Art and Archaeology Emphasis
The following courses are required: C101 or C102, C206. Any three of the following courses may be counted toward the minor: C396, C412, C413, C414, C416, C419, C420, C421, C422, C423, or any of the courses crosslisted under Art and Archaeology. See requirements 1, 2, and 3 above.

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Course Description

C321 Classical Myth and Culture in Film (3 cr.) A & H P: C205 or permission of the instructor. Examines depictions of ancient Greece and Rome in modern cinema and television. Questions to be asked: How historically accurate are these onscreen versions of antiquity? What conventions and stereotypes appear? How has classical mythology been treated? How do these films reflect the period in which they were made?

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Cross-listed Courses

Art and Archaeology
ANTH P220 The Rise and Fall of Ancient Civilizations (3 cr.)
ANTH P301 Archaeological Methods and Analyses (3 cr.)
ANTH P409 Archaeological Ethics (3 cr.)
FINA A310 Topics in Ancient Art (3 cr.)
FINA A311 The Art of the Classical Age of Greece (3 cr.)
FINA A312 The Art of the Roman Empire from Augustus to Constantine (3 cr.)
FINA A313 Greek Pottery and Painting (3 cr.)
FINA A314 History of Greek Sculpture (3 cr.)
FINA A316 Ancient Art from Alexander the Great to Augustus (3 cr.)
FINA A410 Topics in Ancient Art (3–4 cr.)
FINA A415 Roman Painting (4 cr.)
FINA A416 Greek Architecture (4 cr.)
FINA A417 Roman Sculpture (4 cr.)
FINA A418 Roman Architecture (4 cr.)

Literature and Culture
HIST C376 Greek History: Bronze Age to the Persian Wars (3 cr.)
HIST C377 Greek History: The Persian Wars to the Legacy of Alexander (3 cr.)
HIST C388 Roman History (3 cr.)
HIST C390 The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (3 cr.)
PHIL P201 Ancient Greek Philosophy (3 cr.)
REL R220 Introduction to the New Testament (3 cr.)
REL R318 Ancient Mediterranean Religions (3 cr.)
REL R325 Paul and His Influence in Early Christianity
REL R420 Religions of Ancient Rome (3 cr.)

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Cognitive Science

Course Description

Q320 Computation in the Cognitive and Information Sciences (2 cr.)
P: COGS Q260 or CSCI C211 with a grade of B or higher. Students will develop their computer programming skills and learn to write programs that simulate cognitive processes and run experiments with human subjects. The relation between computation and intelligence and a selection of approaches from artificial intelligence will be explored.

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Communication and Culture

Course Description

C222 Democratic Deliberation (3 cr.) A & H Principles and practices of deliberation that enrich democratic culture in civic affairs.

C355 Public Memory in Communication and Culture (3 cr.) Examines the contested nature of public memory from a communication and culture perspective. Focuses on the nature of public memory, its methods of perpetuation, its role in shaping citizens, and its implications for society.

C357 Politics of Style (3 cr.) A & H Critical examination of fashion or other everyday aesthetic expressions as political and cultural practices. Style is analyzed as a form of agency in relation to such issues as gender, consumer culture, and social class.

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Comparative Literature

Course Description

C147 Images of the Self: East and West (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Topics such as the individual in society, the outcast as hero, and artistic sensibility, examined in selected works of Western and Eastern literature from ancient to modern times.

C151 Introduction to Popular Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSB The serious study of entertainment for mass consumption, including popular theatre and vaudeville, bestsellers, mass circulation magazines, popular music, phonograph records, and popular aspects of radio, film, and television. Provides the basic background to other popular culture courses in comparative literature.

C255 Modern Literature and Other Arts: An Introduction (3 cr.) A & H, CSB The study of literature, painting, and music and the ways in which meaning is expressed in such forms. Investigates similarities and differences among the arts. Examples selected from the past 200 years. No previous knowledge of any art required. I Sem., II Sem.

C337 The Twentieth Century: Tradition and Change (3 cr.) A & H, CSB
R: C205 or 3 credit hours of literature. The search for forms and language to express new understandings of art and reality in the era of modernism.

C338 Literature Today: 1950 to the Present (3 cr.) R: C205 or 3 credit hours of literature. An exploration of major literary movements, styles, or currents shaping literature after World War II, such as the theatre of the absurd, postmodernism, magical realism, cyberpunk, postcolonialism, and transnationalism.

C355 Literature, the Arts, and Their Interrelationship (3 cr.) A & H Discussion of theoretical foundations for study of the relationship of the arts; detailed analysis of specific works illustrating interaction of literature with other arts.

C361 African Literature and Other Arts (3 cr.) A & H, CSA R: C205 or 3 credit hours of literature. A focus on critical issues in the field of African letters, such as transnationalism, the question of orality, choice of language, the economics and politics of publishing—both within and outside the continent, and their impacts on cultural forms including new, nonliterary media. Authors such as Achebe, Aidoo, Armah, Diop, Farah, Head, Kunene, Ngugi, p’Bitek, Sembene, and Soyinka.

C370 Comparative Studies in Western and Middle Eastern Literatures
(3 cr.) A & H, CSA
Literary exchanges and influences between Western and Middle Eastern traditions in Arabic, Persian, or Turkish. Period and topic vary. May be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

C445 Early Traditions of Christian Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA R: C205 or 3 credit hours of literature. Imaginative religious literature by Christian authors to the twelfth century; relationship to Jewish, classical, and Muslim cultural traditions; emergence of new genres; development and transformation of early themes and forms.

C499 Studies for Honors (2–6 cr.; 12 cr. max.) P: Consent of the director of undergraduate studies. Independent reading and research in conjunction with an advanced course in comparative literature or an honors paper or project. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

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Computer Science

Course Description

A112 Programming Concepts (1.5 cr.) P: A110, A111, or equivalent computing experience. Introduction to programming for users of computer systems. Emphasis on problemsolving techniques. Lecture and laboratory. An eight-week course. Crosslisted with INFO-I 110. Credit given for only one of CSCI A112 or INFO I110.

A113 Data Analysis Using Spreadsheets (1.5 cr.) P: A110, A111, or equivalent. An introduction to data analysis using spreadsheets, including both scientific and business applications. Elementary statistical concepts and their applications to data analysis. Emphasis on problem-solving techniques. Lecture and laboratory. An eight-week course.

A114 Introduction to Databases (1.5 cr.) P: CSCI A110, A111, or equivalent. Introduction to database design concepts. Entering and modifying data, accessing data using visual tools and SQL, building database applications using forms and application development tools. Emphasis on problem-solving techniques. Lecture and laboratory. An eight-week course. Crosslisted with INFO I111. Credit given for only one of CSCI A114 or INFO I111.

A190 Excursions into Computing (1–3 cr.) For non–science majors. This course exposes students to information technology in everyday life and work. Use of computers in everyday problem solving. Labs include hands-on experience with computer applications packages. No credit toward a major in computer science.

A201 Introduction to Programming I (4 cr.) N & M P: Two years of high school mathematics or MATH M014. Fundamental programming constructs, including loops, arrays, and files. General problem-solving techniques. Emphasis on modular programming and developing good programming style. Not intended for computer science majors. Credit given for only one of CSCI A201 and A597.

A202 Introduction to Programming II (4 cr.) P: A201 or A304. Advanced programming techniques; user-defined functions and types; recursion versus iteration; parameter-passing mechanisms. Classic abstract data types and algorithms. Programming style. Object-oriented programming. May be used in place of C212 to satisfy computer science major requirements.

A216 Digital Multimedia Concepts and Technologies (3 cr.) P: A110, A111, or equivalent computing experience. In-depth introduction to the technologies of digital hardware and software relevant to efficient multimedia communication methods. Lectures focus on computational foundations, underlying concepts, and digital methods. Laboratory provides direct experience with concepts presented in lecture, using latest available digital tools to create direct and Web-based multimedia content. Lecture and laboratory.

A290 Adventures in Computing (1–2 cr.) Exploration of topics in computing. Common topics include tools for power users. Prerequisites vary by topic. Lecture and laboratory format. Three A290 courses will count as one of seven advanced elective courses for majors.

C211 Introduction to Computer Science (4 cr.) N & M P: High school precalculus math. A first course in computer science for those intending to take advanced computer science courses. Introduction to programming and to algorithm design and analysis. Using the Scheme programming language, the course covers several programming paradigms. Credit given for only one of C211 or H211. Lecture and laboratory.

H211 Introduction to Computer Science, Honors (4 cr.) N & M P: High school precalculus math. Honors version of C211. Credit given for only one of H211 or C211.

C241 Discrete Structures for Computer Science (3 cr.) N & M P: CSCI C211. R: MATH M211. Induction and recursive programs, running time, asymptotic notations, combinatorics and discrete probability, trees and lists, the relational data model, graph algorithms, propositional and predicate logic.

H241 Discrete Structures for Computer Science, Honors (3 cr.) N & M
P: H211 or C211. R: MATH M211. Honors version of C241. Credit given for only one of H241 or C241.

C290 Tools for Computing (1–2 cr.) Exploration of topics in computing. Common topics include tools for users. Prerequisites vary by topic. Lecture and laboratory format. May be repeated for credit up to 6 credit hours.

C295 Leadership and Learning (1 cr.) Students work within the community to foster interest, knowledge, and appreciation of the computing sciences by preparing the leading presentations and hands-on activities for children in middle and secondary schools. Not for major credit. May be repeated for up to 6 credit hours.

C311 Programming Languages (4 cr.) N & M P: C212. P or C: C241. Systematic approach to programming languages. Relationships among languages, properties and features of languages, and the computer environment necessary to use languages. Lecture and laboratory.

H311 Programming Languages, Honors (4 cr.) N & M P: H212 or C212. P or C: H241 or C241. Honors version of C311. Credit given for only one of H311 or C311.

C343 Data Structures (4 cr.) N & M P: C212 or H212. P or C: C241 or H241. Systematic study of data structures encountered in computing problems, structure and use of storage media, methods of representing structured data, and techniques for operating on data structures. Lecture and laboratory.

H343 Data Structures, Honors (4 cr.) N & M P: H212 or C212. P or C: H241. Honors version of C343. Credit given for only one of H343 or C343.

B351 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence and Computer Simulation
(3 cr.) N & M (COGS Q351)
P: C211. A survey of techniques for machine intelligence and their relation to human intelligence. Topics include modeling techniques, neural networks and parallel processing systems, problem-solving methods, vision, heuristics, production systems, speech perception, and natural language understanding. Credit given for only one of B351 or COGS Q351.

P436 Introduction to Operating Systems (4 cr.) N & M P: C335, C343, or honors equivalents. Organization and construction of computer systems that manage computational resources. Topics include specification and implementation of concurrency, process scheduling, storage management, device handlers, mechanisms for event coordination. Lecture and laboratory.

P438 Introduction to Computer Networks (4 cr.) P: C335. Foundations of computer networks. Networking hardware technology such as Ethernet, ATM, wireless. Networking protocols (TCP/IP), routing, error correcting. Network services such as DNS, Web servers, virtual private networks (VPN), open SSL. Credit given for only one of CSCI P438 and P538.

B443 Introduction to Computer Architecture (3 cr.) N & M P: C335 and C343, or honors versions. Principles of processors, control units, and storage systems. Registers, buses, microprogramming, virtual storage. Relationship between computer architecture and system software.

B461 Database Concepts (3 cr.) N & M P: C241, C343, or honors versions. Introduction to database concepts and systems. Topics include database models and systems: hierarchical, network, relational, and object-oriented; database design principles; structures for efficient data access; query languages and processing; database applications development; views; security; concurrency; recovery. Students participate in a project to design, implement, and query a database, using a standard database system. Credit given for only one of B461 or B561.

P465-P466 Software Engineering for Information Systems I-II (3-3 cr.)
N & M
P: C343, or honors versions. P or C: B461. Analysis, design, and implementation of information systems. Project specification. Data modeling. Software design methodologies. Software quality assurance. Supervised team development of a real system for a real client.

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Criminal Justice

Major in Criminal Justice
Minor in Criminal Justice
Approved Optional Courses
Area Certificate in Criminal Justice
Departmental Honors Program
Course Description

Major in Criminal Justice

Requirements Students must complete the following:

  1. At least 27 credit hours in criminal justice, including CJUS P100, P200, P202, P290, and K300 (or a substitute approved by the department; see undergraduate advisor).
  2. Two 400-level courses in criminal justice, and two electives. The electives must be at the 300 or 400 level. Only one of the electives may be taken from the list of Approved Optional Courses; the remaining elective must be in criminal justice.

Majors may substitute a course in statistical methods from another department of the College of Arts and Sciences, but in that case no course from the list of Approved Optional Courses may count toward the major. Students who are interested in pursuing this option (i.e., an alternative statistics course) must first verify their eligibility with the Department of Criminal Justice.

Students must complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, including the requirement for a minimum of 25 College of Arts and Sciences credit hours in the major subject area.

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Minor in Criminal Justice

Requirements

  1. P100, P200, and P202.
  2. Two courses in criminal justice at the 300–400 level to be taken on the Bloomington campus. (CJUS K300 does not count in the minor.)
  3. At least 9 credit hours of the above courses must be taken in residence on the Bloomington campus.

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Approved Optional Courses

African American and African Diaspora Studies
A382 Black Community, Law, and Social Change (3 cr.) S & H

Anthropology
E405 Principles of Social Organization (3 cr.)

Economics
E308 Survey of Public Finance (3 cr.) S & H

History
A325 American Constitutional History (3 cr.) S & H

Philosophy
P342 Problems of Ethics (3 cr.) A & H
P345 Problems in Social and Political Philosophy (3 cr.) A & H
P352 Logic and Philosophy (3 cr.) A & H

Political Science
Y302 Public Bureaucracy in Modern Society (3 cr.) S & H
Y303 Formation of Public Policy in the United States (3 cr.) S & H
Y304 Constitutional Law (3 cr.) S & H
Y305 Constitutional Rights and Liberties (3 cr.) S & H
Y308 Urban Politics (3 cr.) S & H
Y311 Democracy and National Security (3 cr.) S & H

Psychological and Brain Sciences
P319 Psychology of Personality (3 cr.) S & H
P320 Social Psychology (3 cr.) S & H
P324 Abnormal Psychology (3 cr.) S & H
P434 Community Psychology (3 cr.)
P460 Women: A Psychological Perspective (3 cr.) S & H

Religious Studies
R336 Religion in the United States, 1850–Present (3 cr.) A & H

Sociology
S316 The Family (3 cr.) S & H
S320 Deviant Behavior and Social Control (3 cr.) S & H
S326 Law and Society (3 cr.) S & H
S335 Race and Ethnic Relations (3 cr.) S & H, CSA

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Area Certificate in Criminal Justice

Requirements Students who complete departmental requirements for a major in criminal justice and earn either a B.S. or B.F.A. degree in the College of Arts and Sciences or a bachelor’s degree from another Indiana University Bloomington school are eligible for the certificate.

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Departmental Honors Program

The department offers outstanding students the opportunity to pursue important issues and problems in depth and to work closely with faculty in the departmental honors program. Students who have completed P100, P200, P202, P290, and K300, and who have a College of Arts and Sciences grade point average of at least 3.300, may be admitted to the honors program in their junior year. For graduation with a B.A. with honors in criminal justice, students must:

  1. Earn a GPA of 3.300 or higher in the major upon graduation.
  2. Complete P399 Honors Seminar. In P399 the student will do exploratory reading in an area of interest, select and develop a research topic, and write a prospectus for the honors thesis.
  3. Write and present an undergraduate honors thesis under the direction of a faculty advisor. The thesis must be read and approved by a three-person faculty committee. A maximum of 6 hours of credit may be earned for the honors thesis by registering for P499.
  4. Complete all other requirements for a major in criminal justice.

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Course Description

P481 Field Experience in Criminal Justice (3 or 6 cr.) P: Junior standing, completion of P100, P200, P202, and P290, and department approval of project. Field experience with directed readings and writing. Credit will not count toward requirements of the major or the minor. Students may complete no more than a maximum of 6 credit hours for any combination of P210, P281, and P481.

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East Asian Languages and Cultures

East Asian Culture Courses, by Subject Area
Special Courses Designated to Either Track Depending on Subject Matter
Other courses that may count toward the majors
Course Descriptions

East Asian Culture Courses, by Subject Area

History, Literature, and Culture
EALC E300 Studies in East Asian Literature A & H, CSA
EALC E301 Chinese Language and Culture A & H, CSA
EALC E303 Korean Folk and Elite Cultures A & H, CSA
EALC E305 Korean Language and Culture S & H, CSA
EALC E321 Traditional Japanese Literature A & H, CSA
EALC E322 Modern Japanese Literature A & H, CSA
EALC E331 Traditional Chinese Literature A & H, CSA
EALC E332 Chinese Literature since 1300 A & H, CSA
EALC E333 Studies in Chinese Cinema A & H, CSA
EALC E351 Studies in East Asian Thought A & H, CSA
EALC E352 Studies in East Asian History S & H, CSA
EALC E371 Twentieth-Century Chinese Literature A & H, CSA
EALC E372 Japanese Fiction and Culture A & H, CSA
EALC E374 Early Chinese Philosophy A & H, CSA
EALC E384 East Asian Nationalism and Cultural Identity S & H, CSA
EALC E385 Asian Americans: Cultural Conflict and Identity S & H, CSA
EALC E473 History of Japanese Theatre and Drama A & H, CSA

Cross-Listed Courses

CMLT C365 Japanese-Western Literary Relations A & H, CSA
CMLT C375 Imagining China, Translating China A & H, CSA
FINA A360 Topics in East Asian Art A & H, CSA
FINA A464 Art and Archaeology of Early China S & H, CSA
FINA A466 Early Chinese Painting S & H, CSA
FINA A467 Later Chinese Painting S & H, CSA
FOLK F305 Asian Folklore/Folklife/Folk Music A & H, CSA
HIST G357 Premodern Japan S & H, CSA
HIST G358 Early Modern Japan S & H, CSA
HIST G369 Modern Japan S & H, CSA
HIST G372 Modern Korea S & H, CSA
HIST G380 Early China S & H, CSA
HIST G382 China: The Age of Glory S & H, CSA
HIST G383 China: The Later Empires S & H, CSA
HIST G385 Modern China S & H, CSA
HIST G387 Contemporary China S & H, CSA
REL R350 East Asian Buddhism A & H, CSA
REL R357 Religions in Japan A & H, CSA
REL R450 Topics in the Buddhist Tradition A & H
REL R452 Topics in East Asian Religions A & H, CSA
REL R469 Topics in Taoism and Chinese Religion A & H, CSA
THTR T468 Non–Western Theater and Drama A & H, CSA

Politics, Social Science, and Business
EALC E302 Geographic Patterns in China S & H, CSA
EALC E316 Computer-Enhanced Language Learning
EALC E350 Studies in East Asian Society S & H, CSA
EALC E354 Society and Education in Japan S & H, CSA
EALC E384 East Asian Nationalism and Cultural Identity S & H, CSA
EALC E385 Asian Americans: Cultural Conflict and Identity S & H, CSA
EALC E386 United States–East Asian Relations S & H, CSA
EALC E390 Contemporary Chinese Politics S & H, CSA
EALC E392 Chinese Foreign Policy S & H, CSA
EALC E393 China’s Political Economy S & H, CSA
EALC E394 Business and Public Policy in Japan S & H, CSA
EALC E395 Japan in World Trade and Politics S & H, CSA

Cross-Listed Courses

HIST G357 Premodern Japan S & H, CSA
HIST G358 Early Modern Japan S & H, CSA
HIST G369 Modern Japan S & H, CSA
HIST G372 Modern Korea S & H, CSA
HIST G380 Early China S & H, CSA
HIST G382 China: The Age of Glory S & H, CSA
HIST G383 China: The Later Empires S & H, CSA
HIST G385 Modern China S & H, CSA
HIST G387 Contemporary China S & H, CSA
POLS Y333 Chinese Politics S & H, CSA
POLS Y334 Japanese Politics S & H, CSA

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Special Courses Designated to Either Track Depending on Subject Matter

EALC E495 Individual Readings
EALC E498 Internship in East Asian Languages and Cultures
EALC H399 Reading for Honors
EALC H499 Honors Thesis

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Other courses that may count toward the majors

C401-C402 Fourth-Year Chinese I-II
J401-J402 Fourth-Year Japanese I-II
K401-K402 Fourth-Year Korean I-II
J421 Introduction to Japanese Linguistics N & M
C425 Teaching Chinese Language
J425 Teaching Japanese Language
E201 Issues in East Asian Literature A & H, CSA
E202 Issues in East Asian Traditions and Ideas A & H, CSA
E203 Issues in East Asian Cultural History S & H, CSA
E204 Issues in East Asian Society S & H, CSA
E231 Japan: The Living Tradition A & H, CSA
E232 China: The Enduring Heritage A & H, CSA
E233 Survey of Korean Civilization A & H, CSA
E251 Traditional East Asian Civilizations S & H, CSA
E252 Modern East Asian Civilization S & H, CSA
E270 Japanese Language and Society A & H, CSA
E271 Twentieth-Century Japanese Culture A & H, CSA
E497 Overseas Study Tour A & H, CSA
CMLT C257 Asian Literature and Other Arts A & H, CSA
CMLT C265 Introduction to East Asian Poetry A & H, CSA
CMLT C266 Introduction to East Asian Fiction A & H, CSA
CMLT C291 Studies in Non-Western Film A & H, CSA
FINA A262 Introduction to Japanese Art and Cultures S & H, CSA
HIST H208 American–East Asian Relations S & H, CSA
REL R265 Introduction to Taoism A & H, CSA

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Course Descriptions

C457 Chinese in Humanities (3 cr.) P: Grade of B or higher in C402 or equivalent proficiency. Advanced language practice associated with authentic academic texts in humanities disciplines. Emphasis on interpreting, analyzing, and presenting Chinese cultural concepts, artifacts, and events from a global perspective, for an authentic purpose, and within a performance assessment framework. May be offered independently in Chinese, or linked with an English-language content course. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

C467 Chinese in Social Science (3 cr.) P: Grade of B or higher in C402 or equivalent proficiency. Advanced language practice associated with authentic academic texts in social science disciplines. Emphasis on interpreting, analyzing, and presenting Chinese cultural concepts, practice, and events from a global perspective, for an authentic purpose, and within a performance assessment framework. May be offered independently in Chinese, or linked with an English-language content course. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

J110 Japanese for Advanced Beginners (3 cr.) Designed for students who already have some familiarity with beginner-level Japanese, but who are not proficient enough in the language to meet the prerequisite for J102. The goal of the course is to enable students to improve their speaking, listening, reading, writing, and more generally, communication skills in Japanese. Credit given for only one of J101 or J110.

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Economics

Course Description

Y398 Internship in Economics (1–3 cr.) P: Departmental approval required. Supervised work experience in an academic or business environment, including as a teaching assistant for undergraduate classes. Performance evaluation by a faculty mentor. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Does not count toward a major or minor in economics.

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English

Course Descriptions

W401 Advanced Fiction Writing (3 cr.) P: Submission of acceptable manuscript to instructor in advance of registration. R: W301. May be repeated once for credit.

W403 Advanced Poetry Writing (3 cr.)
P: Submission of acceptable manuscript to instructor in advance of registration. R: W303. May be repeated once for credit.

L111 Discovering Literature (3 cr.) A & H Designed to give students an introduction both to various forms of literary expression and different modes of literary study and appreciation.

L112 Experiencing World Cultures through Literatures in English (3 cr.)
A & H
Investigates a diversity of world cultures and examines various literary representations (written in English) of their imaginative, emotional, and moral experiences.

L223 Introduction to Ethnic American Literature (3 cr.) A & H Introduces students to a range of ethnic American literature, featuring works in varied combinations by African American, Native American, Asian American, Chicano/a or Latino/a American, Jewish American, Italian American, Irish American, Arab American, and/or other ethnic American authors.

L224 Introduction to World Literatures in English (3 cr.) A & H Comparing and analyzing works originating in at least two continents, this course is designed to introduce students to the complexity of human experience and diversity of global English as represented in literary works from various periods and world cultures.

L354 American Literature since 1914 (3 cr.) A & H Provides an understanding of the pivotal literary innovations and cultural changes during this period. Literary movements such as naturalism, realism, and modernism may be the subject of focus, as might changes in race and gender relations, labor politics, immigration policies, regionalism, and the increasing shift from agricultural to urban economics.

L374 Ethnic American Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Literature about the American ethnic experience, selected from works by African American, Native American, Asian American, Chicano/a or Latino/a American, Jewish American, Italian American, Irish American, Arab American, and/or other ethnic American authors.

L399 Junior Seminar (3 cr.) P: L202. Small seminar on various topics, encouraging independent thinking and research methods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

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Environmental Science

Major in Environmental Science—B.S.
Concentration (minimum of 18 credit hours)

Major in Environmental Science—B.S.

Fundamental Skills and Distribution (variable credit hours depending on course selection)

  1. Writing: English Composition (ENG W131, W231) and Intensive Writing (IW); senior research thesis within major fulfills IW requirement.
  2. Mathematics: Major fulfills requirement.
  3. Public speaking: Select one course from CMCL C121, C122, C205, C223, C225, C228, C229, or THTR T115 or T120.
  4. Foreign language: Student must complete the study of a single foreign language through the second semester of the first year of college-level course work. All or part of the requirement may be fulfilled by performance on placement examinations.
  5. One Topics/Freshman Seminar course from Arts and Humanities or from Social and Historical Studies; the course chosen for this requirement may be used in partial fulfillment of requirement 6 below if the course selected carries the Arts and Humanities designation.
  6. Arts and Humanities: Two courses chosen from “Appendix II: Approved Distribution Courses” in this supplement; COLL E103 may fulfill one of these two courses.
  7. Social and Historical Studies: One course with an emphasis on economics or political science, selected from ECON E201, E202, E364, POLS Y103, or Y313.
  8. Social and Historical Studies: One course with an emphasis on public policy, selected from SPEA V263, V371, V376, V499, or V472.
  9. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: Major fulfills requirement.

Core Requirements (61–63 credit hours)

  1. Biology: BIOL L111 and either BIOL L473 or SPEA E332.
  2. Chemistry (one of the following sequences):*
    1. CHEM C117, C118, and C341 or
    2. CHEM C117, R340, A314 and A316 or
    3. CHEM C117, R340, and N330
      * SPEA E464 may be used in place of CHEM C341 or R340, and CHEM C341 may be used in place of CHEM R340. Students who did not earn at least a B– in high school chemistry should contact the B.S.E.S. program director and the Department of Chemistry Undergraduate Placement Office to determine the appropriate starting course.
  3. Computing: CSCI A202, or GEOG G250, or SPEA E325. Any one of these three courses may be selected.
  4. Environmental Science overview: SPEA E262.
  5. Atmospheric Science: GEOG G304.
  6. Geological Science: GEOL G225.
  7. Field experience: GEOL G329 is offered at the IU Geological Field Station in Montana and should be taken during the summer following the fourth semester of enrollment.
    Students with certain needs can substitute two of the following courses for G329: BIOL L465 Advanced Field Biology, GEOG G350 Instrumentation and Field Methods in Atmospheric Science, SPEA E442 Habitat Analysis—Terrestrial, and SPEA E443 Habitat Analysis—Aquatic.
  8. Mathematics: MATH M211 (or M119 and X201), M212, and either MATH M343 or SPEA E426.
  9. Physics: PHYS P221 and P222.
  10. Statistics: MATH K300 or GEOG G488 or MATH M365 or SPEA K300.
  11. Environmental science senior research: Guided by a faculty member, each student undertakes a project closely related to his or her concentration (see below). Completion of a written thesis and an oral presentation are required; the thesis may be used to fulfill the College’s intensive writing requirement if the guidelines for this requirement are met. Students should enroll in 3 credit hours in the appropriate course within the faculty supervisor’s department (BIOL L490, CHEM C409, CSCI Y390, GEOG G450, GEOL G410, INFO I460, MATH M490, PHYS S406, SPEA E490) or other courses as appropriate given the affiliation of the faculty advisor.

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Concentration (minimum of 18 credit hours)

Whereas the core curriculum provides each student with a solid background in the basic subjects pertinent to the environmental sciences, the concentration is aimed at preparing students for graduate study or professional employment in specific fields. A list of the available concentration areas includes: Atmospheric Science, Ecosystem Science, General, Hydrology and Water Resources, Mathematical Modeling, Surficial Processes, and Pollution Control Technologies and Remediation. B.S.E.S. concentrations include a minimum of 18 credit hours of course work selected by the student in consultation with a faculty advisor, active in the field in which they have chosen to concentrate, and two additional faculty members. Each program is then approved by the B.S.E.S. Program Committee.

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Fine Arts

Major in History of Art—B.A.
History of Art Honors Program
Course Descriptions

Major in History of Art—B.A.

Requirements Students must complete at least 30 credit hours in art history, including the following:

  1. Two of the following survey courses: A101, A102, A155, and A160.
  2. 24 credit hours above the 100 level, including at least four courses at the 200–300 level and at least three courses at the 400 level. The 300- and 400-level courses should be distributed among at least four of the following different areas of art history: ancient, medieval, Renaissance and baroque, modern, Islamic, Asian, African/Oceanic/pre-Columbian, or art theory. Courses must be completed with a grade of C– or higher.

Students must complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Recommendations A reading knowledge of a foreign language and a minor in the humanities are recommended. Some studio course work is also recommended.

Residence Requirement At least 15 credit hours of art history must be completed in residence on the Bloomington campus, including two courses at the 300 level and two courses at the 400 level.

Transferred Credit All art history courses transferred from another institution or campus must be evaluated by the director of undergraduate studies in the Department of the History of Art before they may be applied toward the major.

Limit on Fine Arts Credit Hours A maximum of 63 credit hours of fine arts courses and a maximum of 42 credit hours in art history will count toward the 122 credit hours required for the B.A. degree.

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History of Art Honors Program

The fine arts honors program in history of art is designed to provide outstanding students with opportunities to pursue creative independent study and research. Admission to the program is by application, typically during the spring semester of the junior year. To be considered, a student must have a minimum GPA of 3.500 in history of art and a minimum 3.300 GPA overall. Eligible and interested students should consult the director of the history of art honors program.

The honors program includes a two-course sequence, A400 Senior Seminar
(4 cr.) and A499 Senior Honors Thesis (4 cr.), taken during the senior year. To graduate with honors in history of art, a student must earn an A– or higher in both courses and must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.500 in history of art and a minimum GPA of 3.300 overall.

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Course Descriptions

History of Art

A155 Introduction to African Art (3 cr.) A & H, CSA African art in its cultural setting. Major style areas: prehistoric Nok culture, kingdoms of Ife and Benin, Western Sudan, Guinea Coast, equatorial forests, Congo, eastern and southern Africa.

A300 Topics in Art History (1–3 cr.) R: FINA A102. Specialized topics in the study of art history. May be repeated with different topics for a total of 6 credit hours.

A480 Russian Art (4 cr.) S & H, CSA R: One Russian history course or art history course. Russian art from the twelfth century to the present. Emphasis on the period 1850 to the present: realism, the Slavic revival, symbolism, constructivism, and socialist realism.

Studio

S220 Textiles I (3 cr.) A & H An introduction to textiles and fiber-related techniques and concepts. This survey course investigates a variety of materials and processes including resist dyeing, printing, and felting, emphasizing the expressive potential of each of these techniques through demonstrations, lectures, and critiques.

S240 Basic Printmaking Media (3 cr.) A & H Introduction to printmaking. Emphasis on three basic media: intaglio, lithography, and silk screen. Problems in pictorial composition and drawing. Study of the interrelationships of all graphic media.

S260 Ceramics I (3 cr.) A & H A limited introduction to handbuilding, throwing, glaze mixing, and glaze application, including lectures on basic ceramic techniques. Critiques of student work.

S321 Textiles II (3 cr.) A & H P: S220 or instructor permission. Expands students’ technical, creative, and critical abilities when working with textile-related materials, processes, and concepts. Rotating semester topics include resist-dyeing, repeat-pattern design, screenprinting, weaving, pieced construction, single-line and off-loom construction. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

S351 Typography I (3 cr.) A & H P: S250 and consent of instructor. Studies in visual communication with an emphasis on typography, including measurement and structure, detail and refinement, hierarchy and legibility, tools, and application to various media in digital and print formats. An introduction to type history, aesthetics and analysis are also considered.

S421 Textiles III (cr. arr.) P: S321. A continued exploration of textile-related materials, processes, and concepts with an emphasis on independent investigation and production. May be repeated for a total of 20 credit hours.

S422 B.F.A Textiles (cr. arr.) Intensive study in textile-related materials, processes, and concepts through the production of a body of work reflecting the student’s individual interests. Regular individual meetings and group critiques are planned to foster dialogue and provide additional support. May be repeated for a total of 60 credit hours.

S449 B.F.A. Printmaking Seminar (2 cr.) Open to B.F.A. printmakers. Required each semester. Seminars will have different topics taught by printmaking faculty on a rotating basis. Special printmaking projects, critiques, and artists’ lectures related to the field of printmaking. Historical, technical, and conceptual issues discussed. May be repeated with different topics for a total of 20 credit hours. Group critiques held once a month as part of the seminar.

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Folklore and Ethnomusicology

Course Descriptions

E112 Black Music of Two Worlds (3 cr.) A & H, CSA An exploration of the relationships among musics of West and Central African people and their descendants in the United States, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Emphasis placed on the conceptual and aesthetic continuities between musical expression in Old and New World contexts—a uniformity which exists because of shared African cultural ancestry. Credit given for only one of FOLK E112, FOLK F112, or AAAD A112.

E295 Survey of Hip Hop (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Examines rap music and hip hop culture as artistic and sociocultural phenomena with emphasis on historical, cultural, economic, and political contexts. Topics include the coexistence of various hip hop styles, their appropriation by the music industry, and controversies resulting from the exploitation of hip hop as a commodity for national and global consumption. Credit given for only one of FOLK E295, FOLK F295, and AAAD A295.

E297 Popular Music of Black America (3 cr.) A & H, CSA A chronological survey of Black popular music from 1945–2000: rhythm and blues, soul, funk, disco, hip hop, and their derivative forms. Emphasis placed on the context for evolution and the contributions of African Americans to the development of a multibillion dollar music industry. Credit given for only one of FOLK E297, FOLK F397, AAAD A297, AAAD A397, or MUS M397.

E302 Music in African Life (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Study of how Africans create, perform, think about, and use music in their lives. Topics include traditional and popular musical styles in relationship to social and historical contexts, as well as translocal, transnational, and global cultural and musical exchanges in which Africans participate.

E345 Hip Hop Music and Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA P: Junior or senior standing. Examines rap music as artistic and sociological phenomena with emphasis on its historical and political contexts. Credit given for only one of FOLK E345, FOLK F389, AAAD A345, or AAAD A489.

E388 Motown (3 cr.) A & H, CSA A survey of the development of Motown Record Corporation, Detroit Era (1959–1972). Through lecture, discussion, guided listening and visual experiences, the course studies the musical works, creative processes, business practices, historical events, media, technology, and sociocultural factors that contributed to Motown’s identity as a unique artistic and cultural phenomenon. Credit given for only one of E388, AAAD A388, or AAAD A389.

E394 Survey of African American Music (3 cr.) A & H, CSA A chronological survey of sacred and secular African American musical traditions in North America from the African past to the present. Emphasis placed on context for evolution, musical processes and aesthetics, interrelationships among genres and musical change, issues of gender, and music as resistance. Credit given for only one of FOLK E394, AAAD A394, or MUS M394.

E407 Applied Ethnomusicology and Folklore: Media Productions (3 cr.) Examines the application of ethnomusicology and folklore training in media productions for cultural institutions and commercial industries. A focus on the role of humanists as researchers, consultants, music supervisors, and filmmakers for public media institutions (i.e., PBS, BBC, NPR, PRI), multimedia production companies, and commercial film industries.

E496 Black Religious Music (3 cr.) A & H, CSA An in-depth investigation of Negro spirituals and gospel music, with some treatment of the traditions of lining-out and shape note singing. Examination of genres will address and integrate both the musical and the sociocultural perspectives. Credit given for only one of FOLK E496 or AAAD A496.

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French and Italian

Major in Italian
Minor in Italian
Course Descriptions

Major in Italian

Requirements Students must complete 27 credit hours in Italian courses above M100-M150, or 25 credit hours in Italian courses above M100-M150 if they successfully complete M215, including at least:

  1. 7 credit hours in fourth-year courses.
  2. One 3 credit hour fourth-year course taken on the Bloomington campus, exclusive of M495.

Students must complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Minor in Italian

Requirements At least 15 credit hours of course work past the second semester, including:

  1. M200 and M250, or M215
  2. At least two courses from among M300, M301, M305, M307, M308
  3. At least one course at the 400 level.

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Course Descriptions

French

F102 Beginning French Conversation I (1 cr.) C: F100. This companion course to F100 gives beginning students the opportunity to practice conversational French in a relaxed setting with peers. Led by advanced students of French working under faculty guidance, group activities may include discussion, games, magazine/newspaper/movie discussions, cultural events, cooking, etc. S/F grading. No credit for French major.

F152 Beginning French Conversation II (1 cr.) C: F150. This companion course to F150 gives beginning students the opportunity to practice conversational French in a relaxed setting with peers. Led by advanced students of French working under faculty guidance, group activities may include discussion, games, magazine/newspaper/movie discussions, cultural events, cooking, etc. S/F grading. No credit for French major.

F202 Intermediate French Conversation I (1 cr.) C: F200. This companion course to F200 gives intermediate students the opportunity to practice conversational French in a relaxed setting with peers. Led by advanced students of French working under faculty guidance, group activities may include discussion, games, magazine/newspaper/movie discussions, cultural events, cooking, etc. S/F grading. No credit for French major.

F252 Intermediate French Conversation II (1 cr.) C: F250. This companion course to F250 gives intermediate students the opportunity to practice conversational French in a relaxed setting with peers. Led by advanced students of French working under faculty guidance, group activities may include discussion, games, magazine/newspaper/movie discussions, cultural events, cooking, etc. S/F grading. No credit for French major.

F477 French Conversation Group Leadership (1 cr.) Under the guidance of their instructor, advanced students of French facilitate weekly French conversation groups for lower level students. Leaders are responsible for planning all group sessions, including discussion topics generated by magazine/newspaper articles and movies, and activities such as games and cooking. No credit for French major. May be repeated for a total of 4 credit hours.

Italian

M100 Elementary Italian I (4 cr.) Introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that develop grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultural topics and simple cultural comparisons are introduced. Credit given for only one of the following: M100, M110, M115, or M491.

M110 Italian Language through Opera (4 cr.) P: Consent of department. An analysis of the Italian language through a close reading of the librettos of the major Italian operas. Combines language lessons of M100 and M150 into one semester. Recommended for music students with previous foreign language experience. Students who complete M110 cannot also receive credit for M100, M115, or M150.

M115 Accelerated Elementary Italian (4 cr.) P: Consent of department. An accelerated treatment of material covered in both M100 and M150 designed for highly motivated students and students with previous language training. Credit given for only one of M115 and M100; credit given for only one of M115 or M150.

M150 Elementary Italian II (4 cr.) P: M100. Continued introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that build grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Practice with new cultural topics and basic cultural analysis. Credit given for only one of the following: M110, M115, M150, or M491.

M200 Intermediate Italian I (3 cr.) P: M110, M115, M150, or equivalent. Building on Elementary Italian I and II, students further study and practice fundamental concepts and structures in Italian grammar. Through a variety of assignments and activities, they strengthen proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, writing, cultural analysis and understanding. Includes an introduction to brief literary texts. Credit given for only one of M200 or M215.

M215 Accelerated Second-Year Italian (4 cr.) P: M115 or equivalent, and consent of instructor. An accelerated treatment of material covered in both M200 and M250. Designed for students who have completed M115 and other highly motivated students, students with extensive experience with another language, and/or students who aspire to study abroad. Credit given for only one of the following: M215 or M200-M250.

M250 Intermediate Italian II (3 cr.) P: M200 or equivalent. The study of more complex concepts and structures in Italian grammar. Through a variety of texts, media, and assignments, students practice listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and they analyze cultural topics and situations in greater depth. Increased attention to short literary texts. Credit given for only one of M250 or M215.

M300 Italian Conversation and Diction (3 cr.) P: M250 or consent of instructor. Conducted in Italian, this course continues the study of advanced structures through a variety of media and authentic texts. While the focus is on accuracy and fluency in speaking, practice with other skills and the study of Italian culture will be integrated throughout.

M301 Italian Reading and Expression (4 cr.) P: M250 or consent of instructor. Conducted in Italian, this course introduces students to reading strategies, basic analysis, and discussion of Italian literature of different time periods and genres. Includes advanced grammar structures and vocabulary and a focus on oral and written proficiency. Prepares students for subsequent 300-level work in Italian.

M334 Power and Imagination in Italy (3 cr.) A & H Interdisciplinary approach to the interrelationship of literature, visual culture, and history. No credit for Italian major.

M345 Italian Renaissance Art and Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA A survey of the literature dealing with art in the Italian Renaissance in a variety of literary genres, including works by Michelangelo, da Vinci, Vasari, Alberti, Cennini, and Cellini. No credit for Italian major.

M435 Theatre Workshop (3 cr.) P: M250 or consent of instructor. Examination of Italian theatre, including in-depth study of theatrical works, culminating in the staging of scenes and/or full-scale production of a play. Students must meet with the instructor the week before registration to assume one of several acting and non-acting roles. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

M453 Twentieth-Century Italian Literature and Culture (3 cr.) A & H Course may be taught as a survey course on twentieth-century Italian literature, or it may focus on a specific literary genre or period.

M455 Readings in the Italian Cinema (3 cr.) A & H Analysis of specific movements, topics, or directors in Italian cinema. Attendance of film series required. Subject may vary with each listing and is identified in the online Schedule of Classes. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

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Geography

Major in Geography—B.A.
Major in Geography—B.S.
Course Descriptions

Major in Geography—B.A.

Requirements Students must complete the following:

  1. A minimum of 25 credit hours in geography, of which at least 9 credit hours must be at the 300 or 400 level and at least 3 additional credit hours must be at the 400 level.
  2. One course each in physical geography (either G107 or G109) and human geography (either G110 or G120) and two courses in geographic methodology (to be selected from G235, G237, G250, G336, G338, G350, G436, G438, or G488)

Students must complete the B.A. degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Recommendations Students ordinarily select one of the following concentration areas and identify a faculty member or members associated with that concentration area to be their advisors. Faculty names are listed below with the appropriate specialties.

  1. Atmospheric Science Complete G304 and G350; select from G235, G250, G336, G339, G405, G431, G433, G434, G442, G451, G470, and G475; additionally G450, G460, G477, G488, and G489. (Barthelmie, Brown, Pryor, Robeson)
  2. Human-Environment Interaction Select from G304/G305 and G306/G315 and at least one 400-level course. Courses within this concentration include: G208, G235, G237, G305, G306, G315, G341, G343, G405, G411, G440, G449, G450, G451, G460, G461, G475, and G478. Other recommended courses include: G250, G336, G338, G350, and G488. (Barthelmie, Brown, Evans, Lave, Roy Chowdhury)
  3. Geographic Information Science G235, G237, G250, G336, G338, G436, G438, G439, G450, G460, and G488. (Evans, Rahman, Robeson, Roy Chowdhury)
  4. Human Geography Select courses from G235, G237, G302, G306 (when appropriate), G314, G316, G320, G338, G415, G417, G450, G460, and G488. (Biles, Evans, Grubesic, Knudsen, Lave)
  5. Sustainable Systems Select courses from G208, G302, G305, G315, G320, G332, G406, G411, G415, G442, G450, G460, and G489 (Barthelmie, Brown, Evans, Lave, Pryor, Robeson, Roy Chowdhury)

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Major in Geography—B.S.

Requirements Students must complete the following:

  1. Same geography requirements as B.A.
  2. Mathematics: M211-M212.
  3. Physics: P221-P222.
  4. Biology: minimum of 6 credit hours including L111 and L473 or Chemistry C101-C121, C102-C122 or at least 6 credits in computer science at the 200-level or higher.
  5. Statistics: K300 or G488.
  6. 6 credit hours of mathematics, physics, biology, chemistry, or computer science at the 300 level or higher.
  7. General education:
    1. Writing: English composition (3 cr.) and intensive writing (3 cr.)
    2. Foreign Language: 3 credit hours at the second-year level
    3. Arts and Humanities: two courses.
    4. Social and Historical studies: two courses, including at least one course from geography.
    5. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: fulfilled by major.
    6. Topics courses: COLL E103 or E104.
    7. Electives to fulfill remaining credits.

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Course Descriptions

G341 Ecological Restoration: Science and Politics (3 cr.) S & H Provides a broad overview of the deeply interconnected science and politics of ecological restoration in the United States. Through readings and discussions, covers topics including history, philosophy, ecology, geomorphology, and political economy of restoration.

G343 Perspectives on Environmental Decisions (3 cr.) S & H P: G208 or consent of instructor. Reviews social science theoretical frameworks to explain environmental behavior and decisions, and implications for effective environmental management policies and methodologies. Topics include global changes in land/climate systems; sustainable development; property regimes; vulnerability and adaptation; integrative-interdisciplinary methods for environmental management; equity and participatory decision-making, etc.

G449 Political Ecology (3 cr.) S & H P: G315, G320, G341 or G343, or consent of instructor. An introduction to political ecology, an approach which focuses on the political-economic context of natural resource conflicts with particular attention to issues of equity, justice, and power. Covers the theoretical lineage of political ecology, its development over the last twenty years, and current hot topics in the field.

G461 Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change (3 cr.) S & H P: G208 or consent of instructor. Introduction to global environmental change (GEC), focusing on the human causes and consequences of biophysical transformations of land systems. Emphasis on socioeconomic, political, institutional, and environmental dimensions of land change; tropical forests, grasslands, and urbanizing areas; international environmental regimes; spatial methodologies in GEC research, and integrated approaches.

G478 Global Change, Food, and Farming Systems (3 cr.) S & H P: G208 or consent of instructor. Introduction to food production and consumption systems, emphasizing linkages to land use and social change on food/farming system sustainability. Topics include urbanization, population growth, and economic liberalization; farming livelihoods, gender, and poverty; biotechnology; agro-ecology, global health.

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Germanic Studies

Minor in Germanic Studies
Course Descriptions

Minor in Germanic Studies

Requirements Students must complete 15 credit hours of Germanic Studies course credit at the 300 and 400 level. Courses may include 300-level English-language courses, as well as any course or courses taught in German, Dutch, Norwegian, or Yiddish at the 300–400 level. No course taken in fulfillment of another major or minor in the department may be applied to the Minor in Germanic Studies.

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Course Descriptions

E343 Topics in Dutch Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSB Topics dealing with literature in Dutch. Readings in English translation of novels, plays, and poetry that reflect a specific topic chosen by the instructor. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

E371 Special Topics in Germanic Studies (1–3 cr.) Topics dealing with Germanic languages, literatures, and cultures. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Conducted in English.

S100 Beginning Swedish I (4 cr.)
Development of communicative skills: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing in a cultural context. Introduction to grammar and vocabulary.

S150 Beginning Swedish II (4 cr.) P: S100 with a grade of C– or higher, or equivalent proficiency. Further development of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Swedish. Introduction to Swedish literature and culture. Review of grammar and introduction to new grammatical topics.

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History

Course Descriptions

A205 Asian American History (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Examines the history of Asian migration to the United States from the mid-nineteenth century to the present as part of the making of the “Pacific World.” Major themes to be explored include community formation, race, citizenship, nation, and transnationalism.

A384 Antebellum America (3 cr.) S & H This course examines major issues in the United States between 1815 and 1860. Topics include the market revolution, the expansion of slavery, the “second party system,” “Jacksonian democracy,” evangelical Christianity, reform movements, and the coming of the Civil War. This course stresses the interconnections between economic, social, cultural, and political developments.

A386 History of the American Home (3 cr.) S & H Considers the changing ways in which various Americans have defined “home.” Topics include colonial households, nineteenth-century middle-class homes, “modern” early twentieth-century homes, and post-World War II suburbia. Devotes considerable attention to residences excluded from dominant definitions, including slave cabins, tenements, utopian communities, boardinghouses, apartments, institutions, internment camps, dormitories, and communes.

B321 European Jews in the Age of Discovery (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Jewish history from 1492 to 1789. Topics include the expulsion from Spain; the Inquisition and the marranos; the society and culture of Italian, Turkish, and Polish Jewry; Court Jews in central Europe; Hasidism in eastern Europe; the Enlightenment; Jews and the French Revolution.

D102 Icon and Axe: Russia from Earliest Times to 1861 (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Introduction to main events and issues in Russian history from earliest times to the Crimean War in the mid-nineteenth century. Covers foundation of a great Slavic state into the Eurasian plain, the Kievan era of early state building, colorful rulers such as Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, Catherine the Great. Credit given for only one of D102, D101, or H261.

D103 Icon and Axe: Russia from 1861 to Present (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Introduction to main events and issues in Russian history from the middle of the nineteenth century to present. Covers the great liberating reforms of Tsar Alexander II, the last tsar, Nicholas II, the revolutionary leader Vladimir Lenin, the brutal tyrant Joseph Stalin, and the last Communist leader Mikhail Gorbachev. Credit given for only one of D103, D101, or H261.

E340 African History and Popular Culture (3 cr.) S & H, CSA African popular culture (music, sports, fashion) is the lens used to explore how Africans responded to and shaped life under colonial rule and after independence. We consider questions like: What is the relationship between popular culture and politics? How does popular culture change how we think about colonialism and independence?

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History and Philosophy of Science

Course Description

X227 From Logic to Physics—What Computers Cannot Do (3 cr.) N & M Acquaints learners with the logical limits of computation and with their migration into physics from the framework of the foundations of mathematics within which they were originally conceived.

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Human Biology

Introduction
Major in Human Biology—B.A.
Major in Human Biology—B.S.
Certificate in Human Biology
Foundation Courses
Area of Concentration Courses

Introduction

Many of the complex issues our society faces, from global epidemics and the rising cost of health care to environmental problems like peak oil or global warming, involve both biological and social components. The B.S. and B.A. degrees and the Certificate in Human Biology (HUBI) provide students the opportunity to gain an appreciation for the complexity of humanity by exploring the social, cultural, and ethical consequences of biological issues. A multidisciplinary perspective is essential for understanding the science behind these issues and helping to find real solutions to these twenty-first century problems. In the Human Biology curriculum, students study cases from the perspectives of different disciplines; work with team members to generate and present cases; participate in experiential learning environments such as community service, peer instruction, and original research; and communicate their work to a larger community using various media.

The Human Biology program is designed around a core sequence of four interdisciplinary 3-credit courses, each paired with a 1-credit seminar course. In addition to the core curriculum, students take foundation courses, constituting breadth of study, and courses in a single area of concentration, allowing for more in-depth study in their area of interest. Each area of concentration includes courses from both the life science perspective and the historical, social, arts, and humanities perspectives.

The areas of concentration are:

Human Health and Disease This concentration examines the biological basis for disease as well as the social and cultural implications of health and society.

Human Reproduction and Sexuality This concentration focuses on human reproduction and sexuality both from a biological standpoint and from a psychological and social perspective.

Human Environment and Ecology This concentration addresses humans as organisms interfacing with their environment and the resulting effects of this interaction on the human condition.

Human Origins and Survival This concentration emphasizes the biological basis of human origins, variation, and physiological adaptation through the study of genetics and evolutionary processes, as well as the role of health, disease, and medicine in cultural and evolutionary adaptations.

Human Growth and Development This concentration explores the development of the human body and mind, including the mechanisms and processes of change across the human lifespan, from a biological as well as a social and cultural perspective.

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Major in Human Biology—B.A.

Purpose The B.A. degree in human biology is designed to provide students with a strong foundation in science while exploring their personal interests about the human condition. Students who elect to pursue a B.A. in human biology might have interests in multiple areas of study, such as the social aspects of health issues—social services, gender studies, education, ethics and law, journalism, environmental policy, or resource management. The B.A. degree allows for more breadth in a student’s course work and the possibility for double majoring. Students can also elect to fulfill the requirements necessary for medical, dental, optometry, allied health sciences, and graduate school programs.

Major Requirements In addition to the requirements for the B.A. degree in the College of Arts and Sciences, students must complete 40 credit hours from the following:

  1. Human Biology core courses (all required): B101, B201, B301, and B401.
  2. Human Biology seminar courses (all required): B102, B202, B302, and B402.
  3. Foundation courses: One approved foundation course (minimum 3 credit hours) in each of four different areas of concentration (see list of approved foundation courses below).
  4. Area of concentration courses: 12 additional credit hours in one area of concentration, at least 6 of which must be at the 300 level or above. Within the area of concentration, courses must be selected in accordance with the following criteria:
    1. At least two courses must be selected from the life science perspective list, one of which must be a 300–400 level laboratory (or lecture/lab) course. Up to 3 credit hours of life sciences research (HUBI B490, BIOL L490, CHEM C409, or PHYS S406) may count toward this requirement.
    2. At least two courses must be selected from the historical, social, arts, and humanities perspectives list.

Recommendations Human Biology Program students are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the opportunities available at IU Bloomington to complement their area of concentration by seeking internships, working in research laboratories, attending seminars, or becoming human biology peer instructors.

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Major in Human Biology—B.S.

Purpose The B.S. degree in Human Biology is designed to provide students with a strong foundation in the different perspectives of human biology while they focus their course work in their specific area of concentration. Many human biology B.S. degree students are preparing for a graduate education or professional school in medicine, dentistry, optometry, allied health sciences, business, or law. Students can also prepare for careers in the life science industries or pursue original research with their specialization in the sciences. B.S. students will gain a strong quantitative and ethical science background while developing problem-solving skills using the case-based, team-based approach of the Human Biology Program’s core courses.

Requirements Students must complete the following fundamental skills and distribution requirements:

  1. Writing (English composition and intensive writing): same as the general requirements for the B.A. degree.
  2. Foreign language: three semesters in the same language, or equivalent proficiency.
  3. Mathematics: one of MATH M118, M119, or M211.
  4. Arts and humanities: two courses.
  5. Social and historical studies: two courses.
  6. Natural and mathematical sciences: fulfilled by major.
  7. Topics: one course.
  8. Culture Studies: one course from List A.

Major Requirements

  1. Human Biology core courses (all required): B101, B201, B301, and B401.
  2. Human Biology seminar courses (all required): B102, B202, B302, and B402.
  3. Foundation courses: One approved foundation course (minimum 3 credit hours) in each of four different areas of concentration (see list of approved foundation courses below).
  4. Area of concentration courses: 27 additional credit hours in one area of concentration, at least 15 of which must be at the 300 level or above. Within the area of concentration, courses must be selected in accordance with the following criteria:
    1. At least 18 credit hours must be from courses on the life science perspective list. Students must take courses in at least two different departments. Four courses must be laboratory (or lecture/ lab) courses—one at the 100–200 level, and three at the 300–400 level. Up to 3 credit hours of life sciences research (HUBI B490, BIOL L490, CHEM C409, or PHYS S406) may count toward this requirement.
    2. At least 9 credit hours must be from courses on the historical, social, arts, and humanities perspectives lists. Students must take courses in at least two different departments.
  5. One quantitative analysis course from the following list: MATH K300 or K310, PSY K300 or K310, CJUS K300, ECON E370 or S370, ANTH A306, SOC S371, STAT S300, POLS Y395, LAMP L316, or SPEA K300.
    (Note: Although SPEA K300 fulfills the quantitative analysis requirement, the credit hours for this course count outside the College of Arts and Sciences.)
  6. One ethics course from the following list: BIOL T312, PHIL P140, PHIL P242, PHIL P393, POLS Y379, REL R373, or ENG L240.

Recommendations Human biology students are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the opportunities available at IU Bloomington to complement their area of concentration by seeking internships, working in research laboratories, attending seminars, or becoming human biology peer instructors.

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Certificate in Human Biology

Purpose The Certificate in Human Biology provides a broad and rigorous introduction to the biological sciences and relates these sciences to the problems raised by relationships of human beings to one another and to their environment. This distinctive program is designed to meet societal demand for students with broad biological knowledge and a scientific approach to problem-solving, who also possess an understanding of the social and cultural issues facing them as scientists. What is the biological basis of life, diversity, and disease? What is the biological basis of human behavior? How does the social construct of our society influence science and our understanding of what it means to be human? These are samples of the types of broad questions that can be explored within the Certificate in Human Biology.

Requirements A student may earn a certificate as part of completing the bachelor’s degree and in addition to completing requirements for a major. Students should contact the Human Biology Program advising office to apply for the certificate. Students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.700 at the time of admission and must maintain this GPA to graduate with the certificate. Additionally, in order to complete the certificate, students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.000 in courses taken for the certificate. Students will also be required to complete exit surveys and to develop an electronic portfolio that demonstrates the connections students have made between the courses they complete as part of the certificate and their goals for career and further study after graduation. The certificate requires 27–28 credit hours as follows:

  1. BIOL L112 Introduction to Biology: Biological Mechanisms (3 cr.)
  2. BIOL L211 Molecular Biology (3 cr.)
  3. MSCI M131 Disease and the Human Body (3 cr.)
  4. ANAT A215 Basic Human Anatomy (5 cr.)
  5. PHSL P215 Basic Human Physiology (5 cr.) or BIOL P451 Integrative Human Physiology (4 cr.)
  6. BIOL L350 Environmental Biology (3 cr.) or ANTH B370 Human Variation (3 cr.)
  7. PSY P201 An Introduction to Neuroscience (3 cr.), P315 Developmental Psychology (3 cr.), or P326 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 cr.)
  8. REL R373 Religion and Bioethics (3 cr.).
  9. HUBI B480 Human Biology E-portfolio Capstone (1 cr.).

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Foundation Courses

Human Health and Disease
ANAT A215 Basic Human Anatomy (5 cr.) N & M
BIOL L112 Introduction to Biology: Biological Mechanisms (3 cr.) N & M
BIOL L211 Molecular Biology (3 cr.) N & M
BIOL P451 Integrative Human Physiology (4 cr.)
CHEM C483 Biological Chemistry (3 cr.) N & M
MSCI M131 Disease and the Human Body (3 cr.) N & M

Human Reproduction and Sexuality
BIOL L112 Introduction to Biology: Biological Mechanisms (3 cr.) N & M
BIOL L340 Biological Basis of Sex Differences (3 cr.) N & M
HPER F255 Human Sexuality (3 cr.)
PSY P204 Psychological and Biological Bases of Human Sexuality (3 cr.)
N & M

Human Environment and Ecology
BIOL L318 Evolution (3 cr.)
BIOL L473 Ecology (3 cr.)
CHEM C117 Principles of Chemistry and Biochemistry (5 cr.) N & M
GEOG G208 Human Impact on Environment (3 cr.) N & M
GEOL G104 Evolution of the Earth (3 cr.) N & M
PHYS P125 Energy in the Twenty-first Century (3 cr.) N & M, TFR

Human Origins and Survival
ANAT A215 Basic Human Anatomy (5 cr.) N & M
ANTH B200 Bioanthropology (3 cr.) N & M
ANTH P200 Introduction to Archaeology (3 cr.) S & H
BIOL L111 Introduction to Biology: Evolution and Diversity (3 cr.) N & M
PSY P315 Developmental Psychology (3 cr.) S & H
PSY P438 Language and Cognition (3 cr.) N & M

Human Growth and Development
ANTH B200 Bioanthropology (3 cr.) N & M
BIOL L111 Introduction to Biology: Evolution and Diversity (3 cr.) N & M
BIOL L317 Developmental Biology (3 cr.)
EDUC P314 Life Span Development (3 cr.)
PSY P102 Introductory Psychology II (3 cr.) , S & H
PSY P201 An Introduction to Neuroscience (3 cr.) N & M

Area of Concentration Courses

Human Health and Disease Concentration

  1. Life Sciences Perspectives Courses
    BIOL L211 Molecular Biology (3 cr.) N & M
    BIOL L311 Genetics (3 cr.)
    BIOL L318 Evolution (3 cr.)
    BIOL M250 Microbiology (3 cr.) N & M
    BIOL M350 Microbial Physiology and Biochemistry (3 cr.)
    BIOL M440 Medical Microbiology: Lecture (3 cr.)
    BIOL Z466 Endocrinology (3 cr.)
    CHEM C341 Organic Chemistry I Lectures (3 cr.) N & M
    CHEM C483 Biological Chemistry (3 cr.) N & M
    MSCI M216 Medical Science of Psychoactive Drugs (3 cr.)
    MSCI M470 Mechanism of Human Disease (1–6 cr.)
    PSY P303 Health Psychology (3 cr.) N & M
    PSY P326 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 cr.)
    SPHS S307 Cognitive and Communicative Aspects of Aging (3 cr.)
    N & M

    Lecture/Laboratory Courses
    ANAT A215 Basic Human Anatomy (5 cr.) N & M
    ANAT A464 Human Tissue Biology (4 cr.)
    ANTH B301 Laboratory in Bioanthropology (3 cr.) N & M
    BIOL L113 Biology Laboratory (3 cr.) N & M
    BIOL L319 Genetics Laboratory (3 cr.)
    BIOL M255 Microbiology Laboratory (2 cr.)
    BIOL M445 Medical Microbiology: Laboratory (3 cr.)
    BIOL P451 Integrative Human Physiology (4 cr.)
    CHEM C117 Principles of Chemistry and Biochemistry I (5 cr.) N & M
    CHEM C343 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory (2 cr.)
    CHEM N330 Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry (5 cr.)
    PHSL P215 Basic Human Physiology (4–5 cr.) N & M
    PHYS P201 General Physics I (5 cr.) N & M
    PHYS P202 General Physics II (5 cr.) N & M

  2. Historical, Social, Arts, and Humanities Perspectives Courses
    ANTH E260 Culture, Health, and Illness (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
    CJUS P415 Crime and Madness (3 cr.) S & H
    CLAS C209 Medical Terms from Greek and Latin (2 cr.)
    CMCL C333 Stigma: Culture, Deviance, and Identity (3 cr.) A & H
    CMCL C340 The Rhetoric of Social Movements (Topic: Illness, Violence, and Resistance) (3 cr.) A & H
    CMLT C340 Women in World Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
    ECON E344 Health Economics (3 cr.)
    ENG L240 Literature and Public Life (3 cr.) A & H
    GNDR G225 Gender, Sexuality, and Popular Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
    GNDR G235 Scientific Understandings of Sex and Gender (3 cr.) S & H
    GNDR G335 Explaining Sex/Gender Differences (3 cr.) S & H
    GNDR G435 Health, Sex, and Gender (3 cr.) S & H
    HIST H213 The Black Death (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
    HIST H333 Epidemics in History (3 cr.) S & H
    HON H203 Interdepartmental Colloquia (Topic: Medicine, Magic, and Mortality) (3 cr.) A & H, TFR
    HPSC X200 Scientific Reasoning (3 cr.) N & M
    HPSC X320 Topics in Science: Humanistic (Topics: Philosophy of Medicine; Protoplasm Is Soft Wax in Our Hands) (3 cr.) A & H
    HPSC X323 Topics in Science: Social and Historical (Topic: History of Medicine) (3 cr.) S & H
    INTL I202 Health, Environment, and Development (3 cr.) S & H
    PHIL P393 Biomedical Ethics (3 cr.)
    POLS Y379 Ethics and Public Policy (3 cr.) A & H
    PSY P315 Developmental Psychology (3 cr.) S & H
    PSY P324 Abnormal Psychology (3 cr.) S & H
    REL R373 Religion and Bioethics (3 cr.) A & H
    SOC S101 Social Problems and Policies (Topic: Medicine in America: Physicians, Patients, and Their Problems) (3 cr.) S & H
    SOC S324 Mental Illness (3 cr.) S & H

Human Reproduction and Sexuality

  1. Life Sciences Perspectives Courses
    ANTH B400 Undergraduate Seminar (Topic: Hormones and Behavior)
    (3 cr.)
    BIOL L112 Introduction to Biology: Biological Mechanisms (3 cr.) N & M
    BIOL L311 Genetics (3 cr.)
    BIOL L317 Developmental Biology (3 cr.)
    BIOL L318 Evolution (3 cr.)
    BIOL L331 Introduction to Human Genetics (3 cr.)
    BIOL L340 Biological Basis of Sex Differences (3 cr.) N & M
    BIOL M416 Biology of AIDS (3 cr.)
    BIOL Z466 Endocrinology (3 cr.)
    PSY P204 Psychological and Biological Bases of Human Sexuality
    (3 cr.) N & M
    Note: Only one of PSY P204 and HPER F255 may count toward a degree in human biology.

    Lecture/Laboratory Courses
    ANAT A215 Basic Human Anatomy (5 cr.) N & M
    ANAT A464 Human Tissue Biology (4 cr.)
    BIOL L319 Genetics Laboratory (3 cr.)
    BIOL P451 Integrative Human Physiology (4 cr.)
    BIOL Z318 Developmental Biology Laboratory (2 cr.)
    BIOL Z469 Endocrinology Laboratory (2 cr.)
    PHSL P215 Basic Human Physiology (4–5 cr.) N & M

  2. Historical, Social, Arts, and Humanities Perspectives Courses
    CJUS P412 Sex, Drugs, AIDS, and Criminal Law (3 cr.) S & H
    CJUS P423 Sexuality and the Law (3 cr.) S & H
    CMCL C412 Race, Gender, and Representation (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
    ENG L249 Representations of Gender and Sexuality (3 cr.) A & H
    ENG L389 Feminist Literary and Cultural Criticism (3 cr.) A & H
    GNDR G105 Sex, Gender, and the Body (3 cr.) S & H
    GNDR G235 Scientific Understandings of Sex and Gender (3 cr.) S & H
    GNDR G303 Knowledge and Sex (3 cr.) S & H
    GNDR G335 Explaining Sex/Gender Differences (3 cr.) S & H
    GNDR G399 Regulating Gender (3 cr.) S & H
    GNDR G430 Kinsey’s Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (3 cr.)
    S & H

    GNDR G435 Health, Sex, and Gender (3 cr.) S & H
    HIST A300 Issues in United States History (Topic: American Sexual Histories) (3 cr.) S & H
    HIST H231 The Family in History (3 cr.) S & H, TFR
    HPER F255 Human Sexuality (3 cr.) Note: Only one of PSY P204 and HPER F255 may count toward a degree in human biology.
    SOC S321 Sexual Diversity (3 cr.) S & H
    SOC S338 Gender Roles (3 cr.) S & H
    SOC S413 Gender and Society (3 cr.) S & H
    SOC S422 Constructing Sexuality (3 cr.) S & H

Human Environment and Ecology

  1. Life Sciences Perspectives Courses
    BIOL B368 Ethnobotany (3 cr.) N & M
    BIOL L318 Evolution (3 cr.)
    BIOL L473 Ecology (3 cr.)
    GEOG G208 Human Impact on Environment (3 cr.) N & M
    GEOG G305 Environmental Change—Nature and Impact (3 cr.) N & M
    GEOG G307 Biogeography: The Distribution of Life (3 cr.) N & M
    PHYS P310 Environmental Physics (3 cr.) N & M

    Lecture/Laboratory Courses
    BIOL B300 Vascular Plants (4 cr.) N & M
    BIOL B352 Fungi: Laboratory (2 cr.)
    BIOL B364 Summer Flowering Plants (4–5 cr.) N & M
    BIOL L376 Biology of Birds (4 cr.)
    BIOL L433 Tropical Biology (3 cr.)
    BIOL L465 Advanced Field Biology (3 cr.)
    BIOL L474 Field and Laboratory Ecology (2 cr.)
    BIOL Z375 Invertebrate Zoology Laboratory (2 cr.)
    BIOL Z406 Vertebrate Zoology (5 cr.)
    BIOL Z476 Biology of Fishes (3 cr.)
    GEOL G104 Evolution of the Earth (3 cr.) N & M
    GEOL G105 Earth: Our Habitable Planet (3 cr.) N & M
    GEOL G131 Oceans and Our Global Environment (3 cr.) N & M
    GEOL G171 Environmental Geology (3 cr.) N & M
    GEOL G188 Volcanoes of the Eastern Sierra Nevada (3 cr.) N & M, TFR
    GEOL G424 Geographic Information Systems Applications in Geology
    (3 cr.)

  2. Historical, Social, Arts, and Humanities Perspectives Courses
    ANTH A150 Freshman Seminar in Anthropology: Topics (3 cr.) S & H
    ANTH E101 Ecology and Society (3 cr.) S & H
    ANTH E327 Native Amazonians and the Environment (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
    ANTH E328 Ecological Anthropology (3 cr.) S & H
    ANTH E444 People and Protected Areas: Theories of Conservation
    (3 cr.) S & H
    CEUS R394 Environmental Problems and Social Constraints in Northern and Central Eurasia (3 cr.)
    CMCL C228 Argumentation and Public Advocacy (3 cr.) A & H
    CMCL C406 The Study of Public Advocacy (Topic: U.S. Environmental Movements) (3 cr.)
    ENG L240 Literature and Public Life (3 cr.) A & H
    FOLK F440 Folklife and Material Culture Studies (3 cr.) A & H
    GEOG G315 Environmental Conservation (3 cr.) S & H
    GEOG G320 Population Geography (3 cr.) S & H
    GEOG G406 Sustainable Transportation (3 cr.)
    GEOG G411 Sustainable Development Systems (3 cr.) S & H
    GEOG G415 Advanced Urban Geography (3 cr.) S & H
    INTL I202 Health, Environment, and Development (3 cr.) S & H
    POLS Y313 Environmental Policy (3 cr.) S & H
    POLS Y379 Ethics and Public Policy (3 cr.) A & H
    REL R236 Religion, Ecology, and the Self (3 cr.) A & H
    REL R371 Religion, Ethics, and the Environment (3 cr.) A & H
    SOC S101 Social Problems and Policies (Topic: Envisioning the City)
    (3 cr.) S & H
    SOC S370 Research Methods in Sociology (3 cr.) S & H

Human Origins and Survival

  1. Life Sciences Perspectives Courses
    ANTH B200 Bioanthropology (3 cr.) N & M
    ANTH B350 Issues in Human Origins: Creation and Evolution (3 cr.)
    ANTH B370 Human Variation (3 cr.) N & M
    ANTH B464 Human Paleontology (3 cr.)
    ANTH B470 Human Adaptation: Biological Approaches (3 cr.) N & M
    ANTH P302 Invention and Technology (3 cr.)
    ANTH P380 Prehistoric Diet and Nutrition (3 cr.) N & M
    BIOL L111 Introduction to Biology: Evolution and Diversity (3 cr.) N & M
    BIOL L311 Genetics (3 cr.)
    BIOL L318 Evolution (3 cr.)
    COGS Q240 Philosophical Foundations of the Cognitive and Information Sciences (4 cr.) A & H
    COGS Q301 Brain and Cognition (3 cr.) N & M
    GEOG G208 Human Impact on Environment (3 cr.) N & M
    INFO I400 Topics in informatics (Topic: Seek and Find: Search Strategies in Space and Time) (3 cr.)
    MSCI M470 Mechanism of Human Disease (1–6 cr.)
    PSY P201 An Introduction to Neuroscience (3 cr.) N & M
    PSY P325 Psychology of Learning (3 cr.) N & M
    PSY P326 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 cr.)
    PSY P335 Cognitive Psychology (3 cr.) N & M
    PSY P410 Development of the Brain and Behavior (3 cr.)
    PSY P416 Evolution and Ecology of Learning (3 cr.)
    PSY P423 Human Neuropsychology (3 cr.)
    PSY P438 Language and Cognition (3 cr.) N & M
    PSY P444 Developmental Psychobiology (3 cr.)
    PSY P466 Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology (3 cr.) N & M
    SPHS S201 Speech and Hearing Physiology (3 cr.) N & M
    SPHS S333 Childhood Language (3 cr.) N & M

    Lecture/Laboratory Courses
    ANAT A215 Basic Human Anatomy (5 cr.) N & M
    ANTH B301 Laboratory in Bioanthropology (3 cr.) N & M
    ANTH P385 Paleolithic Technology Laboratory (3 cr.) N & M
    BIOL L319 Genetics Laboratory (3 cr.)
    BIOL P451 Integrative Human Physiology (4 cr.)
    PHSL P215 Basic Human Physiology (4–5 cr.) N & M

  2. Historical, Social, Arts, and Humanities Perspectives Courses
    ANTH A303 Evolution and Prehistory (3 cr.) S & H
    ANTH E210 Human Diversity across Space and Time (3 cr.) S & H
    ANTH E260 Culture, Health, and Illness (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
    ANTH E427 Human Adaptation: Cultural Approaches (3 cr.) S & H
    ANTH L200 Language and Culture (3 cr.) S & H
    ANTH L407 Language and Prehistory (3 cr.) S & H
    ANTH P200 Introduction to Archaeology (3 cr.) S & H
    ANTH P210 Life in the Stone Age (3 cr.) S & H
    ANTH P220 The Rise and Fall of Ancient Civilizations (3 cr.) S & H
    FOLK F215 Health and Morbidity in Traditional Cultures (3 cr.) S & H
    HIST B300 Issues in Western European History (Topic: The Industrial Revolution) (3 cr.) S & H
    HIST H205 Ancient Civilization (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
    HIST H333 Epidemics in History (3 cr.) S & H
    HPSC X102 Revolutions in Science: Plato to NATO (3 cr.) S & H
    HPSC X200 Scientific Reasoning (3 cr.) N & M
    HPSC X320 Topics in Science: Humanistic (Topic: Scientific Concepts of Culture) (3 cr.) A & H
    LING L210 Topics in Language and Society (3 cr.) S & H
    LING L430 Language Change and Variation (3 cr.) S & H
    PHIL P320 Philosophy and Language (3 cr.) A & H
    PSY P315 Developmental Psychology (3 cr.) S & H

Human Growth and Development

  1. Life Sciences Perspectives Courses
    ANTH B370 Human Variation (3 cr.) N & M
    ANTH B480 Human Growth and Development (3 cr.)
    PSY P315 Developmental Psychology (3 cr.) S & H
    PSY P410 Development of the Brain and Behavior (3 cr.)
    PSY P425 Behavior Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence (3 cr.)
    PSY P442 Infant Development (3 cr.)
    PSY P443 Cognitive Development (3 cr.)
    PSY P444 Developmental Psychobiology (3 cr.)
    SPHS S333 Childhood Language (3 cr.) N & M
    SPHS S436 Language Disorders in Children (3 cr.)

    Lecture/Laboratory Courses
    ANAT A215 Basic Human Anatomy (5 cr.) N & M
    ANTH B301 Laboratory in Bioanthropology (3 cr.) N & M
    ANTH B405 Fieldwork in Bioanthropology (cr. arr.)
    BIOL L113 Biology Laboratory (3 cr.) N & M
    BIOL L319 Genetics Laboratory (3 cr.)
    BIOL L324 Human Molecular Biology Laboratory (3 cr.)
    BIOL Z318 Developmental Biology Laboratory (2 cr.)
    PHSL P215 Basic Human Physiology (5 cr.) N & M
    PSY P426 Laboratory in Behavioral Neuroscience (3 cr.)
    PSY P429 Laboratory in Developmental Psychology (3 cr.)
    PSY P433 Laboratory in Neuroimaging Methods (3 cr.)
    PSY P435 Laboratory in Human Learning and Cognition (3 cr.)

  2. Historical, Social, Arts, and Humanities Perspectives Courses
    CJUS P414 Adolescents and the Law (3 cr.) S & H
    CJUS P462 Child Abuse and Neglect (3 cr.) S & H
    ENG L390 Children’s Literature (3 cr.) A & H
    ENG L391 Literature for Young Adults (3 cr.) A & H
    FOLK F364 Children’s Folklore/Folklife/ Folk Music (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
    GNDR G335 Explaining Sex/Gender Differences (3 cr.) S & H
    HIST H231 The Family in History (3 cr.) S & H, TFR
    HPSC X308 History of Biology (3 cr.) A & H
    POLS Y315 Political Psychology and Socialization (3 cr.) S & H
    SOC S316 The Family (3 cr.) S & H
    SOC S344 Sociology of Childhood (3 cr.) S & H
    SOC S435 Social Psychology of the Self (3 cr.) S & H
    SOC S438 Childhood Socialization (3 cr.) S & H
    TEL T317 Children and Media (3 cr.) S & H

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India Studies

Course Descriptions

B100 Introductory Bengali I (5 cr.) Basic sound patterns and writing system with ideas about grammar. Ideas about simple sentence structure and basic grammar leading to reading and construction of short sentences. Learning essential vocabulary for everyday conversation. Practicing different expressions: apology, greeting, etc. Classroom use of films, tapes, short conversation, stories, etc.

B150 Introductory Bengali II (5 cr.) P: B100 or equivalent proficiency. Exercises in basic grammar and sentence structure. Emphasis on learning new words, composing short dialogues, and using them in everyday conversation by developing basic reading skills and understanding main ideas from texts.

B200 Intermediate Bengali I (3 cr.) P: B150 or equivalent proficiency. Focuses on listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Special emphasis given to communicative approach to language learning.

B250 Intermediate Bengali II (3 cr.) P: B200 or equivalent proficiency. Focus given to listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis given to communicative approach to language learning.

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International Studies Program

Major in International Studies
Honors Track
Course Descriptions

Major in International Studies

Requirements Students must complete a minimum of 35 credit hours including the following:

  1. Three courses chosen from I100, I201–I206; one of the three must introduce the chosen thematic concentration.
  2. Three courses (at least 9 credit hours) at the 300–400 level from a single thematic concentration.
  3. Three courses (at least 9 credit hours) at the 300–400 level from a regional concentration area.
  4. Foreign language proficiency beyond the College’s general requirement for B.A. degrees. Students may pursue the study of a single foreign language through six semesters; they may study one foreign language through four semesters and study a second foreign language through two semesters; or they may study one foreign language through four semesters, study the first semester of a second foreign language, and study the first semester of a third foreign language. Non-native speakers of English may petition the International Studies Program for exemption from third-year language study.
    See advisor for details about procedure and necessary documentation.
  5. An overseas/international experience approved in advance by the director of the program.
  6. I315 (3 cr.)
  7. I400 or I406 (3 cr.).
  8. ASCS Q299 Job and Internship Strategies for Liberal Arts Students
    (2 cr.) or an equivalent course approved by the advisor.

Note: Students may need at least 41 credit hours to complete the requirements listed above, including foreign language proficiencies, and may need more than 41 credit hours to complete the overseas/international experience requirement.

Students must complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Honors Track

Requirements Outstanding students majoring in international studies who are interested in departmental honors should submit an application form to the program director no later than the second semester of the junior year. To be eligible for the honors track, a student must first complete 15 credit hours in the international studies major.

The student must have and maintain a grade point average of at least 3.500 in the major and 3.300 overall. Before submitting the application, the student should identify a tentative thesis topic and also identify an honors thesis director, who will advise the student during research and writing. The director of the International Studies Program will provide guidance with this process, if needed. While taking required course work, students will research and write an honors thesis or produce an in-depth creative project that integrates the student’s thematic and regional concentration course work and international experience in either a substantive original paper or performance, as appropriate. The thesis or project must be defended before an International Studies honors committee and must receive a grade of A– or higher.

In summary, students must

  • Maintain a 3.500 GPA in International Studies Program course work.
  • Maintain a 3.300 GPA overall.
  • Complete all requirements for the major and degree.
  • Apply for departmental honors no later than the second semester of the junior year.
  • Take I405 and I406 sequentially during the senior year.
  • Research, write, and defend an honors thesis or complete an in-depth creative project, which earns an A– or higher.

Return to International Studies

Course Descriptions

I315 Methods in International Studies (3 cr.) Introduction to quantitative and qualitative methods used in research in international studies.

I405 Honors Individual Readings in International Studies (3 cr.)
P: Application and approval of program director. Students pursuing departmental honors conduct research in preparation for their honors capstone seminar. May not be repeated for credit.

I406 Honors International Studies Capstone Seminar (3 cr.) P: I405 and permission of department. Required for departmental honors credit, this seminar is designed to consolidate the studies of honors-track majors who have completed all program requirements. Students must complete a project that addresses an issue appropriate to their track.

I415 Individual Readings in International Studies (1–3 cr.) P: Major or minor in International Studies and permission of department. Students conduct individual research projects on an international issue under the direction of a faculty member. Student and instructor should develop a project and submit a “contract” to the director for approval. May repeat I415 or take any combination of I415 and I405 for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

I430 Research in International Studies (1–3 cr.) P: Major or minor in International Studies and permission of department. Overseas facultydirected research in international studies.

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Jewish Studies

Major in Jewish Studies
Certificate in Jewish Studies
Minor in Hebrew
Course Descriptions

Major in Jewish Studies

Requirements Students must complete the following:

  1. Two semesters of modern Hebrew (JSTU H100-H150), biblical Hebrew (JSTU B100-B150), or Yiddish (GER Y100-Y150).
  2. HIST H251 Introduction to Jewish History: From the Bible to Spanish Expulsion and HIST H252 Introduction to Jewish History: From Spanish Expulsion to the Present. Both courses must be taken on the Bloomington campus.
  3. Area of specialization. Four courses in one of three areas of specialization: Literature and the Arts; History and Society; or Religion and Thought. A maximum of two courses of Hebrew and/or Yiddish language instruction at the 200 level or higher may be counted toward any area of specialization. Credit acquired through language testing or through transfer credit from universities other than The Hebrew University (via IU Overseas Study Program) will not exceed the equivalent of two courses in the student’s area of specialization.
  4. Two additional courses must be completed outside the student’s chosen area of specialization.
  5. At least 9 credit hours must be at the 300–400 level.
  6. A student must complete a minimum of 12 credit hours of course work in Jewish Studies on the IU Bloomington campus. A maximum of three courses may be credited toward the major from language testing or transfer credit from universities other than The Hebrew University (via IU Overseas Study Program).

Students interested in a career in the cantorate may pursue a curriculum that combines the major with specific courses in the Jacobs School of Music. Please see the assistant director of the Jewish Studies Program for details.

Students must also complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Certificate in Jewish Studies

Purpose The certificate program gives students pursuing degrees outside the College of Arts and Sciences, or pursuing B.S. or B.A. degrees within the College of Arts and Sciences, an opportunity to gain a broad-based knowledge of Jewish Studies. Students in the School of Journalism may complete their second concentration by completing the Jewish Studies certificate.

Students in the Kelley School of Business may work toward a global studies and languages field specialization or arts and social services field specialization by completing the Jewish Studies certificate. Students in the Jacobs School of Music may complete the certificate along with a Bachelor of Music or as an outside field with a Bachelor of Science in Music.

Requirements Students must complete a minimum of eight courses with a minimum grade of C– distributed as follows:

  1. Two courses in each of the three major areas of Jewish Studies: Literature and the Arts; History and Society; and Religion and Thought. Two courses of Hebrew and/or Yiddish language instruction at the 200 level or higher may be substituted for two courses in one of the major areas.
  2. Two additional courses chosen, in any combination, from these three major areas or from Hebrew and/or Yiddish language courses.
  3. Students wishing to participate in the certificate program must register with the advisor in Jewish Studies. Appointments may be arranged by calling (812) 855-0453.
  4. A student must complete a minimum of 10 credit hours of course work (language testing is not acceptable) in Jewish Studies on the Bloomington campus. A maximum of three courses may be credited toward the certificate from either language testing or from transfer credit from universities other than The Hebrew University (via IU Overseas Study Program).

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Minor in Hebrew

Requirements Students must complete the following:

  1. Six courses in Hebrew language and/or literature (modern or biblical Hebrew) for a minimum of 20 credit hours. (Students transferring first year language course credit may be eligible to complete the minor with a minimum of 18 credit hours.)
  2. At least four courses must be Hebrew language courses.
  3. At least two courses must be at or above the 300 level. These two upper-level courses, which cannot be fulfilled through language testing or transfer credit, must be related in content to Hebrew but need not be language courses per se. These two upper-level courses cannot be counted toward either the Jewish Studies major or the certificate in Jewish Studies. Students interested in pursuing study of courses related to biblical Hebrew might also (with the approval of the Jewish Studies advisor) choose to take upper-level courses in rabbinic and biblical literature taught by Jewish Studies faculty.
  4. A minimum cumulative GPA of a 2.300 is required in the minor.
  5. At least three of the courses must be completed on the Bloomington campus. Up to three courses may be credited toward the minor from language testing and transfer credit or study abroad.
  6. Each student’s course work must be approved by the Jewish Studies advisor to assure a coherent program of study.
  7. A student majoring in Hebrew through the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures may not also earn a minor in Hebrew.

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Course Descriptions

C360 Israeli Film and Fiction (3 cr.) A & H, CSA A sampling of Israeli novels and stories in English translation whose texts were made into film. All readings and discussions conducted in English. Subjects covered pertain to the representation of Israeli culture, values, and experience, including individualism and the collective, war and peace, the self and the nation.

H460 Israeli Film and Fiction in Hebrew (3 cr.) A & H, CSA P: Grade of C or higher in H350 or equivalent proficiency. A sampling of Israeli novels and stories whose texts were made into film. Subjects covered pertain to the representation of Israeli culture, values, and experience, including individualism and collective, war and peace, the self and the nation. Readings, assignments, and discussion in Hebrew.

Jewish Studies Language Courses

Germanic Studies
GER Y100 Beginning Yiddish I (4 cr.)
GER Y150 Beginning Yiddish II (4 cr.)
GER Y200 Intermediate Yiddish I (3 cr.)
GER Y250 Intermediate Yiddish II (3 cr.)

Jewish Studies
JSTU B100 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew I (4 cr.)
JSTU B150 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew II (4 cr.)
JSTU B200 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I (3 cr.)
JSTU B250 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II (3 cr.)
JSTU H100 Introduction to Elementary Hebrew I (4 cr.)
JSTU H150 Introduction to Elementary Hebrew II (4 cr.)
JSTU H200 Intermediate Hebrew I (3 cr.)
JSTU H250 Intermediate Hebrew II (3 cr.)
JSTU H300 Advanced Hebrew I (3 cr.)
JSTU H350 Advanced Hebrew II (3 cr.)
JSTU H365 Advanced Hebrew Conversation and Composition (3 cr.)
JSTU H375 Introductory Readings in Hebrew Literature (in Hebrew) (3 cr.)
JSTU H460 Israeli Film and Fiction in Hebrew (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
JSTU H480 Modern Hebrew Literature in Hebrew (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
JSTU H485 Recent Hebrew Literature in Hebrew (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
JSTU H497 Individual Readings in Hebrew (1–4 cr.)

Courses by Areas of Specialization Including Cross-Listed Courses

  1. Literature and the Arts
  2. History and Society
  3. Religion and Thought

Note: Although JSTU J203, J303, and J403 courses are listed under both Literature and the Arts and History and Society, the area of specialization fulfilled by each of these courses will depend upon the specific topic.

I. Literature and the Arts

College of Arts and Sciences

E103 Topics in Arts and Humanities (topics relating to Jewish Studies) (3 cr.)
A & H, TFR Topic: Who Wrote the Bible?

S103 Freshman Seminar in Arts and Humanities (3 cr.) A & H, TFR Topics: Genesis and Myth; Popular Representations of the Holocaust.

Comparative Literature

C100 Freshman Seminar (3 cr.) A & H Topic: The Agnostic Bible.

C301 Special Topics in Comparative Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Topics: The Agnostic Bible; Literature of the Bible; Poetics of Biblical Narrative; Reading the Prophets.

C377 Topics in Yiddish Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Topics: Fantasy, Realism, and Fiction in Early Modern and Modern “Classic” Yiddish Literature; Love, Soul, and Destiny in Modern Yiddish Literature; Selected Readings in Twentieth-Century Yiddish Fiction.

C378 Topics in Yiddish Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Topics: Culture, Memory, and Identity: Yiddish in the Post-Holocaust World; Ghetto, Shtetl, and Beyond: Millennium of History and Society of Yiddish; History and Sociology of Yiddish; Yiddish in America.

C400 Studies in Comparative Literature (3 cr.) A & H Topics: Job, from the Bible to Kafka; The Poetics of Biblical Narrative.

C405 Senior Seminar in Comparative Literature (3 cr.; 6 cr. max.) A & H Topics: The Bible in Western Literature; Job, from the Bible to Kafka; Prophecy and Poetry.

English

L241 American Jewish Writers (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

L367 Literature of the Bible (3 cr.) A & H

L375 Studies in Jewish Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Topics: American Jewish Writers; Jewish American Responses to the Holocaust; Literature of the Holocaust; Representations of the Holocaust.

L460 Seminar: Literary Form, Mode, and Theme (3 cr.) Topic: The Poetics of Biblical Narrative.

Fine Arts

A200 Topics in Art History (3 cr.) Topic: Introduction to Jewish Art CSA.

Germanic Studies

E341 Dutch Culture: The Modern Netherlands (3 cr.) S & H, CSB Topic: Anne Frank: Her Diary in Perspective.

E351 Topics in Yiddish Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Topics: Fantasy, Realism, and Fiction in Early Modern and Modern “Classic” Yiddish Literature; Love, Soul, and Destiny in Modern Yiddish Literature; Selected Readings in Twentieth-Century Yiddish Fiction.

E352 Topics in Yiddish Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Topics: Culture, Memory, and Identity: Yiddish in the Post-Holocaust World; Ghetto, Shtetl, and Beyond: Millennium of History and Society of Yiddish; History and Sociology of Yiddish; Yiddish in America.

Y495 Individual Readings in Yiddish Studies: Language, Literature, Culture
(1–3 cr.)

Hutton Honors College

H203 Interdepartmental Colloquia (3 cr.) A & H, TFR Topics: The American Jewish Experience: History, Literature, and Culture; Hitler and Anne Frank: Studies in the Representation of Good and Evil.

H226 Interdepartmental Colloquia (3. cr.) A & H Topic: The Agnostic Bible.

H303 Interdepartmental Colloquia (3 cr.) A & H Topics: The American Jewish Experience; American Jewish Writers CSA; Literature of the Holocaust CSA; Poetics of Biblical Narrative.

Jewish Studies

C240 Contemporary Israeli Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

C340 The Kibbutz in Fact and Fiction (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

C360 Israeli Film and Fiction (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

H460 Israeli Film and Fiction in Hebrew (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

H480 Modern Hebrew Literature in Hebrew (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

H485 Recent Hebrew Literature in Hebrew (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

H497 Individual Readings in Hebrew (1–4 cr.)

J203 Arts and Humanities Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) A & H Topic: Jewish Writing through the Ages: Bible to Early Modern Literature

J303 Arts and Humanities Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) A & H Topic: Midrash and the Art of Interpretation.

J403 Arts and Humanities Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) A & H

L380 Modern Hebrew Literature in English (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

L385 Recent Hebrew Literature in English (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

L390 Biblical Themes in Modern Hebrew Literature (3 cr.) A & H

L395 S. Y. Agnon and the Jewish Experience (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

Slavic Languages and Literatures

C365 Seminar in Czech and Central European Literatures and Cultures (3 cr.)
A & H, CSA Topics: Central European Literature and Culture—Between the Wars; Czech and Jewish Culture in Bohemia: Poetry, Film, and Novel.

R345 Jewish Characters in Russian Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

West European Studies

W406 Special Topics in West European Studies (3 cr.) A & H Topic: Anne Frank: Her Diary in Perspective, CSB.

II. History and Society

Anthropology

E332 Jewish Women: Anthropological Perspectives (3 cr.) S & H, CSA

E334 Jews in Moslem Society (3 cr.) S & H, CSA

E371 Modern Jewish Culture and Society (3 cr.) S & H, CSA

E382 Memory and Culture (3 cr.) S & H

E400 Undergraduate Seminar (3 cr.) Topics: Ethnicities in Israel; Israeli Society and Culture; The Jewish Family; Jewish Women; Migrations and Diasporas.

College of Arts and Sciences

E104 Topics in Social and Historical Studies (3 cr.) S & H, TFR Topics: Blacks and Jews; Power, Politics, and Piety: The Struggle for the Holy Land in Israel/Palestine; What Makes It Jewish?

S103 Freshman Seminar in Arts and Humanities (3 cr.) A & H, TFR Topic: Popular Representations of the Holocaust.

Communication and Culture

C445 Media, Culture, and Politics (3 cr.) Topic: Film, Fascism, and Psychoanalysis.

Folklore and Ethnomusicology

F252 Folklore and the Humanities (3 cr.) A & H Topic: Musical Theater and Ethnic Representations: Jews and African Americans.

F358 Jewish Folklore/Folklife/Folk Music (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Topic: Music in Judaism.

F359 Exploring Jewish Identity Today (3 cr.) S & H, CSA

History

A379 Issues in Modern U.S. History (3 cr.) S & H Topic: The Holocaust in American Memory.

B200 Issues in Western European History (3 cr.) S & H Topic: History of Jerusalem: Three Faiths, Three Thousand Years.

B300 Issues in Western European History (3 cr.) S & H (when Jewish history topic) Topic: The Jews of Spain; Sephardic History and Culture.

B303 Issues in Modern European History (3 cr.) S & H (when Jewish history topic) Topic: Anti-Semitism in Europe Since the Enlightenment.

B315 European Anti-Semitism Since the Enlightenment (3 cr.) S & H

B321 European Jews in the Age of Discovery (3 cr.) S & H, CSA

B322 Jews in the Modern World (3 cr.) S & H, CSA

B323 History of the Holocaust (3 cr.) S & H, CSA

B324 Zionism and the State of Israel (3 cr.) S & H, CSA

B400 Issues in Western European History (3 cr.) S & H (when Jewish history topic)

C300 Issues in Classical and Byzantine History (3 cr.) S & H Topics: Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the Medieval Mediterranean; Three Cultures in the Medieval Mediterranean: Interactions between Muslims, Christians, and Jews.

D304 Jews of Eastern Europe (3 cr.) S & H, CSA

J300 Seminar in History (3 cr.) S & H (when Jewish history topic) Topics: The Jews of Islam; The Jews of Spain: Jewish Life under Christianity and Islam; Perpetrators of the Holocaust; The Sephardic Diaspora.

J400 Seminar for History Majors (3 cr.) S & H Topics: Anti-Semitism and Jewish Responses; Jewish Cultural History of the Modern Era; Jewish Emancipation; Perpetrators of the Holocaust.

Hutton Honors College

H203 Interdepartmental Colloquia (3 cr.) A & H, TFR Topics: The American Jewish Experience: History, Literature, Culture; American Jewish Writers; Hitler and Anne Frank: Studies in the Representation of Good and Evil; Literature of the Holocaust; Understanding Antisemitism.

H303 Interdepartmental Colloquia (3 cr.) A & H Topics: The American Jewish Experience; American Jewish Writers; Literature of the Holocaust.

Jewish Studies

C240 Contemporary Israeli Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

C340 The Kibbutz in Fact and Fiction (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

C360 Israeli Film and Fiction (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

H460 Israeli Film and Fiction in Hebrew (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

H480 Modern Hebrew Literature in Hebrew (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

H485 Recent Hebrew Literature in Hebrew (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

J203 Arts and Humanities Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) A & H

J204 Social and Historical Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) S & H Topic: The Arab-Israeli Conflict.

J303 Arts and Humanities Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) A & H Topic: Zionism and Contemporary Israeli Society.

J304 Social and Historical Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) S & H Topic: Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Israel.

J403 Arts and Humanities Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) A & H

J404 Social and Historical Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) S & H

L380 Modern Hebrew Literature in English (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

L385 Recent Hebrew Literature in English (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

L395 S. Y. Agnon and the Jewish Experience (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

P300 Professional Leadership and the Jewish Community (3 cr.)

Political Science

Y352 The Holocaust and Politics (3 cr.) S & H, CSA

III. Religion and Thought

College of Arts and Sciences

E103 Topics in Arts and Humanities (3 cr.) A & H, TFR (topics relating to Jewish Studies) Topics: The Bible and its Interpreters; Power, Politics, and Piety: The Struggle for the Holy Land in Israel/Palestine; Theism, Atheism, and Existentialism; Who Wrote the Bible?

S103 Freshman Seminar in Arts and Humanities (3 cr.) A & H, TFR Topic: Genesis and Myth.

Comparative Literature

C100 Freshman Seminar (3 cr.) A & H Topic: The Agnostic Bible.

C301 Special Topics in Comparative Literature (3 cr.) A & H Topics: The Agnostic Bible; Poetics of Biblical Narrative; Reading the Prophets.

C405 Senior Seminar in Comparative Literature (3 cr.) A & H Topics: The Bible in Western Literature; Job, from the Bible to Kafka; Prophecy and Poetry.

English

L367 Literature of the Bible (3 cr.) A & H

L460 Seminar: Literary Form, Mode, and Theme (3 cr.) Topic: The Poetics of Biblical Narrative.

Folklore and Ethnomusicology

F359 Exploring Jewish Identity Today (3 cr.) S & H, CSA

History

C300 Issues in Classical and Byzantine History (3 cr.) S & H Topics: Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the Medieval Mediterranean; Three Cultures in the Medieval Mediterranean: Interaction Between Muslims, Christians, and Jews.

Hutton Honors College

H203 Interdepartmental Colloquia (3 cr.) A & H, TFR Topic: The Bible and its Interpreters.

H226 Interdepartmental Colloquia (3 cr.) A & H Topic: The Agnostic Bible.

H303 Interdepartmental Colloquia (3 cr.) A & H Topic: Poetics of Biblical Narrative.

Jewish Studies

J203 Arts and Humanities Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) A & H Topics: Jewish Writing through the Ages: Bible to Early Modern Literature; Modern Jewish Thought.

J303 Arts and Humanities Topics in Jewish Studies (3 cr.) A & H Topic: Midrash and the Art of Interpretation.

L390 Biblical Themes in Modern Hebrew Literature (3 cr.) A & H

Philosophy

P205 Modern Jewish Philosophy (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

P305 Topics in the Philosophy of Judaism (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

P490 Readings in Philosophy (1–3 cr.) (In agreement with instructor, intensive readings related to one or a group of philosophers who explore in their writings Jewish themes and topics.)

Religious Studies

R152 Religions of the West (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Topic: The Binding of Isaac in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

R201 Honors Proseminar in Religion (3 cr.) A & H Topic: The Book of Genesis and its Reworking in Western Culture.

R202 Topics in Religious Studies (3 cr.) A & H Topics: Biblical Justice; Hell and Heaven in Judaism.

R210 Introduction to the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

R245 Introduction to Judaism (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

R300 Studies in Religion (3 cr.) A & H Topics: Dilemmas of Modern Judaism; History of God; Introduction to Rabbinic Literature; Issues in the Study of the Hebrew Bible; Readings in Biblical Archaeology I; Fieldwork in Biblical Archaeology I; Fieldwork in Biblical Archaeology II; Revelation in Rabbinic Literature.

R307 Messianism and Messiahs in Comparative Perspective (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

R310 Prophecy in Ancient Israel (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

R317 Judaism in the Making (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

R318 Ancient Mediterranean Religions (3 cr.) A & H, CSA (If Jewish Studies is one-third or more of course material.)

R320 Jesus and the Gospels (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

R325 Paul and his Influence in Early Christianity (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

R341 Introduction to Jewish Mysticism (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

R345 Religious Issues in Contemporary Judaism (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

R360 Comparative Study of Religious Phenomena (3 cr.) A & H Topic: Women and Religion.

R392 The Bible and Slavery (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

R410 Topics in Ancient Israelite Religion (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Topics: Biblical Justice; The Poetics of Biblical Narrative.

R420 Religions of Ancient Rome (3 cr.) A & H

R421 Judaism and Gender: Philosophical and Theological Perspectives (3 cr.)
A & H, CSA

R430 Topics in the History of Christianity (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Topics: The Bible and Slavery; Jews and Christians.

R445 Topics in the History of Judaism (3 cr.) A & H Topics: Dead Sea Scrolls; The Struggle for the Holy Land: Power, Piety, and Politics in the Israeli/Palestinian Conflict; Talmud.

R474 Capstone Seminar in Religion (3 cr.) A & H Topic: Mysticism in Religious Traditions.

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Linguistics

Minor in African Languages
Course Descriptions

Minor in African Languages

Requirements Students must complete the following:

  1. Minimum of 13 credit hours in one of the following language tracks:
    1. Akan: K102, K201, K202, K301.
    2. Bamana: B102, B201, B202, B301.
    3. Hausa: H102, H201, H202, H301.
    4. Swahili: S102, S201, S202, S301.
    5. Wolof: X102, X201, X202, X301.
    6. Zulu: Z102, Z201, Z202, Z301.
  2. Minimum of 3 credit hours in either L480 or L481.

Note: First-semester language courses do not count in the minor. Most students will need to complete 20 credit hours to satisfy all minor requirements in order to complete the prerequisite first semester of the relevant African language as well as the courses required for the minor.

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Course Descriptions

K101 Elementary Akan I (4 cr.) Introduction to Akan, a major language of West Africa, spoken by the Akan peoples of Ghana. With approximately three million speakers, it is the major language of Ghana. Also spoken by thousands of people in the Ivory Coast. Basic grammatical structures and vocabulary. Emphasis on the spoken language. Credit given for only one of K101 or W101.

K102 Elementary Akan II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in K101 or W101, or equivalent proficiency. Basic grammatical structures and vocabulary. Emphasis on spoken language—oral and listening comprehension, language use in specific social settings like the market, school, hospital, doctor’s office, among others. Important cultural points such as food, clothing, marriage. Credit given for only one of K102 or W102.

K201 Intermediate Akan I (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in K102 or W102, or equivalent proficiency. Study of more complex grammatical structures, with emphasis on active skills, speaking and writing. Reading of elementary texts. Credit given for only one of K201 or W201.

K202 Intermediate Akan II (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in K201 or W201, or equivalent proficiency. Study of more complex grammatical structures, with emphasis on active skills, speaking, writing and reading texts. Attention on oral and written composition, reading and listening comprehension, and translation. Description of cultural events through the use of videos and Internet resources. Credit given for only one of K202 or W202.

K301 Advanced Akan I (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in K202 or W202, or equivalent proficiency. Examination of subtle nuances in grammatical structures. Advanced readings of traditional and modern literature. Credit given for only one of K301 or W301.

K302 Advanced Akan II (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in K301 or W301, or equivalent proficiency. Study of complex grammatical structures and more complex contextual discourse patterns. Advanced readings of traditional and modern literature. Advanced oral and written compositions, advanced reading and listening comprehension and translation of complex texts from English to Akan. Credit given for only one of K302 or W302.

X101 Elementary Wolof I (4 cr.) Introduction to Wolof language and culture. Wolof is spoken in West Africa, especially in Senegal, Mauritania, the Gambia, and Mali. Basic grammatical structures and vocabulary. Emphasis is on the spoken language. Exposure to cultural and social settings through the use of electronic media.

X102 Elementary Wolof II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in X101 or equivalent proficiency. Basic grammatical structures and vocabulary. Emphasis is on the spoken language—oral and listening comprehension, and language use in specific social settings.

X201 Intermediate Wolof I (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in X102 or equivalent proficiency. Study of more complex grammatical structures, with emphasis on active skills: speaking, writing, and reading texts. Attention to oral and written compositions, reading, listening comprehension, and translation of texts.

X202 Intermediate Wolof II (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in X201 or equivalent proficiency. Study of more complex grammatical structures, with emphasis on active skills: speaking, writing, and reading texts. Attention to oral and written compositions, reading, listening comprehension, and translation of texts.

X301 Advanced Wolof I (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in X202 or equivalent proficiency. Study of complex grammatical structures and complex contextual discourse patterns. Advanced readings of traditional and modern literature. Advanced oral and written compositions, listening comprehension, and translation of complex texts.

X302 Advanced Wolof II (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in X301 or equivalent proficiency. Study of complex grammatical structures and complex contextual discourse patterns. Advanced readings of traditional and modern literature. Advanced oral and written compositions, listening comprehension, and translation of complex texts.

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Mathematics

Major in Mathematics—B.S.

Requirements: Program II

  1. Writing, same as B.A. degree.
  2. Foreign language, 3 credit hours (or the equivalent) at or above the second-year level.
  3. Arts and humanities, two courses; social and historical studies, two courses; natural sciences, fulfilled by major.
  4. Concentration requirements, at least 33 credit hours of mathematics, including:
    1. M301 (or M303), M311, M312, M343, and M344;
    2. at least one of the sequences M413-M414 or M413-M415;
    3. At least one of the sequences M441-M442, M463-M464, M463-M466, or M471-M472.
  5. Computer Science C211 or A201 or another course approved by the mathematics department. This requirement may be waived for students who can demonstrate proficiency in computer programming.
  6. Outside concentration: a concentration approved by the department consisting of 9 credit hours in one of the following departments: Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Economics, Geology, Physics, Statistics, or other departments with approval of the mathematics department.

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Near Eastern Languages and Cultures

Course Descriptions

N122 U.S. Foreign Policy and the Muslim World (3 cr.) S & H An introduction to some salient debates that shape American foreign policy toward the Middle East and the Muslim world today.

N222 The Contemporary Middle East in World Politics (3 cr.) S & H An introduction to the interaction among people, governments, and outside powers in the greater Middle East and North Africa.

N245 Introduction to the Ancient Near East (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Introduction to ancient Near Eastern cultures from early farmers around 8000 B.C. to the Iron Age kingdoms of the Babylonians, Assyrians, and Iranians; emphasis on agriculture, literacy, urbanization, state formation, sociopolitical and religious institutions, and legal and economic developments. Archaeological and textual information will be utilized in conjunction with visual aids. Credit given for only one of N245, CEUS R250, or CEUS U254.

N306 Topics in Middle Eastern Studies (3 cr.) In-depth studies of particular topics, problems, or themes in Middle Eastern studies. Topics will vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

N380 Topics in Persian Literature in Translation (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Study and analysis of selected readings from Persian literature in English translation. May concentrate on a particular theme, period, or author. Special attention paid to the historical and cultural contexts of the works, as well as problems in translation, critical analysis, and interpretation. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in N380, CEUS R354, and CEUS U372.

N397 Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (3 cr.) S & H, CSA General anthropological introduction to social institutions and cultural forms of the Arab countries of North Africa and the Near East, Israel, Turkey, Iran, and Afghanistan. Topics include ecology, development of Islam and Muslim empires, traditional adaptive strategies, consequences of colonialism, independence and rise of nation-states, impact of modernization, changing conceptions of kinship, ethnicity, and gender. Credit given for only one of N397, ANTH E397, CEUS R352, or CEUS U397.

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Physics

Course Description

P317 Signals and Information Processing in Living Systems (3 cr.) P: P201 and P202 or P221 and P222; MATH M119 and M120 or M211 or M215. Introduction to quantitative methods for life sciences, emphasizing how living systems process information. Topics include noise in sensory signals; consequences for sensory processing; uncertainty and decision making; neural networks, excitable waves in neurons and muscle; stability/instability; models of development and morphogenesis. Open to students in the physical or life sciences.

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Psychological and Brain Sciences

Major in Psychology—B.A.
Major in Psychology—B.S.
Major in Neuroscience—B.S.
Interdepartmental Major in Psychology and Speech and Hearing Sciences
Course Descriptions

Major in Psychology—B.A.

Requirements Students must complete the following courses in psychology:

  1. One of the following entry-level sequences:
    1. P155 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (3 cr.) or
    2. P151 (3 cr.), P152 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (3 cr.) or
    3. P106 (4 cr.) and P199 (1 cr.) or
    4. P101 (3 cr.), P102 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (3 cr.)
    (Note: P299 may be substituted for P199 in any of the sequences above.)
  2. PSY K300, K310, or a substitute approved by the undergraduate advisor
  3. All of the following foundational courses: P304, P335, P346
  4. One advanced course chosen from P337, P349, P402, P405, P406, P407, P409, P410, P411, P413, P416, P417, P423, P425, P430, P434, P437, P438, P440, P442, P443, P444, P446, P447, P448, P449, P457 (if appropriate topic), P459, P460, P466, P495
  5. Two elective courses chosen from P303, P315, P316, P319, P323, P324, P325, P327, P329, P330, P336, P340, P350, P357, P375
  6. One capstone course or appropriate substitute: P404, P421, P424, P426, P429, P433, P435, P436, P493, P494, or P499
  7. Mathematics M118, or M119, or M120, or a 200-level mathematics course, or the equivalent, completed with a C– or higher
  8. A one-semester course in biology completed with a C– or higher
  9. One additional course completed with a C– or higher selected from one of the following departments: Anthropology (B200 Bioanthropology only), Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics (in addition to the course used to satisfy requirement number 7 listed above), and Physics

Students must also complete the degree requirements for the B.A. degree in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Required Outside Concentration A single outside concentration is required of all majors in psychology. The outside concentration must consist of 12 credit hours at any level or of three courses above the 100 level, taken in one department. The following disciplines are frequently chosen as outside concentrations by psychology majors: animal behavior, anthropology, biology, business, chemistry, cognitive science, computer science, criminal justice, history and philosophy of science, linguistics, mathematics, philosophy, or sociology. Students can fulfill this requirement by completing an optional minor, offered by many departments. (See individual departments’ sections in the 2008–10 Bulletin of the College of Arts and Sciences and in this supplement for specific required courses.)

Recommendations Majors should take at least one course in chemistry or physics, one in mathematics, and one in biology (see requirements above). Students should have a sound foundation in mathematics for study in statistics, measurement, and theoretical methods. Those planning graduate work in psychology should include P459. Consult the undergraduate advisors or the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences home page (www.psych.indiana.edu) for listings of courses and model curricula useful for advanced work in various areas of psychology or for particular vocations. We recommend that students take P199 Planning Your Psychology Career in the spring of their sophomore year. This course can be used for career guidance and provides students with invaluable information at an appropriate time.

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Major in Psychology—B.S.

Requirements Students must complete the following fundamental skills and distribution requirements:

  1. Writing, same as B.A. degree.
  2. Mathematics, two courses from the following: M118, M119, M120, 200 level or higher (not including K310).
  3. Computer science courses (or a demonstration of skills with the approval of the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences). This requirement may also be satisfied by the completion of at least 5.5 credit hours from the following list of courses: CSCI A111, A112, A113, A114, A201, or A202.
  4. Foreign language, 3 credit hours at or above the second-year level (or equivalent proficiency) in one language.
  5. One Topics course (COLL E103, E104, or approved equivalents).
  6. Arts and Humanities, three courses (could include COLL E103 or equivalent from number 5 above).
  7. Social and Historical Studies, three courses, exclusive of psychology courses (could include E104 or equivalent from number 5 above).
  8. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: must include Biology L112-L113
    (6 cr.) and one of the following combinations:
    1. Two mathematics courses beyond the two fundamental skills courses listed above or
    2. Physics P201-P202 (or P221-P222) or
    3. Chemistry C101-C121 and C102-C122 (or C117, C341, or R340) or
    4. One additional course in biology (L111, L211, L311, L312, L473, or L479) and one other course from the mathematics, physics, and chemistry courses listed above.

Major Requirements

  1. One of the following entry-level sequences:
    1. P155 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (3 cr.) or
    2. P151 (3 cr.), P152 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (3 cr.) or
    3. P106 (4 cr.) and P199 (1 cr.) or
    4. P101 (3 cr.), P102 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (3 cr.)
    (Note: P299 may be substituted for P199 in any of the sequences above.)
  2. K300, K310, or a substitute approved by the undergraduate advisor.
  3. All of the following foundational courses: P304, P335, P346.
  4. Three advanced courses from P337, P349, P402, P405, P406, P407, P409, P410, P411, P413, P416, P417, P423, P425, P430, P434, P437, P438, P440, P442, P443, P444, P446, P447, P448, P449, P457 (if appropriate topic), P459, P460, P466, P495.
  5. Two capstone courses or appropriate substitutes from P404, P421, P424, P426, P429, P433, P435, P436, P493, P494, or P499.

Required Outside Concentration A single outside concentration is required of all majors in psychology. The outside concentration must consist of 12 credit hours at any level or of three courses above the 100 level, taken in one department. The following disciplines are frequently chosen as outside concentrations by psychology majors: animal behavior, anthropology, biology, business, chemistry, cognitive science, computer science, criminal justice, history and philosophy of science, linguistics, mathematics, philosophy, or sociology. Students can fulfill this requirement by an optional minor, offered by many departments. (See individual departments’ sections in the 2008–10 Bulletin of the College of Arts and Sciences and in this supplement for specific required courses.)

Recommendations We strongly recommend that students fulfill the entry-level sequence and all foundational courses (P346, P335, P304) by the end of the second year of studies.

Students should consult with the psychological and brain sciences undergraduate advisor for additional information on the above requirements. See also the departmental information available at www.psych.indiana.edu.

We recommend that students take P199 Planning Your Psychology Career in the spring of their sophomore year. This course can be used for career guidance and provides students with invaluable information at an appropriate time.

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Major in Neuroscience—B.S.

Requirements Students must complete the following fundamental skills and distribution requirements:

  1. Writing, English Composition and Intensive Writing.
  2. Mathematics, fulfilled by major requirements.
  3. Foreign language, three semesters in the same language, or equivalent proficiency.
  4. One Topics course (COLL E103, COLL E104, or approved equivalents).
  5. Arts and Humanities, two courses (could include COLL E103 or equivalent from number 4 above).
  6. Social and Historical Studies, two courses (could include COLL E104 or equivalent from number 4 above).
  7. Natural and Mathematical Sciences, fulfilled by major requirements.

Major Requirements

Students must complete the following courses:

  1. Introductory courses: PSY P101 or PSY P151 or PSY P106 or PSY P155, PSY P326 or PSY P346, BIOL L112 or BIOL H112, CHEM C117, CHEM C341 or CHEM R340, CHEM C343, PHYS P201, PHYS P202.
  2. Mathematics courses: MATH M211 (or both MATH M119 and MATH M120) and PSY (MATH) K300.
  3. Basic non-neuroscience courses: Select three courses from CSCI A321, CHEM C342, BIOL L211, BIOL L312, MATH M212, MATH M301, or MATH M303.
  4. Advanced neuroscience courses: Select four courses from PSY P337, PSY P349, PSY P406, PSY P407, PSY P409, PSY P410, PSY P411, PSY P423, PSY P437, PSY P466, PSY P457 (any topic with P326 or P346 as a prerequisite), BIOL L410 seminars as appropriate, PHYS P317, or any graduate-level neuroscience course (PSY N500, N501).
  5. Laboratory courses: Select one from PSY P426, PSY P433, or a neuroscience laboratory using one of the following for enrollment: PSY P493, PSY P494, PSY P499, BIOL L490, CHEM C409, PHYS S406.

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Interdepartmental Major in Psychology and Speech and Hearing Sciences

Requirements Students must take a minimum of 40 credit hours. At least 12 credit hours must be completed at or above the 300 level in psychology, and at least 12 credit hours must be completed at or above the 300 level in speech and hearing sciences.

Students must also complete the degree requirements for the B.A. in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Psychology

  1. One of the following entry-level sequences:
    1. P155 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (3 cr.) or
    2. P151 (3 cr.), P152 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (3 cr.) or
    3. P106 (4 cr.) and P199 (1 cr.) or
    4. P101 (3 cr.), P102 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (3 cr.)
    (Note: P299 may be substituted for P199 in any of the sequences above.)
  2. PSY K300 or K310 or a substitute approved by the undergraduate advisor
  3. 3 credit hours from P303, P325, P326, P327, P329, P330, P335, P337, P340, P346, P349, P350, P357 (depending on topic), P402 (depending on topic), P405, P407, P410, P411, P413, P416, P417, P423, P437, P438, P444, P459
  4. 3 credit hours from P304, P315, P316, P319, P320, P323, P324, P336, P357 (depending on topic), P375, P402 (depending on topic), P425, P430, P434, P442, P446, P447, P448
  5. Advanced laboratory: one from P421, P424, P426, P429, P435, P436, P493-P494, P495, or P499. (Another 400-level course may be substituted for this requirement by permission of the undergraduate advisor.)
  6. One additional course in psychology numbered 300 or above

Speech and Hearing Sciences

  1. S111
  2. S275, S319, S333
  3. S201 or S375
  4. At least three courses from S307, S378, S420, S436, S444, S474, S478

Other Requirements The following courses must be completed with a minimum grade of C–:

  1. Mathematics M118, M119, or M120, or a 200-level mathematics course
  2. A one-semester course in biology
  3. Linguistics L103 or L303

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Course Descriptions

P406 Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience (3 cr.) P: P346. Provides an overview of the field of developmental cognitive neuroscience, the study of the relation among human brain function, development, and behavior. Critically examines recent research that applies an integration of neurobiological and psychological perspectives to the study of typical and atypical cognitive development.

P449 Social Psychology of Public Opinion (3 cr.) P: P320 or P304. Describes the methods of public opinion research, empowering students to become informed consumers of poll results. Covers basic social psychological processes that shape opinions, such as people’s self-interest, group memberships, personal experiences, and conformity. Homework involves analysis and interpretation of data from recent surveys on social and political attitudes.

Psychological and Brain Sciences

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Religious Studies

Course Descriptions

R318 Ancient Mediterranean Religions (3 cr.) A & H, CSA A survey of the various religions in the ancient Near East (Egypt, Babylon, Persia) and the Greco-Roman worlds. Attention will be paid to ritual, philosophy, and community formation.

R438 Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X in American Religion (3 cr.)
A & H
An examination of the religious thought of Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X in the context of American religious cultures.

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Slavic Languages and Literatures

Major in Slavic Languages and Literatures
Course Descriptions

Major in Slavic Languages and Literatures

The Russian Track

Purpose This track is designed for students seeking advanced study of the Russian language and/or Russian literature, culture, or film. Students must also complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

  1. R201-R202, R301-R302; R223, R263-R264.
  2. At least four Russian language, literature, culture, or film courses at the 300 level or higher (excluding R491-R492) and totaling a minimum of 12 credit hours.

Total: 35 credit hours.

The Slavic Track

Purpose This track is designed for students seeking a basic knowledge of a Slavic language other than Russian (Czech, Polish, Serbian and Croatian), and familiarization with its literature and culture in English translation. In addition, students either do work in another Slavic literature or culture in English translation (including Russian), or study another Slavic language (including Russian). Students must also complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences. These courses do not count toward a major in the Russian track.

  1. Czech Option: C101-C102, C201-C202, C363-C364; and line 4.
  2. Polish Option: P101-P102, P201-P202, P363-P364; and line 4.
  3. Serbian and Croatian Option: S101-S102, S201-S202, S363-S364; and line 4.
  4. R353 and any three other departmental language, literature, film, or culture courses at the 200 level or higher (excluding R491-R492) and totaling a minimum of 12 credit hours.

Total: 32 credit hours.

Contact the academic advisor to discuss the possibility of a Romanian option.

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Course Descriptions

C101 Elementary Czech I (4 cr.) No previous knowledge of Czech required. Introduction to basic structure of contemporary Czech language and to culture. Reading and discussion of basic texts. I Sem., SS.

C102 Elementary Czech II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in C101, or equivalent. Introduction to basic structure of contemporary Czech language and to culture. Reading and discussion of basic texts. II Sem, SS.

M101 Elementary Romanian I (4 cr.) No previous knowledge of Romanian required. Introduction to basic structure of contemporary Romanian language and to culture. Reading and discussion of basic texts. I Sem., SS.

M102 Elementary Romanian II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in M101, or equivalent. Introduction to basic structure of contemporary Romanian language and to culture. Reading and discussion of basic texts. II Sem., SS.

P101 Elementary Polish I (4 cr.) Introduction to modern standard Polish—reading, writing, and speaking. Focus on learning grammatical patterns and building an active vocabulary. I Sem., SS.

P102 Elementary Polish II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in P101 or equivalent. Introduction to modern standard Polish—reading, writing, and speaking. Focus on learning grammatical patterns and building an active vocabulary. II Sem, SS.

Q101 Elementary Macedonian I (4 cr.) No previous knowledge of Macedonian language required. Introduction to basic structure of contemporary Macedonian and the culture of Macedonia. Reading and discussion of basic texts. Credit given for only one of Q101 or Q311.

Q102 Elementary Macedonian II (4 cr.) P: Q101 or Q311 or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of Q101. Introduction to basic structure of contemporary Macedonian and the culture of Macedonia. Reading and discussion of basic texts. Credit given for only one of Q102 or Q312.

R101 Elementary Russian I (4 cr.) Introduction to contemporary Russian and aspects of Russian culture. Intensive drill and exercises in basic structure; development of vocabulary.

R102 Elementary Russian II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in R101 or equivalent. Introduction to contemporary Russian and aspects of Russian culture. Intensive drill and exercises in basic structure; development of vocabulary.

R114 Elementary Russian for Business Students (3 cr.) Provides a foundation in both Russian language and Russian culture in a business context. Alternates between the teaching of the language and the culture of business in Russia. Students develop foundational skills in language and communications, business culture, and Russian grammar.

R325 Advanced Intermediate Oral Russian I (1 cr.) P: R202 or consent of the department. Designed primarily for those interested in developing oral fluency. Sections in advanced conversation, recitation, and oral comprehension, supplemented by lab and drill in corrective pronunciation, dictation, and reading. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours. I Sem.

R326 Advanced Intermediate Oral Russian II (1 cr.) P: R325 or R301, or consent of the department. Continuation and advanced treatment of topics covered in R325, as well as themes relating to current events. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours. II Sem.

R425 Advanced Oral Russian I (1 cr.) P: R302 or consent of the department. Designed primarily for those interested in maintaining or developing oral fluency. Sections in advanced conversation, recitation and oral comprehension, dictation, and reading. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours. I Sem.

R426 Advanced Oral Russian II (1 cr.) P: R425 or R401, or consent of the department. Continuation of R425. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours. II Sem.

S101 Elementary Serbian and Croatian I (4 cr.) No previous knowledge of Serbian or Croatian required. Introduction to basic structure of contemporary Serbian and Croatian language and to culture. Reading and discussion of basic texts. I Sem., SS.

S102 Elementary Serbian and Croatian II (4 cr.) P: Grade of C or higher in S101 or equivalent. Introduction to basic structure of contemporary Serbian and Croatian language and to culture. Reading and discussion of basic texts. II Sem, SS.

S149 Special Topics in Slavic Studies (1–3 cr.) Study and analysis of literary and/or cultural issues and problems in the Slavic studies area. Variable topics ranging from a study of a single novel to selected works of Slavic literature in their historical and cultural contexts. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

S320 Special Topics in Slavic Studies (1–3 cr.) Study and analysis of literary and cultural issues and problems in the Slavic studies area. Variable topics ranging from a study of a single novel or genre to selected themes of Slavic literature in their historical and cultural contexts. Topics will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

U101 Elementary Ukrainian I (4 cr.) No previous knowledge of Ukrainian required. First semester designed to provide active command of phonology and basic grammatical patterns of Ukrainian.

U102 Elementary Ukrainian II (4 cr.) P: U101 or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of U101, designed to provide active command of phonology and basic grammatical patterns.

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Sociology

Course Descriptions

S105 Community Problems and Outreach (3 cr.) S & H By combining traditional classroom learning with community outreach, this course offers the unique opportunity to acquire both academic and experiential knowledge of social problems currently facing the Bloomington community. The focus of our academic inquiry and community outreach will center around, but will not be limited to, the following social problems: poverty, homelessness, child abuse, and domestic violence.

S122 Envisioning the City (3 cr.) S & H Students conduct field research in a city in order to understand the relationship between the built environment and social problems such as obesity and residential segregation. Addresses approaches to resolving these problems through community action.

S201 Social Problems (3 cr.) S & H Social problems analyzed from the perspective of major sociological theories. Specific problems include poverty and inequality; crime, violence, and law enforcement; institutional problems (education, economy, family, health); globalization in the twenty-first century.

S339 The Sociology of Media (3 cr.) S & H P: 3 credit hours of sociology or consent of instructor. The mass media (print, radio, and television) have come to play an increasingly important role in society. This course explores the effects of the mass media on public opinion, crime and violence, social integration, and values. Mass media messages and audiences will also be considered.

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Spanish and Portuguese

Special Credit Option in Spanish
Course Descriptions

Special Credit Option in Spanish

Automatic special credit of 4 credit hours is granted for S105 when a student tests into S200 or higher on the IU Bloomington Spanish placement exam. Three hours of special credit are granted for S200 for placement into and completion of S250 with a minimum grade of C–. A total of 6 hours of credit is granted for S200 and S250 for placement into and completion of S280 with a minimum grade of C–. Credit for Spanish S200 and/or S250 must be claimed by going to the Spanish and Portuguese Web site at www.indiana.edu/~spanport/undergraduate.shtml and submitting the form electronically. Special credit is never given for S280.

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Course Descriptions

Spanish

S251 Service Learning in Spanish (1 cr.) P: S200 or equivalent. C: S250. Allows S250 students to apply skills from their classroom language-learning experience to community projects such as teaching basic Spanish and presenting cultural activities to elementary school children.

S280 Spanish Grammar in Context (3 cr.) P: S250 or equivalent. A topic-based approach to the formal aspects of Spanish grammar. Formal linguistic skills are developed through explicit grammar instruction, the reading of Hispanic texts, and the study of literature and culture through writing and conversation. Credit given for only one of S280 or S310.

S308 Composition and Conversation in Spanish (3 cr.) P or C: S280 or S310, or equivalent. This content-based course seeks to improve students’ oral and writing skills in Spanish while fostering critical thinking and cultural awareness. The written component includes an analysis of various writing styles: description, narration, exposition, and argumentation. The oral component includes discussions of cultural topics in the Spanishspeaking world. Credit given for only one of S308 or S312.

S315 Spanish in the Business World (3 cr.) P: S280 or S310, or equivalent. Introduction to the technical language of the business world, with emphasis on problems of vocabulary, style, composition, and translation in the context of Hispanic mores. Instruction in Spanish.

S317 Spanish Conversation and Diction (3 cr.) P: S280 or S310, or equivalent. Meets five times a week. Intensive controlled conversation correlated with readings, reports, debates, and group discussions. May be repeated once for credit. S317 is not open to native speakers of Spanish. I Sem., II Sem.

S324 Introduction to the Study of Hispanic Cultures (3 cr.) A & H, CSA P: S280 or S310, or equivalent. Through the examination of a variety of texts, this course explores Spanish, Latin American, and U.S. Latino culture from historical, social, artistic, and political perspectives. Credit given for only one of S324 or S275.

S326 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3 cr.) N & M P: S280 or S310, or equivalent. Introduces the basic concepts of Hispanic linguistics and establishes the background for the future application of linguistic principles. The course surveys linguistic properties in Spanish, including phonology, morphology, and syntax. Additional introductory material on historical linguistics, second language acquisition, semantics, and sociolinguistics will be included. I Sem., II Sem.

S328 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA P: S280 or S310, or equivalent. Develops skills needed for more advanced study of Hispanic literatures through the reading and analysis of texts in at least three literary genres. Credit given for only one of S328, S331, S332, or S333.

S334 Panoramas of Hispanic Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA P: S328, or equivalent. A panoramic introduction to the study of Hispanic literature in its literary-historical development, through a variety of literary genres. Periods and geographical areas may vary. Credit given for only one of S334, S332, or S333.

S336 Introduction to Spanish Translation (3 cr.) P: S280 or S310, or equivalent. An introduction to the practice and techniques of translation, both from Spanish to English as well as from English to Spanish. Translation practice will focus on a variety of textual modes, including literary works, legal documents, journalistic prose, and other materials.

S407 Survey of Spanish Literature I (3 cr.) A & H P: One course from S328, S331, S332, S333; one course from S275, S324, S326; and one course from S308, S312, S315, S317. A historical survey that covers major authors, genres, periods, and movements from the Spanish Middle Ages through the baroque period of the seventeenth century. Readings include prose works, poetry, and drama.

S408 Survey of Spanish Literature II (3 cr.) A & H P: One course from S328, S331, S332, S333; one course from S275, S324, S326; and one course from S308, S312, S315, S317. A historical survey of Spanish literature that covers the main current of Spain’s literary history in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Readings in prose, poetry, and drama by Larra, Perez Galdós, Unamuno, Lorca, and other representative writers.

S411 Spain: The Cultural Context (3 cr.) A & H, CSB P: One course from S324, S328, S331, S333, S334. A course to integrate historical, social, political, and cultural information about Spain. II Sem.

S412 Spanish America: The Cultural Context (3 cr.) A & H, CSA P: One course from S324, S328, S331, S333, S334. A course that integrates historical, social, political, and cultural information about Spanish America. I Sem.

S413 Hispanic Culture in the United States (3 cr.) A & H, CSA P: One course from S324, S328, S331, S333, S334. Integrates historical, racial, political, and cultural information about Hispanics in the United States.

S417 Hispanic Poetry (3 cr.) A & H P: One course from S328, S331, S332, S333; one course from S275, S324, S326; and one course from S308, S312, S315, S317. Study of major aspects, movements, or directions of Hispanic poetry from the Middle Ages to the present.

S418 Hispanic Drama (3 cr.) A & H P: One course from S328, S331, S332, S333; one course from S275, S324, S326; and one course from S308, S312, S315, S317. Forms, traditions, themes, and periods of Hispanic drama from the Renaissance to the present.

S419 Modern Spanish Prose Fiction (3 cr.) A & H P: One course from S328, S331, S332, S333; one course from S275, S324, S326; and one course from S308, S312, S315, S317. Spanish prose fiction from mid-nineteenth-century realism through post-Spanish Civil War narrative innovations.

S420 Modern Spanish-American Prose Fiction (3 cr.) A & H P: One course from S328, S331, S332, S333; one course from S275, S324, S326; and one course from S308, S312, S315, S317. Spanish-American prose fiction from late nineteenth-century modernism to the present.

S422 Hispanic Cinema (3 cr.) A & H P: One course from S328, S331, S332, S333; and one course from S308, S312, S315, S317. Analysis and interpretation of Hispanic films, with an emphasis on the study of their formal aspects. National/regional context varies.

S423 The Craft of Translation (3 cr.) P: S308 or S312, and S328 or S332. A practical approach to the problems and techniques of Spanish/English and English/Spanish translation, using a variety of texts and concentrating on such critical areas of stylistics as tone, rhythm, imagery, nuance, allusion, etc. Language and translation theory will also be studied.

S425 Spanish Phonetics (3 cr.) N & M P: S326 or equivalent. Intensive patterned pronunciation drills and exercises in sound discrimination and transcription, based on detailed articulatory description of standard Spanish of Spain and Latin America. Attendance in language laboratory required. Usually offered I Sem. and II Sem.

S427 The Structure of Spanish (3 cr.) N & M P: S326 or equivalent. Analyzes the structure of simple and compound sentences in Spanish, focusing on the internal structure of the sentence and how certain phrases within the sentence combine in different word orders to produce specific meanings. Covers transitivity, word order, negation, pronominal and verbal systems, and syntactic variation.

S429 Hispanic Sociolinguistics (3 cr.) N & M P: S326 or equivalent. Examines current topics in Hispanic sociolinguistic/pragmatics. Topics include sociolinguistic and phonological and syntactic variation, field methods, discourse analysis, language and power, language ideology, language attitudes, languages in contact, language and gender, language and the law, bilingualism, linguistic politeness, and speech act theory.

S435 Literatura Chicana y Puertorriqueña (3 cr.) A & H P: One course from S328, S331, S332, S333; one course from S275, S324, S326; and one course from S308, S312, S315, S317. Works in Spanish by representative Chicano and Puerto Rican authors of the United States. Cultural values and traditions reflected in both the oral and written literatures.

S450 Don Quixote (3 cr.) A & H P: One course from S328, S331, S332, S333; one course from S275, S324, S326; and one course from S308, S312, S315, S317. Detailed analysis of Cervantes’ novel. Life and times of the author. Importance of the work to the development of the novel as an art form.

S470 Women and Hispanic Literature (3 cr.) A & H P: One course from S328, S331, S332, S333; one course from S275, S324, S326; and one course from S308, S312, S315, S317. Hispanic woman within her cultural context through literary texts. Topics such as women authors, characters, themes, and feminist criticism.

S471 Spanish American Literature I (3 cr.) A & H P: One course from S328, S331, S332, S333; one course from S275, S324, S326; and one course from S308, S312, S315, S317. Introduction to Spanish American literature.

S472 Spanish American Literature II (3 cr.) A & H P: One course from S328, S331, S332, S333; one course from S275, S324, S326; and one course from S308, S312, S315, S317. Introduction to Spanish American literature.

S473 Hispanic Literature and Literary Theory (3 cr.) A & H P: One course from S328, S331, S332, S333; one course from S275, S324, S326; and one course from S308, S312, S315, S317. Studies literature as an art form within the Hispanic tradition. Employs critical methodology and textual interpretation and analysis to exemplify theory of each genre.

S474 Hispanic Literature and Society (3 cr.) A & H P: One course from S328, S331, S332, S333; one course from S275, S324, S326; and one course from S308, S312, S315, S317. Writers and their works in social, political, economic, and cultural context. Specific topic to be announced in the online Schedule of Classes.

S479 Mexican Literature (3 cr.) A & H P: One course from S328, S331, S332, S333; one course from S275, S324, S326; and one course from S308, S312, S315, S317. Mexican literature from independence to the present.

S480 Argentine Literature (3 cr.) A & H P: One course from S328, S331, S332, S333; one course from S275, S324, S326; and one course from S308, S312, S315, S317. Argentine literature from independence to the present.

S481 Hispanic American National/Regional Literatures (3 cr.) A & H P: One course from S328, S331, S332, S333; one course from S275, S324, S326; and one course from S308, S312, S315, S317. Study of national and/or regional literatures of Hispanic America.

Portuguese

P115 Portuguese for Business (2 cr.) Designed to provide the beginning Portuguese student with a foundation in both the Portuguese language and the Brazilian culture in the business context. The course alternates between the teaching of the language and the culture of business in Brazil, and students develop some foundational skills in three main areas: language and communications, business culture, and Portuguese grammar.

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Speech and Hearing Sciences

Major in Speech and Hearing Sciences—B.A.
Major in Speech and Hearing Sciences—B.S.
Minor in Speech and Hearing Sciences
Minor in Speech and Hearing Sciences (Pre-Professional)
Indiana Teacher Certification
Departmental Honors Program
Course Descriptions

Major in Speech and Hearing Sciences—B.A.

Students may choose one of three tracks for the B.A. with a major in Speech and Hearing Sciences.

General Speech and Hearing Major This major is for students who are seeking a broad liberal arts and sciences education that centers on the processes of communication and its disorders, and not necessarily to pursue a clinical career in the field.

Requirements Students must complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences and the following:

  1. SPHS S110 or S115.
  2. SPHS S111 and S275.
  3. SPHS S333.
  4. 15 additional credit hours from the following Speech and Hearing Sciences courses: S201, S302, S307, S319, S375, S420, S430, S436, S444, S445, S461, S473, S478.

Pre-Professional Major with a Concentration in Audiology and Hearing

Requirements Students must complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences and the following:

  1. SPHS S110 or S115.
  2. SPHS S111, S275, S302, S319, S333.
  3. LING L103 or L303.
  4. PSY P101-P102 or P151-P152 or P106.
  5. PSY K300.
  6. SPHS S375, S475, and S478.
  7. One course chosen from the following: SPHS S307, S420, S436, S444, S445, S473.
  8. A minimum of 13 credit hours of courses taken to satisfy requirements 6 and 7.

Pre-Professional Major with a Concentration in Speech-Language Pathology

Requirements Students must complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences and the following:

  1. SPHS S110 or S115.
  2. SPHS S111, S275, S333.
  3. LING L103 or L303.
  4. PSY P101-P102 or P151-P152 or P106.
  5. PSY K300.
  6. SPHS S201.
  7. One of the following course sequences to fulfill course work in the area of acoustics:
    1. S302 and PHYS P105 or
    2. S319 and PHYS P105.
  8. SPHS S375 or S478.
  9. Two courses from the following: SPHS S311, S430, S461, S473.
  10. Two courses from the following: SPHS S307, S420, S436, S444, S445.

A minimum of 14 credit hours of course work must be taken to satisfy requirements 8, 9, and 10.

In addition to the requirements listed above, students in either preprofessional major are encouraged to consider taking courses from the following list: Speech and Hearing Sciences S311, S461, S462.

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Major in Speech and Hearing Sciences—B.S.

Purpose The B.S. program in speech and hearing sciences is designed to provide a more scientific and mathematical background in the field. Two concentrations are described below which have the same core requirements, but different major concentration requirements. The decision of which concentration to pursue should be made in consultation with the undergraduate advisor based on a student’s individual interests and goals.

Requirements Students must complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences and the following:

The following requirements apply to both concentrations (audiology and hearing science; speech and language sciences):

  1. Writing, same as B.A.
  2. Mathematical foundation, two courses:
    1. One course from MATH A118, M118, S118, M119, M120, or any “M” course at the 200 level or higher.
    2. SPHS S319 or S302.
  3. Foreign language, 3 credit hours (or the equivalent) at or above the second-year level.
  4. Arts and humanities, two courses.
  5. Social and historical studies, two courses, including PSY P102 (or P152).
  6. Natural and mathematical sciences (32 credits):
    1. Physics P109.
    2. PSY P101 (or P151), K300, P329, P335 (or COGS Q301).
    3. 3 credits in biology or ANAT A215 or PHSL P215.
    4. 3 credits in physics or chemistry.
    5. 12 additional credits from other natural and mathematics courses not in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, excluding the following: MATH A118, M118, S118, M119, and M120.
  7. Speech and Hearing Sciences courses: S110, S111, S275, S302, S333, and S436.

Concentration in Audiology and Hearing Science The concentration in audiology and hearing science should be selected by students considering graduate studies in audiology, employment as an audiologist in medical facilities, or possible careers in hearing research. The following courses are required for this concentration: Speech and Hearing Sciences S375, S475, and S478.

Concentration in Speech and Language Sciences Those planning careers or graduate study in speech-language pathology, both clinical and research tracks, should select the concentration in speech and language sciences.

The following are the major concentration requirements:

  1. LING L103 or L303.
  2. SPHS S201, S307, S420, S444, and one of the following: S311, S430, S445, S461, S473.

Interdepartmental Major in Speech and Hearing Sciences and Linguistics (Focus on Speech Technology)

Requirements: Students must complete a minimum of 40 credit hours in the major. Students must also complete the degree requirements for the B.A. in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Speech and Hearing Sciences

  1. SPHS S110 Survey of Communication Disorders (3 cr.).
  2. SPHS S319 Mathematical Foundation for Speech and Hearing Sciences (3 cr.).
  3. SPHS S302 Acoustics for Speech and Hearing Sciences (3 cr.) or LING L306 (see below).
  4. At least 6 additional credit hours in SPHS at the 300 level or above.

Linguistics

  1. LING L303 Introduction to Linguistic Analysis (3 cr.).
  2. LING L445 The Computer and Natural Language (3 cr.).
  3. LING L306 Phonetics (3 cr.) or Speech and Hearing Sciences S302 (see above).
  4. At least 6 additional credit hours in Linguistics at the 300 level or above

Other Requirements

  1. Computer Science C211 Introduction to Computer Science (4 cr.).
  2. At least one of the following courses (or an approved substitute):
    1. PSY P325 Psychology of Learning (3 cr.).
    2. PSY P329 Sensation and Perception (3 cr.).
    3. PSY P335 Cognitive Psychology (3 cr.).
    4. CSCI C212 Introduction to Software Systems (4 cr.).
    5. CSCI C241 Discrete Structures for Computer Science (3 cr.).
    6. COGS Q240 Philosophical Foundations of the Cognitive and Information Sciences (4 cr.).
    7. COGS Q270 Experiments and Models in Cognition (4 cr.).
    8. COGS Q260 Programming for the Cognitive and Information Sciences (2 cr.) and Q320 Computation in the Cognitive and Information Sciences (2 cr.).
    9. COGS Q351 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence and Computer Simulation (3 cr.).
  3. Additional courses taken from this list or from Speech and Hearing Sciences at the 300 level or above or from the Department of Linguistics at the 300 level or above to reach the minimum required total of 40 credit hours.

Interdepartmental Major in Speech and Hearing Sciences and Psychology

Requirements Students must take a minimum of 40 credit hours. At least 12 credit hours must be completed at or above the 300 level in psychology, and at least 12 credit hours must be completed at or above the 300 level in speech and hearing sciences.

Students must also complete the degree requirements for the B.A. in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Speech and Hearing Sciences

  1. S111
  2. S275, S319, S333
  3. S201 or S375
  4. At least three courses from S307, S378, S420, S436, S444, S474, S478

Psychology

  1. One of the following entry-level sequences:
    1. P155 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (3 cr.) or
    2. P151 (3 cr.), P152 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (3 cr.) or
    3. P106 (4 cr.) and P199 (1 cr.) or
    4. P101 (3 cr.), P102 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (3 cr.)
    (Note: P299 may be substituted for P199 in any of the sequences above.)
  2. PSY K300 or K310 or a substitute approved by the undergraduate advisor
  3. Three credit hours from P303, P325, P326, P327, P329, P330, P335, P337, P340, P346, P349, P350, P357 (depending on topic), P402 (depending on topic), P405, P407, P410, P411, P413, P416, P417, P423, P438, P444, P459
  4. Three credit hours from P304, P315, P316, P319, P320, P323, P324, P336, P357 (depending on topic), P375, P402 (depending on topic), P425, P430, P434, P442, P446, P447, P448
  5. Advanced laboratory: one from P421, P424, P426, P429, P435, P436, P493-P494, P495, or P499. (Another 400-level course may be substituted for this requirement by permission of the undergraduate advisor.)
  6. One additional course in psychology numbered 300 or above
  7. At least three of the required 300-level psychology courses must be designated as “major section only”

Other Requirements The following courses must be completed with a minimum grade of C–:

  1. Mathematics M118, M119, or M120, or a 200-level mathematics course.
  2. A one-semester course in biology.
  3. Linguistics L103 or L303.

Graduate Study

Students completing the B.A. or B.S. degree in speech and hearing sciences may wish to continue their studies at the graduate level in a program leading to the master’s degree in speech-language pathology or the clinical doctoral degree in audiology. It is recommended that students seeking preparation for graduate study in speech-language pathology include in their curriculum S201, S420, S436, S444, S461, S473, and S478. Students seeking preparation for graduate study in audiology are recommended to select their curriculum to include these courses: S371, S378, S436, S478; and either S420 or S444. In addition, students planning to work in a school system following graduate study may elect to take EDUC M463 Public School Methods in preparation for school certification. Selection of these courses will minimize the time required to earn an M.A. degree at Indiana University and in other similarly structured graduate programs. It is also recommended that students take at least one course outside of the department in the following areas: biological sciences and physical sciences.

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Minor in Speech and Hearing Sciences

Undergraduates wishing to minor in speech and hearing sciences with a general focus must take a minimum of 15 College of Arts and Sciences credit hours to include S110 (or S115), S275, S433, and two of the following courses: A300, S302, S319, S430, S444, or S478. At least 6 credit hours of courses at the 300–400 level are required.

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Minor in Speech and Hearing Sciences (Pre-Professional)

Undergraduates wishing to minor in speech and hearing sciences with a preprofessional focus must take a minimum of 15 College of Arts and Sciences credit hours to include S111; S275; S433 or S333; S201 or S371; and one of the following courses: S302, S307, S319, S378, S420, S430, S436, S444, S474, S478. At least 6 credit hours of courses at the 300–400 level are required.

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Indiana Teacher Certification

Requirements for an Indiana teaching certificate for speech, language, or hearing clinician; educational audiologist; or supervisor of speech, hearing, and language programs include a master’s degree in speech and hearing sciences and related education courses. Students should consult a departmental advisor.

Speech and Hearing Sciences

Departmental Honors Program

The honors program permits outstanding students to pursue important issues in depth, to undertake research projects through independent study, and to enroll in special courses and seminars. Further information may be obtained from the departmental honors advisor.

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Course Descriptions

A300 American Sign Language IV (3 cr.) P: A200 or consent of instructor. Continues to develop knowledge of American Sign Language and of Deaf culture. Students will experience the language outside the classroom through interaction with the Deaf community.

S333 Childhood Language (3 cr.) N & M R: LING L103 or L303. Develops student knowledge of how language is acquired by young children. Examines data on what young infants and young children know about language at different ages, and considers the kinds of theories that may explain this data.

S375 Hearing Science (3 cr.) Provides an in-depth study of hearing in the normal auditory system. Topics include anatomy and physiology of the ear, anatomy and physiology of the auditory brain, and auditory perception and psychophysics.

S444 Voice Physiology Across the Lifespan (3 cr.) N & M P: S201. R: S111. Covers anatomical, biomechanical, and behavioral aspects of voice physiology and explores changes in the voice that occur from birth through adulthood. Discussion of normal voice function is augmented with descriptions of common causes of dysphonia, as well as lessons on how to maintain a healthy vocal system.

S445 Introduction to Fluency Disorders (3 cr.) Focuses on developmental stuttering, as well as cluttering, neurogenic stuttering, and psychogenic stuttering. Emphasis on the identification, behavior characteristics, and etiology of developmental stuttering, along with an overview of common diagnostic/ treatment approaches for stuttering across the lifespan.

S475 Principles of Audiology (4 cr.) R: S275. Examines the field of audiology including assessment and treatment of hearing loss. Laboratory exercises are provided so that students can gain hands-on experience with hearing evaluation and treatment.

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Telecommunications

Area Certificate in Game Studies
Area Certificate in New Media and Interactive Storytelling

Area Certificate in Game Studies

The Certificate in Game Studies is intended for students who want to focus specifically on designing and building interactive games. A student may earn an area certificate as part of completing the bachelor’s degree and in addition to completing requirements for a major. The Area Certificate in Game Studies is available to students outside the telecommunications major or minor.

The program requires the completion of a 13 credit core and 15 credit hours of electives. Each course must be completed with a minimum grade of C– or higher.

Required Courses in Telecommunications
(13 credit hours)

T160 Videogames: History and Social Impact (3 cr.)
T206 Introduction to Design and Production (3 cr.)
T284 Introduction to Interactive Media Design (3 cr.)
T367 Theory and Practice of Game Design (3 cr.)
T460 Projects in Game Design (1 cr.)

Electives (At least 9 of the 15 credit hours of electives must be at the 300–400 level.)

Computer Science
A201 Introduction to Programming (4 cr.)

Fine Arts
D210 Digital Art: Survey and Practice (3 cr.)
D310 Interactive Multimedia (3 cr.)
D317 Video Art (3 cr.)

Telecommunications
T260 The Videogame Industry (3 cr.)
T353 Audio Production (3 cr.)
T361 Flash for Games and Interactive Media (3 cr.)
T364 Introduction to 3D Digital Modeling and Animation (3 cr.)
T366 Multiplayer Game Design (3 cr.)
T369 Sound Design (3 cr.)
T433 Advanced Projects in Web Design (3 cr.)
T461 Advanced Flash for Games and Interactive Media (3 cr.)
T464 Advanced 3D Digital Modeling and Animation (3 cr.)

Theatre and Drama
T438 Advanced Stage Lighting Design (3 cr.)

School of Education
R347 Impact of Games and Simulations in Instructional Technology (3 cr.)

Jacobs School of Music
Z361 Introduction to MIDI and Computer Music (3 cr.)

Students seeking the certificate should contact an undergraduate advisor in the Department of Telecommunications before beginning study. The semester prior to graduation, students must present their program of study to an undergraduate advisor in the Department of Telecommunications for certification.

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Area Certificate in New Media and Interactive Storytelling

The Certificate in New Media and Interactive Storytelling is intended for students seeking a broad range of design skills for a variety of interactive Web content, including information, education, commercial applications, and entertainment.

Purpose “New media” can be defined as the entire range of computer-based or computer-enhanced communication. This includes digital radio and television, Internet applications, and videogames. Meaningful new media projects are a combination of technological expertise and compelling content from a variety of sources, including the sciences, the arts, and the humanities. The goal of this program is to provide undergraduates with the theoretical, creative, and technological bases for the production of new media products.

A student may earn an area certificate as part of completing the bachelor’s degree and in addition to completing requirements for a major. The Area Certificate in New Media and Interactive Storytelling is available to students outside the telecommunications major or minor.

The program requires the completion of a 15 credit hour core, which includes a 3 credit hour final project, and 12 credit hours of electives (9 credit hours must be at the 300 and 400 level).

Students seeking the certificate should contact an undergraduate advisor in the Department of Telecommunications before beginning study. The semester prior to graduation, students must present their program of study to an undergraduate advisor in the Department of Telecommunications for certification.

Required Courses in Telecommunications
(15 credit hours)
T206 Introduction to Design and Production (3 cr.)
T283 Introduction to Production Techniques and Practices (3 cr.)
T284 Introduction to Interactive Media Design (3 cr.)
T471 Applying Theory to Media Design (3 cr.)
T495 New Media Certificate Project (3 cr.)

Electives (12 credit hours from the following list of courses; at least 9 credit hours must be at the 300 or 400 level.)

Communication and Culture
C337 New Media (3 cr.)

Computer Science
A116 Multimedia Communications (1.5 cr.)
A201 Introduction to Programming I (4 cr.)
A348 Mastering the World Wide Web (3–4 cr.)
B481 Interactive Graphics (4 cr.)

Fine Arts
D210 Digital Art: Survey and Practice (3 cr.)
D310 Interactive Multimedia (3 cr.)
D317 Video Art (3 cr.)

Telecommunications
T193 Passport to Cyberia: Making the Virtual Real (3 cr.)
T353 Audio Production (3 cr.)
T354 Program Graphics and Animation (3 cr.)
T361 Flash for Games and Interactive Media (3 cr.)
T364 Introduction to 3D Digital Modeling and Animation (3 cr.)

Theatre and Drama
T438 Advanced Stage Lighting Design (3 cr.)

School of Education
R347 Impact of Games and Simulations in Instructional Technology (3 cr.)

School of Informatics
I300 Human-Computer Interaction (3 cr.)
I450 Design and Development of an Information System (3 cr.)

Jacobs School of Music
Z361 Introduction to MIDI and Computer Music (3 cr.)

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Theatre and Drama

Minor in Theatre and Drama
Major in Musical Theatre—B.F.A.
Course Descriptions

Minor in Theatre and Drama

Requirements Students must complete a minimum of 18 credit hours in theatre and drama, including:

  1. T100 and T101.
  2. A minimum of one course in each of these three areas:
    Acting and directing: T120.
    Design and technology: T125, T230, T326, or T335.
    Theatre history and dramatic literature: T370, T371, T460, T461, T462, or T468.
  3. One additional course in one of the four areas of concentration listed in the major. Students are advised to take the courses in the minor in a building progression (i.e., T100 or T120 should be taken early in the progression of study).

Students are advised to plan their minor program of study in consultation with both their major and minor advisors.

The following is a list of courses recommended for theatre and drama minors:

  1. Acting: T220, T319
  2. Directing: T340
  3. Movement: T410
  4. Playwriting: T453, T454, T458
  5. Stagecraft: T125, T425, T435
  6. Scene design: T326, T426
  7. Costuming: T230, T430
  8. Lighting: T335, T438
  9. Sound design: T347, T447
  10. Stage management: T229; T329 or T428
  11. Dramatic literature: T460, T461, T462, T468
  12. Theatre history: T370, T371
  13. Voice and speech: T325

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Major in Musical Theatre—B.F.A.

Requirements Students must complete at least 91 credit hours in theatre, dance, and music:

  1. 62 credit hours in Theatre and Drama, to include:
    T100 Introduction to Theatre (3 cr.)
    T101 Script Analysis (3 cr.)
    T121 Acting I for Majors: Introduction to Acting (3 cr.)
    T125 Introduction to Theatrical Production (3 cr.)
    T220 Acting II: Scene Study (3 cr.)
    T230 Costume Design and Technology I (3 cr.)
    T300 Musical Theatre Workshop (3 cr., must be repeated to 12 cr.)
    T305 Voice for Musical Theatre (2 cr., must be repeated to 16 cr.)
    T319 Acting III: Advanced Scene Study (3 cr.)
    T325 Voice and Speech (3 cr.)
    T335 Stage Lighting Design (3 cr.)
    T370-T371 History of Theatre and Drama I-II (3-3 cr.)
    T401 Musical Theatre Senior Showcase (1 cr.)
  2. 18 credit hours in dance, including THTR T301-T302 Musical Theatre Dance Styles I-II (3-3 cr.) and an additional 12 credit hours from the following list, with the approval of the director of musical theatre:

    Ballet: MUS J100 and higher, as appropriate.

    Tap Dance chosen from:
    HPER E154 Beginning Tap Dance (1 cr.)
    HPER E254 Intermediate Tap Dance (1 cr.)
    HPER E354 Advanced Tap Dance (1 cr.)

    Jazz chosen from:
    HPER E156 Introduction to Jazz Dance Technique (1 cr.)
    HPER E256 Intermediate Jazz Dance (1 cr.)
    HPER E456 Advanced Jazz Dance (2 cr.)
    MUS J210 Jazz Dance (1 cr.)

    Modern Dance chosen from:
    HPER E155 Modern Dance (1 cr.)
    HPER E255 Modern Dance—Intermediate (1 cr.)
    HPER E355 Modern Dance I Advanced (1 cr.)
    THTR T202 Musical Theatre Dance Technique (2 cr.)
    THTR T410 Movement for the Theatre (3 cr.)

  3. 11 credit hours in music, to include:
    MUS P110 Piano Class I, Music Majors (2 cr.)
    MUS T109 Rudiments of Music I (3 cr.) or
    Z111 Introduction to Music Theory (3 cr.)
    MUS Z373 The American Musical (3 cr.)

    Cultural Studies in Music: 3 credit hours chosen from:
    AAAD A110 African American Choral Ensemble (2 cr.)
    AAAD A112 Black Music of Two Worlds (3 cr.)
    AAAD A120 Soul Revue (2 cr.)
    AAAD A290 Sociocultural Perspectives of African American Music
    (3 cr.)
    AAAD A388 Motown (3 cr.)
    MUS Z393 History of Jazz (3 cr.)
    MUS Z394 Black Music in America (3 cr.)
    MUS Z395 Contemporary Jazz and Soul Music (3 cr.)
    MUS Z413 Latin American Popular Music (3 cr.)

Students must also complete the B.A. degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Course Descriptions

T202 Musical Theatre Dance Technique (2 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Blending ballet and jazz technique to strengthen musical theatre dance performance, the course will focus on specific problems that occur in musical theatre dance, including breathing for singing and dancing, character revelation, dramatic action in dancing, ensemble dancing, and selected styles.

T300 Musical Theatre Workshop (3 cr.) P: Audition and permission of instructor; T101, T120 or T121, and T220. Focus on synthesizing acting, singing, and dancing into one performance technique. Emphasis will vary according to needs of students. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

T306 Musical Theatre Workshop for non–B.F.A. Students (3 cr.) P: T120 or T121; audition; and consent of instructor. The workshop explores performance techniques for musical theatre focusing on synthesizing acting, singing, and dancing into dramatic action and character revelation. Not open to B.F.A. Musical Theatre majors.

T319 Acting III: Advanced Scene Study (3 cr.) P: T101; T220; T325; T410; T220 instructor recommendation or audition. Emphasis on acting skills, breadth of imagination, and depth of performance in a broad variety of styles. Credit given for only one of T319 or T420.

T325 Voice and Speech (3 cr.) P: T120 or T121. R: Sophomore standing. Introduction to voice production. Emphasizes relaxation, breathing, and the production of vocal sounds; deals with vocal habits and cultural holds through exercises and vocal workouts. Introduction to phonetics and practical work with text while freeing the voice and redeveloping a passion for language.

T326 Introduction to Scenic Design (3 cr.) P: T101 and T125, or permission of instructor. An entry-level studio course introducing the process of scene design, concept development, and the communication and presentation of theatrical ideas.

T335 Stage Lighting Design (3 cr.) P: Sophomore standing; T101 and T125; or permission of instructor. Introduction to the process of determining and implementing a lighting design. Analytical skills, concept development, design methods, lighting technology, and practical applications are covered. Lecture and laboratory.

T359 Theatre Production Studio (1–3 cr.) P: T101; one of T125, T229, T230, T335; and permission of instructor. Intermediate, hands-on production course that teaches the theatre production process within a specific area focus. Students gain proficiency within a specific theatre production area and are engaged in a managerial role in an academic season production, including the development of production documentation. Students gain skills in communication, organization, and coordination. May be repeated in a specific area once (at a higher managerial level), and in multiple areas for a total of 3 credit hours.

T401 Musical Theatre Senior Showcase (1 cr.) P: Audition and permission of instructor. Introduction to business and marketing techniques for success in professional theatre. Specific instruction in the audition process culminating in performance for agents and casting directors.

T404 Stage Combat (3 cr.) P: T410. Complete basic training in the safety techniques of theatrical violence, based upon the accepted practices of associations such as the Society of American Fight Directors, and utilized in theatres around the country. Emphasis placed on acting the fight, storytelling, and historical styles of combat.

T411 Physical Theatre (3 cr.) P: T410. The Dynamic Presence Training has foundations in Aikido, Suzuki Technique, and Slow Tempo with influences from the Alexander Technique, Biomechanics, Grotowski’s Plastiques, Linklater Technique, and Mask work. Designed for holistic performer training, this course offers advanced study in observation and awareness, exploration of self, basic vocal production and resonance, and development of a more dynamic stage presence.

T419 Acting IV: Acting Shakespeare (3 cr.) P: T319 or T420; T319 or T420 instructor recommendation or audition. Exploration of precepts of verse in Shakespeare. Emphasis on skills for heightened language, character development, circumstances, and performance. Continued development of the actor as a dramatic instrument. Credit given for only one of T419 or T320.

T421 Acting V: Acting Style I (3 cr.) P: T419 or T320, recommendation of T419 or T320 instructor, and permission of T421 instructor. Techniques for performing comedy with an emphasis on verbal and other physical skills; introduction to period and style of plays from Aristophanes to Goldoni.

T422 Acting VI: Acting Style II (3 cr.) P: T419 or T320; recommendation of T421 or T419 or T320 instructor, and permission of T422 instructor. Techniques for performing comedy with an emphasis on verbal and physical skills; introduction to period and style of plays from Sheridan to Coward.

T425 Introduction to Theatrical Drafting (3 cr.) P: T125 and T326, or written permission of instructor. A studio course consisting of both traditional hand drafting techniques and digital CAD techniques as they are used in theatrical production communication.

T426 Fundamentals of Scenic Design (3 cr.) P: T326 or consent of instructor. A studio course in the theory, process, and techniques of scenic design for the theatre. Topics include principles, elements, and concepts of design; script analysis; design concept development; creative research and its interpretation; and the communication and presentation of theatrical ideas.

T430 Flat Patterning and Draping Basics (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Presents a foundation of techniques in creating and adjusting garment patterns through both flat patterning and draping. Students pattern and fit a set of basic patterns and muslin samples for a female partner/model and complete a finished garment based on period research.

T432 Studies in Stage Management (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. An examination of the stage management requirement and regulations for non-standard production styles. Each year the topic varies and may include spectacle, theme park, festival, or other large scale entertainment. On site observation and experience is a key portion and requirement of the course. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

T433 Costume Design II (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Intensive study of costume design in mainstream theatre. Projects in collaborative aesthetics in design and practical application rendering techniques and visual communication. No laboratory/technology component.

T434 Historic Costumes for the Stage (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Survey of historical costume in western civilization, ancient Mesopotamian cultures through the twentieth century. Taught from sociohistorical perspective and applied to performance theory.

T435 Electronics for Theatre (3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Fundamentals of electricity and electronics as applied to theatre. Investigation of current technology for theatrical performance, including power distribution, control systems, and creative applications for lighting, sound, special effects, and mechanized scenery.

T437 Scene Painting I (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. A studio course introducing techniques and equipment of theatrical scenic painting.

T438 Advanced Stage Lighting Design (3 cr.) P: T335. Stage lighting design—concept development, presentation, and implementation are emphasized, along with advanced lighting techniques and approaches. A practicum will be assigned.

T448 Voice in Performance (3 cr.) P: T325 and permission of instructor. A voice class for the performing artist employing the techniques of artists such as Patsy Rodenburg, Cicely Berry, and Kirsten Linklater. Exploration of the life and muscularity of varied texts. Opening the voice to match the music of what one is saying while learning to identify and respect the writer’s intentions through voice and language.

T451 Stage Rigging I (2 cr.) P: T125 or permission of instructor. Survey of structural engineering terminology and methods as applicable to common rigging practice in the theatre and entertainment industry.

T453 Playwriting I (3 cr.) P: T101 or permission of instructor. Introduction to principles of dramatic structure. Conferences and peer evaluations. Focus is on the creation and revision of a one-act play.

T454 Playwriting II (3 cr.) P: T453 or permission of instructor. Consideration of dramaturgical antecedents and practical and theoretical problems. Creation of a full-length play. Prior playwriting experience helpful, but not required.

T491 Working in the Profession (3 cr.) P: T319. Preparation for a professional theatre career. Topics include auditions, managers, unions, finances, regional theatre, professional courtesy, and realities of the work environment.

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West European Studies

Course Descriptions

E200 Intermediate Modern Greek I (3 cr.) P: E150 or equivalent. Completion of grammar and syntax not covered in E100-E150 and practice in reading selections from a number of modern writers. I Sem.

E250 Intermediate Modern Greek II: An Introduction to Modern Greek Culture (3 cr.) P: E200 or equivalent. Continuation of first-semester E200 Second-Year Modern Greek. Students enrolling must have taken either E200 or placement exam. Course will build on language skills acquired during first semester. This will involve covering more advanced grammar and vocabulary, and developing writing skills. Emphasis placed on verbal expression.

E300 Advanced Modern Greek I: Cultural Literacy and Current Events
(3 cr.)
P: E250 or equivalent. Assists advanced students in developing both their communicative competency in modern Greek and their awareness of Greek culture and society. The emphasis on popular culture begun in E250 continues and is augmented by an emphasis on current events.

E350 Advanced Modern Greek II: Literature, History, and Cinema (3 cr.) P: E300 or equivalent. Assists advanced students in developing both their communicative competency and their awareness of Greek culture and history. Focuses on improving language skills by engaging Greek history through literature and cinema.

E406 Topics in Modern Greek Culture (3 cr.) A & H Selected ideas, trends, and problems in modern Greek culture from the perspective of the arts and humanities. Specific topics will be announced each semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

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