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College of Arts
and Sciences (College)
2008–2010
Academic Bulletin

College Programs
College of Arts and Sciences (College) 
Kirkwood Hall 104 
130 S. Woodlawn 
Bloomington, IN 47405  
Local (812) 855-1821 
Fax (812) 855-2060 
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History

Faculty
Introduction
Major in History
Interdepartmental Major in History and African American and African Diaspora      Studies
Minor in History
Departmental Honors Program
Languages and Overseas Study
Course Descriptions

Faculty

Chairperson

Professor Claude Clegg

Chancellor's Professor

John Bodnar

Bernardo Mendel Chair

Daniel James

Pat M. Glazer Chair

Mark Roseman

Donald F. Carmony Chair

Eric Sandweiss

Paul V. McNutt Professor

Michael McGerr

Thomas and Kathryn Miller Professor

James Madison

Robert F. Byrnes Professor

David Ransel

Sally Reahard Professor

Michael Grossberg

Rudy Professor

Jeffrey Gould

Ruth N. Halls Professor

Dror Wahrman

Professors

Judith Allen, Claude Clegg, Allen Douglas, Ellen Dwyer, Ben Eklof, Wendy Gamber, Peter Guardino, Carl Ipsen, Padraic Kenney, Hiroaki Kuromiya, Edward Linenthal, Klaus Muehlhahn, David Pace, Robert Schneider, Steven Stowe, Lynn Struve

Associate Professors

Maria Bucur-Deckard, Ann Carmichael, Nick Cullather, Arlene Diaz, Arthur Field, John Hanson, Matthias Lehmann, John Nieto-Phillips, Eric Robinson, Leah Shopkow, Rebecca Spang, Jeffrey Veidlinger, Edward Watts

Assistant Professors

Deborah Deliyannis, Konstantin Dierks, Michael Dodson, Sarah Knott, Jason McGraw, Marissa Moorman, Khalil Muhammad, Amrita Myers, Scott O'Bryan, Julia Roos, Sara Scalenghe, Kirsten Sword, Ellen Wu

Academic Advising

James Basore, Ballantine Hall 706, (812) 855-1437

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Introduction

The study of history prepares students to understand our changing world. Department of History courses cover a wide range of issues in all time periods and parts of the world. History students learn how change takes place, the tensions and conflicts it causes, and how individuals, groups, and societies change over time. The history major develops skills that are essential for any career: research, analysis, synthesis, and effective writing.

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Major in History

Requirements

Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours to include:

  1. A concentration of 12 credit hours.
  2. One field of 6 credit hours.
  3. Additional electives (6 credit hours) from areas other than the concentration and field areas.
  4. J300 (Junior Seminar) and J400 (Senior Seminar).
  5. At least 18 credit hours at the 300 and 400 level.
  6. A minimum of 15 credit hours completed on the IU Bloomington campus.

Students must complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences. Further details, including concentration and field areas, may be found at http://www.indiana.edu/~histweb/ugrad/degrees.shtml

Recommendations

Students should consult with departmental and faculty advisors regarding their selection of courses within the primary concentration. Suggestions for programs of study are available from the History advisor and on the Department of History Web site: www.indiana.edu/~histweb.

Prelaw Track

The history major provides an excellent preparation for students intending to study law. In addition, those interested in legal careers should concentrate on developing particular kinds of skills needed in legal education and practice. They should, for example, develop their analytical skills by taking courses such as logic, their writing skills by taking seminars and other courses that offer structured writing exercises, and their speaking skills by taking courses in speech. Finally, since much of the law deals with marketplace issues, students interested in law should consider taking micro- and macroeconomics.

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Interdepartmental Major in History and African American and African Diaspora Studies

Requirements

Students must meet the following course requirements for a minimum total of 40 credit hours. No course counting toward completion of the upper-level hours requirement of the history concentration can also be counted toward completion of the upper-level hours requirement of the African American and African Diaspora Studies concentration.

History

At least 18 credit hours of history courses, including:

  1. At least 15 credit hours of 300–400 level courses (only one of A355 African American History I or A356 African American History II taken in either History or African American and African Diaspora Studies could be counted toward these 15 credit hours).
  2. At least one seminar chosen from J400, J450, or K392.
  3. Any two courses in non-U.S. History (i.e., Western European, Russia and East Europe, Ancient, Middle East, Africa, Latin America, or East Asia).
  4. At least 15 credit hours of these History courses must be completed in residence at the IU Bloomington campus.

African American and African Diaspora Studies

At least 18 credit hours at the 200 level or above, of which at least 12 credit hours must be at the 300 level or above, including:

  1. A150 Survey of the Culture of Black Americans.
  2. A355 African American History I or A356 African American History II.
  3. A379 Early Black American Writing or A380 Contemporary Black American Writing.
  4. 9 additional credit hours from the History, Culture and Social Issues Concentration. These 9 credit hours may include the Senior Seminar.

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Minor in History

Requirements

  1. Students must complete 15 credit hours of history, at least 9 of which must be taken on the Bloomington campus.
  2. Of the 15 credit hours in history, 9 must be at the 300 or 400 level.

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Departmental Honors Program

Students who are admitted to the history department's honors program must complete an Honors seminar (HIST K392) in place of J300 and J400. Honors students also complete a senior year honors thesis with oral defense (K499,
6 cr.) or honors paper (K498, 3 cr.), take a minimum of 33 credits in history, and earn a minimum A– in all completed history honors courses. To graduate with honors, students must maintain a minimum 3.300 cumulative and 3.500 major GPA.

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Languages and Overseas Study

History majors in good standing may earn credit toward the major and toward other degree requirements in the university's overseas study programs. See "Overseas Study Programs" in this bulletin or inquire at the Office of Overseas Study, Franklin Hall 303, (812) 855-9304.

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Course Descriptions

Introductory Courses

H101-H102 The World in the Twentieth Century I-II (3-3 cr.) S & H for H101 and H102, CSA for H102 only. Enrollment limited to freshmen and education majors. Principal world developments in the twentieth century, stressing Latin America, Africa, Asia, and Europe; global and regional problems; political revolutions; social and cultural diversity.

H103 Europe: Renaissance to Napoleon (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Major developments in European thought during the Renaissance, Reformation, scientific revolution, and Enlightenment; traditional politics, economy, and society and their transformation by enlightened despotism, the French Revolution, and Napoleon. Enrollment limited to freshmen and sophomores only.

H104 Europe: Napoleon to the Present (3 cr.) S & H, CSB The development of European society from the downfall of Napoleon in 1815 to the present; the impact of the industrial revolution; the rise of the middle class; liberalism, Marxism, and mass politics; nationalism and imperialism; international communism and fascism. Enrollment limited to freshmen and sophomores only.

H105-H106 American History I-II (3-3 cr.) S & H Evolution of American society: political, economic, social structure; racial and ethnic groups; sex roles; Indian, inter-American, and world diplomacy of the United States; evolution of ideology, war, territorial expansion, industrialization, urbanization, international events and their impact on American history.

H111 Historical Background to Contemporary Problems I (3 cr.) S & H Historical background of four or five problems of current interest.

Comparative History

H333 Epidemics in History (3 cr.) S & H Epidemic infectious disease in human history, explored in a wide variety of cultures and civilizations.

B391 Themes in World History (3 cr.) S & H The shared experience of humankind from earliest times to the present. Topics include the Neolithic "evolution," Eurasian and African cultural exchanges, the era of European reconnaissance, the development of the world economy, "underdevelopment," and contemporary world interrelationships.

W100 Issues in World History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

W200 Issues in World History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

W300 Issues in World History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

W325 World War II: The Peoples (3 cr.) S & H This course will study the lives of the millions of peoples all over the world who participated in World War II as factory workers, propagandists, soldiers, mothers, political leaders, and survivors. Beginning with military strategy and diplomacy, we will focus on life on the home fronts of many nations.

W400 Issues in World History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

United States History

A100 Issues in United States History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

A200 Issues in United States History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics vary from semester to semester but are usually broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

H220 American Military History (3 cr.) S & H From settlement of colonies to present. European background, colonial militia, Indian fighting. Principal foreign wars and their strategic objectives. Technological changes and effect of military on American society. Army is emphasized, with some attention to the Navy, Marines, and Air Force.

A222 Law in America (3 cr.) S & H This course will examine the American legal system from the Revolution to the present. It will use trials, judicial opinions, statutes, stories, films, and other materials to study criminal prosecutions, private law suits, constitutional conflicts, and other critical parts of the American legal experience. The basic goals of the course are to help students understand why law has had a powerful role in the development of American society and the consequences of the American reliance on law.

A225 Elvis and Post-World War II America (3 cr.) S & H Surveys changes in American society from World War II through the 1950s. Using lectures, readings, and films, the course looks at the debates over sexuality, race, and teen rebellion, and how these issues were expressed in the careers of stars like Elvis Presley, Marilyn Monroe, and others.

A261 Modem American Women's History (3 cr.) S & H Surveys U.S. women's history from 1820 to the present. Themes include changing ideals of gender and sexuality; women's labor in industrial and postindustrial America; racial, class, ethnic, and regional diversity; and women's participation in religious, political, social reform, and women's rights movements.

H263 Indiana University, Past and Present (3 cr.) S & H A survey of the history and culture of Indiana University since 1820 in the context of the development of American higher education. Emphasis on the people, programs, and events that have shaped the institution in distinctive ways.

A265 Gender and Sexuality in American History (3 cr.) S & H Examines how changing social definitions of masculinity and femininity, and changing attitudes toward sexual behaviors influenced selected issues and events in American history such as the European "discovery" of America, the Industrial Revolution, race relations, the Spanish American War, and the Cold War.

A300 Issues in United States History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues through the whole of United States history. Topics will vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

A301 Colonial America (3 cr.) S & H Social, cultural, economic, and political development of colonial America from first contact between Native Americans and Europeans, up to the outbreak of the American Revolution. Topics include global capitalism, migration, slavery, consumerism, religious revivalism, and democracy.

A302 Revolutionary America (3 cr.) S & H Political, social and cultural history of the Revolution. What did it take to make a revolution? What did it take to make a nation? How has the revolution lived on in popular memory? Includes strong focus on experience of women and enslaved blacks.

A307 American Cultural History (3 cr.) S & H Major themes in American cultural life since the Civil War. Focus on the cultural expressions of immigrants, racial minorities, religious groups, social classes, women, artists, and professional groups in response to changing conditions.

A309 The South before the Civil War (3 cr.) S & H Social, intellectual, and cultural features of the American South, from English settlement to secession. Emphasis on the development of a distinctive southern regional culture and how it helped shape the buildup to the Civil War.

A310 Survey of American Indians I (3 cr.) S & H, CSA The Native American experience from the pre-Columbian period through American Civil War. Lectures and readings will focus upon Native American cultural patterns, and the Native American response to French, British, and American Indian policies.

A311 Survey of American Indians II (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Native American-white relations from Civil War through 1980s. Focus on Native American attempts to defend their homelands in the American West; establishment of Indian reservations in late nineteenth century. Impact of the Sawes and Wheeler-Howard Acts; emergence of Native American church; urbanization of Native Americans in the twentieth century.

A313 Origins of Modern America, 1865–1917 (3 cr.) S & H 1865–1917: social, economic, cultural, and political ways in which Americans accommodated and resisted changes introduced by large-scale industrialization. Populism and progressivism receive special attention.

A315 United States History since World War II (3 cr.) S & H Political, demographic, economic, and intellectual transformations from 1945 to the present: World War II, Cold War, problems of contemporary America.

A317 Modern American Social and Intellectual History (3 cr.) S & H Development of modern American intellectual and social patterns since 1880. Social thought, literature, science, the arts, religion, morals, education.

A325 American Constitutional History I (3 cr.) S & H Changing constitutional system from seventeenth-century colonies to contemporary nation. Structure of government: federalism, division of powers, political institutions. Relationship of government to society and economy. Civil liberties and democracy. Constitutional law and politics, 1607–1865.

A346 American Diplomatic History II (3 cr.) S & H American diplomacy from 1775 to 1823; diplomacy of American continental expansion to 1898. America as a world power. Involvement in Far Eastern affairs after 1898, diplomacy of World Wars I and II, developments to present.

A347 American Urban History (3 cr.) S & H Evolution of cities and urban life in United States from colonial times to present. Rise of cities (New York, Chicago, Indianapolis, Los Angeles, Miami, and others). Creation of modern urban districts (ghettos, suburbia), city planning, political and economic power structures, ethnic and race relations, law and order (crime, police, prisons).

A351 The United States in World War II (3 cr.) S & H Examination of U.S. effect on the outcome of World War II and change in America caused by the war. Major topics: the process of U.S. involvement, strategies of the major land and sea campaigns, relations within the Grand Alliance, development of the A bomb, and the origins of the Cold War.

A352 History of Latinos in the United States (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Latino experience in the United States from 1848. Economic and social factors of the Latino role in a non-Latin nation. Credit given for only one of HIST A352 and LATS L210.

A355 (AAAD A355) African American History I (3 cr.) S & H, CSA History of blacks in the United States. Slavery, abolitionism, Reconstruction, post-Reconstruction to 1900. Credit given for only one of A355 or AAAD A355.

A356 (AAAD A356) African American History II (3 cr.) S & H, CSA History of blacks in the United States 1900 to present. Migration north, NAACP, Harlem Renaissance, postwar freedom movement. Credit given for only one of A356 or AAAD A356.

A361-A362 Studies in American History for Teachers I-II (3-3 cr.) S & H Contemporary bibliography and interpretations of major problems in United States history.

A363 Survey of Indiana History (3 cr.) S & H A survey of Indiana history and culture from the original inhabitants to recent times, with emphasis on the growth of a distinctive Hoosier culture.

A365 The Republican Party, 1854 to Present (3 cr.) S & H Origins of modern Republican party; significance of Lincoln, Civil War, and Reconstruction; party divisions over civil service reform, tariffs, monetary policies, and immigration; impact of Theodore Roosevelt and Progressives; ascendancy in 1920s and disasters in 1930s and 1940s; McCarthyism; Eisenhower, triumph of conservatives; and beyond.

A366 The Democratic Party, 1828 to Present (3 cr.) S & H Antecedents of Democratic party; the Jacksonian coalition; party divisions on major antebellum issues; era of Civil War and postwar reconstruction; resurgence under Presidents Cleveland and Wilson; harmony and discord from Al Smith to Jimmy Carter; and beyond.

A369 Issues in Early United States History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems in United States history to 1870. Topics will vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

A370 Africans in Colonial America (3 cr.) S & H This course examines the experience of African people in the British colonies of North America, stressing the origins and dynamics of African American cultures and communities prior to the American Revolution.

A379 Issues in Modern United States History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues in United States history from 1870 to the present. Topics will vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

A380 The Vietnam War (3 cr.) S & H The story of America's longest war—the battles, the protests, the movies, and the controversies. The Vietnam War was an epic event, the climax of the Cold War and the high-water mark of American power. Students will learn about the experiences of combatants on both sides, the reasoning behind American strategy, and the history of Vietnam's struggle for independence. The course will also deal with the war's legacies, its place in popular culture, and the war's economic and political aftershocks. Credit given for only one of A380 and H228.

A381 Civil Rights Era in the United States (3 cr.) S & H Examination of race and racial protest after 1945. A look at several protest organizations, key social battles, individual leaders, and the struggle to end racial segregation and exclusion in education, politics, public accommodations, the workplace, and housing. Credit given for only one of A381 or AAAD A405.

A382 The Sixties (3 cr.) S & H An intensive examination of the decade that tore apart post-World War II American society, beginning with the confident liberalism that believed the nation could "pay any price" and "bear any burden" in order to stop communism abroad and to promote reform at home. Focuses on the internal contradictions and external challenges that destroyed this liberal agenda: civil rights and black power, the New Left, the counterculture, second-wave feminism, the sexual revolution, the Vietnam War, and the globalization of the economy; and finishing with the more conservative order that emerged in the early 1970s to deal with the conflicting realities of limited national power and wealth on the one hand, and rising demands for rights and opportunities on the other.

A383 From Ragtime to Rap: Popular Music in the Making of Modem America (3 cr.) S & H History of popular music in the social, cultural, political, and economic history of the modern United States. Examination of a broad range of musical cultures from the late nineteenth century to the present, including ragtime, Tin Pan Alley, jazz, swing, Broadway, blues, gospel, country, Cajun, Zydeco, Tex-Mex, rhythm and blues, folk, rock and roll, soul, and rap. Considers the interrelationship between music on the one hand, and class, gender, race, ethnicity, and generation, on the other; and the role of popular music in American mythmaking.

A384 America Before the Civil War (3 cr.) S & H This course examines major issues in the United States between 1815 and 1860. Topics include the market revolution, the expansion of slavery, the "second party system," "Jacksonian democracy," evangelical Christianity, reform movements, and the coming of the Civil War. This course stresses the interconnections between economic, social, cultural, and political developments.

A400 Issues in United States History (3 cr.) S & H Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics vary but ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Medieval and Modern Europe

B204 Medieval Heroes (3 cr.) S & H, TFR An introduction to the history of the European Middle Ages through the study of its heroes. Teaches skills necessary for students to succeed in any field of history.

H206 Medieval Civilization (3 cr.) S & H, CSA European institutions, social and intellectual history from late Roman Empire to Renaissance. Greco-Roman legacy, Christian institutions, Byzantine and Islamic influences, town revival and trade, rise of universities, emergence of national states and literatures. II Sem.

H209 The Origins of Britain (3 cr.) S & H, CSA England to 1688. Political and constitutional developments, particularly in relation to Henrician Reformation and Puritanism. I Sem.

H210 Britain's Road to Modernity (3 cr.) S & H, CSB England from 1688 to present. Political and economic movements, such as liberalism and socialism, arising out of the industrialization of Britain. II Sem.

H213 The Black Death (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Europe in the age of bubonic plague, 1348–1715, with emphasis on changes in climate, population, food supplies, public health measures, economy, social relations, and religious and artistic responses to disaster

H231 The Family in History (3 cr.) S & H, TFR In every era the family has served as the most basic human institution, but it has always been subject to other forces in society, such as religion, politics, the economy, and the tragic consequences of high death rates. Traces the history of the European family from 1500 to the early twentieth century. Examines changes in relationships within the family (parents/children, husbands/wives) and the changing role of the family in society. Topics include courtship, marriage, child-bearing, child labor, the origins of family limitation and birth control, the definitions of male and female roles, and the effects of other institutions (community, church, schools, state) on the family. Readings will include contemporary novels, and students will participate in group projects using original sources from the nineteenth century and earlier.

H251 Introduction to Jewish History: From the Bible to Spanish Expulsion (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Topics include the origins of Judaism, Jewish life in ancient Israel and the Diaspora, Judaism and the origins of Christianity, Jewish society and culture under Christian and Muslim rule in the Middle Ages.

H252 Introduction to Jewish History: From Spanish Expulsion to the Present (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Jewish history from early modern times to the present. Topics include Jewish daily life in early modern Europe and Ottoman Turkey, Jewish mysticism, Hasidism, Jewish emancipation, modern Judaism, anti-Semitism, the Holocaust, Zionism, the State of Israel, and the history of American Jewry.

B100 Issues in Western European History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

B200 Issues in Western European History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics vary from semester to semester but usually are broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

B224 The Emergence of Europe (3 cr.) S & H This course seeks to answer the questions of how and why Europe emerged as the dominant political and economic power in the world, succeeding in subjugating other peoples around the globe, and then lost that role.

B226 The Mafia and Other Italian Mysteries (3 cr.) S & H This course focuses on the Italian Mafia since 1870 as well as links to the U.S. Mafia. Also considers related areas of Italian "deep politics" (or Italy's Mysteries), including right- and left-wing terror and the strategy of tension. Lecture and discussion plus assorted feature and documentary films.

B260 Women, Men, and Society in Modern Europe (3 cr.) S & H, CSB An overview of the development of gender roles in Europe since the French Revolution; development of the private and public spheres; political ideology and women's roles in society; the industrial revolution, Darwinism, imperialism, nationalism, communism and gender roles; feminism and the sexual revolution.

B300 Issues in Western European History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems across more than one period of Western European history. Topics vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

B301 Issues in Medieval European History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems in the history of the European Middle Ages (200–1500 C.E.). Topics will vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

B302 Issues in Early Modern European History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems in the early Modern Period (1400–1800 C.E.). Topics will vary but usually cut across fields and regions. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

B303 Issues in Modern European History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems in modern European history (1750–present). Topics will vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

B315 European Anti-Semitism since the Enlightenment (3 cr.) S & H Examines the origins, character, and development of anti-Semitism from the Enlightenment to the post-Holocaust period. Asks whether anti-Semitism is a single phenomenon with a clear tradition and cause, or whether it has varied markedly over time and from country to country.

B321 Modern Jewish History: from Expulsion to Revolution (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Jewish history from 1492 to 1789. Topics include the expulsion from Spain; the Inquisition and the marranos; the society and culture of Italian, Turkish, and Polish Jewry; Court Jews in central Europe; Hasidism in eastern Europe; the Enlightenment; Jews and the French Revolution.

B322 Jews in the Modern World (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Topics include Emancipation, the Jewish Enlightenment, modern Judaism, Eastern European Jewry, Jewish politics, women in Jewish society, American Jewry, the Holocaust, Israel.

B323 History of the Holocaust (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Anti-Semitism in imperial and Weimar Germany; the Nazi rise to power; the destruction of European Jewry; Jewish behavior in crisis and extremity, the attitude of the Allied nations; mass murder in comparative historical perspective; theological, moral, and political implications.

B324 Zionism and the State of Israel (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Origins of modern Jewish nationalism in nineteenth-century Europe, creation of a Zionist political movement, varieties of Zionist ideology, alternatives to Zionism, its international diplomatic context, growth of Jewish settlements in the land of Israel, the State of Israel from 1948 to the present.

B351 Western Europe in the Early Middle Ages (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Evolution of European civilization from the fall of Rome, development of Christianity and the Germanic invasions through Charlemagne's empire and the subsequent development of feudalism, manorialism, papacy, and Romanesque architecture.

B352 Western Europe in the High and Later Middle Ages (3 cr.) S & H, CSA P: One of the following: H206, B351, an upper-level medieval history seminar, or permission from the instructor. Expansion of European culture and institutions: chivalry, the Crusades, rise of towns, universities, Gothic architecture, law, revival of central government. Violent changes in late medieval Europe: overpopulation, plague, Hundred Years' War, peasant revolt, crime, inquisition, and heresy.

B353 The Renaissance (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Italian Renaissance as a political and cultural phase in the history of Western civilization. Its roots in antiquity and the Middle Ages; its characteristic expression in literature, art, learning; social transformations; manners and customs. Expansion of the Renaissance into France, Germany, and England.

B354 The Reformation (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Economic, political, social, and religious background of the Protestant Reformation; Lutheran, Reformed, Anglican, and Anabaptist movements, with reference to their political and theological trends; Catholic Reformation.

B356 French Revolution and Napoleon (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Crisis of Old Regime; middle-class and popular revolt; from constitutional monarchy to Jacobin commonwealth; the Terror and revolutionary government; expansion of revolution in Europe; rise and fall of Napoleonic empire.

B357 Modern France (3 cr.) S & H, CSB A social, political, and cultural survey of France in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

B358 The Industrial Revolution and the Economic Development of Europe (3 cr.) S & H Examination of the conversion of Europe from an agricultural to an industrial society with global influences. Topics include the roots of modern economic growth in European society and the contributions of science and technology, trade, government, and population; the impact of industrialization on living standards; the patterns of economic development in Britain, France, and Germany; the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution.

B359-B360 Europe from Napoleon to the First World War I-II (3-3 cr.)
S & H, CSB
Vienna settlement and period of reaction in Europe; liberalism and nationalism; revolutions; industrial revolution, capitalism; socialist movement; unification of Italy and Germany; clericalism and anticlericalism; struggles for political democracy; social legislation; imperialism, nationalist rivalries, and background of World War I.

B361-B362 Europe in the Twentieth Century I-II (3-3 cr.) S & H Economic, social, political, and military-diplomatic developments, 1900 to present. I: 1900–1930: origins, impact, and consequences of World War I; peacemaking; postwar problems; international communism and fascism; the Great Depression. II: 1930–present: Depression politics; crisis of democracy; German national socialism; World War II; Cold War; postwar reconstruction and recovery.

B366 Paris and Berlin in the 1920s: A Cultural History (3 cr.) S & H, CSB A cultural history of Paris and Berlin in the 1920s, focusing on the French avant garde; Dada and surrealism; expressionist painting and cinema; Bauhaus architecture; Brechtian theater; Reichian psychoanalysis; and the American expatriate literature of Stein, Hemingway, and Miller.

B368 Modern Italy (3 cr.) S & H, CSB Risorgimento and unification; liberal Italy and the mutilated victory (WWI); Italian opera; Fascism; alliance with Nazi Germany and defeat (WWII); Christian Democrats v. Communists; major cultural movements; the economic miracle; Mafia, left- and right-wing violence and terrorism; the kickbacks scandal and the Second Republic.

B374 The Cultures of Modern Europe (3 cr.) S & H, CSB Explores the modern history of Western Europe through culture. Examines a series of symbols and myths (literary, musical, journalistic, cinematic, and theatrical) over the past two centuries and through them explores historical, political, and intellectual issues (touching on issues of empire, gender, race, nationalities, etc.).

B377-B378 History of Germany since 1648 I-II (3-3 cr.) S & H, CSB Political, economic, and cultural state of Germany in 1648; growth of absolutist dynasties, especially Habsburg and Hohenzollern; economic and cultural development under absolutism; impact of French Revolution; struggles between reaction and liberalism; unification; industrialization; imperialism, international friction; internal political conflicts; World War I; Weimar Republic; Hitler regime; problems since 1945.

B400 Issues in Western European History (3 cr.) S & H Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics vary but ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Ancient and Near Eastern History

C200 Issues in Ancient History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics vary from semester to semester but usually are broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

H205 Ancient Civilization (3 cr.) S & H, CSA From birth of civilization in Mesopotamia and Egypt until Constantine's conversion to Christianity (337 A.D.). Role of the city in ancient world; nature of imperialism; and impact of Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar, and other charismatic leaders. Archaeology as a source for political and social history.

C300 Issues in Classical and Byzantine History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of the history of Greece or Rome, the history of Late Antiquity in the Greco-Roman world, or of the Byzantine Empire. Topics will vary in focus, region, and period. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

C305 Issues in Near Eastern History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of the history of the Near East, apart from the Greco-Roman World or of the Islamic world. Topics vary but may cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

C376 Greek History: Bronze Age to the Persian Wars (3 cr.) S & H, CSA An introductory survey of early Greek history, beginning with the rise and fall of the Minoans and Mycenaeans of the Bronze Age, then moving on to the rebirth of Greek civilization in the following centuries, ending with Greece's clash with the Persian Empire in the early fifth century B.C. Credit given for only one of C376 or C386.

C377 Greek History: The Persian Wars to the Legacy of Alexander (3 cr.) S & H, CSA A survey of ancient Greek history, ranging from the aftermath of the early fifth century B.C. clash with the Persians and subsequent Athenian Empire to the Hellenistic era initiated by the conquests of Alexander the Great. Credit given for only one of C377 or C387.

C388 Roman History (3 cr.) S & H, CSA P: One of the following: H205; CLAS C101, C102; or consent of instructor. History of Roman people, from legendary origins to death of Justinian (A.D. 565), illustrating development from city-state to world empire. Evolutionary stages exemplify transition from early kingship to republican forms, finally replaced by monarchy of distinctively Roman type.

C390 The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (3 cr.) S & H, CSA P: One of the following: H205; CLAS C101, C102; or consent of instructor. History of the Roman Empire from the Golden Age of the second century A.D. until the collapse of Roman power in the West (476 A.D.) and the rise of Islam; Christianity and the fate of classical culture in an age of political, social, and religious transformation; the impact of recent archaeological discoveries on "the fall of Rome" as a historical problem.

C393 Ottoman History (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Political, social, and economic developments in Ottoman Empire from rise of its power in Antolia (1299) to the end of the classical period (1826). Evolution of Ottoman institutions and relations with major European powers.

C400 Issues in Ancient History (3 cr.) S & H Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics vary but ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Russian and East European History

D100 Issues in Russian and East European History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

D101 Icon and Axe: Russia Through the Ages (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Principal events, leaders, and questions in Russia's development from earliest times to the present, including the founding of the Russian state, Ivan the Terrible, enserfment of the peasantry, Peter the Great's reforms, imperial expansion, industrialism, revolutions of the twentieth century, Stalinism, and the fall of the Soviet Union. Credit given for only one of H261 or D101.

D200 Issues in Russian/East European History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics vary from semester to semester but usually are broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

H223 Between Rome and Constantinople: Eastern Europe and Russia to Mid-Fifteenth Century (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Development of Slavic and non-Slavic peoples and the influences of the Holy Roman and Byzantine empires on their multiple cultures; Mongol conquest of Steppe and Rus'; problems of nation-states; the Renaissance; the Czech-Hussite Reformation; invasion of Ottoman Turks and Islam; and the fall of Constantinople and ascendancy of Muscovy.

D300 Issues in Russian/East European History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

D302 The Gorbachev Revolution and the Collapse of the Soviet Empire (3 cr.) S & H, CSA The revolution in Soviet politics, culture, and daily life wrought by Mikhail Gorbachev (1986–1991) and the end of the Soviet Empire. Examination of selected issues: political structures, family, education, youth, status of women and minorities. Historical roots traced. Credit given for only one of D302 or REEI R302.

D303 Heroes and Villains in Russian History (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Biographies of a number of Russia's most colorful personalities and the times in which they lived; among them, Ivan the Terrible, Pugachev, Peter the Great, Catherine the Great, Bakunin, Tolstoy, Lenin, Trotsky, Stalin.

D304 Jews of Eastern Europe (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Study of the history of Jewish life in Eastern Europe. Topics to be discussed will include Hasidism, Kabbalah, shtetl life, Haskalah (the Jewish Enlightenment), Socialism, Yiddish literary traditions, and the Holocaust.

D305 Women in Russian History and Soviet Society (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
R: H202 and D302 /REEI R302. Women's contribution to Russian history and the woman question in Soviet society. Includes working women, revolutionary women, feminism, women of privilege. Social, political, and cultural histories are treated.

D306 Muscovy and Imperial Russia, 1500–1801 (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Russian history from 1500 to 1801, including cultural, religious, and secular trends; political theory and administration; social stratification and social psychology; industrialization; rural and agricultural life; enlightenment and the development of national self-consciousness; and revisions in traditional historiography. Credit given for only one of D306 or D406.

D308 Empire of the Tsars (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Russian empire under Peter the Great, Catherine the Great, Napoleon's invasion, expansion across Asia into the Americas, nationalism, war, and revolution. Other topics include daily life of the common people, gender issues, religion, and the emergence of a modern industrial society. Credit given for only one of D308 or D409.

D309 Russia in World War II: Battles and People (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Issues covered include Soviet politics and society on the eve of WWII, prewar diplomacy, the major battles of WWII on the Eastern Front, the Soviet "home front," popular culture, and the impact of WWII on the Soviet Union and on the Soviet Union's international position.

D310 Russian Revolutions and Soviet Regime (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Causes and development of Russian revolutions and civil war; Lenin, Trotsky, and Stalin; purges, terror, economic development, society, and arts under Stalin; struggle against Hitler; scope and limits of de-Stalinization under Khrushchev; minorities, dissent, and life in the Soviet Union. Credit given for only one of D410 or D310.

D320 Modern Ukraine (3 cr.) S & H, CSA A history of one of the most neglected nations in European history, once the breadbasket of the Soviet Union and now one of the largest nations in Europe. Examines issues of national identity and national consciousness and explores the place of Ukraine in Eurasian history.

D321 Hungarian History and Civilization to 1711(3 cr.) S & H, CSA Origin of the Hungarian people; settlement of the Danubian basin; adoption of Christianity; formation of Hungarian state; impact of western European civilization and economic system during Middle Ages and Renaissance; effect of Ottoman domination; Ottoman-Habsburg conflict; liberation of Hungary from Turkish rule. Credit given for only one of D421 or D321.

D322 Hungarian History and Civilization 1711–1918 (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Modernization and rebuilding of Hungary during Habsburg enlightened absolutism; age of reform and the revolution of 1848–1849; compromise of 1867; social and economic transformation of Hungary within the framework of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy; problems of a multinational state; World War I and collapse of historical Hungary. Credit given for only one of D422 or D322.

D325 Path to Emancipation: Nationalism in the Balkans, 1804–1923 (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Decline of the Ottoman Empire. Revolutionary traditions and movements; peasant societies and folk customs; literary and linguistic nationalism; Balkan irredentism. Formation of Serbian (Jugoslav), Greek, Rumanian, Bulgarian, Albanian, and Turkish national states. Austro-Hungarian, Russian, and British influence and imperialism in southeastern Europe and Near East. Credit given for only one of D425 or D325.

D327 Nation-Making and Imperial Decline in East Central Europe, 1780–1918 (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Enlightened despotism; Metternichian system; struggle for German unification; Habsburg culture and civilization. German Austrian, Hungarian, Czechoslovak South Slavic, Rumanian, and Polish nationalism. Industrialization; Christian socialism and Austro-Marxism; murder at Sarajevo; destruction of the empire; its legacy to Europe. Credit given for only one of D427 or D327.

D329 Eastern Europe in the First Half of the Twentieth Century (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Begins around 1900 with twilight of great empires (Russian, Prussian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian), exploring origins of modern eastern Europe, the "rebirth" of Eastern Europe after WWI; wild 1920s; polarizing ideological spectrum of the 1930s; and dynamics of communism and fascism. Given the spectre of WWII, this course will pose the question of whether and how we can read the interwar years in a way other than as a prelude to an inevitable catastrophe to come. Credit given for only one of D428, D328, or D329.

D330 Eastern Europe in the Second Half of the Twentieth Century (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Examines origins of communism in Eastern Europe, brutal takeover and Stalinization, attempts to reform communism, the fall of communism and ensuing battles for privatization, democratization, and the Wars in Yugoslavia. Looks at political institutions that shaped communist and post-communist Eastern Europe and important social and cultural developments. Credit given for only one of D428, D328, or D330.

D400 Issues in Russian/East European History (3 cr.) S & H Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics vary but ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

African History

E100 Issues in African History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

E200 Issues in African History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics vary from semester to semester but usually are broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

H227 African Civilizations (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Introduction to African culture; African environment; early humans in Africa; precolonial history; traditional political, economic, and social systems; language, religion, art, music, literature.

E300 Issues in African History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

E331 African History from Ancient Times to Empires and City States (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Origins and groupings of peoples of Africa; political, social, and economic evolution to 1750; Africa's contacts with ancient world, trans-Sahara and Indian Ocean trades, growth of states and empires, spread of Islam. Credit given for only one of E431 or E331.

E332 African History from Colonial Rule to Independence (3 cr.) S & H, CSA 1750 to present. Slave trade, European imperialism; impact of Islam and Christianity, new state formations, reassertion of African culture and identity. Credit given for only one of E432 or E332.

E333 Conflict in Southern Africa (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Early populations and environment; spread of European settlement, interaction with African societies, and early race relations; Zulu power and white power; discovery of minerals and industrialization; urbanization and segregation; African and Afrikaner nationalisms; South Africa and its neighbors; Mandela and the new South Africa. Credit given for only one of E433 or E333.

E334 History of Western Africa (3 cr.) S & H, CSA History of Senegambia, Mali, and Upper Guinea Coast. The Mali Empire, African "landlord" and European "stranger" relationships, slave and nonslave trade, spread of Islam, European conquest and colonial rule, and the integration of western Africa into the world economy. Credit given for only one of E434 or E334.

E336 History of East Africa (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Developments over the past two millennia in Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Malawi, and northern Mozambique. Topics include the environment and peoples; the emergence of hierarchical societies; nineteenth-century economic and political changes; European imperialism; transformations in the colonial era; African independence. Credit given for only one of E436 or E336.

E338 History of Muslim West Africa (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Develops the origins of Islam in West Africa and the ways West Africans incorporated, transformed, and amplified Muslim beliefs and practices throughout history. Credit given for only one of E438 or E338.

E400 Issues in African History (3 cr.) S & H Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics vary but ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Latin American History

F100 Issues in Latin American History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

F200 Issues in Latin American History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics vary from semester to semester but usually are broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

H211-H212 Latin American Culture and Civilization I-II (3-3 cr.) S & H,
CSA
I: 1492–1850. African, Indian, Spanish, Portuguese heritage. Discovery and conquest. Clash of cultures. Spanish empire. Society, culture, economics, politics. Bourbon reform, independence, new republics. 1850–present. Cultural and national identities. Diplomacy, dictators, social progress. National cultures. Mexican revolution: Latin America in a world community. Revolution and counterrevolution. H211, I Sem., II Sem., SS; H212, I Sem., II Sem., SS.

F300 Issues in Latin American History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

F336 Modern Central American History (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Studies social, economic, cultural, and political development from 1821–1990. Major topics include coffee and liberalism, the United States and Nicaragua, the era of reform, revolution, and counter-revolution. Credit given for only one of F436 or F336.

F345 History of Cuba and Puerto Rico (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Explores key historical processes from first inhabitation through the present, including the social and economic repercussions of slavery; the impact of U.S. intervention on the islands; the effects of industrialization on Puerto Rican economy and policies; the Cuban Revolution and the transformation of Cuban society.

F346 Modern Mexico (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Places contemporary Mexico in historical perspective, focusing on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics include nineteenth-century social and political movements; the causes and consequences of the 1910 revolution; the formation of Mexico's political system; problems of economic growth; and the changing patterns of gender, class, and ethnicity in Mexican society. Credit given for only one of F346, F446, or LTAM L400.

Asian History

G101 East Asia in World History (3 cr.) S & H, CSA This course presents, in broad scope, the relevance of developments in East Asia to the history of the physical world, human culture, and advanced civilizations, from the "big bang" to the present. Credit given for only one of EALC E101 or HIST G101.

G200 Issues in Asian History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics vary from semester to semester but usually are broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

H207 (EALC E252) Modern East Asian Civilization (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Contrasting patterns of indigenous change and response to Western imperialism in East Asia during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. China and Japan receive primary consideration; Korea and Vietnam, secondary. Emphasis on the rise of nationalism and other movements directed toward revolutionary change.

H208 American-East Asian Relations (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Describes and analyzes the mutual interaction of the American countries and the major countries of East Asia-China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam—during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Emphasis on cultural interrelations and changing images.

H237 Traditional East Asian Civilization (3 cr.) S & H, CSA A chronological and comparative survey of the traditional civilizations of East Asia through lectures and readings of source materials (in translation) in literature, history, philosophy, and the arts, with emphasis on the interrelationship among the cultures of East Asia from ancient times to the early modern era. Credit given for only one of H237 or EALC E251.

H238 Introduction to South Asian History and Civilization (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Survey course which examines some of the important problems and debates current in South Asian history. Topics covered range from the neolithic period to the present day, and include the nature of ancient South Asian society, medieval Islamic empires, and British imperialism in the region.

G300 Issues in Asian History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

G350 Modern South Asia: Eighteenth to Twentieth Century (3 cr.) S & H, CSA In-depth examination of the "making of modern South Asia" through this region's experience as an imperial territory of Great Britain. The focus of the course is upon social and cultural change, colonial governance, and forms of Indian nationalism.

G357 Premodern Japan (3 cr.) S & H, CSA R: previous history course in any field, or previous East Asian Studies course related to Japan. Society and culture on the Japanese archipelago, from their origins to the high middle ages. Prehistoric Jomon and protohistoric Yayoi. Formation of the Japanese state under the influence of Chinese and Korean models. Heian courtly culture. Ascendancy of military elites and developments in popular culture during Kamakura and Muromachi periods. Credit given for only one of G467 or G357.

G358 Early Modern Japan (3 cr.) S & H, CSA R: Previous history course in any field, or previous East Asian Studies course related to Japan. Samurai culture, expansion of Buddhism, and sectarian violence. High feudalism, unification, and the Tokugawa settlement after 1600. Encounter with European civilization, closed country. Urbanization, social and cultural change, rise of agrarian prosperity in the Edo period to about 1800. Credit given for only one of G468 or G358.

G369 Modern Japan (3 cr.) S & H, CSA R: Previous history course in any field, or previous East Asian studies course related to Japan. Western impact and social and intellectual change in late Tokugawa Japan from about 1720. The Meiji Restoration. State capitalism and the Japanese development process. Empire, war, defeat, U.S. occupation, and renewal in the twentieth century, social and economic structures, religious systems, gender, science and art, and Korea's interaction with its East Asian neighbors. Credit given for only one of G469 or G369.

G372 Modern Korea (3 cr.) S & H, CSA R: Previous history course in any field, or previous East Asian Studies course related to Korea. Early Modern (1800–1910), Colonial (1910–1945), and Era of Division (1945 to present) periods of Korean history, focusing on transformation of politics, economy, education, religion, and thought, as the nation falls under Japanese rule and subsequently splits into two states as a result of internal ideological division and the Cold War. Credit given for only one of G472 or G372.

G380 Early China (3 cr.) S & H, CSA China from its neolithic background through the Qin and Western Han dynasties. Examines the Shang tribal polity, royal and aristocratic phases of the Zhou state, and the creation of the imperial system in the Qin-Han period. Changing patterns of ideology, political legitimacy, and social organization through archaeological and textual sources.

G382 China: The Age of Glory (3 cr.) S & H, CSA R: Previous history course in any field, or previous East Asian Studies course related to China. The Chinese empire from the Han through the Tang dynasties (second century B.C. through tenth century A.D.). Relations among demographic patterns. political forms, social classes, economic developments, religious movements, and cultural diversification, investigated through secondary and translated primary sources. Credit given for only one of G382 or G482.

G383 China: The Later Empires (3 cr.) S & H, CSA R: Previous history course in any field, or previous East Asian Studies course related to China. The Chinese empire from the Song through the middle Qing dynasties (tenth to eighteenth centuries A.D.). Relations among demographic patterns, political forms, social classes, economic developments, philosophical movements, and cultural diversification, investigated through secondary and translated primary sources. Credit given for only one of G483 or G383.

G385 Modern China (3 cr.) S & H, CSA R: Previous history course in any field, or previous East Asian Studies course related to China. A survey of the final century of dynastic rule and the rise to power of the Nationalist and Communist parties, highlighting social and cultural developments, the impact of Western imperialism, and the evolution of revolutionary ideologies. Credit given for only one of G485 or G385.

G387 Contemporary China (3 cr.) S & H, CSA R: Previous history course in any field, or previous East Asian Studies course related to China. A survey of recent Chinese history focusing on social, cultural, and political life in the People's Republic of China and post-1949 Taiwan. Events covered include the Long March, the Cultural Revolution, and the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989. Credit given for only one of G487 or G387.

J200 Seminar in History (3 cr.) S & H P: Consent of instructor. Freshmen and sophomores. Selected topics of history. May be repeated twice for credit. I Sem., II Sem.

J300 Seminar In History (3 cr.) S & H The refinement of students' skills as historians; will focus on the skills of writing, interpretation, historical reasoning, discussion, and research. May be repeated with a different topic and the authorization of the history undergraduate advisor for a total of 6 credit hours.

J301 Seminar in History for Teachers (3 cr.) The refinement of students' skills as historians and teachers of history: will focus on the skills of writing, interpretation, historical reasoning, discussion, research, and teaching.

J400 Seminar in History (3 cr.) S & H P: J300. Capstone course, generally taken in senior year. Students will discuss and analyze primary and/or secondary sources and undertake a substantial project demonstrating mastery of the historian's skills. Topics will vary. Normally limited to majors. May be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

J450 Seminar in Women's History (3 cr.) S & H Selected topics on women's history. Geographical areas will vary. May be taken three times for credit.

T300 Issues in History (3 cr.) S & H Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics will vary but will usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

T400 Issues in History (3 cr.) S & H Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics will vary but will ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

T495 Undergraduate Readings in History (1–12 cr., 12 cr. maximum)

H496 Internship in History (1–6 cr.) S/F grading. P: at least junior standing and 12 credit hours of related course work; prior arrangement with individual faculty member. Faculty-supervised experience in museum work, historic preservation, historical societies, oral history, or other history-related fieldwork in private and public institutions. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours; only 3 credit hours may count toward the major.

Honors Courses

K392 Honors Seminar (3 cr.) For honors students only. Introduction to various approaches in historical scholarship, illustrated with the work of professors in the department. May be taken two times for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

K393 Reading for Honors (1–12 cr., 12 cr. max.) P: approval of departmental honors committee.

K498 Senior Honors Paper (1–3 cr.) Senior-level course for honors students only. Training in research and writing, culminating in an honors paper to be written under direction of a faculty member and reviewed by the director of the History Honors Program. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

K499 Senior Honors Thesis (1–6 cr., 6 cr. maximum) Senior-level course for honors students only. Training in research and writing, culminating in an honors thesis to be written under direction of a faculty member. An oral examination over the thesis is conducted by three faculty members.

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