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College of Arts
and Sciences (College)
2008–2010
Academic Bulletin

College Programs
College of Arts and Sciences (College) 
Kirkwood Hall 104 
130 S. Woodlawn 
Bloomington, IN 47405  
Local (812) 855-1821 
Fax (812) 855-2060 
Contact College
 

Psychological and Brain Sciences

Faculty
Introduction
Major in Psychology—B.A.
Major in Psychology—B.S.
Major in Neuroscience—B.S.
Interdepartmental Major in Psychology and Speech and Hearing Sciences
Minor in Psychology
Neuroscience Certificate
Departmental Honors Program
Overseas Study
Course Descriptions

Faculty

Chairperson

Distinguished Professor and Chancellor's Professor Linda B. Smith

Associate Chairperson

Olaf Sporns

Distinguished Professors

Robert Nosofsky, Richard M. Shiffrin, Linda B. Smith, James T. Townsend

Jack and Linda Gill Chair

Kenneth Mackie

Luther Dana Waterman Professor

Richard M. Shiffrin

Rudy Professors

Bennett I. Bertenthal, James T. Townsend, Stanley Wasserman

Chancellor's Professors

James C. Craig, Robert L. Goldstone, Robert Nosofsky, David B. Pisoni, George V. Rebec, Steven J. Sherman, Linda B. Smith

Distinguished Scholar

William Estes

Professors

Jeffrey R. Alberts, John E. Bates, Geoffrey Bingham, Sharon Brehm, Jerome R. Busemeyer, Thomas A. Busey, Joseph Farley, Peter Finn, Preston Evans Garraghty, Julia R. Heiman, Edward R. Hirt, Amy Holtzworth-Munroe, Susan S. Jones, John K. Kruschke, Brian F. O'Donnell, Dale R. Sengelaub, Eliot R. Smith, Olaf Sporns, William D. Timberlake, Peter Todd, Richard Viken, Meredith West

Associate Professors

Jason M. Gold, William Hetrick, Luiz Pessoa, Cara L. Wellman

Assistant Professors

Heather Bradshaw, Joshua Brown, Brian D'Onofrio, Karin Harman James, Thomas W. James, Michael Jones, Sharlene D. Newman, Anne Prieto, Sari van Anders, Chen Yu

Lecturers

Cynthia Hoffman, Alan Roberts, Lisa Thomassen, Scott Thompson, Irene Vlachos-Weber

Academic Advising

Janis Bolling, Jody K. Ferguson, Carlin Schrag, Psychology 229,
(812) 855-2151, psyneuro@indiana.edu

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Introduction

The Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences (PSY) offers a major in psychology leading to the B.A. or B.S. degree, a B.S. degree in neuroscience, and course work for undergraduates who wish to satisfy distribution requirements. As a science, psychology seeks to understand the basic principles by which living organisms adapt their behavior to the changing physical and social environments in which they live. The breadth of the discipline, with its links to the humanities, mathematics, and other social and natural sciences, encourages the development of broad problem-solving skills through exposure to research methodology and statistical analysis and contributes to the development of communicative skills. Psychological knowledge, techniques, and skills obtained in the B.A. and B.S. programs are applied in many careers and provide background for students entering graduate work in psychology and related areas, as well as the professions of medicine, dentistry, law, and business.

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Major in Psychology—B.A.

Purpose

The B.A. program provides a broad coverage of modern scientific psychology and of the strategies and tactics by which knowledge is acquired in this field. The B.A. program offers the student considerable flexibility in choosing courses, and it requires sufficient background in science and psychology to enable good students to qualify for demanding graduate programs.

Requirements

Students must complete the following courses in psychology:

  1. One of the following entry-level sequences:
    1. P155 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (3 cr.) or
    2. P151 (3 cr.), P152 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (3 cr.) or
    3. P106 (4 cr.) and P199 (1 cr.) or
    4. P101 (3 cr.), P102 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (3 cr.)
  2. PSY K300, K310, or a substitute approved by the undergraduate advisor
  3. All of the following foundational courses: P304, P335, P346
  4. One advanced course chosen from P337, P349, P405, P407, P409, P410, P411, P413, P416, P417, P423, P425, P430, P434, P437, P438, P440, P442, P443, P444, P446, P447, P448, P457 (if appropriate topic), P459, P460, P466, P495.
  5. Two elective courses chosen from P303, P315, P316, P319, P323, P324, P325, P327, P329, P330, P336, P340, P350, P357, P375, P434.
  6. One capstone course or appropriate substitute: P402, P404, P421, P424, P426, P429, P433, P435, P436, P493, P494, or P499.
  7. Mathematics M118, or M119, or M120, or a 200-level mathematics course, or the equivalent, completed with a C– or higher
  8. A one-semester course in biology.
  9. One additional course completed with a C– or higher selected from one of the following departments: Anthropology (B200 Bioanthropology only), Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics (in addition to the course used to satisfy requirement number 7 listed above), and Physics.

Students must also complete the degree requirements for the B.A. degree in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Required Outside Concentration

A single outside concentration is required of all majors in psychology. The outside concentration must consist of 12 credit hours at any level or of three courses above the 100 level, taken in one department. The following disciplines are frequently chosen as outside concentrations by psychology majors: animal behavior, anthropology, biology, business, chemistry, cognitive science, computer science, criminal justice, history and philosophy of science, linguistics, mathematics, philosophy, or sociology. Students can fulfill this requirement by completing an optional minor, offered by many departments. (See individual departments' sections in this bulletin for specific required courses.)

Recommendations

Majors should take at least one course in chemistry or physics, one in mathematics, and one in biology (see requirements above). Students should have a sound foundation in mathematics for study in statistics, measurement, and theoretical methods. Those planning graduate work in psychology should include P459. Consult the undergraduate advisors or the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences home page (www.psych.indiana.edu) for listings of courses and model curricula useful for advanced work in various areas of psychology or for particular vocations.

We recommend that students take P199 Planning Your Psychology Career in the spring of their sophomore year. This course can be used for career guidance and provides students with invaluable information at an appropriate time.

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Major in Psychology—B.S.

Purpose

The B.S. program in psychology is designed for career-oriented and highly motivated students. The program emphasizes breadth of preparation in science and development of math and computer skills, and it requires more advanced courses and laboratory work in psychology than the B.A. program. The student who graduates with a B.S. in psychology should be well prepared for graduate training in psychology and related fields, for professional schools, and for jobs (not necessarily in psychology) that use scientific training and quantitative techniques.

Requirements

Students must complete the following fundamental skills and distribution requirements:

  1. Writing, same as B.A. degree.
  2. Mathematics, two courses from the following: M118, M119, M120, 200 level or higher (not including K310).
  3. Computer science courses (or a demonstration of skills with the approval of the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences). This requirement may also be satisfied by the completion of at least 5.5 credit hours from the following list of courses: CSCI A111, A112, A113, A114, A201, or A202.
  4. Foreign language, 3 credit hours at or above the second-year level (or equivalent proficiency) in one language.
  5. One Topics course (COLL E103, E104, or approved equivalents).
  6. Arts and Humanities, three courses (could include COLL E103 or equivalent from number 5 above).
  7. Social and Historical Studies, three courses, exclusive of psychology courses (could include E104 or equivalent from number 5 above).
  8. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: must include Biology L112-L113 (6 cr.) and one of the following combinations:
    1. Two mathematics courses beyond the two fundamental skills courses listed above or
    2. Physics P201-P202 (or P221-P222) or
    3. Chemistry C101-C121 and C102-C122 (or C117, C341, or R340) or
    4. One additional course in biology (L111, L211, L311, L312, L473, or L479) and one other course from the mathematics, physics, and chemistry courses listed above.

Major Requirements

  1. One of the following entry-level sequences:
    1. P155 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (3 cr.) or
    2. P151 (3 cr.), P152 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (3 cr.) or
    3. P106 (4 cr.) and P199 (1 cr.) or
    4. P101 (3 cr.), P102 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (3 cr.)
  2. K300, K310, or a substitute approved by the undergraduate advisor.
  3. All of the following foundational courses: P304, P335, P346.
  4. Three advanced courses from P337, P349, P402, P405, P407, P409, P410, P411, P413, P416, P417, P423, P425, P430, P434, P437, P438, P440, P442 P443, P444, P446, P447, P448, P457 (if appropriate topic), P459, P460, P466, P495.
  5. Two capstone courses or appropriate substitutes from P402, P404, P421, P424, P426, P429, P433, P435, P436, P493, P494, or P499.

Required Outside Concentration

A single outside concentration is required of all majors in psychology. The outside concentration must consist of 12 credit hours at any level or of three courses above the 100 level, taken in one department. The following disciplines are frequently chosen as outside concentrations by psychology majors: animal behavior, anthropology, biology, business, chemistry, cognitive science, computer science, criminal justice, history and philosophy of science, linguistics, mathematics, philosophy, or sociology. Students can fulfill this requirement by an optional minor, offered by many departments. (See individual departments' sections in this bulletin for specific required courses.)

Recommendations

We strongly recommend that students fulfill the entry-level sequence and all foundational courses (P346, P335, P304) by the end of the second year of studies. Students should consult with the psychological and brain sciences undergraduate advisor for additional information on the above requirements. See also the departmental information available at www.psych.indiana.edu.

We recommend that students take P199 Planning Your Psychology Career in the spring of their sophomore year. This course can be used for career guidance and provides students with invaluable information at an appropriate time.

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Major in Neuroscience—B.S.

Purpose

The B.S. in Neuroscience is designed for students who have an interest in the interdisciplinary field of neuroscience and who are interested in pursuing graduate training in neuroscience, attending medical school, or obtaining a research-related position in biotechnology, the life sciences, or the pharmaceutical industry. The major provides interdisciplinary training in basic scientific principles in the life and physical sciences that are necessary for an understanding of nervous system function, as well as training in the fundamental principles of neuroscience, and opportunities for more advanced training in specific topics in the field. Thus, students will gain a depth of understanding in neuroscience, from the cellular and molecular bases of nervous system function, to a systems-level approach to the study of brain-behavior relationships.

Requirements

Students must complete the following fundamental skills and distribution requirements:

  1. Writing, English Composition and Intensive Writing.
  2. Mathematics, fulfilled by major requirements.
  3. Foreign language, three semesters in the same language, or equivalent proficiency.
  4. One Topics course (COLL E103, COLL E104, or approved equivalents).
  5. Arts and Humanities, two courses (could include COLL E103 or equivalent from number 4 above).
  6. Social and Historical Studies, two courses (could include COLL E104 or equivalent from number 4 above).
  7. Natural and Mathematical Sciences, fulfilled by major requirements.

Major Requirements

Students must complete the following courses:

  1. Introductory courses: PSY P101 or PSY P151 or PSY P106 or PSY P155, PSY P326 or PSY P346, BIOL L112 or BIOL H112, CHEM C117, CHEM C341 or CHEM R340, CHEM C343, PHYS P201, PHYS P202.
  2. Mathematics courses: MATH M211 (or both MATH M119 and MATH M120) and PSY (MATH) K300.
  3. Basic non-neuroscience courses: Select three courses from CSCI A321, CHEM C342, BIOL L211, BIOL L312, MATH M212, MATH M301 or MATH M303.
  4. Advanced neuroscience courses: Select four courses from PSY P337, PSY P349, PSY P407, PSY P409, PSY P410, PSY P411, PSY P423, PSY P437, PSY P466, PSY P457 (any topic with P326 or P346 as a prerequisite), BIOL L410 seminars as appropriate, or any graduate-level neuroscience course (PSY N500, N501).
  5. Laboratory courses: Select one from PSY P426, PSY P433, or a neuroscience laboratory using one of the following for enrollment: PSY P493, PSY P494, PSY P499, BIOL L490, CHEM C409, PHYS S406.

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Interdepartmental Major in Psychology and Speech and Hearing Sciences

Requirements

Students must take a minimum of 40 credit hours. At least 12 credit hours must be completed at or above the 300 level in psychology, and at least 12 credit hours must be completed at or above the 300 level in speech and hearing sciences.

Students must also complete the degree requirements for the B.A. in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Psychology

  1. One of the following entry-level sequences:
    1. P155 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (3 cr.) or
    2. P151 (3 cr.), P152 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.) and P211 (3 cr.) or
    3. P106 (4 cr.), and P199 (1 cr.) or
    4. P101 (3 cr.), P102 (3 cr.), P199 (1 cr.), and P211 (3 cr.)
  2. PSY K300 or K310 or a substitute approved by the undergraduate advisor.
  3. 3 credit hours from P303, P325, P326, P327, P329, P330, P335, P337, P340, P346, P349, P350, P357 (depending on topic), P402 (depending on topic), P405, P407, P410, P411, P413, P416, P417, P423, P437, P438, P444, P459.
  4. 3 credit hours from P304, P315, P316, P319, P320, P323, P324, P336, P357 (depending on topic), P375, P402 (depending on topic), P425, P430, P434, P442, P446, P447, P448.
  5. Advanced laboratory: one from P421, P424, P426, P429, P435, P436, P493-P494, P495, or P499. (Another 400-level course may be substituted for this requirement by permission of the undergraduate advisor.)
  6. One additional course in psychology numbered 300 or above.

Speech and Hearing Sciences

  1. S111.
  2. S275, S319, S333.
  3. S201 or S375.
  4. At least three courses from S307, S378, S420, S436, S444, S474, S478.

Other Requirements

The following courses must be completed with a minimum grade of C–:

  1. Mathematics M118, or M119, or M120 or a 200-level mathematics course.
  2. A one-semester course in biology.
  3. Linguistics L103 or L303.

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Minor in Psychology

Requirements

Students must complete 15 College of Arts and Sciences credit hours including:

  1. P155, or P101 and P102; or P151 and P152; or P106.
  2. Psychology K300 or K310 or another approved College statistics course; or P211.
  3. Any two additional courses in psychology at the 300 or 400 level.
  4. In addition, students must complete mathematics M118, or M119, or a 200-level mathematics course with a minimum grade of C–.

All courses must be completed with a C– or higher, and minor courses must average a minimum of 2.000 overall to earn a minor.

Students whose major department requires a minor should consult with their advisor about additional or other requirements.

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Neuroscience Certificate

Purpose

A student may earn a certificate as part of completing the bachelor's degree and in addition to completing requirements for a major. Through course work and lab experiences in this interdisciplinary certificate program, students will develop an in-depth understanding in neuroscience, from the cellular and molecular bases of nervous system function, to a systems-level approach to the study of brain-behavior relationships.

Requirements

Students must complete a minimum of nine courses (three required basic courses, three advanced neuroscience courses, two labs, one elective) for a minimum total of 24 credit hours. Students must complete each course required for the certificate with a grade of C– or higher, with an overall GPA of 2.000 for all required courses.

Required Basic Courses (All Required)

  • PSY P101 Introductory Psychology (3 cr.) or P151 Introduction to Psychology I for Majors (3 cr.) or P106 General Psychology, Honors
    (4 cr.).
  • PSY P326 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 cr.) or PSY P346 Neuroscience
    (3 cr.).
  • Biology L112 Introduction to Biology: Biological Mechanisms (3 cr.) or H112 Integrated Freshman Learning Experience II (5 cr.).

Advanced Neuroscience Courses (Any Three)

  • PSY P337 Clinical Neuroscience (3 cr.).
  • PSY P349 Cognitive Neuroscience (3 cr.).
  • PSY P407 Drugs and the Nervous System (3 cr.).
  • PSY P409 Neural Bases of Sensory Function (3 cr.).
  • PSY P410 Development of the Brain and Behavior (3 cr.).
  • PSY P411 Neural Bases of Learning and Memory (3 cr.).
  • PSY P423 Human Neuropsychology (3 cr.).
  • PSY P437 Neurobiology of Addictions (3 cr.).
  • PSY P444 Developmental Psychobiology (3 cr.).
  • PSY P466 Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology (3 cr.).
  • PSY P457 Topics in Psychology, seminars as appropriate (1–3 cr.).
  • Biology L410 Topical Issues in Biology, seminars as appropriate
    (3–5 cr.).
  • Cognitive Science Q301 Brain and Cognition (3 cr.).

Lab Courses (Any Two)

  • PSY P426 Laboratory in Behavioral Neuroscience (3 cr.).
  • PSY P493 Supervised Research I (2–3 cr.), in approved laboratory.
  • PSY P494 Supervised Research II (2–3 cr.), in approved laboratory.
  • PSY P499 Honors Thesis Research (1–12 cr.), in approved laboratory.
  • Biology L490 Individual Study (1–12 cr.), in approved laboratory.
  • Chemistry C409 Chemical Research (1–5 cr.), in approved laboratory.
  • Physics S406 Research Project (1–6 cr.), in approved laboratory.

Elective Courses (Any One)

Note that some of the elective courses have prerequisites that are not included in the "Required Basic Courses" listed above.

Psychology

  • P303 Health Psychology (3 cr.)
  • P329 Sensation and Perception (3 cr.)

Biology

  • L111 Introduction to Biology: Evolution and Diversity (3 cr.)
  • L211 Molecular Biology (3 cr.)
  • L311 Genetics (3 cr.)
  • L312 Cell Biology (3 cr.)
  • L317 Developmental Biology (3 cr.)
  • L321 Principles of Immunology (3 cr.)
  • L331 Introduction to Human Genetics (3 cr.)
  • P451 Integrative Human Physiology (4 cr.)
  • Z466 Endocrinology (3 cr.)

Chemistry

  • C101-C102 Elementary Chemistry I and II (3-3 cr.), C103 Introduction to Chemical Principles (5 cr.)
  • C117-C118 Principles of Chemistry and Biochemistry I and II (5-5 cr.)
  • C121-C122 Elementary Chemistry Lab I and II (2-2 cr.) or C125-126 Experimental Chemistry I and II (2-2 cr.)
  • C341 Organic Chemistry I Lectures (3 cr.) and C343 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory (2 cr.)
  • C342 Organic Chemistry II Lectures (3 cr.) and C344 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (2 cr.)
  • C483 Biological Chemistry (3 cr.)
  • C485 Biosynthesis and Physiology (3 cr.)

Medical Sciences

  • P416 Comparative Animal Physiology (3 cr.)
  • A464 Human Tissue Biology (4 cr.)
  • P417 Neurobiology (3 cr.)

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Departmental Honors Program

The department offers several special courses for outstanding students. P106 is an intensive introductory course. Special courses, P402 and P499, for more advanced students, provide increasing involvement in special problems and research programs, terminating with an independent research project and an honors thesis.

Application for admission to the honors program may be made during the sophomore or junior year. To earn the psychology honors degree, the student must complete P499, including an independent laboratory research project, and complete a strong minor.

We recommend students begin this project no later than spring of their junior year in order to allow adequate time for completion before graduation. Students in the honors program are given preference in assignments of research and teaching assistantships. Students interested in the honors program should request further information from the departmental advisors.

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Overseas Study

Students are encouraged to study abroad, particularly in Indiana University overseas study programs, where they can continue to make progress toward their degrees and apply financial aid to program fees. For information about study abroad, contact the Office of Overseas Study, Franklin Hall 303,
(812) 855-9304 (www.indiana.edu/~overseas).

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Course Descriptions

P101 Introductory Psychology I (3 cr.) N & M Introduction to psychology; its methods, data, and theoretical interpretations in areas of learning, sensory psychology, and psychophysiology. Equivalent to IUPUI B105 and P151. Credit given for only one of P101, or P151, or P106. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P102 Introductory Psychology II (3 cr.) S & H P: P101 or P151. Continuation of P101. Developmental, social, personality, and abnormal psychology. Equivalent to IUPUI B104 and P152. Credit given for only one of P102, P152, or P106. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P106 General Psychology, Honors (4 cr.) N & M P: Consent of instructor or Hutton Honors College. Intensive introduction to psychology. Lectures and demonstrations, laboratory exercises, and student projects. Combines material from P101 and P102 and P211, or P151 and P152 and P211. Credit given only for only one of P106, or P101 and P102 or P151 and P152. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P151 Introduction to Psychology I for Majors (3 cr.) N & M Introduction to psychology for majors: its roots, methods, data, and theory. Major topics will include experimental methodology, neural science, learning and memory, sensation, perception, and cognition, with particular emphasis placed on experimental design and quantitative analyses. Credit not given for both P151 and P101.

P152 Introduction to Psychology II for Majors (3 cr.) S & H Introduction to psychology for majors. Continuation of P151. Presents major theoretical issues, research methods, and findings in social psychology, developmental psychology, individual differences, and psychopathology. Credit not given for both P152 and P102.

P155 Introduction to Psychological and Brain Sciences (3 cr.) N & M An introduction to psychological and brain sciences for psychology majors. Introduces students to the history of psychology and its place in science, to the experimental method, and to the broad range of topics studied by psychological scientists. Credit given for only one of P101, P106, P151, or P155.

P199 Planning Your Psychology Career (1 cr.) P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152 (P152 can be taken concurrently with P199). Intended for psychology majors only. Where do you want to be 10 years from now? How can you get there? Information for undergraduate majors to help them intelligently organize their undergraduate studies. Information about what psychologists do, professional and practical issues in career choice, course selection, intern/ research experience, and planning a course of study.

P201 An Introduction to Neuroscience (3 cr.) N & M P: P155 or P101 or P151, or P106. Introduction to recent findings in behavioral neuroscience as they relate to human behavior. Topics may include neural bases of learning and memory, sex differences in the brain, cerebral hemispheric differences, and behavioral consequences of brain damage and neuro-surgery. Does not fulfill area requirements for psychology major.

P204 Psychological and Biological Bases of Human Sexuality (3 cr.)
N & M
P: P155, P101, P106, or P151. Introduction to recent findings in the study of human sexual behavior, with emphasis on the interaction between psychological, social, and biological factors. Topics include sexual differentiation and development, the physiology of sexual response, sexual orientation, and patterns of sexual behavior. Does not fulfill area requirements for psychology major.

P211 Methods of Experimental Psychology (3 cr.) N & M P: P155 or P101 or P106 or P151. Design and execution of simple experiments, treatment of results, search of the literature, and preparation of experimental reports. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P299 Sophomore Honors Seminar (3 cr.) P: Approval of department honors committee or consent of instructor. Introduction to faculty laboratory research. Discussion of selected topics in psychology.

K300 (MATH K300) Statistical Techniques (3 cr.) N & M P: MATH M118 or M119. Introduction to statistics; nature of statistical data; ordering and manipulation of data; measures of central tendency and dispersion; elementary probability. Concepts of statistical inference and decision: estimation and hypothesis testing. Special topics include regression and correlation, analysis of variance, non-parametric methods. Credit given for only one of the following: K300, K310; CJUS K300; ECON E370 or S370; SOC S371; or SPEA K300. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P303 Health Psychology (3 cr.) N & M P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152. Focuses on the role of psychological factors in health and illness. Through readings, lecture, and discussion, students will become better consumers of research on behavior-health interactions and develop a broad base of knowledge concerning how behaviors and other psychological factors can affect health both positively and negatively.

P304 Social Psychology and Individual Differences (3 cr.) S & H P: P101 or P106 or P151 or P155 or equivalent. A foundations course illustrating how psychological questions and problems can be addressed from the social, group, and individual differences level of analysis. Credit given for only one of P304 or P320.

K310 (MATH K310) Statistical Techniques (3 cr.) N & M P: MATH M119 or equivalent. Introduction to probability and statistics; elementary probability theory, conditional probability, independence, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion. Covers concepts of statistical inference and decision; estimation and hypothesis testing; Bayesian inference; and statistical decision theory. Special topics include regression and correlation, time series, analysis of variance, non-parametric methods. Credit given for only one of the following: K300, K310; CJUS K300; ECON E370 or S370; SOC S371; or SPEA K300. I Sem., II Sem.

P315 Developmental Psychology (3 cr.) S & H P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P106, or P151 and P152. An introduction to how and why behavior changes over time. The theories and methods used to study behavioral change in both human and nonhuman models. Topics include development in perception, movement, language, cognition, and social /emotional behavior. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P316 Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence (3 cr.) S & H P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106. Development of behavior in infancy, childhood, and youth; factors that influence behavior. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P319 Psychology of Personality (3 cr.) S & H P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106. Methods and results of scientific study of personality. Basic concepts of personality traits and their measurements, developmental influences, and problems of integration. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P320 Social Psychology (3 cr.) S & H P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106. Principles of scientific psychology applied to the individual in social situations. Credit given for only one of P304 or P320. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P323 Industrial/Organizational Psychology (3 cr.) S & H P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106. The application of psychological data and theory to the behavior of individuals within organizational settings. Special emphasis on critical assessment of applied techniques.

P324 Abnormal Psychology (3 cr.) S & H P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106. A first course in abnormal psychology with emphasis on forms of abnormal behavior, etiology, development, interpretation, and final manifestations. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P325 Psychology of Learning (3 cr.) N & M P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106. Facts and principles of animal and human learning, especially as treated in theories attempting to provide frameworks for understanding what learning is and how it takes place. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P326 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 cr.) P: P155, or P101, or P151, or P106 and one of the following: BIOL L100, L111, L112, A215, P215, or equivalent. An examination of the cellular bases of behavior, emphasizing contemporary views and approaches to the study of the nervous system. Neural structure, function, and organization are considered in relation to sensory and motor function, motivation, learning, and other basic behaviors. Credit given for only one of P326 or P346.

P327 Psychology of Motivation (3 cr.) N & M P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106. R: P211. How needs, desires, and incentives influence behavior; research on motivational processes in human and animal behavior, including ways in which motives change and develop. I Sem., II Sem.

P329 Sensation and Perception (3 cr.) N & M P: P155 or P101 or P151 or P106. R: MATH MO26 or M119 or introductory physics. Basic data, theories, psychophysics, illusions, and other topics fundamental to understanding sensory and perceptual processes. I Sem., II Sem.

P330 Perception/Action (3 cr.) N & M P: P155 or P101 or P151 or P106. Roboticists know that actions like catching a fly ball are exceedingly complex, yet people perform them effortlessly. How perceptual information is generated by and used in guiding such actions is covered, as are issues of motor coordination and control. Classes include laboratories on analysis of optic flow and limb movements.

P335 Cognitive Psychology (3 cr.) N & M P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106. Introduction to human cognitive processes, including attention and perception, memory, psycholinguistics, problem solving, and thinking. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P336 Psychological Tests and Individual Differences (3 cr.) N & M P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106; and K300 or K310. Principles of psychological testing. Representative tests and their uses for evaluation and prediction. Emphasis on concepts of reliability, validity, standardization, norms, and item analysis.

P337 Clinical Neuroscience (3 cr.) P: P326 or P346. Psychological disorders such as depression and autism exact a huge toll in human suffering and social costs. This course surveys the role of disturbed neural mechanisms on the development of psychological disorders. Methods for investigating the relationship between a disorder and proposed mechanisms will be critically evaluated.

P340 Human Memory (3 cr.) N & M P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106; and K300. R: P335. Research, theory, and data on human memory and information-processing models of memory.

P346 Neuroscience (3 cr.) P: P155, or P101, P106, or P151 or equivalent. A survey of contemporary neuroscience, examining the neural basis of behavior with approaches including molecular, cellular, developmental, cognitive, and behavioral neuroscience. Sensory and motor function, learning and memory, and other behaviors are considered using anatomical, physiological, behavioral, biochemical, and genetic approaches, providing a balanced view of neuroscience. Credit given for only one of P346 or P326.

P349 Cognitive Neuroscience (3 cr.) P: P326 or P346. An overview of the field of cognitive neuroscience. The neural basis of cognition is studied by considering the impact of neuropsychological case studies, neuroimaging (ERP and fMRI), and behavioral investigations on our understanding of sensory-motor systems, learning, memory, emotion, and spatial behavior.

P350 Human Factors/Ergonomics (3 cr.) N & M P: P155 or P101 or P151 or P106. Theories and data of experimental psychology applied to the problems of the interaction of people and technology.

P356 Teaching Internship (2 cr.) P: Undergraduate major in Psychological and Brain Sciences; minimum grade point average of 3.500 in psychology; and permission of the instructor. Supervised experience in assisting in an undergraduate course. Discussion of good teaching practices. Students will complete a project related to the aims of the course in which they are assisting. S/F grading.

P357 Topics in Psychology (3 cr.) P: P101 or P106 or P151 or P155 or equivalent. Introduction to fundamental issues, integrative approaches, and real-world applications of psychology. Examples include investigating a topic from a developmental, cognitive, individual difference, and neuroscience perspective; or addiction from a clinical, developmental, social, and neuroscience point of view.

P375 Intimate Relationships (3 cr.) P: P155 or P102 or P152. Focuses on the social psychology of relationships, including marriage, divorce, human sexuality, jealousy, communication, and friendships.

P402 Honors Seminar (3 cr.) P: Approval of departmental honors committee or consent of instructor. Students may enroll in one of several seminars led by various instructors. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

P404 Computer and Statistical Models in Psychology (3 cr.) This laboratory course provides an introduction to elementary mathematical, statistical, and computer models in psychology. Students learn to use computer spreadsheet packages to program formal models and to apply the models to analyze data obtained in psychological experiments.

P405 Elementary Mathematical Psychology (3 cr.) N & M P: P155 or P101 or P151 or P106; MATH M118 and M119. R: MATH M360. Survey of mathematically oriented psychological theories and their applications to learning, perception, psychophysics, decision making, small groups, etc.

P407 Drugs and the Nervous System (3 cr.) P: P326 or P346. Introduction to the major psychoactive drugs and how they act upon the brain to influence behavior. Discussion of the role of drugs as therapeutic agents for various clinical disorders and as probes to provide insight into brain function.

P409 Neural Bases of Sensory Function (3 cr.) P: P326 or P346. Detailed description of the neural systems responsible for vision, touch, hearing, taste, smell, and balance. Similarities and differences in the strategies employed by these systems will be stressed.

P410 Development of the Brain and Behavior (3 cr.) P: P326 or P346. Examination of the interaction of the developing brain with the behavior it mediates. Cellular systems and organismal levels of analysis will all be considered in the organization of structure function relationships in the neural basis of behavior.

P411 Neural Bases of Learning and Memory (3 cr.) P: P326 or P346. Comprehensive survey of theories and data concerned with neural correlates of associative and non-associative forms of learning and memory. Vertebrate and invertebrate model systems and preparations as well as data obtained from the human neuropsychology literature will be studied.

P413 Operant and Pavlovian Conditioning (3 cr.) P: P325 or consent of instructor. Advanced treatment of the history, basic concepts, theory, and experimental literature of contemporary learning. The focus is on the behavior of nonhuman species.

P416 Evolution and Ecology of Learning (3 cr.) P: P325, P417, or consent of instructor. Advanced treatment of history, basic concepts, theories, and experimental literature examining the relation of learning and evolution. Compares ethological, comparative, and general process approaches.

P417 Animal Behavior (3 cr.) N & M P: P155, or P101, or P151, or P106. Methods, findings, and interpretations of recent investigations of animal behavior.

P421 Laboratory in Social Psychology (3 cr.) P: P155, or P151 and P152, or P101 and P102 or P106; P211; K300 or K310, and P320 or P304. Research methodology in the study of social behavior. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

P423 Human Neuropsychology (3 cr.) P: P326 or P346 or equivalent. A critical examination of neurological functioning with respect to human and other animal behavior. Assesses the behavioral functions of neural structures and systems through understanding the behavioral consequences of brain damage and through basic experimental study.

P424 Laboratory in Sensation and Perception (3 cr.) P: P155, or P151 and P152 or P101 and P102, or P106; P211; K300 or K310, and P329. The experimental investigation of current and classical problems in sensory psychology and perception.

P425 Behavior Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence (3 cr.) P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106, and P324. A survey of major behavior disorders, with emphasis on empirical research and clinical description relative to etiology, assessment, prognosis, and treatment.

P426 Laboratory in Behavioral Neuroscience (3 cr.) P: P155, or P151 and P152 or P101 and P102, or P106; P211; K300 or K310; and P326 or P346. Experiments with and demonstrations of contemporary approaches in behavioral neuroscience. I Sem., II Sem.

P429 Laboratory in Developmental Psychology (3 cr.) P: P155, or P151 and P152, or P101 and P102, or P106; P211; K300 or K310; and P315 or P316. Research methods in developmental psychology and their application to selected problems in the development of humans and of nonhuman species.

P430 Behavior Modification (3 cr.) P: P324 and P325 or consent of instructor. Principles, techniques, and applications of behavior modification, including reinforcement, aversive conditioning, observational learning, desensitization, self-control, and modification of cognitions.

P433 Laboratory in Neuroimaging Methods (3 cr.) P: P211 or P106; P326 or P346; K300 or acceptable substitute. Laboratory experience in all facets of a neuroimaging experiment, including experimental design, data acquisition, data analysis, data interpretation, and data presentation. Introductory magnetic resonance (MR) physics and the physiology of blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) changes are included.

P434 Community Psychology (3 cr.) P: P155, or P101 and P102 or P151 and P152, or P106; junior or senior standing. R: P324. An ecological orientation to the problems of mental health, social adaptation, and community change.

P435 Laboratory in Human Learning and Cognition (3 cr.) P: P155, or P151 and P152 or P101 and P102, or P106; P211; K300 or K310; and P325 or P335. Experimental study of human learning and cognitive processes. I Sem., II Sem.

P436 Laboratory in Animal Learning and Motivation (3 cr.) P: P155, or P151 and P152, or P101 and P102, or P106; P211; K300 or K310; and P325 or P327. Experimental studies of animal learning and motivation.

P437 Neurobiology of Addictions (3 cr.) N & M P: P101 or P106 or P155, and P346, and two biology courses (e.g., L112, L211). (Concurrent enrollment in P346 and biology courses only with permission of the instructor.) Provides an in-depth look at the neurobiological bases of addictions, from the cellular, molecular, and systems neuroscience levels of analysis.

P438 Language and Cognition (3 cr.) N & M P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106. R: P335. Methods, research, and theory in psycholinguistics. Examination of speech perception, speech production, psychological studies of syntax and semantics, language development, cognitive basis of linguistic theory, neurology of language, and language comprehension and thought.

P440 Topics in Cognitive Psychology (3 cr.) P: P335. A critical examination of an area within cognitive psychology. Topics will vary by semester but could include attention, memory, categorization, imagery, language, thinking, problem solving, or decision making.

P442 Infant Development (3 cr.) P: P315 or P316. Surveys cognitive, socio-emotional, and perceptual motor development during the first two years of life. Emphasis is on theory and research addressing fundamental questions about the developmental process, especially the biological bases for developmental change.

P443 Cognitive Development (3 cr.) P: P315 or P316. Human cognitive development. Topics may include language, problem solving, conceptual growth, perception, and cultural influences.

P444 Developmental Psychobiology (3 cr.) P: P315 or P316. R: P326 or P346. Survey of phylogenetic and ontogenetic principles from a comparative perspective. Focuses on a broad biological approach to organic and social development.

P446 Group Processes (3 cr.) P: P320 or P304. Social psychological theory and research on the behavior of individuals in groups covering major topics such as group formation and cohesiveness, group performance and decision making, social influence processes in groups, and intragroup and intergroup conflict.

P447 Social Influence Processes (3 cr.) P: P320 or P304. An advanced review of the theoretical and empirical literature in experimental social psychology concerning social influence processes and effects. Topics to be covered include attitude formation and change, persuasion, conformity, compliance, and behavior change.

P448 Social Judgment and Person Perception (3 cr.) P: P320 or P304. Judgments, decisions, and perceptions of a social nature include self-knowledge, judgments of causality, biases and errors of social judgment such as stereotyping, and the relation of thinking and feeling. Principles will be considered in the context of applied areas such as law and psychotherapy.

P457 Topics in Psychology (1–3 cr.) P: Junior or senior standing. Studies in special topics not ordinarily covered in other departmental courses. Topics vary with instructor and semester. May be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credits.

P459 History and Systems of Psychology (3 cr.) P: P155, or P101 and P102 or P151 and P152, or P106; and 6 additional credit hours in psychology. Historical background and critical evaluation of major theoretical systems of modern psychology: structuralism, associationism, behaviorism, Gestalt psychology, and psychoanalysis. Methodological problems of theory construction and system making. Emphasizes integration of recent trends.

P460 Women: A Psychological Perspective (3 cr.) S & H P: P155, or P101 and P102, or P151 and P152, or P106; and 3 additional credit hours in psychology; and junior or senior status. Basic data and theories about the development and maintenance of sex and gender differences in behavior and personality.

P466 Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology (3 cr.) N & M P: P326 or P346. Introduction to the cellular and molecular processes that give the nervous system its unique character. Covers the cell biology of neurons and glia and mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. Examines the genetic and molecular approaches to the biological basis for higher brain functions such as learning and memory.

P493 Supervised Research (2–3 cr.) P: P155, or P151 and P152, or P101 and P102, or P106; P211; K300 or K310. Active participation in research. An independent experiment of modest magnitude, participation in ongoing research in a single laboratory. Students who enroll in P493 will be expected to enroll in P494. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6 credit hours. I Sem., II Sem.

P494 Supervised Research II (2–3 cr.) P: P493. A continuation of P493. Course will include a journal report of the two semesters of work. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6 credit hours. I Sem., II Sem.

P495 Readings and Research in Psychology (1–3 cr.) P: Written consent of instructor, junior or senior standing. May be repeated twice for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

P499 Honors Thesis Research (1–12 cr.; 12 cr. max.) P: Approval of departmental honors committee. May be substituted for advanced laboratory requirement or, given the permission of the departmental honors committee, for certain other requirements in the program for majors. I Sem., II Sem.

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