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University
Graduate
School
2000-2002
Academic Bulletin

University Graduate School  
Kirkwood Hall 111 
Indiana University 
Bloomington, IN 47405 
(812) 855-8853 
Contact Graduate Office 
 

Environmental Programs

Graduate Faculty
Dual Master Degrees
Doctor of Philosophy Degree
Ph.D. Minor in Environmental Studies
Courses

School of Public and Environmental Affairs
Bloomington

Departmental e-mail:
speainfo@indiana.edu

Note: Be sure to specify which program you are interested in when sending mail.

Departmental URL:
http://www.indiana.edu/~speaweb/

Graduate Faculty

Unless otherwise noted in parentheses, the faculty memberís primary affiliation is within the School of Public and Environmental Affairs.

Arthur E. Bentley Professors
Lynton Caldwell (Emeritus), Elinor Ostrom (Political Science)

Distinguished Professors
Gary Hieftje (Chemistry), Ronald Hites (Chemistry and Public and Environmental Affairs)

Professors
Randall Baker, Simon Brassell (Geological Sciences), Keith Clay (Biology), Jeremy Dunning (Geological Sciences), George Ewing (Emeritus, Chemistry), Hendrik Haitjema, Theodore Miller, Emilio Moran (Anthropology), Craig Nelson (Biology), David Parkhurst, Lisa Pratt (Geological Sciences), J. C. Randolph, Edwardo Rhodes, Eugene Tempel (Education), Donald Whitehead (Emeritus, Biology), Jeffrey White, Daniel Willard (Emeritus)

Associate Professors
Debera Backhus, Chris Craft,* C. Susan B. Grimmond (Geography), Diane Henshel, Kerry Krutilla, Flynn Picardal, Ingrid Ritchie* (I), Scott Robeson (Geography)

Assistant Professors
Matthew Auer,* Vicky Meretsky,* Sara Pryor (Geography), Hans Peter Schmid* (Geography), Philip Stevens*

An (I) after a faculty memberís name indicates that the person teaches at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis

Academic Advisor
Professor Hendrik Haitjema, SPEA 440, (812) 855-0563

Doctoral Student Advisor
Professor J.C. Randolph, SPEA 447, (812) 855-4953

The environmental programs described below are cooperative undertakings of the School of Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA), the College of Arts and Sciences, and the University Graduate School. They are administered by SPEA or the University Graduate School or both and provide courses and degree programs for students, not only in SPEA, but across the university.

Degrees Offered
Dual masterís degrees in environmental science (M.S.E.S.) and ecology/ evolutionary biology (M.A.), dual masterís degrees in environmental science (M.S.E.S.) and geological sciences (M.S.), dual masterís degrees in environmental science (M.S.E.S.) and geography (M.A.) (all three dual degrees are offered jointly with SPEA), and the Doctor of Philosophy in environmental science. In addition, SPEA offers the Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.), the Master of Public Affairs (M.P.A.) with a concentration in environmental policy and natural resources management, a combined M.S.E.S./M.P.A. degree, a combined M.S.E.S. and Doctor of Jurisprudence, and a combined M.P.A. and Doctor of Jurisprudence. The latter two combined degrees are offered jointly with the School of Law. For information regarding ecology and evolutionary biology, geography, and geological sciences, consult the respective department listings elsewhere in this bulletin; for information regarding the degrees offered exclusively or jointly by the School of Public and Environmental Affairs and the School of Law, see their respective bulletins or call (812) 855-2840.

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Dual Master Degrees

The student must apply to and be accepted by both the School of Public and Environmental Affairs and either the program in ecology and evolutionary biology of the Department of Biology, the Department of Geography, or the Department of Geological Sciences. The student must select a supervisory committee of at least three faculty members, representing both the School of Public and Environmental Affairs and either ecology and evolutionary biology, geography, or geological sciences.

Requirements
A total of 60 credit hours that qualify the student for two masterís degrees. For specific program requirements, see the departmental listings in this bulletin and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs Graduate Programs Bulletin.

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Doctor of Philosophy Degree

The doctoral program is a cooperative undertaking of the School of Public and Environmental Affairs and the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Geography, and Geological Sciences. The program is administered by the School of Public and Environmental Affairs. The Ph.D. in environmental science is awarded by the University Graduate School.

The overall goal of this doctoral program is to provide a rigorous, comprehensive education in environmental science. The specific objectives of the program are: (1) to conduct advanced research and scientific analysis of environmental systems, events, and problems; (2) to further understanding of the nature and management of natural and human environments; and (3) to provide an opportunity for students and faculty members in several departments to engage in collaborative environmental research in an interdisciplinary mode.

Admission
A student must apply to the School of Public and Environmental Affairs for doctoral studies. Those accepted for doctoral studies in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs will be recommended to the University Graduate School for formal admission into the Ph.D. program. Applicants to this program must have completed at least a bachelorís degree in science, mathematics, engineering, or a closely related field. Applicants for admission are required to submit a statement of career goals and research interests (including identification of potential research advisors), official results of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate work completed, and a minimum of three letters of recommendation. Students whose native language is not English must also submit results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

Advisory Committee
As soon as possible after the student has enrolled, but not later than one semester after enrollment, an advisory committee for each student must be organized. Normally this committee will consist of at least four faculty members. At least two should be from the School of Public and Environmental Affairs; the others may be from one or more other departments. Membership of the advisory committee will be approved by the director of the Doctoral Program in Environmental Science and the dean of the University Graduate School. At least three members of the advisory committee must be members of the graduate faculty. The role of the advisory committee is defined below.

Degree Requirements
The degree requires: (1) substantial knowledge in a primary environmental science concentration; (2) breadth in related environmental science and policy; (3) an understanding of research methods; (4) an in-depth knowledge of the dissertation topic; and (5) a dissertation that demonstrates the studentís ability to analyze, explain, and interpret research clearly and effectively.

Fields of Study
Each student will define an interdisciplinary principal field of study and describe it in a narrative statement. The narrative statement should (1) describe the studentís previous educational experiences, (2) discuss the studentís research goals and career objectives, and (3) outline a program of course work that lies within the studentís proposed field of study. This document must be approved by the studentís advisory committee and will then serve as the studentís plan for fulfilling the field of study course work requirements described below.

Each student also will be required to outline a program of course work that fulfills the requirements for breadth in environmental science and policy. The breadth requirement may be fulfilled by using a wide spectrum of environmentally related courses, including other science courses, or if appropriate, course work from areas such as anthropology, economics, law, and management. In addition, each student is required to prepare a statement of activities/course work to assure strong grounding in the appropriate research methodologies to embark on their dissertation research. Normally these will include computer applications, areas of applied mathematics such as statistics and mathematical modeling, and technical skill areas such as electronics and analytical chemical techniques.

The research undertaken by the student will be interdisciplinary in nature rather than specifically disciplinary as in a traditional science department. Because a knowledge of the basic sciences is necessary to understanding environmental problems and the application of that knowledge is necessary for the development of solutions to those problems, the research may be primarily basic, primarily applied, or some mixture of both.

Course Requirements
The exact nature and amount of course work in each of three areas-(1) principal field of study, (2) breadth in environmental science and policy, and (3) research methods-will be determined by the advisory committee after review and approval of the studentís plan of study in each of these areas. Selection of specific courses will focus on obtaining (1) adequate knowledge for qualifying examinations, (2) appropriate preparation for a research project, and (3) a mixture of courses that meet the individual professional goals of the student.

The Ph.D. degree requires the completion of at least 90 credit hours in advanced study and research beyond the bachelorís degree. A student must complete a minimum of 15 credit hours of advanced course work in their specific field of study and a minimum of 15 credit hours of advanced course work in environmental science and policy. Students must also complete a minimum of 30 credit hours of research, normally taken as SPEA E625 or SPEA V890 and/or research methods course work. The student, with approval of the advisory committee, should complete some combination of additional course work and research credit sufficient to meet the 90 credit hour requirement.

Students should note that all 30 credit hours of advanced course work, if properly selected, and 6 credit hours of research, may be applied toward the Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.) degree. With an additional 12 credit hours of approved course work, a student may be awarded the M.S.E.S. degree while completing the requirements for the Ph.D. degree in environmental science. Completion of the M.S.E.S. degree as part of this doctoral program is not a requirement; however, this option may be appropriate for some students.

Qualifying Examinations
Before a student is admitted to candidacy, all requirements determined by the advisory committee must be met and the qualifying examinations passed. A student who fails qualifying examinations may retake them only once. The decision to admit a student to doctoral candidacy will be made by the advisory committee, which will evaluate the studentís performance in a written examination, research proposal, and oral examination.

Written Examination
This examination, should be taken by the end of the studentís fifth semester in the Ph.D. program. The exam focuses on topics covered by the studentís course work and relates to the studentís research interests. The examination is written and graded by the studentís advisory committee. The written examination is graded as pass, conditional pass, or fail.

Research Proposal
No later than the end of the fifth semester and typically prior to the scheduling of the studentís written examination, the student should submit a written research proposal for review by the advisory committee. The proposal should be documented, stating clearly a research objective, the approach to be taken, and the significance of the work.

Oral Examination
Each candidate will be examined orally by the advisory committee. The oral examination will be comprehensive in nature and also will cover the studentís research proposal.

Research Committee
Upon successful completion of the qualifying examination, a research committee will be formed. Normally this committee will consist of at least four faculty members. At least two should be from the School of Public and Environmental Affairs; the others may be from one or more other departments. The director of the Doctoral Program in Environmental Science will recommend the studentís research committee to the dean of the University Graduate School. At least three members of the research committee must be full members of the graduate faculty.

Dissertation
A dissertation is required and must be of sufficient value to warrant publication. The dissertation must represent a substantial research effort, both in quality and quantity. A public presentation of the dissertation research is required. The dissertation must be defended before and approved by the research committee.

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Ph.D. Minor in Environmental Studies

(12 credit hours)

Students in Ph.D. programs at Indiana University may, with the consent of their committee, choose environmental studies as an outside minor. The minor is flexible and is usually designed by students in accordance with their needs.

Requirements

  1. The candidate must secure a faculty advisor in consultation with the director of the Ph.D. in Environmental Science Program. The advisor may not be from the candidateís major department. The candidateís advisor will serve as the representative in all examinations or other requirements of the candidateís Ph.D. program that relate to the minor. The advisor will decide on the character of the examination, if any, in the minor field and will certify that the candidate has met the requirements of the minor.
  2. The candidate must take at least 12 credit hours of graduate-level courses related to environmental studies. These courses must be outside the candidateís major department. The choice of courses should be made in consultation with the candidateís advisor and must be approved by the director of the Ph.D. in Environmental Science Program. Acceptance of the proposed minor will be based on two criteria: (a) the courses must have a direct relationship to environmental studies and (b) the courses must not normally be required as part of major or tool-skill options in the studentís major department. Courses in the minor program should be selected according to the studentís interest. Students majoring in areas other than the natural sciences, for example, may wish to consider course offerings in the natural sciences; similarly, natural science students should consider course offerings in the social and behavioral sciences.
  3. A minimum grade point average of 3.0 (B) must be attained in the courses used for the minor.

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Courses

For descriptions of courses offered by the School of Public and Environmental Affairs, see the School of Public and Environmental Affairs Graduate Programs Bulletin.

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