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University
Graduate
School
2000-2002
Academic Bulletin

University Graduate School  
Kirkwood Hall 111 
Indiana University 
Bloomington, IN 47405 
(812) 855-8853 
Contact Graduate Office 
 

Journalism

Graduate Faculty
Special School Requirements
Master of Arts Degree

Master of Arts for Teachers Degree
Doctor of Philosophy Degree
Courses

School of Journalism
Bloomington

Dean
Associate Professor Trevor Brown

Departmental URL:
http://www.journalism.indiana.edu/

Graduate Faculty

Professors
John Ahlhauser (Emeritus), James Brown, I. Wilmer Counts (Emeritus), Dan Drew, Jack Dvorak,* Ralph Holsinger (Emeritus), Peter Jacobi (Emeritus), David Nord, Christine Ogan, David H. Weaver, G. Cleveland Wilhoit, Richard Yoakam (Emeritus)

Associate Professors
David Boeyink,* Trevor Brown, Bonnie Brownlee,* Claude Cookman,* Jon Dilts,* Owen V. Johnson, Carol Polsgrove, S. Holly Stocking

Assistant Professors
Randall Beam,* Maria Grabe,* Radhika Parameswaran,* Paul Voakes*

Associate Dean for Graduate Studies
Professor Dan Drew, Ernie Pyle Hall 215A, (812) 855-8111

Degrees Offered
Master of Arts, Master of Arts for Teachers, dual Master of Arts and Master of Library Science (jointly with the School of Library and Information Science), dual Master of Arts and Master of Public Affairs, dual Master of Arts and Master of Science in Environmental Science (jointly with the School of Public and Environmental Affairs) and Doctor of Philosophy

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Special School Requirements

(See also general University Graduate School requirements.)

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Master of Arts Degree

Two programs (tracks) are available: a professional track and a research and teaching track. The following requirements apply equally to both tracks.

Admission Requirements
(1) A superior record in the undergraduate major from a recognized institution, (2) an appropriate level of achievement on the Graduate Record Examination General Test, (3) three letters of recommendation, and (4) a 500-word statement of purpose.

Superior students who have not majored in journalism or mass communications are encouraged to apply to either the professional or research/teaching track, but they may be required to take foundation courses in news reporting, and editing, and communications law. The reporting and editing requirements may be waived for individuals who have had professional media experience.

Grades
B (3.0) average or above required.

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Master of Arts Degree, Professional Track

Course Requirements
A total of 30 credit hours, including the core offerings of J501 and J510, three professional skills courses, and 15 additional credit hours. The additional credit hours may be all journalism electives or, upon approval of the studentís advisor, may include up to 9 credit hours in a minor field. A special arrangement with the School of Library and Information Science allows a 12-credit minor in that school.

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Master of Arts Degree, Research and Teaching Track

Course Requirements
A total of 30 credit hours, including the core offerings of J500, J510, J800, and 21 additional credit hours. The additional credit hours may all be journalism electives or, upon approval of the studentís advisor, may include up to 9 credit hours in a minor field. A special arrangement with the School of Library and Information Science allows a 12-credit minor in that school.

Thesis
Thesis or creative project (J800) required, for 3 credit hours.

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Master of Arts for Teachers Degree

Major Field Course Requirements
A minimum of 20 credit hours in journalism, advertising (marketing), and telecommunications. Consult the associate dean for graduate studies for specific degree requirements.

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Dual Master of Arts and Master of Library Science Degrees

Admission Requirements
Students must be admitted by both the School of Journalism and the School of Library and Information Science. Requirements for admission to the School of Journalism are the same as those for the M.A. degree.

Course Requirements
A total of 21 credit hours in journalism, including J500, J510, J651, a graduate-level reporting course, either a professional skills course or J800, and 6 additional credit hours of graduate journalism electives. Thirty (30) credit hours are required in the School of Library and Information Science, including the core of L503, L505, L507, L520, L524, L528, L570, L628, and one from L623, L624, or L625 and 3 credit hours of electives in SLIS.

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Dual Master of Arts and Master of Public Affair (M.P.A.)

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Dual Master of Arts and Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.)

General Requirements
A total of 57 credit hours is required for the dual Master of Arts and Master of Public Affairs (M.P.A.). A total of 58 credit hours is required for the dual Master of Arts and Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.).

Admission Requirements
Students must be admitted by both the School of Journalism and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs. Requirements for admission to the School of Journalism are the same as those for the M.A. degree.

Journalism Course Requirements
A total of 21 credit hours in journalism, including J501, J510, plus three of the following professional-skills classes: J401, J413, J455, J520, J551, J552, J553, J554, J556, J560, J563, J565, and 6 additional credit hours of graduate journalism electives.

Note: A student without a journalism undergraduate degree may be required to take J560 Reporting/Editing Workshop and J572 The Press and the Constitution as electives.

SPEA Course Requirements
Thirty-six (36) credit hours are required in SPEA for the M.P.A. (Master of Public Affairs); 37 credit hours are required for the M.S.E.S. (Master of Science in Environmental Science).

The M.P.A. requirements include: V501, V502, V503, V505, V506, V517, V540, V560, V600 plus 15 credits in a specialized concentration.

The M.S.E.S. requirements include: E526, E527, E536, E538, E552, E680, V517 plus two of the following: E560, V539, V520, V540, V625, V640, V643, V645, plus 12 hours in a specialized concentration.

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Doctor of Philosophy Degree

The School of Journalism offers the Doctor of Philosophy degree in mass communications, journalism track.

Admission Requirements
(1) Masterís degree from a recognized institution, (2) superior record in the major subject, (3) appropriate level of achievement on the Graduate Record Examination General Test, (4) three letters of recommendation, and (5) a 500-word statement of purpose. Students who have not majored in mass communications at either the bachelorís or masterís level are encouraged to apply. Consult the associate dean for graduate studies on whether graduate credit can be granted for course work done at the M.A. level.

Course Requirements
(1) Foundation core of J500, J600, J651, J570 or J571, J555 and one statistics course. (2) Either proficiency in depth in an appropriate language, usually French, German, Russian, or Spanish; or completion of an approved set of three tool-skill courses. With the permission of the director of graduate studies, these courses may be counted in the concentration areas. (3) At least two other approved courses at the 600 level in the School of Journalism. These courses may be counted in the concentration areas. (4) Twenty-one (21) to 27 credit hours in each of two concentration areas; and up to 27 credit hours in electives and dissertation for a minimum of 90 credit hours.

Much of the concentration area course work will be taken in departments outside the School of Journalism. Students, in consultation with their faculty advisors, should construct concentration areas according to their own research interests. The concentration areas may be selected from the following: (1) international communication, (2) history and philosophy of communication, (3) communication law, (4) the media and public policy, (5) economics and media management, (6) media and social systems, (7) political communication, (8) communication and culture, (9) visual communication, and (10) communication ethics. With the approval of the advisory committee, students may choose other areas of concentration more closely related to their interests. Students should consult their faculty advisors in selecting courses in concentration areas.

Grades
B (3.0) average or above required overall and in School of Journalism course work.

Periodic Review
At the beginning of the second year, members of the graduate faculty together with the studentís advisor will meet with the studentís first-year instructors to examine the grade and research records of each graduate student to assess the studentís strengths and areas in need of attention. Any student whose achievements and potential fall far below standard will be discouraged from further work.

Advisory Committee Selection
During the first semester of the second year of course work, students will select four faculty members to serve on the advisory committee. Most students select one member for the core, one for each of the two concentration areas, and one for methodology. The chair of the advisory committee must be a member of the journalism faculty. One other member of the committee must come from journalism. A least two of the members must be on the Graduate Faculty, and one must be from outside the journalism and telecommunications faculty. The outside member usually represents one of the concentration areas.

Qualifying Examination
Each student is evaluated for Ph.D. candidacy in the following ways: at the completion of course work, the student will take (1) a four-hour written examination on the foundation core, (2) a problem-solving, take-home examination on methodology, (3) a two-hour written examination on educational methods, (4) a four-hour written examination on the first concentration area, (5) a 4-hour written examination on the second concentration area; and following the written examinations, (6) a comprehensive oral examination administered by the studentís advisory committee. (The written and oral examinations must be completed within a period of no more than four weeks.)

Research Committee Selection
The research committee will consist of four faculty members, one from outside the School of Journalism and the Department of Telecommunications. The chairperson and at least one other member of the committee must be journalism faculty. The members may be, but need not be, the same as those who served on the advisory committee, and the chairperson may be the same or different. The chairperson should be a full member of the Graduate Faculty. All members must be members of the Graduate Faculty, and at least half the committee must be full members.

Final Examination
Oral, primarily a defense of the dissertation.

Ph.D. Minor in Journalism
Students must take 15 credit hours of graduate course work in the School of Journalism. Upon consultation with an advisor in journalism, students may organize a minor tailored to their interests, but they must submit the proposed program of study to the Graduate Committee of the School of Journalism for approval.

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Courses

Courses in the 400s, listed here and described in the College of Arts and Sciences bulletin, are open to graduate students, who will be expected to achieve an appropriately higher level of performance than the undergraduates taking such courses.

J401 Depth Reporting and Editing (3 cr.)
J409 Media Management (3 cr.)
J410 The Media as Social Institutions (3 cr.)
J413 Magazine Article Writing (3 cr.)
J414 International Newsgathering Systems (3 cr.)
J423 Public Opinion (3 cr.)
J425 Supervision of School Publications (3 cr.)
J455 News Analysis and Opinion Writing (3 cr.)
J470 Broadcast Media Analysis (3 cr.)
J500 Introduction to Mass Media Research (3 cr.) Seminar on content analysis, experiments, survey methods, qualitative research, historical and legal methodology. Development of media research proposals.
J501 Public Affairs Reporting (3 cr.) Lectures and roundtable discussion of problems in covering public affairs issues at the national, state, and local levels. Emphasis on reporting on government, social welfare agencies, elections, political parties, special interest groups, and other areas of general public interest.
J510 Media and Society Seminar (3 cr.) Examination of structure, functions, ethics, and performance of communication and mass media, stressing a review of pertinent research literature. Analysis of media policies and performance in light of communication theory and current economic, political, and social thought.
J514 International Communication (3 cr.) Comparative analysis of international media systems. Course topics and geographical regions studied vary from semester to semester.
J520 Seminar in Visual Communication (3 cr.) Integration of advanced visual communication skills, including photography, writing, and editing. Individual projects in packaging news and public affairs information. Emphasis on experimentation with message forms outside constraints of the traditional news media.
J525 Colloquium in Scholastic Journalism (1-3 cr.) Examination of problems in teaching journalism and supervising school publications. Topics may include impact on scholastic journalism of changes in educational philosophy, law, financial support, and technology. May be repeated for state certification to teach secondary school journalism, but no more than 6 credits may be counted toward graduate degree.
J528 Public Relations Management (3 cr.) Designed to enable students to manage a public relations department. Theories and principles relevant to public relations practiced in agency, corporate, and not-for-profit organizations will be covered. This will include developing goals and objectives, working with clients, developing budgets, and research methods.
J529 Public Relations Campaigns (3 cr.) Designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop and execute a PR campaign for a local not-for-profit organization. Students will be exposed to relevant PR theory and in depth case study analysis.
J530 Issues in New Communication Technology (3 cr.) Study of the political, economic, social, legal, and historical issues involved in the introduction and diffusion of communication technologies. Research on the uses and potential effects of new technologies on the structure and practice of journalism and mass media.
J531 Public Relations for Nonprofits (3 cr.) This graduate seminar focuses on how a nonprofit organization creates images and how it shapes its programs and goals to gain public support. Assignments and readings are designed to foster a theoretical and practical understanding of promotional techniques and campaigns using journalistic and other media.
J542 Arts, Media, and Society (3 cr.) Study of issues in arts journalism and the role of the arts in mass media and society. Lectures by guest experts and independent research on current trends and problems in the field, emphasizing the public affairs aspects of the arts.
J544 Science, Society, and Media (3 cr.) An examination of science in society, with a particular look at research and commentary on media coverage of science and technology. Reading, reflection, and discussion of both theoretical and practical issues, and independent reading and research on a topic of the studentís own choosing.
J551 Seminar: Reporting the Law (3 cr.) Study of public affairs aspects of the law. Research and reporting on timely topics pertaining to the courts, the legal profession, and law enforcement agencies particularly as they relate to the social-political-economic order.
J552 Seminar: Reporting the Arts (3 cr.) Principles of literary, theater, art, dance, and music reporting and criticism. Emphasis on the preparation of articles for publication.
J553 Education and the Media (3 cr.) Study of problems and issues in such areas as school finance, curriculum development, teaching methodology, and the politics of education. Research and reporting on current trends in the field.
J554 Science Writing (3 cr.) Exploration of the challenges and opportunities associated with writing about science for non-scientists. Reading and discussion of articles and texts about communicating science to non-scientists, and practical exercises in reporting and writing.
J555 Teaching Mass Communications in College (3 cr.) Exploration of the theory and practice of college pedagogy. Specific attention to skills required for teaching mass communications. Includes development of a new course syllabus and teaching portfolio.
J556 Seminar: Urban Affairs Reporting (3 cr.) Study of current urban problems, such as air pollution, transportation, inner-city redevelopment, ghetto life, and metropolitan government. Research and reporting on timely topics.
J560 Topics Colloquium (3 cr.) Topical seminar dealing with changing subjects and material from semester to semester. May be repeated twice for credit with a different topic.
J563 Computerized Publication Design I (3 cr.) This publishing design course incorporates typesetting, electronic photo editing, graphics, and page design. Students are instructed in design theory, computer publishing skills, and creative problem solving.
J565 Computerized Publication Design II (3 cr.) This advanced publishing design course builds on J563 Computerized Design I and incorporates advanced work in color, type design, computer illustration, creative problem solving, and an introduction to print production.
J570 Theory and Research: Individual Level (3 cr.) Introduction to the theory and research relevant to mass media studies at the individual level of analysis. Corresponds to R541 in the telecommunications department.
J571 Theory and Research: Macro-Social Level (3 cr.) Introduction to theoretical orientations and research findings at the macro-social level of analysis.
J572 The Press and the Constitution (3 cr.) Seminar on specialized topics concerning the rights and obligations of mass media under the Bill of Rights. Research and discussion on law of privacy, access, and other constitutional problems.
J600 Quantitative Methods in Mass Communication Research (3 cr.) P: J500 or R500, and one statistics course. Advanced behavioral methods in the analysis of mass communication data. Practice in analyzing data with computerized statistical programs.
J614 Communication and National Development (3 cr.) Study of the structure and roles of the mass media in national development and the application of communication theory and technology to the problems of development and social change.
J624 Russian and East European Area Media Systems (3 cr.) Investigation of theory and practice of communications systems in the region, including history, news content, institutions, journalists, technology, economic and political pressures, as well as audience and international influences.
J650 History and Philosophy of the Media (3 cr.) Lectures and discussion on the origins, the historical growth, and the philosophical roots of the communication media, with particular emphasis on the relationship between the media and political, economic, social, and cultural trends in the United States.
J651 Qualitative Methods in Mass Communication Research (3 cr.) Seminar on qualitative, historical, and legal research methods for mass communication research.
J652 Propaganda and the Mass Media (3 cr.) Study and analysis of modern propaganda audiences, techniques, media, themes, and effects through historical perspective. Independent research on topics concerning classic propaganda campaigns in World War I, World War II, the Korean War, and Vietnam as well as campaigns waged by religious, business, and pressure groups.
J653 The Media in the Twentieth Century (3 cr.) Seminar on topics in the history and philosophy of the communication media in the twentieth century, stressing both continuity and change in an age of rapid technological growth for print and electronic media in the United States and in selected areas of the world.
J655 Ethics and Journalism (3 cr.) Exploration of the role of ethics in journalism. Using literature which examines ethics in the context of journalism practice, the course will analyze ways journalists attempt to deny or limit the role of ethical values. Special attention to objectivity, freedom, and casuistry.
J660 Topics Colloquium (3 cr.) Topical seminar dealing with changing subjects and material from semester to semester. May be repeated twice for credit.
J672 Topics in Communication Law (3 cr.) Independent research and roundtable analysis of selected problems in communication law.
J673 Government and Mass Media (3 cr.) Independent research and roundtable analysis of political communication and government-media relations.
J680 Management Operations (3 cr.) Study and evaluation of current management practices employed by the mass media, covering such topics as personnel practices, efficiency measures, fiscal operations, community relations, use of technology, and employee continuing education.
J682 Editorial Operations (3 cr.) Analysis and research of problems confronting media management trying to open new or expand old circulation markets. Emphasis on how to employ demographic studies, market analysis, reader-interest surveys, metropolitan studies, and the like in planning editorial, advertising, and circulation campaigns.
J700 Specialized Reporting Project (3 cr.)
J800 M.A. Thesis or Creative Project (3 cr.)*
J804 Readings and Research in Journalism (cr. arr.)*

Graduate
G741 Ph.D. Research in Mass Communications (cr. arr.)*
G790 Readings and Research in Mass Communications (1-3 cr.)*

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