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School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 2008-2010 Online Bulletin Table of Contents

 

 

School of Health,
Physical Education,
and Recreation
2008-2010
Academic Bulletin

HPER Program
School of HPER
1025 E. 7th St.
Bloomington, IN 47405-7109
Local (812) 855-1561
Fax (812) 855-4983
Contact HPER Office
 

Graduate Program

General Information
Admission
Financial Assistance
Graduate Student Research and Human Subjects
Academic Regulations
Graduate Certificate Programs
Master's Degrees1
Master of Science Degrees
Master of Public Health Degree
Director of Recreation Degree1
Doctoral Degrees

General Information

The graduate program provides a comprehensive understanding of a chosen field, extensive preparation in a specialized area of interest, and a working knowledge of research techniques. The master’s and doctoral degrees are offered in the Department of Applied Health Science, the Cooper Graduate Program in Kinesiology, and the Department of Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies. The Master of Public Health degree is offered through the Department of Applied Health Science. The Director of Recreation degree is offered in the Department of Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies. In addition to these degree programs, the Departments of Applied Health Science and Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies offer certificate programs.

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Admission

Application for Graduate Study
Students with Disabilities
Steps for Admission
Application Deadlines
Admission Status
Admission—Master's Degree
Admission—Director of Recreation Degree
Admission—Doctoral Degree

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Application for Graduate Study

Apply on the Internet for admission to graduate degree programs by visiting www.gradapp.indiana.edu. The online application requires completion of an “Educational Objectives” section. In this section, next to “Academic Program,” select Health—Physical Education and Recreation M.S. or Director for master’s and director’s admission. Select Health—Physical Education and Recreation Ph.D. for doctoral program admission. Required supplemental application items that must be mailed, such as transcripts, recommendation forms, and test scores, should be sent to:

Records Office
School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation
Indiana University
HPER 115
1025 E. Seventh Street
Bloomington, IN 47405-7109

For those unable to apply for graduate program admission online, paper applications may be obtained by either writing to the address above, or calling (812) 855-1561. Please be aware that processing of a paper application will take up to four weeks longer than processing of the online application. If possible, apply online.

Visit the School of HPER home page www.hper.indiana.edu to view in-depth information about the School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation.

Application procedures differ for those who are not citizens of the United States and/or those who have had their previous schooling outside of the United States. International applicants may also apply online by visiting www.gradapp.indiana.edu.

Send paper recommendation forms (if recommendations were not submitted nline) to the School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation address above. International applicants must mail all paper academic records and financial documents to the address below.

International Admissions
Indiana University
300 N. Jordan Avenue
Bloomington, IN 47405-7700
U.S.A.

For international applicants who are unable to apply for graduate program admission online, paper applications may be obtained by either writing to the International Admissions address above or calling (812) 855-4306.

International applicants should read the information about the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) as described in steps 5 and 6 below.

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Students with Disabilities

We would like to make reasonable accommodations for people with documented disabilities. If you have a documented disability for which you believe you may require assistance, please contact the Indiana University Office of Disability Services for Students, located in Franklin Hall 096, or call (812) 855-7578.

Students who have, or believe they may have, a learning disability that affects their capacity to complete basic requirements for a degree in the School of HPER should contact the Office of Disability Services for Students for information about services and accommodations for students with learning disabilities.

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Steps for Admission

Admission to certain graduate degree programs may require additional steps; however, admission procedures for all graduate programs in the School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation include the following:

  1. The online application for graduate program admission is submitted electronically. Applicants who are unable to submit the online application should submit the paper-based application to the School of HPER Records Office, Indiana University, HPER 115, 1025 E. Seventh Street, Bloomington, IN 47405-7109.
  2. The applicant must submit official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course work taken at institutions other than Indiana University. Although a student may not have completed undergraduate course work at the time of application, admission to a master’s degree program may be granted on the strength of the student’s work up to the time of application. An official, final transcript from an accredited institution attesting to the award of a bachelor’s degree must be submitted before the student can graduate.
  3. The applicant should request three people to submit Application Recommendation Forms on his or her behalf. Writers of references should have sufficient knowledge of the applicant’s abilities to make informed judgments about the applicant’s ability to succeed in a graduate degree program. Online recommendation forms are included in the online application. If you prefer, you may download and print paper copies and distribute them to your recommenders, who should complete them and send them to the School of HPER Records Office.
  4. The applicant is requested to submit a small photograph with the application materials (optional).
  5. Graduate Record Examination scores (aptitude portion only) must be submitted by all of the following prospective students:
    1. All international applicants regardless of degree being sought.
    2. All applicants for a director’s or doctoral degree.
    3. All applicants for the Master of Science degree in the Departments of Kinesiology and Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies.
    4. All applicants for the Master of Science in Applied Health Science degree with an emphasis in nutrition science.
    5. All applicants for the following master's degree programs in the Department of Applied Health Science whose undergraduate grade point averages are lower than 2.8 on a 4.0 scale: Master of Public Health degree
      Master of Science in Applied Health Science degree with emphases in:
         health promotion
         human development and family studies
         safety management
         school and college health programs.
      Therefore, scores from the GRE are not required for applicants with an undergraduate GPA of 2.8 or higher, if they are applying for admission to the Master of Public Health degree program, or any of the four emphases under the Master of Science in Applied Health Science degree listed above.
      Applicants who want to be considered for fall admission to a degree program that requires submission of these scores are advised to take the Graduate Record Examination no later than December. Approximately four weeks are required before GRE scores will be known. Admission decisions begin in February, so take the GRE early. For information concerning the Graduate Record Examination, write to the Educational Testing Service, Box 6000, Princeton, NJ 08541-6000. Applicants may visit the GRE Web site at www.gre.org. For students who are already on the IU Bloomington campus, information can be obtained from the Records Office, School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Indiana University, HPER 115, 1025 E. Seventh Street, Bloomington, IN 47405-7109; phone (812) 855-1561.
  6. International applicants whose native language is not English must submit TOEFL scores. A minimum TOEFL score of 550 on the paper-based test, or 213 on the computer-based test, or a 79-80 on the Internet-based test, is normally required for admission to all graduate degree programs. For students from countries where the TOEFL is not available, other evidence concerning English proficiency may be considered. All entering international students whose native language is not English will be required to take the Indiana University English language examination before registering for course work. Appropriate remedial English courses may be prescribed on the basis of test results.
  7. Online applicants will pay a nonrefundable application fee by credit card when submitting the electronic application. Those submitting the paper application must pay the same fee by check or money order, using the graduate application fee return envelope provided.

Applicants should be aware that applications are not reviewed until all required materials are received.

Note: Credentials submitted for admission become the property of the university and will not be returned to the applicant.

Each applicant receives notification of the admission decision. Admitted students are permitted to enroll in courses for the entry term stated in the student’s application for admission. An admitted student, who wishes to begin course work during an entry term that is different than the entry term stated in the student’s application, must contact the Records Office in HPER 115, telephone number (812) 855-1256, to request such a change. Some graduate programs may require permission of the program director to change entry semesters. Initial registration for courses must occur within 18 months after the applicant has been accepted for admission.

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Application Deadlines

Master’s Degree Programs For admission to the following three master’s degree programs, all required application materials must be received by the dates specified below.

•  Athletic training master’s degree program—Review of applications for fall‑term admission begins February 1. (Highly selective; fewer than 20 applicants admitted annually.)
•  Master of Public Health degree program—Admission for fall term only, with an application deadline of February 1.

A rolling admission structure is in place for all other School of HPER master’s degree programs, and for the Director of Recreation degree program. Applications will be accepted year-round, and upon receipt of all required application materials, decisions may be made until approximately one month before the beginning of the desired term.

Ph.D. Degree Program In general, fall-term doctoral admission decisions are made by the end of April. The doctoral admissions committee does not normally meet in May, June, July, or August. Therefore, all required application materials must be received and reviewed with a resulting admission decision by April 30.

Assistantships, Fellowships, or Scholarships Master’s, directorate, and doctoral applicants seeking consideration for assistantships, fellowships, or scholarships must be admitted before March 1 to be considered for the next academic year. Only the credentials of admitted students will be reviewed for assistantship appointments. This review begins March 1.

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Admission Status

The types of admission status are as follows:

Admitted
The applicant has met all admission requirements, and has been accepted into a degree program. Admission status is unconditional for those students admitted to master’s degree programs with an approved undergraduate degree from a four-year accredited institution. A student may be conditionally admitted before completing his or her undergraduate degree with the understanding that the degree will be completed before the student may earn a master’s degree. Students may also be admitted with prescribed prerequisite course work, which must be completed before earning the master’s degree.

Denied
The applicant is not permitted to pursue the academic program for which application was made. Applicants whose record would ordinarily qualify them for admission but who are denied because no places are available in the desired program may request to have their applications reconsidered for admission at some future date. Applicants who are denied admission for other reasons may request reconsideration if significant new evidence can be presented concerning their ability to pursue graduate course work successfully. If such evidence includes courses taken at Indiana University (or other institutions), the executive associate dean will review the course work on a case-by-case basis to determine whether or not such course work may be counted toward degree requirements if the applicant is subsequently admitted.

Continuing Nondegree
The holder of a bachelor’s degree who is not a candidate for a graduate degree may enroll as a continuing nondegree graduate student. Those wishing to enroll as nondegree students must be advised by the executive associate dean. Continuing nondegree students may enroll only in those courses for which they have obtained specific permission to register. Consideration will be given to the academic background of the individual and course enrollment limitations. If a student, initially enrolled as a continuing nondegree student, later wishes to obtain a graduate degree, a formal admission application must be submitted to the school. It is important to note that no more than 9 credit hours taken before formal admission to a degree program in the school may be counted toward a graduate degree.

Transient Students
Students in good standing in any recognized graduate school who plan to return to their former university may enroll as nondegree students. A statement from the dean or departmental chairperson of the home institution verifying graduate status will be accepted in lieu of transcripts and letters of recommendation.

Audit Status
A student who wants to enroll in a HPER graduate course as an auditor must complete the Permission to Audit Form and return it to the Records Office, School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Indiana University, HPER 115, 1025 E. Seventh Street , Bloomington, IN 47405-7109; phone (812) 855-1561. The privilege of auditing a course is awarded only under special circumstances. Course instructors have the final right of approval on any such arrangement. Credit may not be awarded for any course taken as an audit.

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Admission—Master's Degree

See also ’’Steps for Admission.’’ Individuals holding bachelor’s degrees from accredited institutions, or who are within one semester of meeting degree requirements, are eligible to apply for admission to master’s degree programs.

Criteria which are considered for admission to master’s degree programs include:
      •    Undergraduate education and grade point average (GPA)
      •    Scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) for most majors.            See number 5 under “Steps for Admission.”
      •    TOEFL scores for students with a native language other than English.            See number 6 under “Steps for Admission.”
      •    References
      •    Personal statement

Greatest consideration for admission will be given to those students have earned an undergraduate GPA of at least 2.80 (on a 4.0 scale). An applicant with an undergraduate GPA below 2.8 may compensate for the low GPA with a high level of performance in the other admission criteria: GRE, references, and personal statement.

Professional experience related to the applicant’s area of study is highly desirable. Specific admission requirements regarding professional experience are determined by each department and based upon the particular program of study for which application is made.

Applicants with deficiencies in academic background will be notified of specific courses to be taken as prerequisites or corequisites to degree course work. Such course work cannot be counted toward the credit hours required for completion of the degree but is required to be completed before the degree is granted.

Master’s Thesis Option
Applicants who are applying for the master’s thesis option must complete all application materials as described earlier in ’’Steps for Admission.’’ On the application, the applicant must request permission to pursue the master’s thesis option. Admission to a graduate program does not ensure admission to the thesis option. The decision to admit an applicant to this option is based upon the applicant’s academic preparation and area of interest, as well as the availability of a faculty member to guide the thesis research.

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Admission—Director of Recreation Degree

(See also ’’Steps for Admission.’’) Greatest consideration for admission will be given to students who possess a minimum undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 and a graduate GPA of at least 3.2 (on a 4.0 scale).

Applicants with deficiencies in academic background will be notified of specific courses to be taken as prerequisites or corequisites to degree course work. Such course work ordinarily cannot be counted toward the credit hours required for completion of the degree.

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Admission—Doctoral Degree

See ’’Steps for Admission.’’

Prerequisites
Although most applicants for the doctorate generally have backgrounds in the area of specialty, the possession of degrees in these fields is not a prerequisite to admission. However, qualified applicants who have deficiencies in academic or professional background may be required to take specific courses or acquire specific experience as prerequisites to degree course work. Credit hours earned in courses prescribed for this purpose ordinarily cannot be included in the 90 credit hours required for the degree.

English Language Proficiency
A basic proficiency in the English language is required of all students. For international students whose native language is not English, a TOEFL score of at least 550 is required on the paper-based test, or 213 on the computer-based test, or a 7-;80 on the Internet-based test. See number 6 under “Steps for Admission.”

Academic Standards for Admission to the Ph.D. Degree Program in Health Behavior in the Department of Applied Health Science
Greatest consideration for admission will be given to applicants who:

  • Possess an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0
  • Possess a graduate GPA of at least 3.5
  • Meet or exceed at least one of the following GRE scores: Verbal: 500; Quantitative: 600; Analytical: 600; or Analytical Writing: 4.5
  • Earn at least one of the following GRE scores: Verbal: 600; Quantitative: 600; Analytical: 600; or Analytical Writing: 4.5
  • Possess two years of relevant work experience

The Department of Applied Health Science prefers applicants with refereed research, professional conference presentations, and/or publications.

Availability of Advisor Admission to the doctoral program is dependent on the availability of a faculty advisor in the area of study.

Academic Standards for Admission to the Ph.D. Degree Program in Human Performance in the Department of Kinesiology
Greatest consideration for admission will be given to applicants who:

  • Possess an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0
  • Possess a graduate GPA of at least 3.5
  • Earn GRE scores at or above the mean, reported annually by the Educational Testing Service, in at least two of the following sections: Verbal, Quantitative, Analytical, or Analytical Writing
  • Earn at least one of the following GRE scores: Verbal: 600; Quantitative: 600; Analytical: 600 or Analytical Writing: 4.5

Availability of Advisor Admission to the doctoral program is dependent on the availability of a faculty advisor in the area of study.

Academic Standards for Admission to the Ph.D. Degree Program in Leisure Behavior in the Department of Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies
Greatest consideration for admission will be given to applicants who:

  • Possess an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0
  • Possess a graduate GPA of at least 3.5
  • Earn GRE scores at or above the mean, reported annually by the Educational Testing Service, in at least two of the following sections: Verbal, Quantitative, Analytical, or Analytical Writing
  • Earn at least one of the following GRE scores: Verbal: 600; Quantitative: 600; Analytical: 600; or Analytical Writing: 4.5
Availability of Advisor
Admission to the doctoral program is dependent on the availability of a faculty advisor in the area of study.

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Financial Assistance for Graduate Students

Assistantship Positions

Application Deadline March 1

Eligibility
Any graduate student who is officially admitted with a major in applied health science, kinesiology, or recreation, park, and tourism studies is eligible to apply for an assistantship.

Criteria
Criteria for selection are experience, departmental needs, scholarship records, and recommendations.

Duties
Students may be appointed as associate instructors, research assistants, or graduate assistants. Students are normally assigned to the department in which they are majoring. Duties may involve assisting faculty with teaching, research, or other departmental duties; teaching classes; or working in the Division of Recreational Sports. Other special assignments may also be made.

Stipend
Stipends for academic-year assistantships range from $10,000-$12,500. These are based on whether a student is a master’s or doctoral student and the number of years in the graduate program.

Fee Remission
Limited or full fee remission may be awarded to any student enrolled in at least 6 credit hours per semester and working between 15 and 30 hours per week in a graduate student academic appointment. Fee remission may be awarded if a student is appointed less than 15 hours per week at departmental discretion. Fee remission may be awarded for a maximum of 30 credit hours per 12-month period, beginning with the start of the fall semester with at most 12 credit hours in any semester or combined summer session. Fee remission does not cover dedicated fees, mandatory fees, and course-related fees or audit hours. An eligible appointee should be prepared to pay, at the time of registration, the unremittable portion of approximately $22 per credit hour, plus mandatory and special course-related fees.

Doctoral Fellowship Opportunity
The School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation awards HPER Fellowships to qualified doctoral students. All newly admitted doctoral students, as well as current doctoral students in residence, are considered for this highly competitive fellowship.

HPER Research and Travel Grant-in-Aid
The purpose of the HPER Student Research Grant-In-Aid support is to encourage research. Student research support is viewed as an essential component in an academic environment that encourages students to become actively engaged in research-related activities.

The program of financial support for student research at Indiana University’s School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation is intended to provide support for inquiry through the HPER Student Research Grant-in-Aid for doctoral dissertation, master’s thesis, and research project support. Students seeking support beyond normal departmental channels are encouraged to explore funding opportunities at the university level and to submit a grant-in-aid application to the School of HPER Research Council. A companion program, the HPER Student Travel Grant-In-Aid, provides funding for the dissemination of research results at professional conferences.

The Research Council of the School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, in keeping with its mission of encouraging high-quality research by faculty and students, has established these awards and the application procedures. A subcommittee of the full council, appointed annually by the council chair, processes all HPER Student Research Travel Grant-In-Aid applications.

For more information visit: www.hper.indiana.edu/financial/grants.shtml.

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Graduate Student Research and Human Subjects

Indiana University requires that all research using human subjects be approved before the research begins. This satisfies a number of federal, state, and institutional regulations, and more importantly, ensures protection of the rights and welfare of persons used in research. Every research proposal submitted by a student and/or faculty member must contain documentation that clearance has been obtained for the use of human subjects. No thesis or dissertation will be accepted for which such clearance has not been obtained. Forms and procedures for this purpose are available online at www.research.indiana.edu/rschcomp/hmpg.html..

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Graduate Academic Regulations

The specific degree and certificate requirements that must be fulfilled by each student are those appearing in the current bulletin at the time of matriculation. Course requirements for each of the school’s graduate programs are specified in the following sections of this bulletin.

General Information
Academic Standing
Transfer of Credit
Time Limitations and Academic Deadlines
Residence Requirement
Required Graduate Student Meetings
Employment
Teacher Certification

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Advising
Each student will be assigned an academic advisor. The program of each candidate must be planned cooperatively bythe student and the advisor, taking into account the student’s educational background and objectives. All phases of the student’s program are subject to the approval of the advisor. All graduate students are required to meet with their advisor before registering for classes each term. During each of these meetings, a student and advisor identify the courses in which the student will enroll for the following term. The resulting semester schedule is written on an Academic Advisor Registration Approval Form and signed by the advisor. The student must submit the signed form to the Records Office in HPER 115 to receive clearance to register. Paper copies of the Advisor Registration Approval Form may be picked up in HPER 115, or the form may be downloaded online at www.indiana.edu/~hperwww/academics/forms/index.shtml. (Additional registration information is available in the Enrollment and Student Academic Information Bulletin.)

Degree Requirements/Tab Sheets
In the School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, the requirements for each master’s degree program are outlined on separate degree requirement tab sheets, available in HPER 115. The tab sheet for each academic program
specifies such requirements as total credit hours needed for completion of the degree, courses to be taken, GPA requirements, suggested electives, and other information. These tab sheets are used by students and their academic
advisors to guide the selection of courses and monitor progress. Adhering to the requirements specified on the tab sheet is the student’s responsibility.

Course Load for International Students Monitored by SEVIS
The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) has created the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) to maintain current information on nonimmigrant students, exchange visitors, and their dependents (i.e., all those in the F or J visa status). Students monitored by SEVIS must maintain full-time enrollment during fall and spring semesters (at least 8 credits for graduate students, or 6 credits for graduate students with associate instructorships or graduate assistantships). For more information about SEVIS, please visit www.indiana.edu/~intlserv.

Grades
Quality points are assigned for purposes of determining the cumulative grade point average (GPA) as follows: A+ or A = 4 credit points; A– = 3.7; B+ = 3.3; B = 3.0; B– = 2.7; C+ = 2.3; C = 2.0; C– = 1.7; D+ = 1.3; D = 1.0; D– = 0.7; F = 0. No points are assigned for grades of I (Incomplete), S (Satisfactory), P (Pass), or W (Withdrawal).

Grade of Incomplete A grade of I (Incomplete) is given only when the work of the course is substantially completed and when the student’s work is of passing quality. The student’s instructor determines the requirements and time frame for completion of the course. The maximum time, allowed by the university, for completion of the course is one year from the date on which the grade of I was recorded. Only upon appeal to the associate dean for graduate studies is an extension of an Incomplete possible. If the student fails to remove the Incomplete within the time allowed, the Office of the Registrar will change the grade to an F. Students should not register in a course in which they have a grade of I. Once a student has graduated, an Incomplete may remain on the official record. These regulations do not apply to research and reading courses in which completion of the course work is not necessarily required at the end of the semester. Incomplete work in these courses will be denoted by R (deferred grade).

Withdrawal A grade of W (Withdrawal) is given automatically when a withdrawal from course work occurs during a specific span of time after the late schedule adjustment period at the beginning of a regular semester or summer session. For the dates of this period, consult the Enrollment and Student Academic Information Bulletin. Thereafter, a W will be given only if the student is passing on the date of withdrawal and has an illness or employment obligation. If the student is failing on the date of withdrawal or stops attending class without officially withdrawing, a WF (Withdrawn with Failure) will be recorded on that date and will be treated as a failing grade. For further information regarding withdrawal dates and procedures, refer to the Enrollment and Student Academic Information Bulletin.

Note: Reducing the number of credit hours will affect financial aid status, especially in relation to fellowships, scholarships, fee remissions, graduate work study, hourly work study, and scheduled repayment of loans. The details of specific awards should be reviewed before withdrawing to ascertain the effect of a reduction in total credit hours.

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Academic Standing

All graduate students are expected to maintain an overall GPA of at least 3.0. Students whose averages fall below this level will be placed on probation. Master’s degree students who have failed to achieve a GPA of at least 3.0 by the time the credit hour requirements for the degree have been completed will be denied further enrollment. Doctoral students who lack the required minimum average will not be permitted to take the qualifying examinations.

Grades below C will not count toward degree requirements for director’s and doctoral degrees. Grades below C– will not count toward degree requirements for master’s degrees. However, all grades earned in courses taken for graduate credit will be included in the calculation of the grade point average.

Restrictions on Independent Study
Students whose cumulative GPA is lower than 3.0 will not be permitted to register for the following independent study research and readings courses or for internships and practicums:

Applied Health Science:C 640, C 641, C 644, C 717, C 777, F 640, F 641, H 640, H 641, H 642, H 643, H 717, H 740, H 741, H 777, N 640, N 641, S 640, S 641, S 642, S 643, S 717, S 777

Kinesiology: K 601, K 602, K 604, K 605, K 606, K 701, K 702

Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies: R 640, R 641, R 642, R 740, R 741

Pass/Fail
Course work that is prerequisite to a degree program or that is to be counted toward the total credits required for the degree may not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. With the written consent of the student’s advisor and the executive associate dean, permission may be given to take other course work under this option.

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Transfer of Credit

The evaluation and approval of credit to be transferred is based upon the following:

  1. For Ph.D. degrees, course work completed more than seven years before successful completion of the qualifying examination is not applicable to the program unless it has been satisfactorily updated. The graduate advisor, after consultation with the advisory committee, may recommend to the executive associate dean that a maximum of 15 credit hours of course work taken before the seven-year time limit be revalidated if it can be demonstrated that the knowledge contained in the course(s) remains current. Currency of knowledge may be demonstrated by such accomplishments as (a) passing an examination specifically on the material covered by the course; (b) passing a more advanced course in the same subject area; (c) passing a comprehensive examination in which the student demonstrates substantial knowledge of the content of the course; (d) teaching a comparable course; or (e) publishing scholarly research demonstrating fundamental principles of the course. Each course for which consideration for revalidation is being requested should be justified separately.
  2. A minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale must have been earned for the work to be transferable.
  3. A maximum of 5 credit hours of graduate work may be transferred from other institutions for application to a master’s degree. Exception: Indiana University graduates may transfer up to 10 credit hours from other accredited graduate schools.
  4. A student’s academic advisor must submit a Request for Transfer of Graduate Credit Form to HPER 115, for final approval of the executive associate dean. This form may be found online at:
    www.indiana.edu/ ~hperwww/academics/forms/index.shtml.
  5. Any graduate course work to be taken at another institution for the purpose of transfer to an Indiana University program must be approved in advance by the advisor and the executive associate dean.
  6. Director’s degree candidates who have not earned their master’s degrees at Indiana University may transfer a maximum of 30 approved credit hours from other institutions.
  7. Director’s degree candidates who have earned a master’s degree at Indiana University may transfer a maximum of 10 credit hours beyond the master’s degree from other institutions.
  8. Not more than 30 credit hours from other approved graduate institutions may be accepted toward the requirements for the Ph.D. The acceptance and distribution of the transferred credit are determined by the student’s advisory committee at the time of the formal course prescription meeting and must be approved by the executive associate dean.
  9. Grades of Pass (P) or Satisfactory (S) cannot be accepted unless there is official documentation from the transferring institution to verify that these grades are equivalent to at least a B on a graduate grading scale.
  10. No credit can be transferred for a course that cannot be officially documented as carrying graduate credit.

Work at Other Indiana University Campuses
A student wishing to enroll in degree-related course work at any other Indiana University campus must secure the appropriate forms from the Records Office, HPER 115, before registering for such courses.

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Time Limitations and Academic Deadlines

Students are responsible for knowing the following time limits and academic deadlines.

Initial Registration
Initial registration for courses must occur within 18 months from the beginning of the semester for which the student was admitted.

Master’s Completion
All requirements for a master’s degree must be completed within six calendar years after initial enrollment in course work.

Directorate Completion
All requirements for a directorate must be completed within six calendar years after initial enrollment in course work.

Doctorate Course Work Completion
A student registered in a doctoral program must satisfactorily complete all course work and the qualifying examination within five years after the date of initial registration.

Doctorate Dissertation Completion
The time limit for completion of the doctoral dissertation (including the dissertation defense and submission of the dissertation) is seven years from the date of passing the qualifying examination. Requalifying for candidacy is required if the dissertation is not completed within the seven-year period. Failure to meet this requirement will result in the termination of candidacy and of the student’s enrollment in the degree program. Any student whose candidacy lapses will be required to apply for reinstatement before further work toward the degree may be formally done. (See also the section of this bulletin titled ’’Dissertation.’’)

Eligibility for Graduation
At least six months before the expected date of graduation, candidates for master’s and director’s degrees must file an Application for Graduation in the Records Office, HPER 115. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree must file a similar application with the University Graduate School, Kirkwood Hall 111. Application forms are available from those offices. Failure to file this application by the proper time may result in failure to graduate at the expected time. The responsibility for checking degree requirements rests with the student.

Graduation
Doctoral students who wish to participate in the May or December Commencement exercises must have completed the data-collection phase of the dissertation research by the deadline date for filing the graduation application. Arrangements for Commencement regalia are to be made with the Indiana Memorial Union Bookstore. Diplomas will be mailed to the permanent address on file at the Office of the Registrar. Allow approximately eight weeks following the date of graduation for the delivery of diplomas.

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Residence Requirement

Residence is defined as full-time pursuit of academic course work on the Bloomington campus. In meeting residence requirements, students are expected to be on campus in regular contact with faculty and fellow graduate students during the specified time period. A full-time schedule is normally considered to consist of 12 to 15 credit hours of course work. For full-time graduate assistants, research assistants, and associate instructors, 6 credit hours constitute a full-time course load.

A period of full-time residence is not required for students in master’s or director’s degree programs. However, master’s degree students must take a minimum of 25-30 of the required 35-51 credit hours at Indiana University. Doctoral students must be enrolled for a minimum of two consecutive semesters of fulltime course work on the Bloomington campus.

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Required Graduate Student Meetings

The graduate student is expected to meet regularly with advisory and/or research committees for academic and research advising. In addition to these informal meetings, the following official meetings are required for each of the graduate degrees:

Master’s thesis option students: proposal meeting and thesis defense

Directorate thesis option students: course prescription meeting, directorate qualifying examination, proposal meeting, and thesis defense

Directorate internship option students: course prescription meeting, directorate qualifying examination, and final internship evaluation

Doctoral students: course prescription meeting, qualifying examination, proposal meeting, and dissertation defense

The proposal meeting and the thesis/dissertation defense are public meetings, open to the academic community. Those attending these meetings are expected to follow the established protocol.

The proposal meeting is open to faculty and students in the university community. During the first portion, the student formally presents the research proposal in an open forum. Committee members and visitors have the opportunity to ask questions. Visitors leave after the formal presentation. The remaining time is determined by the student’s research committee.

Students may schedule the meetings described above by completing and submitting an Application to Schedule a Graduate Student Meeting Form in HPER 115. Students must carefully follow the directions on the form. Paper copies of this form are available in HPER 115, or the form may be downloaded online at www.indiana.edu/~hperwww/academics/forms/index.shtml.

Note: No meetings may be scheduled during final examination week or vacation periods.

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Employment

Persons who are employed full time should carry only 5 to 6 credit hours of graduate course work per semester. Those employed half time should not take more than 9 credit hours. The maximum credit load for associate instructors, research assistants, and graduate assistants depends on the number of credit hours indicated in the work assignment notice sent at the time of the appointment.

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Teacher Certification

Students who wish to teach in Indiana public schools must meet the minimum state licensing requirements and obtain a standard license. More information is available from the certification office in the School of Education, Indiana University, Education 1074, 201 N. Rose Avenue, Bloomington, IN 47405-1006; phone (812) 856-8511.

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Graduate Certificate Programs

A graduate Certificate of Health Studies is available through the Department of Applied Health Science for nonmajor students with an interest in health education and health promotion. The certificate requires a minimum of 15 credit hours of graduate course work, including HPER-C 589, and 12 credits approved by the student’s advisor.

A graduate Certificate in Gerontology and Health is available through the Department of Applied Health Science for both non-major and major. The certificate requires a minimum of 15 credit hours of graduate course work including HPER H-524, HPER F-542 or HPER H-642 or HPER H-643 or HPER C-644 and two courses selected from EDUC-P 518, EDUC-P 517, HPER-C 615, HPER-C 535, HPER-C 625, HPER-F 560, HPER-F 533, HPER-R 565, or HPER-R 566.

A graduate Certificate in Therapeutic Outdoor Programs (TOP) is offered through the Department of Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies. TOP provides students and professionals with a comprehensive foundation of therapeutic interventions, theory, and practice offered through Indiana University and BradfordWoods. The certificate requires the successful completion of a package of six courses (HPER-R 504, HPER-R 511, HPER-R 512, HPER-R 561, HPER-R 564, and HPER-R 643) totaling 15 credits. Additional course work may be possible, depending on the goals and training needs of the student.

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Master's Degrees

Degrees offered by the school include a Master of Science in Applied Health Science, a Master of Science in Kinesiology, a Master of Science in Recreation, and a Master of Public Health. Students pursuing a Master of Science degree may select specific “options’’ for concentrated study within their major. The Master of Public Health degree prepares students to serve as leaders or scholars in public health with particular focus on understanding the health behaviors of individuals in communities and the mechanisms to support the delivery of effective health promotion programs in community, corporate, and governmental settings. Students who want to earn a second master’s or a dual degree in a different department in the school should contact the executive associate dean. Requirements vary for specific degree combinations.

Thesis Option
The chronological progression of steps in the master’s thesis process are:

  • Formation of a master’s thesis committee
  • Thesis proposal meeting
  • Completion of thesis
  • Defense of thesis
  • Submission of required thesis materials
  • Graduation

Master’s Thesis Committee
When a student is admitted to the thesis option, a member of the graduate faculty will be appointed to serve as the student’s advisor and as the chair of the master’s thesis committee. This committee consists of the chair and at least two other graduate faculty members. Information regarding the eligibility of faculty members to serve on the master’s thesis committee is available in the School of HPER Records Office in HPER 115. A Nomination of Master’s Thesis Committee Form, signed by the members, must be submitted in HPER 115. A paper version of this form may be obtained in HPER 115 or it may found online at www.indiana.edu/~hperwww/academics/forms/index.shtml. The research proposal meeting may not be scheduled before the executive associate dean approves the submitted Master’s Thesis Committee Form. The chair/advisor will guide all phases of the thesis development. After the thesis topic has been identified, the student must prepare a detailed outline of the research proposal. The outline must then be submitted to the committee for approval. The committee is also responsible for the evaluation of the completed thesis.

Thesis Proposal Meeting
Before formal approval of the master’s thesis proposal by the student’s thesis committee, the proposed research must be presented at a public proposal meeting. Information about and applications for the proposal meeting are available in HPER 115. No later than two weeks prior to the date of the proposal meeting, the chair and the student must submit a one-page announcement of the proposal meeting to the School of HPER Records Office in HPER 115. Please visit the Records Office for details regarding the format of this announcement.

During the first portion of the proposal meeting, the student formally presents the research proposal in an open forum. Committee members and visitors have the opportunity to ask questions. Visitors leave after the formal presentation. The remaining time is determined by the student’s research committee.

Note: Every proposal must contain documentation that clearance has been obtained for the use of human subjects. No thesis or dissertation will be accepted for which such clearance has not been obtained. Forms and procedures for this purpose are available online at www.research.indiana.edu/rschcomp/hmpg.html.

Completion of Thesis
The master’s thesis committee will guide the student during development of the thesis. The format and procedures for writing a master’s thesis are identical to those for the doctoral dissertation, with the following exceptions: (1) extent of the study and (2) items submitted upon completion.

Thesis Defense
Students must submit a request to schedule the thesis defense at least 5 weeks in advance of the desired defense date. No later than four weeks prior to the defense date, the chair and the student must submit a one-page abstract announcing the thesis defense meeting to HPER 115. The thesis defense is a public meeting conducted by the student’s thesis committee. A student should confer with the thesis committee chair regarding expectations.

Submission of Required Thesis Materials
Before the degree may be awarded, students must:

  • have completed all required courses for the master’s degree
  • receive a grade for thesis credits
  • submit two bound copies of the thesis to HPER 115
  • submit a Permission to Publish Form in HPER 115 (form available in HPER 115)
For information on such topics as format, meetings, and procedures, please consult with the graduate recorder in HPER 115.

All requirements for a master’s degree must be completed within six calendar years after initial enrollment in course work.

An international master’s thesis student, who has already registered for the required 5 thesis credits and has not completed requirements for the thesis, may maintain enrollment status for fall and spring semesters by registering for HPER-G 599 Thesis Research. This course carries no credit but satisfies enrollment requirement for international students involved in research. HPER-G 599 is not offered during the summer sessions.

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Master of Science Degrees

General Information
Master's Degree—Double Major
Dual Master's Degrees
Applied Health Science Options
Kinesiology Options
Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies Options

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For Master of Science degree, students are required to successfully complete a minimum of 35 credit hours, at least 20 credit hours of which must be in the major department (applied health science, kinesiology, or recreation, park, and tourism studies).Many master’s degree programs require more than the minimum 35 credit hours. This section contains a description of each master’s degree program.

For students choosing to write a thesis, 5 credits are awarded for completion of a thesis. These credits count toward the minimum 35 credit hours required for the degree. However, while thesis credits are awarded in the form of departmental courses, thesis students must complete 20 other credit hours in the major department in order to satisfy the minimum major requirement.

In pursuing a master’s degree, students may select one of the options listed in their major department. HPER courses required to fill the requirements for a given option will be counted toward the total 20 credit hours required in the major field. Even though a course from a discipline outside of the school may be required in a given option, it cannot be counted toward the total 20 credit hours required in the major field.Wherever a choice between two courses is permitted in meeting option requirements, the alternative not chosen may be used as an elective. All electives used to meet degree requirements must be approved by the advisor.

A maximum of 6 credit hours in independent study, readings, and research courses (not including internships) may be used to meet degree requirements unless special permission is obtained from the executive associate dean. A student must have at least a 3.0 GPA to enroll in independent study courses.

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Master's Degree—Double Major

A student may decide to complete two majors or areas of emphasis in the same department. All requirements for each program of study must be met. The student must complete a minimum of 15 credit hours from each area and must have a minimum of 45 credit hours combined for the two areas of study.

The student may use the same course to satisfy requirements in each major when that course is required in each degree program (e.g., HPER-T 590 and HPER-T 591), and courses from one major may be used to satisfy elective requirements for the other when an obvious relationship exists. However, such courses may be counted only once for credit. In all cases, the academic advisor must recommend the use of the course work from the second major, and this must be approved by the executive associate dean.

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Dual Master's Degrees

To be eligible to earn two master’s degrees, the student must be formally admitted by both departments. All requirements for each degree must be met. If the student decides to complete a thesis, the thesis committee shall include two faculty members from the department where the thesis is being completed and one faculty member from the second major.

The student must complete a minimum of 20 credit hours from each department where the degrees will be awarded and must have a minimum of 55 credit hours combined for the two degrees. In many cases it will be possible to use courses taken in one major as part of the other major, especially when the same course is required in both departments, and courses taken in one department may serve as electives for the other degree when it is obvious that a close relationship exists. However, such courses may be counted only once for credit.

In all cases, the academic advisor must recommend the use of course work from the second degree, and this use must be approved by the executive associate dean.

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Master of Science in Applied Health Science Options

Health Promotion

A minimum of 35 credit hours is required for this program, and a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) is required for graduation. A minimum grade of C– is required in each course. All electives for completing the degree must be approved by the advisor.

Required courses (6 credits):
HPER-C 589 Models and Theories of Health Behavior (3 cr.)
HPER-H 500 Philosophy and Principles of Health Education (3 cr.)

Select one of the following three courses (3 cr.):
HPER-C 602 Intervention Design in Public Health (3 cr.)
HPER-H 502 Instructional Strategies for School and College Health (3 cr.)
HPER-C 501 Assessment and Planning in Public Health (3 cr.)

Select one of the following two courses (3 cr.):
HPER-C 591 Public Health Statistics (3 cr.)
HPER-T 591 Interpretation of Data in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)

Required courses (9 credits):
HPER-H 519 Contemporary Issues in Health Promotion (3 cr.)
HPER-H 594 Health Program Evaluation (3 cr.)
HPER-H 635 Health Promotion in the 21st Century (3 cr.)

Select one of the following courses (3-6 cr.):
HPER-H 642 Internships in Health Promotion (3 cr.)
HPER-H 599 Master’s Thesis (3-6 cr.)

Required research course:
HPER-T 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)
Electives: Select (3 credits) from C–, F-, H-, N-, S-, and T-prefix, 500/600 or above courses.
Free electives to reach 35 minimum graduate credits (3-6 cr.)

Human Development and Family Studies

A minimum of 35 credit hours is required for this program, and a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) is required for graduation. A minimum grade of C– is required in each course. All electives for completing the degree must be approved by the advisor.

Required courses: (9 credits)
HPER-C 589 Models and Theories of Health Behavior (3 cr.)
HPER-C 591 Public Health Statistics (3 cr.)
HPER-F 654 Conceptual Frameworks in Human Development and Family Studies (3 cr.)

Select 6 credits from the following list:
HPER-F 531 Human Development I: Preconception through Age 6 (3 cr.)
HPER-F 532 Human Development II: Ages 6-19 (3 cr.)
HPER-F 533 Human Development III: Adulthood (3 cr.)
HPER-F 541 Effects of Divorce on Children (3 cr.)
HPER-F 544 Parent and Child Relationships: Theoretical, Research, and Practical Aspects (3 cr.)
HPER-F 546 Issues in Human Development and Family Studies (3 cr.) (Can be taken for up to 6 cr., if topics differ)

Select 6 credits from the following list:
HPER-F 517 Seminar in Human Development and Family Studies (3 cr.) (Can be taken for up to 6 cr., if topics differ)
HPER-F 557 Stress and Resilience in the Family (3 cr.)
HPER-F 559 Special Problems: Human Development and Family Studies
(1-3 cr.)
HPER-F 560 Grief in a Family Context (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours of social science courses.
HPER-F 656 Families and Health (3 cr.)

Select 3 credits from the following list:
HPER-F 542 Internship in Human
Development and Family Studies (3 cr.) (Prerequisite: graduate GPA of at least 3.0)
HPER-F 543 Family Life Education (3 cr.)
HPER-F 553 Teaching Sex Education (3 cr.)
HPER-F 555 Leading Family Process Discussion Groups (3 cr.)
HPER-F 558 Workshop in Human Development and Family Studies (1-3 cr.)
HPER-F 640 Research in Human Development and Family Studies (cr. arr.) (Prerequisite: GPA of at least 3.0)
HPER-F 641 Readings in Human Development and Family Studies (cr. arr.) (Prerequisite: GPA of at least 3.0)
HPER-H 517 Workshop in Health Education (3 cr.)
HPER-H 540 Practicum in College Sex Education (3 cr.)

Elective Courses: (3 credits required for thesis option; 5 credits required for non-thesis option; courses taken beyond the minimum in above areas may be taken as electives)

Research Requirement: (students must choose one of the next two options)


(Thesis Option: 8 credits)
HPER-T 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)
HPER-H 599 Master’s Thesis (5 cr.)

(Non-Thesis Option: 6 credits)
HPER-T 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)
HPER-F 598 Non-thesis Project in Human Development and Family Studies
(3 cr.)

Nutrition Science

A minimum of 35 credit hours is required for this program, and a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) is required for graduation. A minimum grade of C– is required in each course, and 20 credits must be in the Department of Applied Health Science. All electives for completing the degree must be approved by the advisor.

Required courses:
HPER-C 589 Models and Theories of Health Behavior (3 cr.)
HPER-N 530 Advanced Nutrition I (3 cr.)
HPER-N 532 Advanced Nutrition II (3 cr.)
HPER-N 600 Nutrigenomics (3 cr.)

Select one of the following courses:
CHEM-C 483 Biological Chemistry (3 cr.)
CHEM-C 484 Biomolecules and Catabolism (3 cr.)
MCHE-C 580 Medical Biochemistry (3 cr.)

Select 5 credits from the following list:
HPER-N 520 Food Chemistry (3 cr.)
HPER-N 525 Food Chemistry Laboratory (2 cr.)
HPER-N 531 Medical Nutrition Therapy (3 cr.)
HPER-N 533 Medical Nutrition Therapy Application (2 cr.)
HPER-N 536 Community Nutrition (3 cr.)
HPER-N 601 Phytonutrients (3 cr.)
HPER-N 620 Nutrition in Sports (3 cr.)
CHEM-C 485 Biosynthesis and Physiology (3 cr.)
MCHE-C 583 Physiological Biochemistry (3 cr.)

Required:
HPER-T 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)
HPER-C 591 Public Health Statistics (3 cr.)
HPER-T 592 Statistical Techniques in Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation (3 cr.)

Thesis/Non-Thesis Option:
Select one of the following courses:
HPER-H 599 Masters Thesis (6 cr.)
HPER-N 640 Research in Nutrition Science (3 cr.)

Select one of the following courses:
HPER-N 641 Readings in Nutrition Science (3 cr.)
HPER-N 539 Special Problems: Nutrition and Food Science (3 cr.)

Safety Management

A minimum of 36 credit hours is required for this program, and a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) is required for graduation. A minimum grade of C– is required in each course. All electives for completing the degree must be approved by the advisor.

Required courses:
HPER-S 502 Instructional Strategies for Safety Education (3 cr.)
HPER-S 513 Safety Management in Business and Industry (3 cr.)
HPER-S 552 Principles and Concepts of Workplace Safety Behavior (3 cr.)

Selective Safety Courses (6 -12 credits. Choose at least one track; students may take both tracks for 12 hours credit, thereby reducing the number of elective course work to 9 credit hours.)

Safety Track
HPER-S 514 Safety Standards for Industry and Construction (3 cr.) (Spring)
HPER-S 515 Safety Performance Measures and Leadership (3 cr.) (Fall)

Health Track
HPER-S 610 Occupational Risk Management (3 cr.)
HPER-S 632 Managing Occupational Health Programs (3 cr.)

Required:
HPER-T 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)

Select one of the following courses:
HPER-C 591 Public Health Statistics (3 cr.)
HPER-T 592 Statistical Techniques of Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation (3 cr.)

Select 9-15 credits from the following elective courses to complete the required 36 credits:
HPER-H 511 Advanced Emergency Care (3 cr.)
HPER-S 517 Workshop in Safety Education (1-6 cr.)
HPER-S 617 Seminar in Safety Education (1-6 cr.)
HPER-S 640 Research in Safety Education (1-3 cr.)
HPER-S 641 Readings in Safety Education (1-3 cr.)
HPER-S 642 Internship in Safety Education (1-6 cr.)

School and College Health Programs

A minimum of 36 credit hours is required for this program, and a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) is required for graduation. A minimum grade of C– is required in each course. All electives for completing the degree must be approved by the advisor.

Required courses:
HPER-H 500 Philosophy and Principles of Health Education (3 cr.)
HPER-C 589 Models and Theories of Health Behavior (3 cr.)
HPER-H 502 Instructional Strategies for School and College Health (3 cr.)
HPER-H 510 Organization of School Health Programs (3 cr.)
HPER-H 594 Health Program Evaluation (3 cr.)
HPER-H 623 School Health Program Management (3 cr.)
HPER-H 695 Acquiring and Managing External Funds in Health and Human Services (3 cr.)

Select one of the following courses:
HPER-H 653 Practicum in School Health Management (3 cr.)
HPER-H 599 Master’s Thesis (3 cr.)

Required research course:
HPER T590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)

Select and complete one of the following three (9 cr.) options:

  • Option 1: Pre-K to 12 School Focus: Select two courses (6 cr.) from Education Leadership with EDUC-A prefix, and select one course (3 cr.) with HPER-C, F, H, S, N or T prefix (note: must be a statistics course if you are completing a master’s thesis.)
  • Option 2: Post Secondary Schools Focus: Select two courses (6 cr.) from Higher Education with EDUC-C prefix, and select one course (3 cr.) with HPER-C, F, H, S, N or T prefix (note: must be a statistics course if you are completing a master’s thesis.)
  • Option 3: Health Content Focus: Select three courses (9 cr.) with HPER-C, F, H, S, N or T prefix. (Note: must be a statistics course if you are completing a master’s thesis.)

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Kinesiology Options

For each of the following emphasis areas, certain core courses or their equivalents are required. Depending on individual career goals, and in consultation with an advisor, the student will select additional courses to complete the required credit hours in one of the areas listed below (a minimum of 20 credit hours is required in kinesiology). The number of credit hours required in the kinesiology options ranges from 35 to 51 credits. Listed below are the courses required within each of the respective options. Prerequisite courses may be prescribed for students lacking sufficient background for graduate-level study in their chosen options.

Adapted Physical Education

A minimum of 35-37 credit hours is required for this program, and a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) is required for graduation. A minimum grade of C– is required in each course. All electives for completing the degree must be approved by the advisor.

Required courses:
HPER-K 524 Exercise and Physical Activity for People with Disabilities (3 hrs)
HPER-K 550 Motor Assessment of Persons with Disabilities (3 hrs)
HPER-K 551 Medical Aspects of Disabling Conditions (3 hrs)
HPER-K 552 Problems in Adapted Physical Education (3 hrs)
HPER-K 572 The Physical Education Curriculum (3hrs)
HPER-K 577 Seminar and Practicum in Adapted Physical Activity (5 hrs over two semesters)

Students choose between a thesis option and a non-thesis option

Thesis option: (17 cr.)
HPER-T 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology and Recreation
(3 hrs)
HPER-T 591 Interpretation of Data in Health, Kinesiology and Recreation (3 hrs)
HPER-K 600 Master’s Thesis (5 cr.)
Directed Electives (6 cr.)
Non-thesis option: (15 cr.)
HPER-T 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology and Recreation
(3 hrs)
Directed Electives (12 cr.)
Exit Requirement: Pass National APENS examination

Applied Sport Science 

A minimum of 35 credit hours is required for this program, and a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) is required for graduation. A minimum grade of C– is required in each course. All electives for completing the degree must be approved by the advisor.

Required core courses (15 credits)
HPER-K 525 Psychological Foundations of Exercise and Sport (3 cr.)
HPER-K 530 Mechanical Analysis of Human Performance (3 cr.)
HPER-K 533 Advanced Theories of High Level Performance (3 cr.)
HPER-K 535 Physiological Basis of Human Performance (3 cr.)
HPER-T 591 Interpretation of Data in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)

Select one of the following courses (3 credits):
HPER-K 541 Nature and Basis of Motor Skill (3 cr.)
HPER-K 542 Neuromuscular Control of Movement (3 cr.)

Consult your academic advisor to select a minimum of 17 credits of graduate level electives to complete the 35 required credits for the degree.

Athletic Administration/Sport Management

A minimum of 36 credit hours is required for this program, and a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) is required for graduation. A minimum grade of C– is required in each course. All electives for completing the degree must be approved by the advisor.

Select 9 credits from the following courses with approval of major advisor:
HPER-K 585 American Sport through Film (3 cr.)
HPER-K 521 History of Sport in the United States (3 cr.)
HPER-K 522 The Role of Sports in Society (3 cr.)
HPER-K 525 Psychological Foundations of Exercise and Sport (3 cr.)
HPER-T 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)
HPER-T 591 Interpretation of Data in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)
HPER-T 592 Statistical Techniques of Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation (3 cr.)
HPER-T 691 Multivariate Statistical Analysis (3 cr.)

Select 27 credits from the six sections below with the following stipulations:
One course must be taken from each of the six sections.
Students must choose a specialization from among one of the following three sections: Administration, or Marketing, or Communication.
Students must complete 12 credits in that chosen section.
No course may be used to fill more than one requirement.
Not all foundations courses are listed. See advisor for other desirable courses.

Section 1: Administration
HPER-K 500 Special Topics in Kinesiology: Topic: Administration of Fitness Programs (3 cr.)
HPER-K 584 Leadership and Sport Communication (3 cr.)
HPER-K 510 Administrative Theory of
Competitive Sports Programs (3 cr.) HPER-K 512 Issues in Commercial Sport (3 cr.)
HPER-K 513 Sport and Higher Education (3 cr.)
HPER-K 518 Governance in Sport Management (3 cr.)
HPER-K 560 Exercise in Corporate Fitness and Wellness (3 cr.)
HPER-R 520 Organizational Leadership for Leisure Service (3 cr.)
HPER-R 525 Administrative Theory and Management Practices in Leisure Services (3 cr.)
HPER-K 570/R 570 Recreational Sports Administration (3 cr.)
HPER-K 581 Sales and Service Management in Sport (3 cr.)
HPER-K 583 Sport Public Relations (3 cr.)
HPER-K 611 NCAA Compliance (3 cr.)

Section 2: Law
HPER-K 517 Contemporary Sports Law Issues (3 cr.)
HPER-K 511 Legal Issues in the Sport Environment (3 cr.)
HPER-R 544 Legal Aspects of Recreation Administration (3 cr.)
HPER-K 611 NCAA Compliance (3 cr.)

Section 3: Marketing
HPER-K 500 Special Topics in Kinesiology: Topic: Issues/Topics in Sport Marketing (3 cr.)
HPER-K 514 Sport Marketing and Sponsorship (3 cr.)
HPER-K 580 Sport Communication (3 cr.)
HPER-K 581 Sales and Service Management in Sport (3 cr.)
HPER-K 583 Sport Public Relations (3 cr.)
HPER-K 614 Sport Sponsorship and Retention (3 cr.)

Section 4: Strategy
HPER-K 516 The Sport Industry (3 cr.)

Section 5: Financial Analysis
HPER-K 615 Financial Analysis in Sport (3 cr.)
HPER-T 594 Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)

Section 6: Communication
HPER-K 580 Sport Communication (3 cr.)
HPER-K 581 Sales and Service Management in Sport (3 cr.)
HPER-K 582 Creative Sports Writing (3 cr.)
HPER-K 583 Sport Public Relations (3 cr.)
HPER-K 584 Leadership in Sport Communication (3 cr.)
HPER-K 586 Understanding SportMedia (3 cr.)
HPER-K 500 Special Topics in Kinesiology: Topic: Seminar in Information Systems (3 cr.)

Competency Requirements:

Students must meet the following competency requirements by showing coursework equivalents either prior to entering the program or during the initial semesters of graduate study. Competency requirements will vary according to specialization. Check with your advisor.

Required competency:
HPER-T 591 Interpretation of Data in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)

One of the following:
HPER-P 333 Sport in America: Historical Perspectives (3 cr.)
HPER-K 521 History of Sport in the United States (3 cr.)

One of the following:
HPER-P 405 Introduction to Sport Psychology (3 cr.)
HPER-K 525 Psychological Foundations of Exercise and Sport (3 cr.)
HPER-K 522 The Role of Sport in Society (3 cr.)

One of the following:
HPER-R 237 Computers in Park, Recreation, Sport, and Tourism Management (3 cr.)
HPER-K 506 Computer Applications in Kinesiology (3 cr.)

Electives:
Elective courses allow the student to specialize. Electives must be chosen in consultation with the student’s major advisor. Students have access to graduate courses within the School of HPER and outside the School. Many students elect HPER K605: Internships in Sports Management (maximum of 3 credits).

Athletic Training

A minimum of 51 credit hours is required for this program, and a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) is required for graduation. A minimum grade of C– is required in each course. All electives for completing the degree must be approved by the advisor.

(51 credits required. Requirements arranged by term)
Fall A

HPER-T 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)
HPER-A 610 Research Seminar in Athletic Training I (2 cr.)
HPER-A 581 Athletic Training Principles for the Spine (3 cr.)
HPER-A 587 Athletic Training Principles for Upper Extremities (3 cr.)
HPER-A 603 Practicum in Athletic Training (2 cr.)

Spring A
HPER-T 591 Interpretation of Data in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)
HPER-A 610 Research Seminar in Athletic Training I (2 cr.)
HPER-A 590 Athletic Training Principles for Lower Extremities (3 cr.)
Elective (3 cr.)
HPER-A 603 Practicum in Athletic Training (2 cr.)

Fall B
HPER-A 611 Research Seminar in Athletic Training II (2 cr.)
HPER-A 585 Rehabilitation and Conditioning of Athletes (3 cr.)
HPER-A 603 Practicum in Athletic Training (2 cr.)
HPER-K 602 Independent Study and Research (3 cr.)
  or HPER-K600 Master’s Thesis (3 cr.)

Spring B
HPER-A 611 Research Seminar in Athletic Training II (2 cr.)
HPER-A 584 Administration of Athletic Training (3 cr.)
HPER-A 582 Current Topics in Athletic Training (3 cr.)
HPER-A 603 Practicum in Athletic Training (2 cr.)
HPER-K 602 Independent Study and Research (2 cr.)
or HPER-K600 Master’s Thesis (2 cr.)

Summer
HPER-A 588 Anatomical Basis of Athletic Injuries (3 cr.)

Biomechanics

A minimum of 35 credit hours is required for this program, and a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) is required for graduation. A minimum grade of C– is required in each course. All electives for completing the degree must be approved by the advisor.

Required courses:
HPER-T 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)
HPER-T 591 Interpretation of Data in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)
HPER-K 530 Mechanical Analysis of Human Performance (3 cr.)
HPER-K 535 Physiological Basis of Human Performance (3 cr.)
Select one of the following courses: HPER-K 541 Nature and Basis of Motor Skill (3 cr.)
HPER-K 542 Neuromuscular Control of Movement (3 cr.)
HPER-K 543 Cortical Control of Human Movement (3 cr.)

Select 9 credits from the following courses:
HPER-K 531 Measurement and Analysis of Physiological Signals – EMG
(3 cr.)
HPER-K 532 Clinical Biomechanics – Gait (3 cr.)
HPER-K 630 Biomechanics of Human Performance (3 cr.)
HPER-K 631 Quantitative Mechanical Analysis of Human Motion (3 cr.)
HPER-K 601 Readings in Physical Education (1 cr.)
HPER-K 602 Independent Study and Research (2 cr.)

Select remaining electives to reach the required minimum 35 credits from the following:
HPER-K 705 Experimental Laboratory Techniques: 3D Filming (3 cr.)
HPER-K 600 Master’s Thesis (credits arranged)
HPER-K 541 Nature and Basis of Motor Skill (3 cr.)
HPER-K 542 Neuromuscular Control of Movement (3 cr.)
HPER-K 543 Cortical Control of Human Movement (3 cr.)
HPER-K 641 Topics in Motor Integration (3 cr.)
HPER-K 690 Seminar in Human Performance (3 cr.)
HPER-K 636 Cardiopulmonary Assessment Lab (3 cr.)
HPER-K 533 Advanced Theories of High Level Performance (3 cr.)
HPER-K 650 Rehabilitation of Persons with Disabilities (3 cr.)
HPER-K 524 Exercise and Physical Activity for People with Disabilities (3 cr.)
HPER-K 598 Ergonomics (3 cr.)
HPER-K 599 Cognitive Ergonomics (3 cr.)
HPER-T 592 Statistical Techniques of Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation (3 cr.)
HPER-T 691 Multivariate Statistical Analysis (3 cr.)
HPER-T 693 Experimental Analysis and Design (3 cr.)
CSCI-A 592 Introduction to Software Systems (3 cr.)
CSCI-A 593 Computer Structures (3 cr.)
CSCI-A 594 Data Structures (3 cr.)
CSCI-A 597 Introduction to Programming I (3 cr.)

Ergonomics

A minimum of 38 credit hours is required for this program, and a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) is required for graduation. A minimum grade of C– is required in each course. All electives for completing the degree must be approved by the advisor.

Required Courses:
HPER-K 598 Ergonomics (3 cr.)
HPER-K 599 Cognitive Ergonomics (3 cr.)

Cognate Area (6 credits)
Select one sub discipline and two courses from this sub discipline to form a cognate area. Course work in this area must be selected in consultation with the student’s major professor.

Motor Control
HPER-K 541 Nature and Basis of Motor Skill (3 cr.)
HPER-K 542 Neuromuscular Control of Movement (3 cr.)
HPER-K 543 Cortical Control of Human Movement (3 cr.)
HPER-K 594 Human Error (3 cr.)

Biomechanics
HPER-K 530 Mechanical Analysis of Human Performance (3 cr.)
HPER-K 531 Measurement and Analysis of Physiological Signals-EMG (3 cr.)
HPER-K 532 Clinical Biomechanics – Gait (3 cr.)
HPER-K 630 Biomechanics of Human Performance (3 cr.)

Exercise Physiology
HPER-K 500 Special Topics in Kinesiology: Topic: Physical Activity and Health (3 cr.)
HPER-K 500 Special Topics in Kinesiology: Topic: Administration of Fitness Programs (3 cr.)
HPER-K 535 Physiological Basis of Human Performance (3 cr.)
HPER-K 560 Exercise in Corporate Fitness and Wellness (3 cr.)
HPER-K 562 Exercise Prescription in Health and Disease I (3 cr.)

Safety Management
HPER-S 510 Organization and Administration of Safety Management Programs (3 cr.)
HPER-S 552 Principles and Concepts of Workplace Safety Behavior (3 cr.)
HPER-S 617 Seminar in Safety Education: OSHA General Industry Standards (3 cr.)

Required research competency courses (9 credits):
Select one of the following courses:
HPER-T 591 Interpretation of Data in Health, Kinesiology and Recreation (3 cr.)
HPER-K 597 Assessment in Ergonomics (3 cr.)

Required Courses:
HPER-K 690 Seminar in Human Performance (Ergonomics) (3 cr.)
HPER-K 602 Independent Study and Research (3 cr.)

Required Internship:
HPER-K 607 Internship in Ergonomics (8 cr.)

Electives (9 credits):
Select three courses from the recommended electives, or the subdisciplines above, to develop an individualized area of concentration. Course work in this area must be selected in consultation with the student’s major professor.

HPER-K 524 Exercise in Physical Activity for People with Disabilities (3 cr.)
HPER-K 527 Adherence to Physical Activity (3 cr.)
HPER-K 537 Advanced physiology of Exercise (3 cr.)
HPER-K 589 Introduction to CAD in Ergonomics (3 cr.)
HPER-K 590 Advanced Technology in Ergonomic Analysis (3 cr.)
HPER-K 591 Participatory Ergonomics (3 cr.)
HPER-K 592 Macro-Ergonomics: Sociotechnological Systems Design (3 cr.)
HPER-K 593 Physical Ergonomics (3 cr.)
HPER-K 595 Work Design (3 cr.)
HPER-K 596 Industrial Design and Ergonomics (3 cr.)
HPER-C 510 Organization and Administration of Public Health Programs (3 cr.)
HPER-C 589 Models and Theories of Health Behavior (3 cr.)
HPER-H 617 Seminar in Health Education: Health, Technology and Aging
(3 cr.)
COGS-Q 551 Brain and Cognition (3 cr.)
EDUC-R 620 Instructional Task Analysis (3 cr.)
EDUC-Y 604 Multivariate Analysis in Education Research (3 cr.)
FINA-U 604 Special Topics in Studio Art: Computer Modeling (3 cr.)
FINA-S 571 Graduate Sculpture [CAD] (3 cr.)
FINA-S 572 Graduate Sculpture [CAD Applications] (3 cr.)
INFO-I 543 Usability and Evaluation Methods of Interaction Design (3 cr.)
PSY-P 503 Complex Cognitive Processes (3 cr.)
PSY-P 504 Learning and Motivation (3 cr.)
PSY-P 517 Methods in Direct Observation of Behavior (3 cr.)
SLIS-L 503 User Needs and Behavior in Theory and Practice (3 cr.)
SLIS-L 540 Foundations of Information and Architecture (3 cr.)
SLIS-L 542 Introduction of Human Computer Interaction (3 cr.)
SLIS-L 578 User Interface Design of Information Systems (3 cr.)
STAT-S 681 Topics in Applied Statistics: Non Parametric Data (3 cr.)

Exercise Physiology

A minimum of 35 credit hours is required for this program, and a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) is required for graduation. A minimum grade of C– is required in each course. All electives for completing the degree must be approved by the advisor.

Required Core Courses (23 cr.):
HPER-K 530 Mechanical Analysis of Human Performance (3 cr.)
HPER-K 542 Neuromuscular Control of Movement (3 cr.)
HPER-K 635 Cardiovascular & Respiratory Physiology of Exercise (3 cr.)
HPER-K 636 Cardio-Pulmonary Assessment Lab (3 cr.)
HPER-K 638 Biochemical Adaptations to Exercise (3 cr.)
HPER-K 639 Laboratory Techniques for Exercise Biochemistry (2 cr.)
HPER-K 690 Seminar in Human Performance (3 cr.)
HPER-T 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology, & Recreation
(3 cr.)

Select one of the following courses:
HPER-T 591 Interpretation of Data in Health, Kinesiology, & Recreation (3 cr.)
HPER-T 592 Statistical Techniques of Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation (3 cr.)

Eligible Elective Courses required to complete the minimum 35 required credits: Others may be substituted with permission of advisor.
BIOL-L 313 Cell Biology Laboratory (3 cr.)
BIOL-T 567 Cell Physiology (3 cr.)
BIOL-Z 466 Endocrinology (3 cr.)
CHEM-C 341 Organic Chemistry Lectures 1 (3 cr.)
CHEM-C 342 Organic Chemistry Lectures 2 (3 cr.)
CHEM-C 483 Biological Chemistry (3 cr.)
CHEM-C 484 Biomolecules and Catabolism (3 cr.)
CHEM-C 485 Biosynthesis and Physiology (3 cr.)
HPER-K 506 Computer Applications in Kinesiology (3 cr.)
HPER-K 531 Measurements and Analysis of Physiological Signals – EMG
(3 cr.)
HPER-K 533 Advanced Theories in High- Level Performance (3 cr.)
HPER-K 562 Exercise prescription in Health and Disease I (3 cr.)
HPER-K 563 Cardiac Assessment in Exercise Testing (3 cr.)
HPER-K 564 Exercise Prescription in Health and Disease II (3 cr.)
HPER-K 602 Independent Study and Research (3 cr.)
HPER-N 620 Nutrition in Sports (3 cr.)
HPER-K 600 Masters Thesis (3 cr.)
PHSL-P 431 Mammalian Physiology (3 cr.)
PHSL-P 531 Human Physiology 1 (3 cr.)
PHSL-P 532 Human Physiology 2 (1-5 cr.)

Fitness Management

A minimum of 36 credit hours is required for this program for the non-thesis option, and 44 credit hours are required for thesis option. A minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) is required for graduation. A minimum grade of C– is required in each course. All electives for completing the degree must be approved by the advisor.

Core Courses – Twenty-four (24) credit hours required:
HPER–K 500 Special Topics in Kinesiology: Topic: Administration of Fitness Programs (3 cr.)
HPER-R 544 Legal Aspects of Recreation Administration (3 cr.)
HPER-K 527 Adherence to Physical Activity (3 cr.)
HPER-C 589 Models and Theories of Health Behavior (3 cr.)
HPER-K 615 Financial Analysis in Sport (3 cr.)
or HPER-T 594 Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)
HPER-K 553 Physical Activity and Health (3 cr.)
HPER-K 524 Exercise and Physical Activity for People with Disabilities (3 cr.)
HPER-K 554 Seminar in Physical Activity and Wellness (3 cr.)

Program Concentrations
Choose one of the following program concentrations must be chosen in consultation with the student’s major advisor:

A. Physical Activity, Fitness and Wellness Specialist Track—Twelve (12) credit hours:
HPER-K 535 Physiological Basis of Human Performance (3 cr.)
HPER-K 560 Exercise in Corporate Fitness and Wellness (3 cr.)
HPER-K 525 Psychological Foundations of Exercise and Sport (3 cr.)
HPER-K 599 Cognitive Ergonomics (3 cr.)
HPER-K 625 Physical Activity and Mental Health (3 cr.)
HPER-K 598 Ergonomics (3 cr.)
HPER-T 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology and Recreation
(3 cr.)
HPER-C 535 Contemporary Issues in Aging and Health (3 cr.)
HPER-H 617 Seminar in Health Education: Topic: Health, Technology, and Aging (3 cr.)
HPER-H 594 Health Program Evaluation (3 cr.)

B. Physical Activity, Fitness andWellness Management Track—Twelve (12) credit hours
HPER-K 614 Sport Sponsorship and Retention (3 cr.)
HPER-K 514 Sport Marketing and Sponsorship (3 cr.)
HPER-K 516 The Sport Industry (3 cr.)
HPER-R 565 Leisure and Aging (3 cr.)
HPER-R 570 Recreational Sport Administration (3 cr.)
or HPER-K 510 Administrative Theory of Competitive Sports Programs (3 cr.)
HPER-K 580 Sport Communication (3 cr.)
HPER-K 581 Sales and Service Management in Sport (3 cr.)
HPER-T 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology and Recreation
(3 cr.)

C. Physical Activity and Public Health Track—Twelve (12) credit hours
HPER-C 510 Organization and Administration of Public Health Programs (3 cr.)
HPER-C 501 Assessment and Planning in Public Health (3 cr.)
HPER-T 591 Interpretation of Data in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)
HPER-C 611 Epidemiology (3 cr.)

Nonthesis option:
As a final requirement for the degree, students in the nonthesis option must pass a comprehensive examination following completion of course requirements.

Thesis option:
If the thesis option is desired, the following materials must be submitted by the end of the second semester of full-time enrollment for consideration of admittance:

A formal letter from the student stating research interests and justification for admittance into the thesis option.

Written verification that a tenure line faculty member in the fitness management emphasis area will serve as major advisor for the project.

Students admitted to the thesis option must complete the following courses as a part of the degree program:
HPER-T 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology and Recreation
(3 cr.)
HPER-T 591 Interpretation of Data in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)
HPER-K 600 Master’s Thesis (5 cr.)

Admission Competencies: Students must meet the following competency requirements by showing the following coursework or equivalents prior to entering the program:
HPER-P 205 Structural Kinesiology (3 cr.) or ANAT-A 215 Basic Human Anatomy (5 cr.)
PHSL-P 215 Basic Human Physiology (5 cr.)
HPER-P 409 Basic Physiology of Exercise (3 cr.)
HPER-P 419 Fitness Testing and Interpretation (3 cr.)
HPER-P 420 Exercise Leadership and Program Design for Apparently Healthy and Special Populations.

A student must also possess current certification as health/fitness instructor or equivalent from one of the following agencies: American College of Sports Medicine; American Council on Exercise; National Strength and Conditioning Association; or National Academy of Sports Medicine.

Students will not be admitted without evidence that the admission competencies have been met.

Motor Learning/Control

A minimum of 35 credit hours is required for this program, and a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) is required for graduation. A minimum grade of C– is required in each course. All electives for completing the degree must be approved by the advisor.

Required courses (21 cr.):
HPER-T 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)
HPER-T 592 Statistical Techniques of Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation (3 cr.)
HPER-K 530 Mechanical Analysis of Human Performance (3 cr.)
HPER-K 535 Physiological Basis of Human Performance (3 cr.)
HPER-K 542 Neuromuscular Control Movement (3 cr.)
HPER-K 543 Cortical Control Movement (3 cr.)
HPER-K 600 Master’s Thesis (3 cr.)

Recommended Electives:
HPER-K 641 Topics in Motor Integration (3 cr.)
HPER-K 690 Seminar Human Performance (3 cr.)
HPER-K 702 Research in Human Performance (3 cr.)
HPER-K 630 Biomechanics of Human Performance (3 cr.)
HPER-K 525 Psychological Foundations of Exercise and Sport (3 cr.)
HPER-K 601 Readings in Physical Education (ARR)
PSY-P 503 Complex Cognitive Processes (3 cr.)
PSY-P 504 Learning and Motivation (3 cr.) COGS-Q 500 Intro to Cognitive Science (3 cr.)
COGS-Z 551 The Brain and Cognition (3 cr.)
MED-M 555 Medical Neuroscience (3 cr.)
NEUS-N 500 Neural Science I (4 cr.)
NEUS-N 501 Neural Science II (4 cr.)
Additional electives may be selected with approval of advisor.

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Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies Options

Listed below are the courses required within each of the respective options. Prerequisite courses may be prescribed for students lacking sufficient background for graduate-level study in their chosen options.

Outdoor Recreation

A minimum of 35 credit hours is required for this program, and a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) is required for graduation. A minimum grade of C– is required in each course. All electives for completing the degree must be approved by the advisor.

Foundation courses (12 cr.)
HPER-R 500 Philosophy of Leisure and Recreation (3 cr.)
HPER-R 520 Organizational Leadership for Leisure Service (3 cr.)
HPER-T 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)
HPER-T 591 Interpretation of Data in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)

Select one of the following two courses (2-5 cr.)
HPER-R 539 Master’s Project in Administration (2-4 cr.)
HPER-R 599 Master’s Thesis (5 cr.)

Specialization courses (18 cr.)
Studentsmust complete aminimum of 18 hours of specialization courses. A total of 12 hours must be taken within the Recreation Department. Choose fromone of the four specialization areas: (1) Outdoor Interpretation, (2) ResourceManagement, (3) Outdoor Leadership, (4) Outdoor Recreation. Course selectionmust be approved by graduate advisor.

Recreation Administration

A minimum of 35 credit hours is required for this program, and a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) is required for graduation. A minimum grade of C– is required in each course. All electives for completing the degree must be approved by the advisor.

Required courses (18 cr.):
HPER-R 500 Philosophy of Leisure and Recreation (3 cr.)
HPER-R 520 Organizational Leadership for Leisure Service (3 cr.)
HPER-R 525 Administrative Theory and Management Practices in Leisure Services (3 cr.)
HPER-R 544 Legal Aspects of Recreation Administration (3 cr.)
HPER-T 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)
HPER-T 591 Interpretation of Data in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)

Select one of the following courses:
HPER-R 539 Master’s Project in Administration (3-4 cr.)
HPER-R 599 Master’s Thesis (5 cr.)

Required emphasis courses (9 cr.)
HPER-R 522 Economics and Marketing for Leisure and Tourism (3 cr.)
HPER-R 530 Comprehensive Recreation Planning/Park Design (3 cr.)
HPER-T 594 Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)

Recommended electives (3-5 cr.) Selected with approval of advisor
HPER-R 524 Fundraising in Public and Nonprofit Agencies (3 cr.)
HPER-R 580 Tourism Planning and Management in Recreation, Park, and Nonprofit Agencies (3 cr.)
HPER-R 640 Independent Study and Research (3 cr.)
HPER-R 641 Readings in Recreation (3 cr.)
HPER-R 642 Internship in Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies (2-8 cr.)
HPER-R 643 Practicum in Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies (cr. arr.)
Others: see Advisor

Pre-requisites (If required)
HPER-R 391 Graduate Prerequisite in Recreation and Park Administration
(3 cr.)
HPER-R 466 Management of Leisure Services (3 cr.)
HPER-R 471 Human Resource Management in Leisure Services (3 cr.)

Recreational Sports Administration

A minimum of 35 credit hours is required for this program, and a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) is required for graduation. A minimum grade of C– is required in each course. All electives for completing the degree must be approved by the advisor.

Required courses (21 cr.):
HPER-R 500 Philosophy of Leisure and Recreation (3 cr.)
HPER-R 520 Organizational Leadership for Leisure Services (3 cr.)
HPER-R 525 Administrative Theory and Management Practices in Leisure Services (3 cr.)
HPER-R 544 Legal Aspects of Recreation Administration (3 cr.)
HPER-T 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)
HPER-T 591 Interpretation of Data in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)
HPER-T 594 Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)

Select one of the following courses:
HPER-R 539 Master’s Project in Administration (3-4 cr.)
HPER-R 599 Master’s Thesis (5 cr.)

Required emphasis courses (9 cr.)
HPER-R 570 Recreational Sports Administration (3 cr.)
HPER-R 571 Dynamics of Recreational Sport Environment (3 cr.)
HPER-R 572 Seminar in Recreational Sports (3 cr.)

Recommended electives (3-5 cr.) Selected with approval of advisor
HPER-R 524 Fundraising for Public and Nonprofit Agencies (3 cr.)
HPER-R 522 Economics and Marketing for Leisure and Tourism (3 cr.)
HPER-R 530 Comprehensive Recreation Planning/Park Design (3 cr.)
HPER-R 580 Tourism Planning and Management in Recreation, Park, and Nonprofit Agencies (3 cr.)
HPER-R 640 Independent Study and Research (3 cr.)
HPER-R 641 Readings in Recreation (3 cr.)
HPER-R 642 Internship in Recreation and Park, and Tourism Studies (2-8 cr.)
HPER-R 643 Practicum in Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies (cr. arr.)
Others: see Advisor

Pre-requisites (If required)

HPER-R 206 Recreational Sports Programming (3 cr.)
HPER-R 391 Graduate Prerequisite in Recreation and Park Administration
(3 cr.)
HPER-R 466 Management of Leisure Services (3 cr.)

Therapeutic Recreation

A minimum of 35 credit hours is required for this program, and a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) is required for graduation. A minimum grade of C– is required in each course. All electives for completing the degree must be approved by the advisor.

Foundation courses (12 cr.)
HPER-R 500 Philosophy of Leisure and Recreation (3 cr.)
HPER-R 525 Administration Theory and Management Practices in Leisure Services (3 cr.)
HPER-T 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)
HPER-T 591 Interpretation of Data in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)

Specialization courses (14-17 cr.)
HPER-R 560 Professional Development for Therapeutic Recreation (3 cr.)
HPER-R 561 Advanced Therapeutic Recreation Processes (3 cr.)
HPER-R 562 Social Psychology of Therapeutic Recreation (3 cr.)
HPER-R 563 Program Development and Consultation in Therapeutic Recreation (3 cr.)

Select one of the following courses:
HPER-R 642 Internship in Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies (2-3 cr.)
HPER-R 599 Master’s Thesis (5 cr.)

Note: Students entering the degree program without eligibility for national certification in therapeutic recreation are required to complete an internship that meets requirements for national certification. Students entering the degree program with national certification eligibility or national certification in therapeutic recreation may elect to meet emphasis requirements through either an internship or thesis.

Electives (8-9 cr.) Selected with approval of advisor

Tourism Management

A minimum of 35 credit hours is required for this program, and a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) is required for graduation. A minimum grade of C– is required in each course. All electives for completing the degree must be approved by the advisor.

Required courses (12 cr.):
HPER-R 500 Philosophy of Leisure and Recreation (3 cr.)
HPER-R 520 Organizational Leadership for Leisure Services (3 cr.)
HPER-T 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)
HPER-T 591 Interpretation of Data in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)

Select one of the following courses:
HPER-R 539 Master’s Project in Administration (3-4 cr.)
HPER-R 599 Master’s Thesis (5 cr.)

Emphasis courses: Select 4 courses (12 cr.) from:
HPER-R 580 Tourism Planning and Management in Recreation, Park, and Nonprofit Agencies (3 cr.)
HPER-R 522 Economics and Marketing for Leisure and Tourism (3 cr.)
HPER-R 540 Policy Studies in Outdoor Recreation and Tourism (3 cr.)
HPER-R 526 Cultural Heritage Tourism (3 cr.)
HPER-R 523 Visitor Behavior (3 cr.)

Recommended electives (3-5 cr.) Selected with approval of advisor:
STAT 511 Statistical Methods I (3 cr.)
STAT 512 Applied Regression Analysis (3 cr.)
SOC-S 554 Statistical Techniques in Sociology I (3 cr.)
SOC-S 650 Statistical Techniques in Sociology II (3 cr.)
PSY-P 553 Advanced Statistics in Psychology I (3 cr.)
PSY-P 554 Advanced Statistics in Psychology II (3 cr.)
HPER-R 525 Administrative Theory and Management Practices in Leisure Services (3 cr.)
HPER-T 592 Statistical Techniques of Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation (3 cr.) GEOG-G 500 Research Problems in Geography (4 cr.)
GEOG-G 540 Topics in Environmental Geography (3 cr.)
ANTH-E 663 Exhibiting Cultures (3 cr.)
ANTH-E 600 Gender/Labor Politics—East Asia (3 cr.)
ANTH-A 600 Cultures and Corporations (3 cr.)
ANTH-L 400 Topical Seminar in the
Ethnology of Communication (3 cr.)
ANTH-L 600 Topical Seminar in the Ethnology of Communication (3 cr.)
ANTH-E 500 Pro-seminar in the Ethnology of Communication (3 cr.)
HPER-R 515 Special Concerns in Parks and Recreation (3 cr.)

Others: See advisor.

Prerequisites (If needed)
HPER-R 391 Graduate Prerequisite in Recreation and Park Administration
(3 cr.)
HPER-R 423 Visitor Behavior (3 cr.)
TCEM 461 Tourism Research Planning & Development (3 cr.) at IUPUI or HPER-R 490 Research and Evaluation (3 cr.)
TCEM 472 Global Tourism Seminar (3 cr.) at IUPUI or HPER-R 350 Sustainable Tourism (3 cr.)
TCEM 499 Operational Tourism Analysis (3 cr.) at IUPUI or HPER-R 499 Research in Recreation

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Master of Public Health Degree

Public Health

A minimum of 43 credit hours is required for this program, and a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) is required for graduation. All electives for completing the degree must be approved by the advisor. Prerequisite courses may be prescribed for students lacking sufficient background for graduate study in public health.

Required Courses (29 credits)
HPER-C 589 Models and Theories of Health Behavior (3 cr.)
HPER-C 591 Public Health Statistics (3 cr.)
HPER-C 512 Environmental Health Science (3 cr.)
HPER-C 611 Epidemiology (3 cr.)
HPER-C 510 Organization and Administration of Public Health Programs (3 cr.)
HPER-C 505 Public Health Foundations and Leadership (3 cr.)
HPER-C 501 Assessment and Planning in Public Health (3 cr.)
HPER-H 594 Health Program Evaluation (3 cr.)
HPER-C 644 Field Experience in Public Health (5 cr.) (Prerequisite: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0)

CONCENTRATION COURSEWORK (14 credits)
Select and complete one of the following 14 credit hour concentrations:

Option 1: Public Health Leadership and Practice
HPER-C 529 Health and Disease Disparities in Diverse Communities (3 cr.)
HPER-C 602 Intervention Design in Public Health (3 cr.)
HPER-C 650 M.P.H. Culminating Experience (2 cr.)
Electives (minimum 6 cr.)

Option 2: Public Health Research
HPER-T 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation
(3 cr.)
HPER-C 641 Readings in Public Health (2-3 cr.)
HPER-C 640 Research in Public Health (2-3 cr.)
HPER-H 599 Master’s Thesis (3 cr.)
Electives (minimum 3 cr.)

Elective credit listed in the options above should be chosen from the following:
HPER-C 514 Health Education in Occupational Settings (3 cr.)
HPER-C 515 Health Education in Clinical Settings (3 cr.)
HPER-C 516 Introduction to Health Counseling (3 cr.)
HPER-C 518 The Nature of Addictive Disorders (3 cr.)
HPER-C 640 Research in Public Health (3 cr.)
HPER-C 641 Readings in Public Health (1-3 cr.)
HPER-H 510 Organization of School Health Programs (3 cr.)
HPER-H 525 Computer Applications in Health Education (3 cr.)
HPER-H 530 International Health (3 cr.)
HPER-H 645 Travel Study (1-10 cr.)
HPER-H 695 Acquiring andManaging External Funds for Health and Human Services (3 cr.)
HPER-N 530 Advanced Nutrition I (3 cr.)
EDUC-R 505 Workshop in Microcomputers (3 cr.)
EDUC-R 531 Computers in Education (3 cr.)
EDUC-R 543 Preparation of Inexpensive Instructional Materials (3 cr.)
HPER-C 602 Intervention Design in Public Health (3 cr.)
Other electives may be chosen with approval of advisor (3-6 cr.)

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Director of Recreation Degree

General Information
Program of Studies
Directorate Advisory Committee
Thesis
Internship
Final Examination

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General Information

The director’s degree is an intermediate degree between the master’s degree and the doctorate. It provides professional preparation beyond the master’s degree for those who are interested in supervisory, administrative, or master teaching positions in the field of recreation.

Candidates applying for admission should consider this level of graduate study to be a terminal degree.

Candidates for this degree will pursue a program of studies that places primary emphasis on planning, organizing, and developing programs; managing program finances; dealing with staff and public relations; and/or specializing in specific teaching areas.

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Program of Studies

The program consists of a total of 65 hours of approved graduate credit, including 30 credits beyond the master’s degree, 35 credits in the major field, in addition to the 8 credits of thesis or 6-8 credits of internship; and 9 credits outside of the major department. Students who have not earned their master’s degree at Indiana University may transfer a maximum of 30 approved credit hours from other institutions. Students who have earned a master’s degree at Indiana University may transfer a maximum of 10 approved credit hours from other institutions. A maximum of 10 credit hours earned in ’’independent study’’ courses may be counted for the director’s degree. Specific programs will be planned in conjunction with the Advisory Committee. For a listing of independent study courses, see ’’Restrictions on Independent Study’’ under the ’’Academic Standing’’ heading in this bulletin.

Independent study courses such as readings, independent study, thesis, and practicum credit hours completed at another institution or as part of the master’s program may not be counted toward the director’s degree.

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Directorate Advisory Committee

The student’s advisor (who will serve as chair) and at least one other graduate faculty member will make up the directorate advisory committee. The committee prepares a ’’prescription of courses’’ for the program of studies, writes and evaluates the written comprehensive examination, and supervises the thesis or the internship experience. Information on the eligibility of faculty members to serve on the directorate advisory committee is available in the School of HPER Records Office, HPER 115.

The directorate advisory committee will work with the student to prepare the course prescription. It must be approved by the advisory committee and filed in the HPER Records Office, HPER 115, for approval by the executive associate dean. This official meeting should occur during the first semester of fulltime enrollment. Deficiencies in academic background will be diagnosed by the committee and remedial course work prescribed. In general, such remedial course work cannot be counted as a part of the credit hours required for the degree. Should the advisory committee prescribe requirements for completion of the degree that are not stated in the bulletin, this should be specified in writing as part of the formal course prescription.

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Thesis

The candidate is encouraged to pursue a significant study in the major field. Appropriate scientific tools should be used, and application should be made of relevant principles and procedures. The conclusions and recommendations should reflect the candidate’s grasp of the study and reveal the complexities, depth, and application of the findings of the investigation. Eight (8) credit hours are given for a satisfactory thesis.

Note: Every proposal must contain documentation that clearance has been obtained for the use of human subjects. No thesis or dissertation will be accepted for which such clearance has not been obtained. Forms and procedures for this purpose are available online at www.research.indiana.edu/ rschcomp/hmpg.html.

The format and procedures for writing a director’s thesis are identical to those for the doctoral dissertation, with the following exceptions: (1) extent of the study and (2) number of copies (two) submitted to the School of HPER Records Office, HPER 115. Before formal approval of the proposal by the student’s director’s committee, the student is required to present the proposed research at a public proposal meeting. Information about and applications for the proposal meeting presentation are available in HPER 115. Approval of the director’s thesis committee is required before the public proposal can be scheduled.

The research proposal meeting is open to faculty and students in the university community. During the first portion, the student formally presents the research proposal in an open forum. Committee members and visitors have the opportunity to ask questions. Visitors leave after the formal presentation. The remaining time is determined by the student’s research committee.

After completing all course work, the directorate candidate must enroll each semester for thesis or research credit at the regular fee until graduation. Candidates must be enrolled during the semester (including summer) in which the degree is awarded.

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Internship

The internship lets the candidate work under the direct supervision of an experienced professional, gain practical insights into a major area of concentration, and keep up to date with new tools and techniques used by the profession. Special care is taken to avoid duplicating previous professional experiences, and emphasis is placed on developing and exercising new competencies.

The candidate cannot be employed in a fulltime position during the internship. In all probability, the candidate will be required to establish residence in the city of internship. At least 6 and no more than 8 credit hours are given for satisfactory completion of the internship. The advisor must submit the Internship Agreement Form to HPER 115 after consultation with the student, the additional committee members, and the professional field advisor. Normally, only independent study courses can be taken during the period in which the internship is being conducted. Two copies of the intern experience report are to be submitted to the HPER Records Office, HPER 115. A final oral internship evaluation is conducted by the advisory committee following the completion of the internship.

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Final Examination

Each candidate for the director’s degree is required to pass a three-hour written comprehensive examination in the major area of study. A final oral examination is conducted by the advisory committee following the completion of the written comprehensive examination. If the advisory committee members concur, the final oral internship evaluation may be combined with the final comprehensive oral examination.

The qualifying examination is scheduled to be held twice during the academic year. If all members of the student’s advisory committee are available and if approval is obtained from the executive associate dean, a student may apply to take the qualifying examination during the summer session. A student must file the Application for an Examination with the HPER Records Office, HPER 115, at least one month before the qualifying examination. To be eligible to take the qualifying examination, students must be within one course of completing their prescribed program of study and receive the recommendation of their advisor.With the recommendation of a student’s advisory committee and approval from the executive associate dean, a student who fails the qualifying examination may be allowed to retake the examination once only. All requirements for a directorate must be completed within six calendar years after initial enrollment in course work.

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Doctoral Degrees

About the Program
General Requirements
Doctoral Advisory Committee
Prerequisites
Ph.D. Degree Course Prescription Requirements
Research Skill/Foreign Language Requirement
Major, Minor, and Dissertation Course Work Requirements
Doctoral Minors available through the School of HPER
Qualifying Examinations
Doctoral Qualifying Examination Procedures
Enrollment after the Qualifying Examination
Off-Campus Enrollment
Admission to Candidacy
Dissertation Research Committee
Dissertation
Final Examination
Dissertion Submission and Publication

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About the Program

The school is authorized to qualify candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in health behavior, human performance, and leisure behavior. The Ph.D. degree is offered through the University Graduate School but administered by the School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. This degree provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the field of interest and an intimate knowledge of research methodology.

The Department of Applied Health Science offers the doctoral degree in health behavior. The doctoral degree in leisure behavior is offered by the Department of Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies. The Cooper Graduate Program in Kinesiology offers the doctoral degree in human performance with specialties in adapted physical education, biomechanics, exercise physiology, motor learning/control, and sport management.

Admission to Doctoral Study
See ’’Steps for Admission’’ and ’’Admission—Doctoral Program’’ in this bulletin.

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General Requirements

Procedures and policies for admission, appointment of committees, and related matters are presented in the following sections. (See also “Graduate Academic Regulations’’ in this bulletin.) Students seeking the Ph.D. must be familiar with and meet all the requirements stipulated in the Indiana University Graduate School Bulletin, www.indiana.edu/~bulletin/iu/grad. (Choose “University Graduate School.” See ’’General Requirements for Advanced Degrees’’ and the section entitled ’’Health, Physical Education, and Recreation’’ in the University Graduate School Bulletin.) The chronological progression of steps in the doctoral degree process are:

  • Admission
  • Prescription of course work
  • Completion of course work
  • Qualifying examination
  • Admission to candidacy
  • Formation of research committee
  • Research proposal
  • Completion of dissertation research
  • Defense of dissertation
  • Submission of final dissertation
  • Graduation

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Doctoral Advisory Committee

A member of the graduate faculty, with a departmental endorsement to chair graduate student committees, will be appointed to chair the student’s doctoral advisory committee. After some familiarity has been established with the courses and faculty, the student will nominate two additional graduate faculty members to represent the major and minor areas on the advisory committee. The committee must include at least one member from outside the major department. An Appointment of Advisory Committee Form must be completed and submitted to HPER 115 with signatures of the advisory committee members. Paper copies of this form may be obtained in HPER 115 or downloaded online at www.indiana.edu/~hperwww/academics/forms/index.shtml. Final confirmation of committee representatives is the responsibility of the executive associate dean. Information regarding the eligibility of faculty to serve on the doctoral advisory committee is available in the Records Office, HPER 115.

The doctoral advisory committee will work with the student to prepare a ’’prescription of courses’’ for the program of studies. The prescribed course of studies must be approved by the advisory committee and the executive associate dean no later than the eighth week of the second semester of full-time enrollment. The advisory committee will be responsible for prescribing course work and writing and evaluating qualifying examinations. Requirements for completion of the degree that are not stated in the bulletin must be specified in writing as part of the formal course prescription.

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Prerequisites

Although most applicants for the Ph.D. generally have backgrounds in appropriately related fields, the possession of degrees in these fields is not a prerequisite to admission. It should be recognized, however, that applicants with deficiencies in academic backgrounds will be required to take specific courses as prerequisites (or corequisites) to degree course work. Deficiencies in academic background will be diagnosed by the doctoral advisory committee and remedial course work prescribed. In general, such remedial work cannot be counted toward the credit hours required for the degree.

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Ph.D. Degree Course Prescription Requirements

A formal meeting of the student and the advisory committee will result in completion of a Report of Course Prescription Meeting Form. This form must be approved by the advisory committee and the executive associate dean. Paper copies of this form are available in HPER 115. The form is also available online at www.indiana.edu/~hperwww/academics/forms/index.shtml. The components of a course prescription include research skills, major courses, minor courses, elective courses, and dissertation credits. The following are detailed descriptions of these components.

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Research Skill/Foreign Language Requirement

A candidate for the Ph.D. degree must select one of the following research skill options. A minimum grade of B (3.0) must be obtained in each course used in meeting this requirement. Credits earned in meeting research skill requirements may not be counted in the total of 90 credits required in the major, minor, and elective course components of the course prescription.

Option I
Appropriate research skill courses such as those described below for a total of at least 9 credit hours.

  1. Advanced statistics courses, typically HPER-T 592, HPER-T 691, and HPER-T 693.
  2. Engineering (mandatory for biomechanics): one course in each of statics, dynamics, and mechanics of materials. These courses should have the content of standard theoretical courses in engineering. Acceptance of equivalent courses requires support of the student's advisor and approval of the associate dean for graduate studies.
  3. Other appropriate research skills that have been endorsed by the doctoral advisory committee and approved by the associate dean for graduate studies. Some examples of other appropriate skill areas are computer science, mathematics, and electronic techniques in physics.

Option II
Reading proficiency in the selected foreign language and at least 5 credit hours from the research skill courses described below. Demonstration of reading proficiency is described in Option III.

  1. Advanced statistics courses (6 credits). Students typically select two courses from among HPER-T 592, HPER-T 691, and HPER-T 693.
  2. Other appropriate research skills that have been endorsed by the doctoral advisory committee and approved by the associate dean for graduate studies. Some examples of other appropriate skill areas are computer science, mathematics, and electronic techniques in physics.
Option III
Demonstrate reading proficiency in two languages or proficiency in depth (test or two courses) of one foreign language selected from French, German, or Russian. Permission may be sought to substitute another language for this requirement. International students will not be permitted to use their native languages in meeting this requirement. Such students may, however, elect to present English proficiency as the foreign language, which requires a minimum TOEFL score of 550 on the paper-based test, or 213 on the computer-based test, or a 79-80 on the Internet-based test. In addition, verification in English proficiency must be obtained from the Indiana University Center for English Language Training, Memorial Hall 330, (812) 855-6457. A special form requesting this action must be obtained from the Records Office, HPER 115.

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Major, Minor, and Dissertation Course Work Requirements

Requirements totaling a minimum of 90 credits beyond the bachelor’s degree are to be distributed as follows:

  • Major area requires a minimum of 30 credit hours in the major department.
  • Minor area requires 12 to 15 credit hours in a cognate field outside the major department.
  • Dissertation requires 20 to 30 credit hours.
  • Elective credit hours may range between 0 and 25. An optional second minor may be included in the elective credit hours. Courses used for the second minor may be within or outside the major department.
  • Total, 90 credits.
Course Prescription Stipulations:
  • Courses used to satisfy research skills and languages are not counted in the 90 required total credit hours of major, minor and elective courses.
  • Courses used to satisfy the 90 required graduate credit hours and the research skills and language requirement may not have been completed more than seven years before the date on which the student takes the qualifying examination. The graduate advisor, after consultation with the advisory committee, may recommend to the executive associate dean that a maximum of 15 credit hours of course work taken before the seven-year time limit is revalidated if it can be demonstrated that the knowledge contained in the course(s) remains current. Currency of knowledge may be demonstrated by such accomplishments as (a) passing an examination specifically on the material covered by the course; (b) passing a more advanced course in the same subject area; (c) passing a comprehensive examination in which the student demonstrates substantial knowledge of the content of the course; (d) teaching a comparable course; or (e) publishing scholarly research demonstrating fundamental principles of the course. Each course for which consideration for revalidation is being requested should be justified separately.
  • A minimum of 15 of the 90 required graduate credit hours must be completed outside the student’s major department. This excludes courses taken to complete the research skills and languages requirement.
  • All Ph.D. students must complete HPER-T 590 and HPER-T 591, or their equivalents, as prerequisites to the major work. Credit hours earned in HPER-T 590 do not count toward the major or minor, but may be counted in the elective portion the 90 required credit hours. HPER-T 591 or its equivalent does not count toward the research skill requirement or the 90 total credit hours required for the degree. It should not be listed on the doctoral course prescription.
  • A maximum of 15 credit hours of independent study, readings, and research courses are allowed.
  • Independent courses such as readings, independent study, thesis, and practicum credit hours completed at another institution, or as part of the master’s program, may not be a part of the doctoral course prescription.
  • Frequent involvement in research projects (with or without academic credit) is an essential element of the program.
  • Deficiencies in course work must be made up during the first year.
  • The major consists of appropriate course work prescribed by the doctoral advisory committee.
  • A student registered in a doctoral program must satisfactorily complete all course work and the qualifying examination within five years of the initial registration.
  • The pattern of distribution of the total number of minor credit hours is flexible; however, provision must be made for at least one minor outside the department in which the degree is being earned.
  • Elective or minor course work must clearly support the development of research competency in the major field.

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Doctoral Minors available through the School of HPER

Applied Health Science Options for Doctoral Minor
The courses required for the applied health science doctoral minor options are as follows:

Addictive Behaviors
HPER-C 516, HPER‑C 518, HPER-C 589; an additional 6 credits in consultation with an advisor.

Gerontology
HPER-H 524/EDUC-P 513, HPER-C 535, HPER-C 615/HPER-K 500, HPER–R 565, HPER-R 566; EDUC-P 517, EDUC-P 518.

Health Promotion
HPER-C 589, HPER-H 500; 9 additional credits in consultation with an advisor.

Human Development and Family Studies
HPER-H 654. Select 12 credits from HPER-F 517, HPER-F 531, HPER-F 532, HPER-F 533, HPER-F 541, HPER-F 543, HPER-F 546, HPER-F 557, HPER-F 558, HPER-F 559, HPER-F 560, HPER-F 640, HPER-F 641, and HPER-F 656
in consultation with an advisor.

Human Sexuality Education
HPER-C 589, HPER-H 515, HPER-H 540, HPER-H 555; 3 additional credits in consultation with an advisor.

Nutrition Science
HPER-N 530, HPER-N 532, HPER-N 640, CHEM-C 483 or CHEM-C 484 or MCHE-C 580; select one course from HPER-N 520, HPER-N 531, HPER-N 536, HPER-N 600, HPER-N 601, HPER-N 620, and HPER-N 641 in consultation with an advisor.

Public Health
HPER-C 501, HPER-C 589, HPER-C 611, HPER-H 500; select one course from HPER-C 510, HPER-C 514, HPER-C 515, HPER-C 516, HPER-C 518, HPER-C 640, C HPER-641, HPER-H 530 in consultation with an advisor.

Safety Management
HPER-C 589; an additional 12 credits in consultation with an advisor.

School and College Health Programs
HPER-C 589, HPER-H 500 or HPER-H 502, HPER-H 510, HPER-H 623, HPER-H 635.

Kinesiology Options for Doctoral Minor Courses required for a doctoral minor in kinesiology are individually determined through consultation with a faculty advisor.

Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies Options for Doctoral Minor
Courses required for the doctoral minor in experiential education are listed below. Courses required for additional minors in recreation, park, and tourism studies are individually determined through consultation with a faculty advisor.

Experiential Education
15 credits are required for this minor. Specific courses are to be determined in consultation with a faculty advisor. School of HPER courses eligible for selection are HPER-R 504, HPER-R 511, HPER-R 512, HPER-H 513, HPER-R 543, HPER-R 544, HPER-R 564, and HPER-R515 with the topic Theoretical Foundations of Adventure/Experiential Education. Students may also elect to include one of the following School of Education courses: EDUC-P 540, EDUC-P 545, EDUC-G 532, EDUC-G 573, EDUC-G 575..

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Qualifying Examinations

To become a candidate for the Ph.D. degree, and to proceed with the dissertation research project, students must pass a comprehensive qualifying examination and submit a Nomination to Candidacy Form to the School of HPER Records Office. The qualifying examination covers the fundamentals of the fields in which specialization has been elected. The examination will not be limited to the subject matter of the courses taken. The examination consists of a written portion and an oral portion. The doctoral qualifying examination is scheduled during the first and second semesters. If all members of the student’s advisory committee are available, and if approval is obtained from the executive associate dean, a student may apply to take the qualifying examinations during the summer session. Important note: The date on which a student’s Ph.D. degree is awarded must be at least eight months after the passing date of the qualifying examination.

Doctoral Qualifying Examination Procedures

  1. A student must submit the Application for Doctoral Qualifying Examination Form to the chair of the student’s advisory committee at least four weeks before the stated examination date.
  2. The completed Application for Doctoral Qualifying Examination Form, including the signatures of each member of the student’s advisory committee, must be submitted to the School of HPER Dean’s Office, in HPER 115, at least three weeks before the stated date of the examination. Paper copies of this form are available in HPER 115. The form is also available online at www.indiana.edu/~hperwww/academics/forms/index.shtml.
  3. The graduate recorder determines eligibility of the applicant to sit for the examination. A student must have completed the required research skill courses, and be within one course of completing the 90 credit (major, minor, and elective) portion of the course prescription, to sit for the examination. Note: If a student passes the qualifying examination with one outstanding incomplete course, this course must be completed before submission of the Nomination to Candidacy Form.
  4. Each member of the advisory committee is informed, by letter and email, of the scheduled examination.
  5. Advisory committee members submit questions to the committee chair.
  6. The committee chair submits a properly formatted examination to the School of HPER Dean’s Office at least one week before the examination date.
  7. The written portion of the qualifying examination takes place.
  8. The student’s questions and resulting answers are forwarded to the committee members by email and one hard copy is maintained in the School of HPER Dean’s office.
  9. The oral portion of the qualifying examination must take place within a month following the written examination. Permission to exceed a month between the written and oral portions of the examination must be obtained from the executive associate dean. The oral portion of the examination may not be scheduled during recess periods.
  10. If a student passes the qualifying examination, a notification letter will be sent to the student with a Nomination to Candidacy Form.
  11. In the event of a failure of the qualifying examination, a letter will be sent notifying the student of the failure and the opportunity for one more attempt to pass the examination.
  12. In the event of a second failure, the student will be notified of formal dismissal from the doctoral program. No future registrations will be permitted through the School of HPER.

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Enrollment after the Qualifying Examination

After passing the qualifying examinations, a doctoral candidate must enroll each semester for dissertation or research credit at the regular fee until graduation. If the required number of dissertation credits is reached before the dissertation is completed, the candidate must continue to enroll for dissertation or research credits or HPER-G 901 (a 6 credit hour course with a flat $150 fee). Enrollment during summer sessions is not required unless the degree is to be awarded during a summer session. Candidates must be enrolled during the semester (including summer) during which the degree is awarded. Note: (1) HPER-G 901 is not offered during the summer sessions and (2) registration in HPER-G 901 is restricted to six semesters.

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Off-Campus Enrollment

Doctoral candidates who are off campus and wish to enroll must contact the graduate recorder in the Records Office, HPER 115, for registration authorization. Students will be billed by the bursar for the appropriate tuition and fees.

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Admission to Candidacy

It is the student’s responsibility to submit a completed Nomination to Candidacy for the Ph.D. Degree Form to the HPER Records Office in HPER 115 after (a) completing the research skill requirement, (b) completing all prescribed course work, and (c) passing the qualifying examination. Paper copies of this form are available in HPER 115. The form is also available online at www.indiana.edu/~hperwww/academics/forms/index.shtml. The Nomination to Candidacy for the Ph.D. Degree Form requires the signatures of the members of the student’s advisory committee and signifies their last act before disbanding. The completed form requires associate dean approval in the School of HPER and in the University Graduate School. The School of HPER executive associate dean shall notify the student and the doctoral committee of admission to candidacy, after which the student will generally be registered for dissertation research hours only.

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Dissertation Research Committee

Upon successful completion of the qualifying examination, and admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree, the responsibilities of the advisory committee have been discharged, and that committee is technically disbanded. A new committee—the research committee— must be appointed for the purpose of guiding the candidate’s dissertation research. In most instances the membership of the research committee is very similar, if not identical, to that of the advisory committee. However, the actual makeup of the committee will be determined by the nature of the research to be pursued and the interests and qualifications of faculty.

Membership on the research committee requires formal nomination and appointment procedures. The Ph.D. research committee must have at least four members. All members must have graduate faculty status. The committee chair and at least one other member must be departmentally endorsed to chair graduate student committees. All dissertation research committees must include at least one member from outside the major department. Information regarding the eligibility of faculty to serve on the dissertation research committee is available in the Records Office HPER 115.

It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that the following items are submitted to the HPER Records Office in HPER 115, for associate dean approval in the School of HPER and in the University Graduate School.

  • Completed Nomination of Research Committee for the Ph.D. Form. (Paper copies of this form are available in HPER 115. The form is also available online at www.indiana.edu/~hperwww/academics/forms/index.shtml.)
  • One or two page prospectus of the dissertation research
  • If the proposed research involves human subjects, animals, biohazards, or radiation, approval from the appropriate university committee must also be obtained. It is most common for School of HPER students to submit an approved Human Subjects Form.
Important Note: A Ph.D. candidate may not defend the dissertation until at least six months have passed following University Graduate School approval of the items listed above.

It is expected that all doctoral candidates conduct their dissertation research under the direct supervision of a faculty member in the major department. Under certain circumstances it may be desirable to deviate from this policy. Within very strict limitations, and only with special permission, it may be possible to arrange for a specially qualified faculty member of another department to supervise the dissertation as either director of research or as co-chairperson of the research committee. In every case, however, the chairperson, or the co-chair, of the dissertation research committee must be in the major department.

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Dissertation

Each candidate must present a satisfactory dissertation in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the doctoral degree. The dissertation permits the candidate to demonstrate creative ability in identifying and treating a significant problem; to collect, analyze, and interpret meaningful data by appropriate research methods; to make valid generalizations based on the findings; and to present the study in acceptable written form. The dissertation should be designed and carried out so as to make a positive contribution to the knowledge base of the profession. Completion of a dissertation normally requires at least one year of concentrated effort.

Dissertation Proposal
Ph.D. candidates present a research proposal during a meeting, open to faculty and students in the university community. Dissertation proposal materials are submitted to the chair of the candidate’s research committee within a sufficient time frame prior to the proposal meeting to permit a thorough review.Materials include an introduction to the study, a review of literature, and a description of research procedures to be used. A one-page abstract, formatted according to specified guidelines, and signed by the chair of the research committee, must be submitted to the executive associate dean a minimum of two weeks prior to the date of the proposed meeting.

During the first portion of the meeting, the student formally presents the research proposal in an open forum. Committee members and visitors have the opportunity to ask questions.

Visitors leave after the formal presentation. How the remaining time is used is determined by the student’s research committee.

Note: Every proposal must contain documentation that clearance has been obtained for the use of human subjects. No dissertation will be accepted for which such clearance has not been obtained. Forms and procedures for this purpose are available online at www.research.indiana.edu/rschcomp/hmpg.html.

It is suggested that at the time of the proposal meeting, publication expectations of the research (including such factors as publication timelines, coauthorship, ordering of names in publication) be formulated and submitted to the candidate’s file. Candidates should be aware that some faculty members may require this form. Guidelines and forms for this agreement are available in the Records Office, HPER 115.

Dissertation Completion
After approval by the committee, the research is conducted under the supervision of the dissertation director. The acceptability of the completed dissertation is first passed by the chair and then by the doctoral committee at a formal meeting.

The dissertation must be completed within seven years after the successful completion of the qualifying examinations. Failure to meet this requirement will result in the termination of candidacy and of the student’s enrollment in the degree program. To be reinstated to candidacy, the student must (a) apply for reinstatement and (b) retake and pass the qualifying examination or its equivalent (defined by the doctoral research committee in advance). A recommendation for reinstatement to candidacy must come from the chair of the doctoral research committee and receive final approval by the executive associate dean. Progress toward dissertation completion will be a factor in granting permission to continue. Such reinstatement, if granted, will be valid for a period of three years.

After the completed dissertation has been approved by the chair, it will be typed in accordance with established regulations. At least four weeks before the final examination, a copy of the completed dissertation must be presented to each committee member. Each copy of the dissertation must be accompanied by an acceptance page, a 350-word abstract, and a vita sheet. An additional 350-word abstract, an additional title page, and a onepage announcement of the dissertation defense must also be submitted to the chair.

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Final Examination

The final oral examination in defense of the dissertation is a public meeting conducted by the candidate’s committee. An application, along with an approved abstract, for the final examination must be filed at least five weeks before the scheduled date of the exam. Failure to meet this deadline will delay the scheduling of the final defense. Formal announcement of the examination (which includes the abstract), with the approval of the committee chair, will be circulated to faculty and students of the school. For Ph.D. candidates, the announcement (including the abstract) will also be forwarded to the University Graduate School for distribution to all graduate faculty. It is the candidate’s responsibility to secure the application form from the Records Office, HPER 115, and ensure that it is filed at the appropriate time.

A minimum of four working weeks must be allowed for the committee to examine the dissertation before its final defense.

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Dissertation Submission and Publication

After the final examination in defense of the dissertation has been passed and the dissertation has been approved, Ph.D. degree candidates must submit the dissertation online at dissertations.umi.com/indiana/. Students must follow the directions at this Web site to submit dissertations properly.

  • The online dissertation submission form asks students to identify their departments. The ”School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation” should be selected in that field on the form.
  • Next, the form asks for a student’s main subject category. School of HPER majors are not listed; select the “Health Sciences—General” subject category.
  • Finally, in the field for additional subject categories, enter your major: health behavior, or human performance, or leisure behavior.

The online dissertation submissionWeb site contains complete instructions. However, if a problem is encountered, contact the University Graduate School at (812) 855-1117. Candidates for the Ph.D. must follow the guidelines and procedures for completing the dissertation, as outlined in the University Graduate School Bulletin. These guidelines and procedures are available at www.graduate.indiana.edu/preparing-theses-and-dissertations.php.

In addition to completion of the online dissertation submission process, a Permission to Publish Form must be obtained from and submitted to HPER 115. This form allows the Microform Publication Division at the University of Oregon to access the dissertation online. The University of Oregon provides the service of copying theses and dissertations in microfiche form and storing them for universities with schools and departments such as the Indiana University School of HPER. This service is separate from the Proquest microfilm and copyright process.

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