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2005-2008 Graduate Studies Northwest Campus Bulletin: Table of Contents

2005-2008 Graduate Studies Northwest Campus Bulletin: Graduate Course Descriptions

 

 

Indiana University
Northwest 2005-2008
Graduate Studies Bulletin

IU Northwest
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Indiana University Northwest 
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Division of Social Work

Web site:
www.iun.edu/~socialwk

Telephone:
(219) 980-7111

Administrative Officers
Faculty
Master of Social Work
General Information
Mission
Policy on Nondiscrimination
Educational Requirements
Academic Regulations and Policies
Advanced Standing Program Requirements
Transfer Students
Application Review Considerations
Master of Social Work Curriculum
Concentration
Phi Alpha
Code of Ethics
Master of Social Work Degree Requirements

Administrative Officers

Michael Patchner, Ph.D., Dean
Denise Travis, Ph.D., Director, Division of Social Work

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Faculty

Frank Caucci, Ph.D., M.S.W., Associate Professor of Social Work
Christopher Cotten, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Social Work
Deanna McDonald, M.S.W., Clinical Assistant Professor of Social Work and Director of Field Instruction
Manoj Pardasani, Ph.D., LCSW, Assistant Professor of Social Work
Mark Thomas, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Social Work
Denise Travis, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Social Work

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Master of Social Work

In recognition of the time and geographic constraints of many students who seek professional social work education, the Indiana University School of Social Work offers six programs of study leading to the 60 credit hour M.S.W. degree. The Indianapolis campus offers a two-year full time program, a three-year part-time weekday program, a three-year part-time evening program, a three-year part-time Saturday program, and an Advanced Standing Program. (The Advanced Standing Program is designed for students with a strong academic record who have earned a Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.) degree from a program accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.) Students must complete their M.S.W. within five years of their B.S.W. graduation. Indiana University South Bend offers a three-year part-time evening program. Indiana University Northwest offers a three-year part-time program. The school offers a three-year part-time program at IPFW (Fort Wayne) administered by the main campus at IUPUI.

The general goal of the program is preparation for advanced social work practice. In addition to generalist knowledge and skills, the programs provide an opportunity for development of special competence in child welfare, families, health, leadership, and mental health and addictions. Educational resources for students in the program include a substantial library, an audiovisual center, student computer modules, and diversified field instruction settings throughout the state.

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General Information

The Division of Social Work is a collaborative effort of the Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis School of Social Work and Indiana University Northwest. As part of the School of Social Work at IUPUI, the IUN program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. The division offers the Master of Social Work on a three-year or four-year part-time schedule designed to meet the needs of working professionals in Northwest Indiana.

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Mission

The mission of the Indiana University School of Social Work is to educate students to be effective and knowledgeable professional social workers prepared for practice in the twenty-first century. Such practitioners are committed to the alleviation of poverty, oppression, and discrimination. The school is dedicated to the enhancement of the quality of life for all people, particularly the citizens of Indiana, and to the advancement of just social, political, and economic conditions through excellence in teaching, scholarship, and service. Within the context of a diverse, multicultural, urbanized, global, and technologically oriented society, the school prepares social workers who will shape solutions to a wide range of interpersonal and social problems by developing and using knowledge critically while upholding the traditions, values, and ethics of the social work profession.

Teaching
Scholarship
Service
Program Goals

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Teaching

The teaching mission is to educate students to become professional social workers equipped for a lifetime of learning, scholarship, and service. Graduates embrace person-in-environment and strengths perspectives that are linked to the welfare of individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. They learn to keep abreast of advances in knowledge and technology, be self-reflective, and apply best practice and accountable models of intervention. The school prepares social work practitioners and scholars ready to assume leadership roles at the B.S.W., M.S.W., and Ph.D. levels. (Only the M.S.W. degree is available at IUN.)

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Scholarship

The scholarship mission includes the discovery, integration, application, dissemination, and evaluation of client-centered and solution-focused knowledge for and with social work professionals and other consumers. Innovative forms of scholarship are encouraged in developing knowledge for use in practice, education, and service concerning social needs and social problems.

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Service

The service mission is dedicated to the promotion of the general welfare of all segments of society. Service includes work in the school, university, profession, and community and reflects the school’s expertise in teaching, scholarship, and social work practice. Service in the interest of persons at greatest risk is consistent with the social work profession’s attention to social justice.

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Program Goals

The Master of Social Work program derives its program goals from the mission statement of the Indiana University School of Social Work. They are also informed by the Curriculum Policy Statement of the Council on Social Work Education (1992). The program goals are to:

  1. Educate students to be effective and knowledgeable professionals prepared for advanced social work practice in the twenty-first century.
  2. Build upon a liberal arts perspective to prepare students to continue their professional growth and development through a lifetime of learning, scholarship, and service.
  3. Educate students to understand and apply the fundamental values and ethics of the social work profession in their practice.
  4. Prepare students for social work practice with diverse populations and with client systems of all sizes.
  5. Educate students about the social context of social work practice, the changing nature of those contexts, the behavior of organizations, and the dynamics of change.
  6. Engage in scholarly activity including the discovery, integration, application, dissemination, and evaluation of client-centered and solution-focused knowledge.
  7. Conduct service that promotes the general welfare of all segments of society and promotes social and economic justice.

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Policy on Nondiscrimination

Based on the tradition of the social work profession, and consistent with Indiana University’s Equal Opportunity Policy, the Indiana University School of Social Work affirms and conducts all aspects of its teaching, scholarship, and service activities without discrimination on the basis of race, color, gender, socio-economic status, marital status, national or ethnic origin, age, religion or creed, disability, or political or sexual orientation.

The School of Social Work has a strong commitment to diversity and nondiscrimination. Indeed, diversity is celebrated as a strength. This perspective is demonstrated by the composition of its faculty and student body, curriculum content, and recruitment and retention activities and by an active diversity committee. Further commitment is demonstrated through participation in university committees dealing with oppressed populations; numerous service activities, including advocacy on behalf of the disadvantaged; the selection of field practicum sites; and school policies related to promotion and tenure of its faculty.

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Educational Requirements

Students are admitted on the assumption that they have the potential academic ability and personal suitability for completing the professional program in which they are enrolled. All students in the M.S.W. program are expected to maintain the standards established by the School of Social Work and those held by the social work profession. In order to detect possible problems, the School of Social Work reviews students’ performance periodically.

The Master of Social Work degree is recommended by the school and conferred by the university. Students must successfully complete 60 credit hours of required and elective courses carrying graduate credit. Each student is expected to follow the university and school schedules and dates for completion of requirements, including completion of all work within seven calendar years from the time of first enrollment.

Liability Insurance  
Students are required to carry professional liability insurance. Under the school’s blanket policy, the cost of insurance is included in the students’ practicum course fee.

Credit for Life Experience  
Academic credit for life experience and previous work experience is not given in whole or part toward the social work degree.

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Academic Regulations and Policies

The general regulations and policies detailed in this bulletin apply to all students in the division.

Admissions  
Admission to the social work program is selective. Each year more students apply than can be accommodated. Current admission standards require the following:

  1. An earned bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university
  2. A broad liberal arts background plus instruction in human biology, i.e., L100 Humans and the Biological World (3 cr.) or the equivalent.
  3. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.
  4. A minimum of six courses in social and/or behavioral sciences.
  5. One statistics course, i.e., K300 Statistical Techniques (3 cr.) or the equivalent.
  6. One research methodology course.
  7. Evidence of characteristics or potential required for competent social work practice as defined in the mission statement of the IU School of Social Work. Such evidence may be derived from application materials, letters of reference, pertinent work experience, and an admission interview.
  8. GRE test not required.

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Advanced Standing Program Requirements

In addition to the application requirements listed above, the following are additional requirements specific to the Advanced Standing Program:

  1. Graduation within five years from an undergraduate B.S.W. program accredited (or admitted to candidacy for accreditation) by the Council on Social Work Education.
  2. A cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale in all social work courses taken prior to Admission Committee action. Accordingly, applicants for admission with advanced standing must provide the Admission Committee with a transcript that records at least the fall semester (or winter quarter) grades of their senior year. Therefore, the applicant may need to submit an application closer to the deadline date.
  3. A fourth reference letter is required from the B.S.W. director of the applicant’s undergraduate program.
  4. Evidence of characteristics and/or potential required for competent social work practice as defined in the mission statement of the school. Such evidence may be derived from the application materials, letters of reference, and pertinent work or volunteer experience.

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Transfer Students

A limited number of transfer students from other accredited M.S.W. programs may be accepted each year. Master of Social Work students interested in transferring to Indiana University must complete an application for admission to the program. Upon receipt of the completed application, the division director will review the materials and decide if the applicant may be accepted in the program. If accepted, the division director will analyze the student’s transcript and course syllabi to determine which credits earned in another accredited social work program will transfer to Indiana University. In all circumstances, however, transfer students must complete all required courses in their chosen Concentration Curriculum at the Indiana University School of Social Work.

In addition to meeting all admissions requirements, transfer students must submit the following information:

  1. A letter to the admissions chair that specifically outlines the circumstances and reasons for this transfer;
  2. A letter from the dean or director of the applicant’s previous M.S.W. program, approving the transfer and describing the applicant’s academic performance to date;
  3. A copy of all supporting documents that contain course descriptions of classes to be considered for transfer credit.

All courses eligible for transfer must have a grade of B or higher. All course work for the M.S.W. must be completed within a seven-year period.

Additionally, any admitted student may request a transfer of up to 6 non-social work graduate credits if relevance to the student’s course of study toward the M.S.W. and academic soundness can be shown. In all cases, graduate credit from other disciplines must be consistent with the goals and objectives of the M.S.W. program and must fall within the seven-year requirement for completion of all courses.

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Application Review Considerations

The admission process is guided by the M.S.W. admissions coordinator and conducted by faculty serving on the M.S.W. Admissions Committee. In evaluating applicants, faculty reviewers take into consideration the following factors:

  1. Past academic performance as reflected in a cumulative undergraduate GPA.
  2. Graduate course work performance (if any).
  3. Judgments by faculty reviewers of the candidate’s commitment to social work and suitability for the profession, based on a reading of the application.
  4. Length and type of work and volunteer experience.
  5. Letters of reference.
  6. Evidence of personal qualities considered important for the practice of social work.
  7. Diversity considerations.

Applicants are accepted, placed on a waiting list, or rejected. Applicants on the waiting list will be held until the beginning of the program as replacements for persons declining acceptance or withdrawing. Admission is competitive, and the instructional resources of the school and division determine total enrollment.
Admission offers cannot be deferred beyond the year of acceptance.

Guest Students  
Nondegree graduate candidates may be admitted to the Division of Social Work to take the S600 elective courses for up to 6 credit hours. These are generally offered during the Summer Sessions. Contact the Division of Social Work office to obtain school authorization.

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Master of Social Work Curriculum

Social Work is a dynamic profession concerned with the changing needs of people and society. To respond to such needs, the curriculum of the School of Social Work undergoes continuing review by the faculty with the participation of students, members of the practice community, and others. Students must complete 60 credit hours of graduate-level course work in order to meet the minimum requirements for the Master of Social Work degree. All students complete a common 15 credit Foundation Curriculum and 15 credit Intermediate Curriculum that emphasize a generalist perspective for social work practice. The intermediate Curriculum includes a one-semester practicum of a minimum of 320 clock hours. Following that, students complete a Concentration Curriculum that prepares them for advanced practice in child welfare, families, health, school social work, leadership, mental health and addictions, or an individualized concentration. The Concentration Practicum of a minimum of 640 clock hours is usually completed over two semesters. All Foundation Curriculum course work must be completed before students are eligible to enroll in any required courses in the Concentration Curriculum.

The overall objectives of the Foundation and Intermediate Curricula of the M.S.W program include development of

  1. basic, generalist competence applicable to a broad range of social work practice;
  2. basic competence at all levels: individual, family, group, community, and organization;
  3. basic competence for practice in social service delivery systems.
    The overall objectives of the Concentration Year include development of special competence in a concentration area.

Typical course arrangements for students admitted to the M.S.W. program are shown below.

Foundation Curriculum (15 cr.)
S 501 Professional Social Work at the Master’s Level: An Immersion
S 502 Research I
S 503 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I
S 504 Professional Practice Skills I
S 505 Social Policy Analysis and Practice

Intermediate Curriculum (15 cr.)
K505 Introduction to Special Education
S 513 Human Behavior in the Social Environment II
S 514 Practice with Individuals and Families I
S 515 Social Policy and Services II
S 516 Social Work Macro Practice
S 555 Social Work Practicum I (3 cr.)

Concentration Curriculum (30 cr.)

School of Social Work
S 623 Practice Research Integrative Seminar
S 600 Social Work Practice in Schools
S 651 Social Work Practicum II: School Social Work
S 682 Assessment in Mental Health and Addictions
S 661 Executive Leadership Practice
S 632 Child Welfare Practice I: Working with Children Impacted by Violence in     the Family
S 652 Social Work Practicum III: School Social Work
S 687 Mental Health and Addictions Practice with Groups

Leadership
S 623 Practice Research Integrative Seminar I
S 663 Leveraging Organizations, Communities and Political System
S 651 Social Work Practicum II: Leadership
S 661 Executive Leadership Practice
S 682 Assessment in Mental Health and Addictions
S 652 Social Work Practicum III: Leadership
S 662 Fiscal Management, Marketing and Resource Development
S 664 Designing Transformational Programs

Mental Health and Addictions
S 623 Practice Research Integrative Seminar I
S 685 Mental Health and Addictions Practice with Individuals and Families
S 683 Community-Based Practice in Mental Health/Addictions
S 651 Social Work Practicum II: Mental Health/Addictions
S 661 Executive Leadership Practice
S 682 Assessment in Mental Health and Addictions (DSM-IV)
S 652 Social Work Practicum III: Mental Health/Addictions

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Concentration

Students complete an interpersonal practice (clinical) concentration and the second half of the student’s academic work is taken in this concentration. Students focus upon application and development of skills in social work practice with individuals, families, and groups.

Field Practicums  
All students in the program complete both a foundation practicum and a concentration practicum. The foundation practicum requires a total of 320 hours (approximately 20 hours per week for one semester). Concentration practicum requirements total 640 hours spread over two or three semesters. Field practicums are educationally directed practice experiences under the supervision of an approved field instructor. A faculty liaison oversees the experience, which provides an opportunity for the student to integrate and apply classroom content and practice principles.

The foundation practicum is focused on generalist practice. It emphasizes the development and application of social work values and ethics, appreciation and understanding of diversity, strategies of social change for achieving social justice, identification of oppression and populations at risk, application of biopsychosocial knowledge for social work practice, understanding of social policy and social service delivery systems, development of communication and interactional skills, and understanding and application of research to generalist practice.

The concentration practicum builds upon the experiences gained during the foundation practicum and curriculum. The specific focus is on the processes of application, critical analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of knowledge, and the further development of skills and values acquired in the classroom and practicum.

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Phi Alpha

The Zeta Pi chapter of Phi Alpha, the national honor society for social work, was organized at IUN in 1997. The purposes of Phi Alpha are to provide a closer bond among students of social work and promote humanitarian goals and ideals. Phi Alpha fosters high standards of education for social workers and invites into membership those who have attained excellence in scholarship and achievement in social work. The M.S.W. committee sets the criteria for excellence.

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Code of Ethics

All students in the program are expected to follow the Code of Ethics adopted by the National Association of Social Workers (NASW). Copies of the Code of Ethics are provided to all students. In addition, all students are subject to the Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities, and Conduct of Indiana University. Students are responsible for acquainting themselves with and adhering to the policies in this document.

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Master of Social Work Degree Requirements

About the Program
The M.S.W. Foundation Curriculum
The M.S.W. Concentration Curriculum

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About the Program

Social work is a dynamic profession concerned with the changing needs of persons and society. To respond to such needs, the curriculum of the School of Social Work is regularly reviewed by the faculty, students, members of the practice community, and others. The M.S.W. curriculum is designed to provide students with opportunities to develop competence for advanced interpersonal practice.

The M.S.W. program consists of 60 credit hours of study and fieldwork. The first 30 credit hours are core courses taken by all students and are referred to as the Foundation curriculum. The second 30 credit hours provide a concentration of study in advanced interpersonal practice referred to as the Concentration curriculum. Although the school values knowledge gained from life experience, academic credit cannot be granted for non-academic activities.

Students must file an application for graduation the semester before they expect to complete degree requirements. Failure to file this application will result in the student’s name not appearing on the graduation list for that semester in which the course work is being completed.

It is the responsibility of students to be certain that their graduation or other academic requirements are met. The graduate office will keep a record of the student’s progress. Degree candidates will be assigned a faculty advisor who will aid their program planning, follow their progress, and be available for general academic and career counseling.

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The M.S.W. Foundation Curriculum

SWK S500 Social Welfare and the Social Work Profession 3
SWK S510 Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Individuals, Families, Groups 3
SWK S511 Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Organizations, Communities, Societies 3
SWK S520 Evaluation Processes in Social Work 3
SWK S530 Social Policy and Services I 3
SWK S540 Social Work Practice I: Theory and Skills 5
SWK S541 Social Work Practice II: Individuals, Families, Groups 3
SWK S542 Social Work Practice II: Organizations, Communities, Societies 3
SWK S550 Social Work Practicum I: Generalist Practice 4
[320 clock hours during the spring semester]

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The M.S.W. Concentration Curriculum

The final 30 credit hours of the M.S.W. program prepare students for advanced practice in Interpersonal Social Work Practice. The concentration is organized as follows:

Interpersonal Practice

SWK S600 Elective 3
SWK S600 Elective 3
SWK S621 Social Work Research: Interpersonal 3
SWK S631 Social Policy and Services II 3
SWK S643 Social Work Practice III: Individuals 3
SWK S644 Social Work Practice III: Families 3
SWK S645 Social Work Practice III: Groups 3
SWK S651 and SWK S652 Social Work Practicum II and III: Interpersonal Practice 9
[640 clock hours during the fall and spring semesters]

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