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2006-2008 Undergraduate Studies Northwest Campus Bulletin: Table of Contents

2006-2008 Undergraduate Studies Northwest Campus Bulletin: Undergraduate Course Descriptions

 

 

Indiana University
Northwest 2006-2008
Undergraduate Studies
Bulletin

IU Northwest
Office of Admissions 
Hawthorn Hall 100 
3400 Broadway 
Indiana University Northwest 
Gary, IN 46408-1197 
Local: (219) 980-6991 
Toll Free: (888) 968-7486 
Fax: (219) 981-4219 
Contact Office of Admissions
 

College of Arts and Sciences

Web site:
www.iun.edu/~artsci

Telephone:
(219) 980-6733

Administrative Officers
Faculty
Faculty Emeriti COAS
General Information
Academic Regulations and Policies
Entering the College of Arts and Sciences
Admission: General Requirements
Restart Policy
Students Currently Enrolled in the IU Northwest College of Arts and Sciences   (COAS) Who Wish to Take Courses at Other Institutions
Interdepartmental Major
Second Bachelor's Degree
Graduation with Distinction
Scholastic Honor Society
Bachelor of Arts
Degree Completion Chart for Bachelor of Arts
Minors (Optional)
Bachelor of Science
Associate of Arts
Associate of Science
Academic Work outside the College of Arts and Sciences
Career Information
Courses and Programs
Program Listing by Department
Approved Group III Distribution Courses by Discipline
Approved Group IV-2 Culture Studies Courses by Discipline

Administrative Officers

Dorothy W. Ige, Ph.D., Dean

Diane Marks Robinson, B.A., Assistant to the Dean

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Faculty

Department of Biology
Department of Chemistry, Physics, and Astronomy
Department of Communication
Department of Computer Information Systems
Departments of Fine Arts
Department of English
Department of Geosciences
Department of Health Information Technology -- Allied Health Sciences
Department of History/Philosophy and Religious Studies
Department of Mathematics
Department of Minority Studies
Department of Modern Languages, Comparative Literature, and Linguistics
Department of Performing Arts
Department of Psychology
Department of Sociology and Anthropology
Women's Studies Program

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Department of Biology

Spencer A. Cortwright, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology and Chairperson

Carol L. Castañeda, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology

Kevin J. Kennedy, M.S., Lecturer in Biology

Michael S. LaPointe, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology

Peggy L. Ruckman, M.S., Lecturer in Biology

Joanne M. Scalzitti, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology

Richard D. Sheffer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology

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Department of Chemistry, Physics, and Astronomy

Atilla Tuncay, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry, Health
Professions Advisor and Chairperson

Kwesi E. Aggrey, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs

Nelson H. DeLeon, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry

Alan F. Lindmark, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry

John R. Morris, Ph.D., Professor of Physics

Julie Peller, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Kizhanipuram Vinodgopal, Ph.D., Professor of
Chemistry

Linda Wozniewski, M.A.T., M.B.A., Lecturer in
Chemistry

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Department of Communication

Lori L. Montalbano-Phelps, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Communication and Chairperson and Adjunct Associate Professor of Women’s Studies

Dorothy W. K. Ige, Ph.D., Professor of Communication, Adjunct Professor of Afro-American Studies and Women’s Studies, and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences

Taylor S. Lake, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Communication and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies

Clifford T. Long, M.A., Lecturer in Communication

James H. Tolhuizen, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Communication

Alicia Wright, M.A., Lecturer in Communication

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Department of Computer Information Systems

William Dorin, Ph.D., Professor of Computer Information Systems and Chairperson

Vidya Arshanapalli, M.A., Senior Lecturer in Computer Information Systems

Judith A. Knapp, M.B.A., Associate Professor of Computer Information Systems

Diane Larson, M.S., Lecturer in Computer InformationSystems

Donald S. Szarkowicz, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Computer Information Systems

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Department of English

George R. Bodmer, Ph.D., Professor of English and Chairperson

William Allegrezza, Ph.D., Lecturer in English

Alan P. Barr, Ph.D., Professor of English and Adjunct Professor of Women’s Studies

Patricia Buckler, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English

William K. Buckley, Ph.D., Professor of English

Robin R. Hass Birky, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English and Adjunct Associate Professor of Women’s Studies

Richard J. Hull, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English

Lou Ann Karabel, M.A., Senior Lecturer in English and Coordinator of Developmental Writing

Mary Harris Russell, Ph.D., Professor of English and Adjunct Professor of Women’s Studies

Douglas J. Swartz, Ph.D., Senior Lecturer in English and Director of Writing

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Departments of Fine Arts

Gary S. Wilk, M.F.A., Associate Professor of Fine Arts and Chairperson

Neil Goodman, M.F.A., Professor of Fine Arts

David W. Klamen, M.F.A., Professor of Fine Arts

Kelly E. Knaga, M.F.A., Lecturer in Fine Arts

Adrienne Kochman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Fine
Arts

Derek Walter, M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Fine Arts

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Department of Geosciences

Kristin Huysken, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology and Chairperson

Erin P. Argyilan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geosciences

Zoran Kilibarda, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geology

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Department of Health Information Technology -- Allied Health Sciences

Margaret A. Skurka, M.S., Professor of Allied Health Sciences and Director of Health Information Management Programs

Linda Galocy, Lecturer, Health Information Systems, Allied Health Sciences

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Department of History/Philosophy and Religious Studies

Xiaoqing D. Chen Lin, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History and Interim Chairperson

Gianluca DiMuzio, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy

James B. Lane, Ph.D., Professor of History

Anja Matwijkiw, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy

Jerry Pierce, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History

Roberta L. Wollons, Ph.D., Professor of History and Adjunct Professor of Women’s Studies

Christopher Young, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History

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Department of Mathematics

Vesna Kilibarda, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics and Chairperson

Jon Becker, M.S., Senior Lecturer in Mathematics and Director of Developmental Mathematics

Peter Caithamer, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics

Iztok Hozo, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics

William Odefey, M.A., Lecturer in Mathematics

Stela Pudar-Hozo, M.A. Equivalency, Lecturer in Mathematics

Lary R. Schiefelbusch, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics

Bogdan Vajiac, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics

Henry L. Wyzinski, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics

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Department of Minority Studies

Raoul Contreras, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Latino Studies and Chairperson of Minority Studies

Earl R. Jones, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Afro-American Studies and Associate Professor of Public and Environmental Affairs

Regina V. Jones, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Minority Studies and Adjunct Assistant Professor of English

Scooter Pegram, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of French and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Minority Studies

Faculty from Other Units:
Jack M. Bloom, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology and Adjunct Associate Professor of Minority Studies and History

Dorothy W. K. Ige, Ph.D., Professor of Communication, Adjunct Professor of Afro-American Studies, Adjunct Professor of Women’s Studies, and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences

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Department of Modern Languages, Comparative Literature, and Linguistics

Eva Mendieta, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Spanish and Chairperson and Adjunct Associate Professor of Women’s Studies

Adrian Garcia, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Spanish and
Adjunct Associate Professor of Women’s Studies

Ana Osan, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Spanish and Adjunct Associate Professor of Women’s Studies

Scooter Pegram, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of French and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Minority Studies

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Department of Performing Arts

Julie Jackson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Theatre and Chairperson

Katherine Arfken, M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Theatre

Garrett L. Cope, M.A., Associate Professor of Theatre and Coordinator of Outreach

Jerry R. Taylor, M.A., Associate Professor of Theatre

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Department of Psychology

Mark Hoyert, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Chairperson

Bruce W. Bergland, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Chancellor

Mary Ann Fischer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology

Karl Nelson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology

Stephanie H. Smith, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology

Faculty From Other Units:
Cynthia D. O’Dell, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology and Women’s Studies and Director, Women’s Studies Program

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Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Charles P. Gallmeier, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Chairperson

Jack M. Bloom, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology and Adjunct Associate Professor of Minority Studies and History

Tanice G. Foltz, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology
and Adjunct Associate Professor of Women’s Studies

Robert F. Lovely, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology

Robert J. Mucci, Ph.D., Associate Professor of
Anthropology and Anthropology Coordinator

Stephanie L. Shanks-Meile, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology
and Adjunct Professor of Women’s Studies

Michelle D. Stokely, Ph.D., Lecturer in Anthropology

Marty E. Zusman, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology

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Women's Studies Program

Cynthia D. O’Dell, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Women’s Studies and Psychology and Director, Women’s Studies Program

Faculty from Other Units:
Alan P. Barr, Ph.D., Professor of English and Adjunct Professor of Women’s Studies

Tanice G. Foltz, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology and Adjunct Associate Professor of Women’s Studies

Adrian Garcia, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Spanish and Adjunct Associate Professor of Women’s Studies

Robin Hass Birky, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English and Adjunct Associate Professor of Women’s Studies

Dorothy W. K. Ige, Ph.D., Professor of Communication, Adjunct Professor of Afro-American Studies and Women’s Studies, and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences

Taylor Lake, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Communication and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies

Eva Mendieta, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Spanish and Adjunct Associate Professor of Women’s Studies

Lori L. Montalbano-Phelps, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Communication and Adjunct Associate Professor of Women’s Studies

Ruth Needleman, Ph.D., Professor and Coordinator of Labor Studies and Adjunct Professor of Women’s Studies

Ana Osan, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Spanish and Adjunct Associate Professor of Women’s Studies

Mary Harris Russell, Ph.D., Professor of English and Adjunct Professor of Women’s Studies

Stephanie L. Shanks-Meile, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Adjunct Professor of Women’s Studies

Roberta L. Wollons, Ph.D., Professor of History and Adjunct Professor of Women’s Studies

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Faculty Emeriti in COAS

Pradeep K. Bhattacharya, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Biology

Kenneth J. Brock, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Geology

Frederick B. Chary, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of History

Ronald D. Cohen, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of History

Herman Feldman, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Psychology

Robert G. Foor, M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Theatre

John B. Gruenenfelder, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Philosophy

Paul B. Kern, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of History

John J. Kroepfl Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Physics and Dean Emeritus of the College of Arts and Sciences

Keith E. Lorentzen, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Chemistry

Patricia Lorimer Lundberg, Ph.D., Professor Emerita of English and Women’s Studies

William M. Neil, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of History

James E. Newman, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of History

Angeline Prado-Komenich, Ph.D., Professor Emerita of Spanish and Women’s Studies

Mark Reshkin, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Geology, Professor Emeritus of Public and Environmental Affairs

Wayne H. Siek II, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of English

Timothy A. Stabler, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Biology

John Synowiec, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Mathematics

Robert B. Votaw, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Geology

John N. Zneimer, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of English

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General Information

Mission

At the center of IU Northwest is the College of Arts and Sciences. Providing a broad education in the arts and sciences, the college prepares students through study in major disciplines for careers of their choice and for lives as educated, critical, and inquiring citizens in a world of rapid change.

At the core of our many programs, some unique to the region, are the analytical, cognitive, and expressive skills needed to assimilate and advance knowledge. An arts and sciences education focuses on an understanding of the human condition—past and present—and the world in which we live. It emphasizes a humanistic and esthetic appreciation of cultural life as well as valuing of science and its methodology in which intellect, logical processes, ethical perspectives, and problem solving are key. The strong research and creative activities of our faculty encourage students toward a life of learning and reflection.

Intrinsic to a liberal education is preparing graduates to appreciate, contribute to, and thrive in a diverse, culturally rich, technologic and scientifically advanced society with a compelling history, and a promising future, and a capacity for transformation. Through our teaching, research, creative arts, and professional and community services, we engage in the vitality of northwest Indiana. An informed, educated population is not only democracy’s strongest, best hope, it is also society’s wisest investment. That, more than anything else, is the endeavor of the faculty and staff of the College of Arts and Sciences.
At present the college consists of 16 departments offering baccalaureate degrees in the following areas: actuarial science, Afro-American studies, biology, chemistry, computer information systems, economics, English, fine arts, French, geology, history, mathematics, communication, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, Spanish, and theatre. Courses are offered in all of those fields plus anthropology, astronomy, Canadian studies, comparative literature, computer science, geography, German, journalism, Latino studies, linguistics, music, physics, religious studies, telecommunications, and women’s studies.

In addition to undergraduate education leading to the bachelor’s degree, which prepares students for citizenship as well as for professional training and graduate study, the programs of the College of Arts and Sciences provide students in allied health sciences, business, continuing studies, dental auxiliary education, education, nursing, and public and environmental affairs with courses that are a foundation for those professional programs.

The Associate of Arts degree provides alternatives to traditional baccalaureate degrees for students who are unable to complete four-year programs because of other commitments or responsibilities.

A postbaccalaureate certificate in computer information systems is offered for students with baccalaureate degrees in another discipline who wish to complement their undergraduate education with course work similar to the requirement for a Bachelor of Science degree in computer information systems.

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Academic Regulations and Policies

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences are encouraged to familiarize themselves with “General Academic Regulations and Policies’’ in the front section of the bulletin.

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Entering the College of Arts and Sciences

Incoming freshmen generally are admitted to and provided counseling by University Division at IU Northwest, or admitted directly to the College of Arts and Sciences. Freshmen are encouraged to visit departments in which they are interested to discuss possible programs with faculty and advisors. Additional information is available in the College of Arts and Sciences offices, Tamarack Hall, Room 55.

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Admission: General Requirements

The following requirements pertain to IU Northwest only. Students contemplating transfer to other campuses should consult the appropriate bulletins and the IU Care electronic advising system.

Baccalaureate Degrees

A faculty member from the student's major department provides academic counseling for each student in the College of Arts and Sciences prior to each semester's enrollment. Although academic counseling is intended to provide effective guidance and every student is encouraged to seek the counsel of a faculty advisor, all students are responsible for planning their own programs and for meeting the following degree requirements by the time they expect to graduate. Students who have been awarded a baccalaureate degree cannot at a later date change the degree to include additional majors and/or minors. (Note: Degree requirements are not the same at every campus of Indiana University.)

  1. Minimum of 120 credit hours. At least 105 credit hours must be in courses in the College of Arts and Sciences unless a student pursues a minor or a certificate in another division of the university that grants degrees. If so, the 105 credit hour minimum in Arts and Sciences may be reduced sufficiently to allow the student to fulfill the minimum number of credit hours for the other division’s minor or certificate, providing that all other Arts and Sciences requirements are met. If no such non­Arts-and-Sciences minor or certificate is pursued, the remaining 15 credit hours may be taken in the College of Arts and Sciences or in divisions of the university that grant degrees. Only courses that count toward a degree are acceptable.
  2. Minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0.
  3. Minimum of 36 credit hours in courses at the 300- 400 (junior-senior) level.
  4. Minimum of 25 credit hours with grades of C– or higher in the major field and a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 in the major field.
  5. Minimum of 15 credit hours with grades of C– or higher in the minor field and a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 in the minor field.
  6. Maximum of 45 credit hours in one subject that may be counted toward the B.A. degree.
  7. Twenty-six (26) credit hours of the work of the senior year must be completed while in residence at the IU Northwest campus. At least 10 credit hours of course work in the major field must be completed on the IU Northwest campus.
  8. Work for credit in the College of Arts and Sciences may be done at Bloomington or other Indiana University campuses.
  9. Not more than 60 credit hours earned in accredited two-year institutions of higher education, nor more than 90 credit hours from accredited four-year institutions of higher education, may be applied toward a degree.
  10. By special permission of the dean, up to 6 credit hours toward a degree may be earned through correspondence study. Ordinarily, students in residence in the college are not permitted to enroll concurrently in courses offered through the Division of Independent Study.
  11. A student who fails to complete a degree within 10 years of matriculation will forfeit the automatic right to use the requirements in effect at the time of matriculation. In such cases, the dean, in consultation with the student’s major department chair, will determine which set of requirements, or what particular combination of old and new requirements will be appropriate for the student.
  12. All credit of candidates for degrees, except that of the current semester, must be on record at least six weeks prior to the conferring of degrees.
  13. An application for a degree must be filed in the Office of the College of Arts and Sciences no later than July 1 for December graduation. May and August graduates must file the application for graduation by October 15. Degrees are conferred in May, August, and December. Commencement is held only in May.

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Restart Policy

Students who have been away from Indiana University for at least five years and who earned grades that make it impossible or very difficult to return to a College of Arts and Sciences degree program, may petition for a “restart.” Under a restart, the College of Arts and Sciences will establish a new degree record for the student that will consist of courses previously taken that were completed with a minimum grade of C. Note that all Indiana University course work will remain on the student’s permanent record (the university transcript); this policy will affect only the student’s College of Arts and Sciences record.

Students will be eligible for consideration for this policy if it has been a minimum of five years since full-time or continuous part-time enrollment. Students will need to provide evidence that would indicate a significant change in their ability to succeed in academic work. Reevaluation of fundamental skills may be necessary before the student can proceed. Students should petition for a restart as part of the readmission process. They are held to the deadlines for submission of readmission petitions (June 20 for fall semester; October 1 for spring semester; and March 1 for summer sessions)

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Students Currently Enrolled in the IU Northwest College of Arts and Sciences COAS) Who Wish to Take Courses at Other Institutions

Current IU Northwest COAS students who seek to take additional courses at another college or university that are specifically required for their IU Northwest major are strongly advised to seek prior approval by their departmental chair, the chair of the department offering the course, and the Dean of COAS before those courses are taken, in order to ensure the transfer of those courses back to IU Northwest and the acceptance of those courses for their degree requirements.

Students who leave IU Northwest for a semester or longer, take courses elsewhere, and return to IU Northwest at a later date must go through the usual transfer of credit process as required for students new to IU Northwest; their department chairs and Dean have the right to deny approval of the acceptance of those courses by IU Northwest. Prior approval is advised.
(Approved by College of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee, February 24, 2006)

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Interdepartmental Major

Interdepartmental majors are available to students who wish to combine two disciplines or subjects into an interdepartmental concentration area. Such students are required to complete a minimum of 40 credit hours in the interdepartmental major. Students must also fulfill the following requirements:

  1. The 40 credit hour concentration need not be equally divided between the two disciplines, but a program designed to give substantial knowledge should be planned in each discipline.
  2. Each of the two areas should include a minimum of four 300- or 400-level courses for a minimum of 12 credit hours in each area.
  3. Students must have two advisors, one from each department in which they propose to study.
  4. The program of studies must be approved by both departments and by the college.

The following interdepartmental majors are available in the College of Arts and Sciences:

Afro-American Studies and Communication
Afro-American Studies and English
Computer Information Systems and Fine Arts
Computer Information Systems and Mathematics

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Second Bachelor's Degree

Normally the holder of a baccalaureate degree who wishes to pursue a further educational goal is encouraged to become qualified for admission to a graduate degree program. In certain cases, however, the dean may admit a baccalaureate degree holder to candidacy for a second baccalaureate degree. When such admission is granted, candidates must earn at least 26 additional credits-in-residence and meet the requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences and of the department in which they are candidates.

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Graduation with Distinction

Recognition for excellence in scholarship is awarded at graduation by identifying such students in three categories of distinction. These are, with their corresponding minimum overall grade point averages: distinction (3.60), high distinction (3.75), highest distinction (3.89). The number of students so recognized will not exceed 10 percent of the graduating class in the college for that year. Students considered for this recognition must have completed at least 60 graded credit hours at Indiana University.

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Scholastic Honor Society

Omicron Sigma Delta is a liberal arts scholastic honorary society based on the same criteria as those used by the prestigious national honorary scholastic society, Phi Beta Kappa. Candidates are selected from the college’s juniors and seniors on the basis of high scholarship and good character.

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Bachelor of Arts

The College of Arts and Sciences at IUNorthwest offers instruction leading to degrees in the following majors:

Afro-American studies
Biology Chemistry
Communication
Economics
English
Fine arts
French
Geology
History
Mathematics
Philosophy
Political science
Psychology
Sociology
Spanish
Theatre

Courses are offered in the following disciplines, some of which have programs that can lead to associate degrees and minors:
Anthropology
Astronomy
Canadian studies
Comparative literature
Computer science
Geography
German
Journalism
Latino studies
Linguistics
Music
Physics
Religious studies
Telecommunications
Women’s studies

The curriculum for the B.A. degree introduces the student to a variety of subjects that provide the fundamentals of a liberal education; enable the student to make an intelligent choice of a subsequent field of concentration; aid the student in securing adequate preparation for advanced work; and provide for some degree of specialization in the junior and senior years.

Specific Requirements

In addition to the general requirements for all degrees in the college, candidates for the B.A. degree must complete Groups I-V of the distribution requirements. Students may elect to follow the requirements currently in effect or the requirements that were in effect when they matriculated.

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Group I: English Composition and Mathematics

English composition
Every student must demonstrate the ability to use correct, clear, effective English. The student may satisfy this requirement in either of the following ways:

  1. By being exempted with or without credit. Students who wish to be considered for exemption must take the SAT Verbal Examination. A score of 670 or higher on the SAT Verbal Examination will be sufficient for exemption. For exemption with credit, students must take both the SAT Verbal Examination and the English Composition Achievement Test and receive scores of 600 or higher on both exams; 3 credit hours of ENG W141 will be granted.
  2. By completing ENG W131 Elementary Composition I(3 cr.), with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

Mathematics
May be fulfilled in one of the following ways:

  1. Earning minimum test scores of 650 on the SAT exam or 29 on the ACT exam.
  2. By completing, with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, one of the following courses: MATH M100, MATH M110, MATH M118, MATH M119, MATH M125, or MATH M215.
  3. By exemption (without credit) through an appropriate examination as determined by the Department of Mathematics.

Intensive Writing
Must be fulfilled after completing the ENG W131 requirement:

  1. By completing one intensive writing course at the 200 level or above in the English department, or
  2. By completing an “Intensive Writing Course’’ in any arts and sciences department. If so designated, the course may also be counted toward fulfilling other arts and sciences degree requirements (e.g., distribution, major, 300-400 level).

An intensive writing course is one in which the writing component is fully integrated with the content and objectives of the course. Thus, a student would not be able to pass the course without fulfilling the intensive writing component and, conversely, it would be equally impossible for a student to pass the intensive writing component and not receive a passing grade in the course.

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Group II: Foreign Language

The College of Arts and Sciences entrance requirement is two courses at the 100 level in a foreign language. Students admitted to arts and sciences without this background will be required to make up the deficiency. The requirement may be met by examination or by successful completion of the course taken. (Two years of good high school work in a foreign language should enable a student to place out of the first 8 credit hours and into 200-level courses.) Preferably, placement is determined by the score obtained on the College Board Achievement Test administered during the student’s senior year in high school.

The B.A. degree requirement of foreign language may be fulfilled in the following ways:

  1. By completing satisfactorily 6 credit hours of course work or the equivalent at the 200 level in a foreign language or by completing 3 credit hours of course work or the equivalent at the 200 level and two semesters of culture courses taught in English from the same language base. These culture courses may be taken at any point during the student’s program of study of a foreign language.

By attaining at any time an achievement test score sufficient for placement in courses at the first-semester third-year level in a foreign language.

Special Credit as a Result of Placement Test
A student who places at the third-year level on the language placement test and receives a grade of C or higher in the validating third-year-level course will be eligible to receive 6 hours of special credit with a grade of S. A student who places in the second semester of the second year and completes the validating course with a grade of C or higher will be eligible to receive 3 hours of special credit with a grade of S. It will be the responsibility of the student to request that the language department forward this information to the College of Arts and Sciences.

Proficiency Examinations
A student may complete the language requirement by taking a proficiency examination administered by the department concerned. Students with a background in a language other than those taught at IU Northwest may take an examination from the relevant department at IU Bloomington. Such examinations will be given after the student has petitioned the IU Bloomington department and received the consent of the department. See section of this bulletin entitled “Credit by Examination” under “Academic Regulations and Policies” for details.

Foreign Students
Students whose native language is not English may substitute demonstrated proficiency in their native language if it is offered for instruction at Indiana University. They may not, however, earn credit for any courses at the first- or second-year level in their native language.

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Group III: Distribution

Students must take 12 credit hours outside of their major discipline in each of the three categories from at least two disciplines within each category. No more than 9 credit hours within a single discipline will be counted for Group III credit.

A complete list of courses that fulfill these requirements is located at the end of the Arts and Sciences section of the bulletin.

A. Mathematics, physical sciences, geography, and life sciences

Anthropology
Astronomy
Biology
Chemistry
Computer information systems
Geology
Mathematics1
Physics
Psychology

A student must take at least one science course in Group IIIA that includes a laboratory.

B. Social and behavioral sciences

Afro-American studies
Anthropology
Economics
Geography
History
Latino studies
Linguistics
Political science
Psychology
Sociology
Spanish
Speech
Telecommunications
Women's studies

C. Humanities

Afro-American studies
Anthropology
Canadian studies
Comparative literature
English
Fine arts
French
History
Latino studies
Music
Philosophy
Religious studies
Sociology
Spanish
Speech
Theatre
Women's studies

A student must take at least one studio arts/ performing arts/creative writing course in the humanities.

1 MATH M014 does not count for credit at IU Northwest in the College of Arts and Sciences, the School of Education, or the School of Business and Economics.

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Group IV: Western Civilization and Culture Studies

Courses used to fulfill the Group IV requirements cannot be used to fulfill the Group III requirement.

May be fulfilled by:

  1. Completing the Western Civilization sequence, HIST H113-HIST H114; and
  2. Successful completion of 3 credit hours in the cultural experiences of minority people in the United States or 3 credit hours in Latin American or non-Western cultures. Specific courses that fulfill this requirement are listed at the end of the Arts and Sciences section of the bulletin.

Group V: Requirements for the Major

No later than the first semester of the junior year, students should plan a tentative outline of the program in their major with their advisors in the department of their major.

The following are minimum requirements for any major. Further and detailed requirements are to be found in the departmental statements in this bulletin. The specific departmental requirements that must be fulfilled by each student are those published in the bulletin current at the time the major is declared, or those in the bulletin current at the time of graduation, whichever the student chooses.

  1. At least 25 credit hours must be taken in the major, and the cumulative grade point average in the major must be at least 2.0.
  2. Any course in which the student receives a grade below C- may not be used to fulfill requirements for the major. However, any course that the student passes will count toward the 120 credit hour total.
  3. Individual departments may require a minor of 15 to 20 credit hours in another subject. Any course taken to satisfy the requirements of a minor must be completed with a grade of C- or better; and the cumulative grade point average of all courses taken in the minor must be at least 2.0 (C). At least 6 credit hours of courses in the minor must be taken in residence at Indiana University Northwest. (See the individual departmental listings.)
  4. Not more than 45 credit hours in any one subject may be counted toward the B.A. degree.
Students must take 3 credit hours of capstone course work: either in the student's major or in one of the Group III categories in one of the Group III interdisciplinary capstone courses. The course may also be counted toward fulfilling other arts and sciences degree requirements (e.g., distribution, major, 300-400 level). Consult departmental advisors for details.

For procedure regarding change of major, see the assistant to the dean.

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Minors (Optional)

A minor shall consist of at least 15 credit hours with a grade of C– or higher and a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 in the minor field. (A minimum of two courses totaling at least 6 credit hours must be taken while in residence at IU Northwest.)
Students in one department (e.g., history) may satisfy requirements for a minor in another department (e.g., anthropology). Students may have more than one minor. Students’ major(s) and minor(s) may be listed on their transcripts. Students must advise the recorder in the College of Arts and Sciences of the minor(s) and receive advisement from the minor department. Students who have been awarded a baccalaureate degree cannot at a later date change the degree to include additional majors and/or minors.

The Department of Communication requires a minor; students in communication should check with their advisor about the requirements for a minor.

The following minors are available in the College of Arts and Sciences:

Arts and Sciences:
Afro-American studies
Anthropology
Biology
Canadian studies
Chemistry
Communication
Computer information systems
Economics
English
Fine arts
French
Geology
History
Latino studies
Mathematics
Philosophy
Physics
Political science
Psychology
Race-ethnic studies
Sociology
Spanish
Theatre
Women’s studies

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Bachelor of Science

The College of Arts and Sciences at IU Northwest offers instruction leading to Bachelor of Science degrees in the following majors:

Actuarial science
Biology
Chemistry
Computer information systems
Geology
Mathematics
Psychology

In addition to the general requirements for baccalaureate degrees in the college, candidates for the B.S. degree must complete the group requirements as follows:

Group I English Composition and Mathematics
(same requirement as for B.A. degree)
Group II Foreign Language or Western Civilization
Requirement may be satisfied by successful completion of either two semesters of a foreign language at the 200 level or higher or by successful completion of HIST H113 and HIST H114 Western Civilization.
Group III Distribution
A student must take a total of 18 credit hours listed under the categories of Group IIIB and IIIC with a minimum of 6 credit hours in each category. At least one of these courses must be a studio arts/performing arts or creative writing course in the humanities. (A complete list of courses that fulfill these requirements is located at the end of the Arts and Sciences section of this bulletin.)
Group IV Culture Studies
Requirement may be satisfied by successful completion of 3 credit hours in the cultural experiences of minority people in the United States or 3 credit hours in Latin American or non-Western cultures. Specific courses that fulfill this requirement are listed at the end of the Arts and Sciences section of the bulletin. For B.S. degrees, such a course will be counted toward graduation in both categories, Group III and Group IV.
Group V Major
May be fulfilled by completing satisfactorily the departmental requirements for the major.  Students must take 3 credit hours of capstone course work: either in the student’s major or in one of the Group III categories in one of the Group III interdisciplinary capstone courses. The course may also be counted toward fulfilling other arts and sciences degree requirements (e.g., distribution, major, 300-400 level). Consult departmental advisors for details. (See Bachelor of Arts requirements for listing of available minors.)

Students must take 3 credit hours of capstone course work: either in the student's major or in one of the Group III categories in one of the Group III interdisciplinary capstone courses. The course may also be counted toward fulfilling other arts and sciences degree requirements (e.g., distribution, major, 300-400 level). Consult departmental advisors for details. (See Bachelor of Arts requirements for listing of available minors.)

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Associate of Arts

The College of Arts and Sciences at IU Northwest offers instruction leading to Associate of Arts degrees in the following concentrations: Afro-American studies, anthropology, biology, chemistry, communication, computer information systems, English, fine arts, French, geology, history, Latino studies, mathematics, philosophy, physics, psychology, sociology, Spanish, theatre and Women’s Studies.

Associate of Science

The College of Arts and Sciences at IU Northwest offers instruction leading to an Associate of Science degree in Health Information Technology.

General Requirements
Specific Requirements

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General Requirements

  1. Minimum of 60 credit hours.
  2. Minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0.
  3. Minimum of 15 credit hours with grades of C– or higher in the concentration area and a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 in the concentration area.
  4. Maximum of 18 credit hours in one discipline that may be counted toward an A.A. degree.
  5. At least 15 credit hours of work of the final year and at least 6 credit hours in the concentration area must be completed while in residence at IU Northwest or another IU campus.
  6. Work for arts and sciences credit may be done at Bloomington or other Indiana University campuses.
  7. Not more than 30 credit hours earned in accredited two-year institutions of higher education, not more than 45 hours from accredited four-year institutions of higher education, may be applied toward the A.A. degree.
  8. By special permission of the college dean, limited credit toward a degree may be earned through correspondence study or by special credit examination. Ordinarily, students in residence in the college are not permitted to enroll concurrently in courses offered through the Division of Independent Study.
  9. Students who fail to complete the work for the A.A. degree within six years from the time they first register in the university may be required to pass comprehensive examinations on the subjects in their concentration area.
  10. All credits of candidates for degrees, except that of the current semester, must be on record at least six weeks prior to the conferring of degrees.
  11. An application for a degree must be filed in the Office of the College of Arts and Sciences no later than July 1 for December graduation. May and August graduates must file the application for graduation by October 15. Degrees are conferred in May, August, and December. Commencement is held only in May.

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Specific Requirements

Group I: English Composition and Mathematics

English Composition
Every student must demonstrate the ability to use correct, clear, effective English. The student may satisfy this requirement in either of the following ways:

  1. By being exempted with or without credit. Students who wish to be considered for exemption must take the SAT Verbal Examination. A score of 670 or higher on the SAT Verbal Examination will be sufficient for exemption. For exemption with credit, students must take both the SAT Verbal Examination and the English Composition Achievement Test and receive scores of 600 or higher on both exams; 2 credit hours of ENG W143 credit will be granted.
  2. By completing ENG W131 Elementary Composition (3 credits) with a grade of C (2.0) or better.
Mathematics
May be fulfilled in one of the following ways:
  1. Earning minimum test scores of 650 on the SAT exam or 29 on the ACT exam.
  2. By completing, with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, one of the following courses: MATH M100, MATH M110, MATH M118, MATH M119, MATH M125, or MATH M215.
  3. By exemption (without credit) through an appropriate examination as determined by the mathematics department.

Group II: Foreign Language

Two foreign language courses at the 100 level or higher.

Group III: Distribution

A student must take 6 credit hours from category A, 9 credit hours from category B, and 9 credit hours from category C. None of those credit hours may be in the concentration discipline but must be from at least two disciplines within each category.

A complete list of courses that fulfill the requirements listed below is located at the end of the Arts and Sciences section of the bulletin:

  1. Mathematics and physical and life sciences: Anthropology, astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer information systems, geography, geology, mathematics, physics, psychology.
  2. Social and behavioral sciences: Afro-American studies, anthropology, economics, geography, history, Latino studies, linguistics, political science, psychology, sociology, Spanish, speech, telecommunications, women’s studies.
  3. Humanities: Afro-American studies, anthropology, Canadian studies, comparative literature, English, fine arts, French, history, Latino studies, music, philosophy, religious studies, sociology, Spanish, speech, theatre, women’s studies.

Group IV: Western Civilization

May be fulfilled by completing satisfactorily the 6 credit hour sequence, HIST H113-HIST H114.

Group V: Concentration

A minimum of 15 and a maximum of 18 credit hours in one arts and sciences discipline. Consult departmental listings for specific requirements. (These credits cannot count toward fulfillment of Group III requirements.)

Group VI: Electives

Sufficient electives to meet the 60 credit hour minimum of the A.A. degree. Those electives may be chosen from courses offered in the College of Arts and Sciences or from other degree-granting divisions of the university.

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Academic Work outside the College of Arts and Sciences

A candidate for a baccalaureate degree in the College of Arts and Sciences must complete satisfactorily at least 105 credit hours in courses in the College of Arts and Sciences unless a student pursues a minor or a certificate in another division of the university that grants degrees. If so, the 105 credit hour minimum in Arts and Sciences may be reduced sufficiently to allow the student to fulfill the minimum number of credit hours for the other division’s minor or certificate, providing that all other Arts and Sciences requirements are met. If no such non-Arts-and­Sciences minor or certificate is pursued, the remaining 15 credit hours may be taken in the College of Arts and Sciences or in divisions of the university that grant degrees. Only courses that count toward a degree are acceptable.

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Career Information

Each department has a faculty member assigned to advise students about graduate school and career opportunities. Information regarding preprofessional programs is available on pp. 43-45 of the bulletin. Additional information is available in the office of the College of Arts and Sciences.

COAS J151, a course in career exploration and development, is offered under the auspices of the College of Arts and Sciences. This course is open to all students and is recommended to incoming freshmen who are unsure of their educational goals. COAS W398, an internship course, is also available.

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Courses and Programs

The rest of this section of the bulletin gives detailed information about the degree programs, majors, minors, concentrations, and courses offered by the College of Arts and Sciences. Frequently, the semesters in which courses are usually offered are indicated. In the course descriptions, the abbreviation “P’’ refers to course prerequisites, which are requirements that must be met before enrolling in the course. The abbreviation “R’’ identifies courses that are recommended but not necessary for enrollment in the course. Consent of the instructor is an implicit prerequisite for all courses in the college.

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Program Listing By Department

Department of Biology
Canadian Studies
Department of Chemistry, Physics, and Astronomy
Department of Communication
Department of Computer Information Systems (CIS)
Department of Economics
Department of English
Departments of Fine Arts
Department of Geosciences
Health Information Technology
Department of History/Philosophy and Religious Studies
Department of Mathematics
Department of Minority Studies
Department of Modern Languages, Comparative Literature, and Linguistics
Department of Performing Arts
Department of Psychology
Department of Sociology and Anthropology
Women's Studies Program
Minors in Business or Public and Environmental Affairs (Optional)

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Department of Biology

About the Department of Biology
Major in Biology—B.A.
Major in Biology—B.S.
Minor in Biology
Associate of Arts—Concentration in Biology
Special Programs for Preprofessional Students in the Health Sciences
Options for Special Credit
Courses for Nonmajors

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About the Department of Biology

Biology is the study of life. The Department of Biology at IU Northwest offers an interdisciplinary program in the life sciences leading to a Bachelor of Science degree, a Bachelor of Arts degree, or an Associate of Arts degree. Students majoring in other subjects may also earn a Minor in Biology. Our undergraduate programs are designed to interface with the faculty’s expertise in biomedical sciences, biotechnology, and environmental and ecological sciences. The programs are diverse, flexible, and designed to accommodate individuals who have a wide range of interests within the life sciences. Courses are available for students seeking preprofessional training in the medical sciences (premedical, predental, and allied health sciences), for those pursuing occupations in biotechnology, forensics, and the pharmaceutical industry, for students intending to continue with graduate studies, and for those interested in environmental issues and field work. We firmly believe that the training of an undergraduate student is enhanced by experience in the “discovery side” of the discipline. Thus, students are encouraged to participate in research with faculty
mentors. Many of our faculty have adjunct appointments at the Northwest Center for Medical Education, located across campus, and also maintain collaborations at other research institutions within the greater metropolitan area. This expands the opportunities for our students to engage in research projects with a broad spectrum of life scientists within and outside of Indiana University.

Each student majoring in biology is encouraged to acquire in-depth knowledge in related scientific disciplines or in other areas of study that use biology or contribute to biological methodologies. Biology students are thus encouraged to consider obtaining a minor in another area of study. The student’s advisor will help plan such a program, which may be in disciplines in the College of Arts and Sciences or in other divisions of the university.

In addition to course work structured for the biology major, the Biology Department offers an array of classes designed for students majoring in other disciplines who are interested in certain areas of the life sciences.

The Department of Biology sponsors a chapter of Beta Beta Beta, the national honorary society in biology. Moreover, many of our students belong to student run organizations with faculty advisors such as the Biology club and the Preprofessional Studies Club. These organizations foster friendships and community amongst students interested in the biological sciences and other sciences, and offer outside avenues for learning and gaining experience related to their formal training within the department.

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Special Programs for Preprofessional Students in the Health Sciences

Students interested in a preprofessional curriculum for medicine, dentistry, podiatry, optometry, or other health fields should refer to the preprofessional curriculum section in this bulletin. No specific major or degree program is required for preprofessional students. Students desiring a B.S. or B.A. biology degree should consult with the biology faculty to plan their course work. Most professional schools prefer students who will have completed a B.S. or B.A. degree before actually beginning the professional curriculum.

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Minor in Biology

Students wanting to minor in the biological sciences are required to take 15-18 credit hours and may elect to have a minor in one of the following fields: biology, environmental biology, microbiology, plant sciences, zoology, or human biology. Courses in these minor areas are to be chosen with the consent of the biology department. Biology majors who satisfactorily complete the environmental biology, plant sciences, microbiology, or zoology options will be considered to have completed a minor concentration in that area. A list of the requirements for the various options may be obtained from the biology office.

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Major in Biology—B.S.

The Bachelor of Science in Biology degree provides students with a rigorous general background in the field of biology to prepare for graduate or professional school or science-related jobs requiring bachelor’s-level training. The requirements in chemistry, mathematics, and physics have been selected to optimize the student’s future opportunities. The degree provides a rigorous background in fundamental biology and cognate areas, and prepares students for professional or research-oriented careers and graduate work in a selected area of biology.

Requirements
Introductory courses BIOL L101 (4 cr.) and BIOL L102 (4 cr.) along with BIOL L211(3 cr.) and BIOL L311 (4 cr.) are required. BIOL L101 and BIOL L102 must be taken in sequence. BIOL L101 is the prerequisite for BIOL L211, which is the prerequisite for BIOL L311.

At least 25 additional credit hours in Biology upper-level (300-400) courses must be completed. Students must complete at least four additional upper level labs.
A minimum of one course must be taken from the listed courses in each of the areas below. Students should consult with Biology faculty for additional information concerning prerequisites and course content.

  1. Molecular and Cellular Biology (BIOL L312, M310, L321, L323)
  2. Genetics, Development, Evolutionary Biology (L318, Z318, L331, Z466)
  3. Ecology, Physiology, and Organismal Biology (B355, Z406, L473; P416 or P461)

In addition to the required biology courses, the student must complete:

CHEM C105-CHEM C106 and CHEM C125- CHEM C126 are required and should be taken concurrently with BIOL L101 and BIOL L102, CHEM C341, CHEM C342, CHEM C343; and CHEM C344 or BIOL L323
Either PHYS P201-PHYS P202 or PHYS P221- PHYS P222
MATH M215 PSY K300 (statistics)

One of the following: CSCI A106, C106, A201, or C201 BIOL L473, BIOL M440, or BIOL Z466 may satisfy the capstone requirement.

BIOL L403 (Senior Seminar) must be completed during the senior year (1 cr.).
Students may specialize in the following emphasis areas by choosing at least 12 credit hours from the listed courses within the specialty area (courses not listed may be substituted with consent from the departmental chair):

  1. Biotechnology and Molecular Biology
  2. Choose from the following list of courses: Cell Biology L312, Molecular Biology Laboratory L323, Microbiology M310, Virology M430, Developmental Biology Z317 and Z318.
  3. Biomedical Sciences
  4. Choose from the following list of courses: Cell Biology L312, Immunology L321, Human Genetics L331, Special Topics in Biology (including Autoimmunity) L391, Professional Internship L498 or Individual Study L490, Microbiology M310, Virology M430, Medical Microbiology M440, Human Physiology P431, Developmental Biology Z318, Endocrinology Z466,
  5. Ecology and Conservation Biology
  6. Choose from the following list of courses: Ecology L473, Regional Ecology L476, Restoration Ecology L482, Conservation Biology L483, Independent Research L490, Vertebrate Zoology Z406, Plant Diversity B355.

In addition to the above courses, the student is responsible for fulfilling the general requirements of the Bachelor of Science degree as established by the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Major in Biology—B.A.

Requirements Introductory courses BIOL L101 (4 cr.) and BIOL L102 (4 cr.) along with BIOL L211 (3 cr.) and BIOL L311 (4 cr.) are required. BIOL L101 and BIOL L102 must be taken in sequence. BIOL L101 is the prerequisite for BIOL L211, which is the prerequisite for BIOL L311.
At least 18 additional credit hours in biology upper-level (300-400) courses must be included. Students must complete at least two additional upper-level labs.
A minimum of one course must be taken from the listed courses in each of the areas below. Students should consult with the department for additional information concerning prerequisites and course
content.

  1. Molecular and Cellular Biology (BIOL L312, M310, L321, L323)
  2. Genetics, Development, Evolutionary Biology (L318, Z318, L331, Z466)
  3. Ecology, Physiology, and Organismal Biology (B355, Z406, L473, P416 or P461)

CHEM C105-CHEM C106 and CHEM C125-CHEM C126 are required and should be taken concurrently with BIOL L101 and BIOL L102. Students planning on graduate or professional school should take chemistry through CHEM C344, physics PHYS P201-PHYS P202, mathematics at least through MATH M215, statistics (PSY K300 or equivalent), and a computer language/application course.

BIOL L473, BIOL M440, or BIOL Z466 may satisfy the capstone requirement.

In addition to the above courses, the student is responsible for fulfilling the general requirements of the Bachelor of Arts degree as established by the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Associate of Arts—Concentration in Biology

Requirements
BIOL L101, BIOL L102, plus two additional upper-level courses. The upper-level courses should be chosen in consultation with the student’s academic advisor. CHEM C 105, CHEM C125, CHEM C106, and CHEM C126 are also required.

Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Options for Special Credit

The department awards 3 hours of credit with a grade of S for BIOL E112 to students who score a 4 on the advanced placement examination and 6 hours of credit for BIOL E111 and BIOL E112 to students who score a 5 on the advanced placement examination. Students who score 650-690 on the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) exam earn 3 hours of credit for BIOL E112. Students who score 700 or better earn 6 hours of credit for BIOL E111 and BIOL E112. A grade of S in BIOL E111 and BIOL E112 may be earned by passing a departmental exemption examination given the first Wednesday evening of classes each semester. This credit satisfies the introductory course requirements, but carries no laboratory credit. Additional laboratory work, upon a review by the department chairperson, may be recommended to remedy any deficiencies in laboratory skills.

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Courses for Nonmajors

The BIOL L100 course offers the nonmajor an opportunity to examine the fundamental principles of biology and to prepare for more advanced courses should the decision be made to continue in biology.

The 200-400 level nonmajor courses are designed to acquaint students possessing minimal science background with the basic principles underlying the modern biological sciences. Emphasis is given to those biological concepts and advances that are of prime importance to the liberally educated nonscientist.

In addition to BIOL L100, the following courses are intended for nonmajors: BIOL L104, PHSL P130, BIOL L200, BIOL M200, BIOL L215, PHSL P261, PHSL P262, PHSL P263, BIOL L300, BIOL L302, BIOL L310, BIOL L316, BIOL L350, BIOL L363, BIOL L378, and BIOL L499.

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Canadian Studies

The Canadian Studies program gives students a better understanding of the diverse origins and multifaceted character of Canada. It gives direction and depth to the student’s liberal arts education through a focus on Canada.

Minor in Canadian Studies

The minor in Canadian Studies may consist of: a) either 15 credit hours, to include Canadian Studies CDNS C101 and CDNS C301, and three of the following: CDNS C350, CDNS C400, HIST H230, POLS Y217, GEOL T315, and CDNS C495; or b) 18 credit hours to include FREN F200-FREN F250 or equivalent, CDNS C101 and CDNS C301, and two of the following: CDNS C350, CDNS C400, HIST H230, POLS Y217, GEOL T315, and CDNS C495.

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Department of Chemistry, Physics, and Astronomy

Chemistry
Preprofessional Curricula
Certificate in Environmental Science
Physics
Astronomy

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CHEMISTRY

Major in Chemistry

The chemistry major provides an excellent academic background for graduate school (B.S. or B.A.–ACS degree); for a career as an industrial chemist (B.S. or B.A.–ACS degree); for acceptance into medical, dental, or other professional health-related programs; and for positions in chemical instrument sales or chemically related administrative positions.

B.S. or B.A.—ACS Degree

These degree programs are designed primarily for students planning to go on to graduate school or preparing for careers as industrial chemists. The American Chemical Society certifies these IU Northwest programs. Graduates of these programs will be recommended to the American Chemical Society as having fulfilled requirements of the ACS Committee on Professional Training. The B.S. degree emphasizes science courses as major requirements outside of the major required core; the B.A. emphasizes non-science courses outside of the required major core. The B.S. is set up to enable the student to easily obtain a minor in a related area (see below).

Minimum Degree: Students not receiving the Professional (ACS) degree are encouraged to take as many chemistry courses as possible above the minimum to enhance their professional skills and employment possibilities.

Recommended Minors (15 to 20 credit hours)
Although a minor is not required, it may enhance professional opportunities. Recommended minors: biology, computer science, geosciences, mathematics, or physics. Consult the chemistry department or the appropriate department for details. The B.S. degree is set up to enable the student who so desires to take a minor in one of these areas.

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Degree

(ACS CERTIFIED)

Departmental requirements:
Chemistry: 46 credit hours minimum, including CHEM C105-CHEM C 106, CHEM C125-CHEM C126, CHEM C301, CHEM C310, CHEM C341-CHEM C344 inclusive, CHEM C361- CHEM C363 inclusive, CHEM C409 (2 cr.), CHEM C410, CHEM C430, and at least one from among: CHEM C303, CHEM C335, CHEM C431, CHEM C441, or CHEM C483. CHEM C209 is also required or waived if proficiency examination is passed. (CHEM C301 and proficiency examinations are the capstone requirements.) Physics (10 cr.): PHYS P221-PHYS P222; Mathematics (13 cr.): MATH M215-MATH M216 and MATH M311; Biology (4 cr.): BIOL L101; Computer Science (4 cr.): CSCI C201; Ancillary science electives: minimum of 16 credit hours (consult department for a listing of approved courses). Total credit hours 123-128. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) Degree

Departmental requirements:
Minimum degree requirements: 35 credit hours of chemistry including CHEM C105-CHEM C106, CHEM C125, CHEM C126, CHEM C301, CHEM C310, CHEM C341, CHEM C342, CHEM C343, CHEM C361, CHEM C363, CHEM C430, CHEM C209 (waived if proficiency examination is passed). Also required: MATH M215-MATH M216 and PHYS P221-PHYS P222. (CHEM C301 and proficiency examination are the capstone requirements.)

(ACS—Certified Degree)

46 credit hours in chemistry including CHEM C105-CHEM C106, CHEM C125- CHEM C126, CHEM C301, CHEM C310, CHEM C341-CHEM C344 inclusively, CHEM C361-CHEM C363 inclusively, CHEM C409 (2 cr.), CHEM C410, CHEM C430, CHEM C209 (waived if proficiency examination is passed) and any two of the following (one must be a chemistry course): CHEM C431, CHEM C441, CHEM C483; PHYS P301; or an
advanced mathematics or physics course. Also required: MATH M215-MATH M216, MATH M311; PHYS P221-PHYS P222; and CSCI C201. German is strongly suggested as the foreign language. See the Arts and Sciences section of this bulletin for non-science requirements. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

ACS Degree (B.S. or B.A.)

Suggested sequence of required science and mathematics courses:

Freshman Year
CHEM C105-CHEM C106 Principles of Chemistry
CHEM C125-CHEM C126 Experimental Chemistry I and II
MATH M215-MATH M216 Analytical Geometry and Calculus I and II

Sophomore Year
CHEM C341-CHEM C342 Organic Chemistry Lecture I and II
CHEM C343-CHEM C344 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I and II
PHYS P221-PHYS P222 Physics I and II
MATH M311 Calculus III

Junior Year
CHEM C361-CHEM C362 Physical Chemistry I and II
CHEM C363 Physical Chemistry Laboratory
CHEM C310 Analytical Chemistry

Senior Year
CHEM C301 Chemistry Seminar
CHEM C409 Chemical Research
CHEM C410 Principles of Chemical Instrumentation
CHEM C430 Inorganic Chemistry

Minor in Chemistry

Requirements:
CHEM C105, CHEM C125, CHEM C106, CHEM C126, CHEM C341 and two advanced courses of 3 credit hours or more.

Associate of Arts—Concentration in Chemistry

Requirements:
CHEM C105, CHEM C125, CHEM C106, CHEM C126, CHEM C341, CHEM C342, CHEM C343, and one other chemistry course of 3 credits or more at the 300-400 level, MATH M215, CSCI C201, PHYS P221. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Chemistry Courses

Courses for non-science majors are CHEM C100, CHEM C101, CHEM C102, CHEM C120, CHEM C121, and CHEM C122. Courses for science majors are CHEM C105, CHEM C106, CHEM C125, CHEM C126, CHEM C209, CHEM C301, CHEM C303, CHEM C310, CHEM C335, CHEM C341, CHEM C342, CHEM C343, CHEM C344, CHEM C361, CHEM C362, CHEM C363, CHEM C403, CHEM C409, CHEM C410, CHEM C430, CHEM C431, CHEM C441, and CHEM C483.

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PREPROFESSIONAL CURRICULA

Dentistry
Law
Medicine
Optometry
Pharmacy
Physical Therapy
Physician Assistant
Podiatry
Veterinary

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Dentistry

Students may be admitted to the School of Dentistry upon receipt of their baccalaureate degrees or at the end of three years in the College of Arts and Sciences.

A student entering the School of Dentistry after completing 90 credit hours in the College of Arts and Sciences, exclusive of military training and physical education, who has satisfied the Group I through V requirements, may apply 32 credit hours earned the first year in dentistry as electives and at the end of this year earn the B.A. degree. Students expecting to do this should consult with their major departments since IU Northwest awards the B.A. degree.

Predental requirements:
(1) BIOL L101 and BIOL L102; (2) CHEM C105-CHEM C106, CHEM C341, and CHEM C343; (3) ENG W131; (4) PHYS P201-PHYS P202 or PHYS P221-PHYS P222; (5) 3-4 credit hours in psychology; (6) 3 credit hours of interpersonal communication; (7) 3 credit hours in biochemistry; (8) 4 credit hours in anatomy with a laboratory; (9) 4 credit hours in physiology with a laboratory.

For further information regarding programs, the Dental Aptitude Test, and applications, contact the health professions advisor at (219) 980-6745.

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Law

Admission to law schools requires a baccalaureate degree and a Law School Admission Test (LSAT) score. The degree may be in any discipline. Students preparing for law school are advised to take courses in logical thought, American history, American politics, business, and criminal and civil law. While no specific courses are required, Indiana University offers an interdisciplinary pre-law minor for students interested in attending law school.

The minor includes six courses totaling 18 credit hours. Students in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs, the School of Business and Economics, and history majors in Arts and Sciences could double-count courses that are required for their major or concentration, but they are required to take at least four courses or 12 credit hours outside of their major or concentration. The structure of the minor is as follows:

HIST H106 American History II (Twentieth Century)
PHIL P150 Elementary Logic
BUS L201 Legal Environment of Business
SPEA J101 American Criminal Justice
POLS Y103 Introduction to American Politics One elective
Students may pick from the following courses for the elective:
ECON E103 Introduction to Microeconomics
HIST H105 American History I
SPEA J301 Substantive Criminal Law
SPEA J303 Evidence
SPEA J306 The Criminal Courts
BUS L303 Commercial Law
BUS A201 Introduction to Financial Accounting
HIST A313 Origins of Modern America
HIST A315 Recent U.S. History
SPEA H441 Legal Aspects of Health Care Administration

The pre-law advisor can approve an elective that is not on this list if it meets the educational objectives.

The university provides pre-law counseling for interested students. Contact the pre-law advisor at 219-980-6841 or 219-980-6636.

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Medicine

A student may be admitted to the School of Medicine upon receipt of the baccalaureate degree with a major in any department in the College of Arts and Sciences provided courses required by the School of Medicine are included.

Premedical Requirements
(1) BIOL L101 and BIOL L102;
(2) CHEM C105, CHEM C125, CHEM C106, CHEM C126, CHEM C341-CHEM C342, CHEM C343, and CHEM C344;
(3) PHYS P201-PHYS P202 or PHYS P221-PHYS P222.

For additional information about the Medical College Admission Test, the American Medical College Application Service, programs, and application procedures, contact the Health Professions Advisor at (219) 980-6745.

Occupational Therapy
Indiana University offers a six-year program leading to a master’s degree in occupational therapy (four years preoccupational therapy leading to a bachelor’s degree with a major in any department in the College of Arts and Sciences, two years in the master’s program offered by Indiana University on the IUPUI campus). IU Northwest offers the courses required for entry into master’s programs in occupational therapy. Upon completion of the bachelor’s degree, students must apply for entry to a school of occupational therapy for their professional training. Admission to an occupational therapy program also requires documented volunteer or paid experiences in health care settings.
For further information contact the Health Professions Advisor at (219) 980-6745.

Pre-occupational Therapy Requirements
(1) CHEM C101, CHEM C121 or higher; (2) 4 credit hours of anatomy with a laboratory, (3) 4 credit hours of physiology with a laboratory; (4) 6 credit hours of composition; (5) 3 credit hours of speech; (6) 3 credit hours of basic statistics; (7) 3 credit hours of math, M118 or higher; (8) 3 credit hours of ethics or philosophy; (9)3 credit hours of introductory sociology; (10) 6 credit hours of introductory psychology; (11)3 credit hours of abnormal psychology; (12)3 credit hours of life span psychology; (13) one course in medical terminology; (14) 12-13 credit hours of electives. This plan of study will satisfy most of the requirements of other institutions. Applicants seeking admission to an occupational therapy program should contact the school they are interested in attending for up-to-date information on specific prerequisites and admission requirements.

For further information contact the health professions advisor at (219) 980-6745.

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Optometry

Indiana University offers a seven-year program leading to a degree in optometry (three years preoptometry, four years in the School of Optometry). During the three-year preoptometry program, the student must complete 90 credit hours, including the following: CHEM C105, CHEM C106, CHEM C125, CHEM C126, and CHEM C341 (4 credit hours, or two courses); MATH M215; PHYS P201 and PHYS P202; PSY P101, PSY P102, and PSY K300; BIOL L101, BIOL M310, plus one additional advanced course; ENG W131; 6 credit hours in arts and humanities plus 6 credit hours in social and behavioral sciences; and proficiency equivalent to 10 credit hours of foreign language.

The student may submit an application to the School of Optometry one semester in advance of completion of preoptometry requirements.

For applications and additional information contact the health professions advisor at (219) 980-6745.

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Pharmacy

IU Northwest does not grant a degree in pharmacy, but students may complete prepharmacy courses on this campus. The following plan of study is for students who will apply for admission to the School of Pharmacy and Pharmacal Sciences at Purdue University, West Lafayette campus. (The information is subject to change as a result of action by federal and/or state governments, the Trustees of Purdue University, the administration of Purdue University, and the faculty of the School of Pharmacy and Pharmacal Sciences.)

The application for admission should be submitted to Purdue University before January 5 to ensure consideration for the fall semester. Students who decide to transfer to another institution may have to adjust their program.

Prepharmacy courses include one year of general chemistry with laboratory (minimum of 8 credit hours); one year of organic chemistry with laboratory (minimum of 8 credit hours); one year of calculus (minimum of 6 credit hours); one semester of economics (3 credit hours); one year of biology with laboratory (minimum of 8 credit hours); one semester of microbiology with laboratory (minimum of 4 credit hours); one year of anatomy and physiology (8 credit hours); one semester of physics; and two semesters of English composition (minimum of 6 credit hours).

Students who complete prepharmacy at IUNorthwest can apply for admission to the School of Pharmacy at Purdue and should schedule PHPR200 (Pharmacy Orientation) after transferring. High school and college records will be considered in determining eligibility for admission. A student should also have at least a B+ average for all courses previously taken. In addition, the grade in each course must be at least a C for the credit to transfer. Grades are not transferred; only credit in the course is recorded. Purdue University does not automatically accept advanced credit that is granted by other universities. A similar program is now in place with the Chicago College of Pharmacy and its 2+3 program.

For further information on the health professions and pharmacy contact the health professions advisor at (219) 980-6745.

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Physical Therapy

Indiana University offers a seven-year program leading to a degree in physical therapy (four years pre-physical therapy leading to a bachelor’s degree with a major in any department in the College of Arts and Sciences, three years in the doctoral physical therapy program offered by Indiana University on the IUPUI campus). IU Northwest offers the courses required for entry into master’s and doctoral programs in physical therapy. Upon completion of the bachelor’s degree, students must apply for entry to a school of physical therapy for their professional training. Admission to a physical therapy program also requires documented volunteer or paid experiences in health care settings.
For further information contact the Health Professions Advisor at (219) 980-6745.

Prephysical Therapy Requirements
(1) CHEM C105, CHEM C125, CHEM C106, CHEM C126; (2) PHYS P201 and PHYS P202 or PHYS P221 and PHYS P222; (3) 4 credit hours of anatomy with a laboratory; (4) 4 credit hours of physiology with a laboratory; (5)3 credit hours of basic statistics; (6) 3 credit hours of introductory psychology; (7)3 credit hours of life span Human Development/Psychology; (8) 6 credit hours of social science or humanities electives. This plan of study will satisfy most of the requirements of other institutions. Applicants seeking admission to a physical therapy program should contact the school they are interested in attending for up-to-date information on specific prerequisites and admission requirements.
For further information contact the health professions advisor at (219) 980-6745.

Physician Assistant

Indiana University does not have a degree program in physician assistant studies. However, the courses needed for admission are available at IU Northwest. Admission to most programs requires a minimum of three years (90 credit hours) of study at an accredited college or university. Some programs that offer a master’s degree in physician assistant studies also require a bachelor’s degree. The course requirements vary quite a bit although most programs require two courses of general chemistry with the lab, one course in biology with the lab, one course in microbiology with the lab, two courses in anatomy and physiology with the lab, and two courses in organic chemistry with the lab or one course in organic chemistry and one course in biochemistry. Admission to a physician assistant program generally requires volunteer or paid experience in a health care setting. Applicants seeking admission to a physician assistant program should contact the school they are interested in attending for up-to-date information on specific prerequisites and admission requirements.

For further information contact the health professions advisor at (219) 980-6745.

Podiatry

Indiana University does not have a degree program in podiatry. However, the courses needed for admission are available at IU Northwest. The minimum requirement for admission to a school of podiatry is completion of three academic years (90 credit hours) of study at an accredited college or university. Applicants are strongly encouraged to obtain a baccalaureate degree before entering a college of podiatry. The undergraduate curriculum should include these courses (science courses must include laboratories): 8 credit hours of biology (with a recommendation that 4 of those credits be either cell biology or biochemistry); 8 credit hours of inorganic chemistry; 8 credit hours of organic chemistry; 8 credit hours of physics; and 6 credit hours of English composition and literature.

Further information on the health professions and podiatry may be obtained by contacting the health professions advisor at (219) 980-6745.

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Veterinary

Indiana University does not have a degree program in veterinary medicine. However, the courses needed to apply for admission to such a program are available at IU Northwest.

Candidates must complete a minimum of 70 credit hours of course work before taking the Graduate Record Exam. Minimum requirements are 6 credit hours of English composition; 3 credit hours of speech; 8 credit hours of general biology with laboratories; 16 credit hours of general and organic chemistry with laboratories; one semester of genetics; two semesters of calculus; 8 credit hours of physics with laboratories; 4 credit hours of genetics with laboratory; three semesters of humanities; and 18 credit hours of electives. If an animal nutrition course is not available at the undergraduate campus, a student may take this course after admission to the program.

Further information on the health professions and veterinary medicine may be obtained by contacting the health professions advisor at (219) 980-6745.

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CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

The objective is to train scientists who currently have degrees and work in industries in areas related to the environment. The certificate will have 48 credit hours of prerequisites in the sciences and math.

Prerequisites:

Biology BIOL L101-BIOL L102 (8)
Chemistry CHEM C105-CHEM C106-CHEM C125-CHEM C126-CHEM C341 (13)
Geology GEOL G101-GEOL G102- GEOL G415 (7)
Math MATH M215-MATH M216 (10)
Physics PHYS P201-PHYS P202 or PHYS P221- PHYS P222 (10)

Note: All these courses need not be taken prior to admission to the program, but represent prerequisites for certain courses required in the program.

Certificate:
Minimum of 28 credit hours:
Required courses:

Biology: BIOL L473 Ecology (3); Chemistry: CHEM C303 Environmental Chemistry Lecture (3)
and CHEM C410 Instrumental Analysis (4); SPEA E400 Topics in Environmental Studies (3) and SPEA V550 Topics in Public Affairs: Environmental Law (3)

and 9 hours credit minimum from:

Chemistry: CHEM C361 Physical Chemistry (3), CHEM C310 Analytical Chemistry (5); Geology: GEOL G406 Introduction to Geochemistry (3), GEOL G451 Principles of Hydrogeology (3), GEOL G317 Field and Laboratory Techniques (3); Biology: BIOL Z468 Limnology (4), BIOL L474 Field and Laboratory Ecology (2), BIOL B355 Plant Diversity (3), BIOL Z374 Invertebrate Zoology (3), BIOL Z406 Vertebrate Zoology (4).

A student may opt for a concentration in one of the three areas by taking 9 credit hours in one department or a general certificate by taking courses in more than one department.

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Physics

The courses in this department meet the needs of two classes of students: (1) pre-health professional students and (2) those who wish to acquire a general knowledge of physics for use in other fields. (IU Northwest does not offer a degree in physics.) The department also furnishes the necessary introductory courses for three other classes of students: (1) those who wish to make careers as research physicists in industrial or government laboratories, (2) those who wish to obtain academic positions in universities and colleges, and (3) those who wish to teach in high schools. An adequate background in mathematics is essential for the pursuit of work in physics.

Major in Physics—B.A.

IU Northwest does not offer a major in physics. These requirements are for the Bloomington campus.

Concentration Requirements
Physics: At least 25 credit hours, including PHYS P201-PHYS P202 or PHYS P221-PHYS P222, PHYS P301. Recommended courses are PHYS P309, PHYS P331,PHYS P332, PHYS P340.

Mathematics: MATH M215, MATH M216, and MATH M343 are required.

Minor in Physics

Requirements
16 credit hours including PHYS P201- PHYS P202 or PHYS P221-PHYS P222, plus selections from PHYS P301, PHYS P320, PHYS P331, PHYS or PHYS P340. Alternatives are permissible with departmental approval.

Associate of Arts—Concentration in Physics

Requirements
19 credit hours of physics, including PHYS P201-PHYS P202 or PHYS P221-PHYS P222; PHYS P301 and PHYS P340; MATH M215-MATH M216, and MATH M311 or MATH M313. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Courses for Non-Science Majors

Courses PHYS P101 and PHYS P120 are intended for students majoring in the humanities, social sciences, and education. They assume little or no background in science or mathematics. All courses listed can be used to satisfy divisional distribution requirements; however, credit will be granted for only one of the following sequences: PHYS P101-PHYS P102, PHYS P103-PHYS P104, or PHYS P151-PHYS P152. PHYS P151-PHYS P152 will not fulfill the science requirement for education majors. These courses are not open to physics majors.

Courses for Science Majors

Courses PHYS P201, PHYS P202, PHYS P303, PHYS P310, and PHYS P320 are intended primarily for students majoring in the biological, mathematical, and physical sciences; however, students, especially premedical students, are urged to also consider the courses listed under “Courses for Physics Majors.’’ With the exception of PHYS P310, the courses listed here are not recommended for physics majors.

Courses for Physics Majors

Courses PHYS P221, PHYS P222, PHYS P301, PHYS P309, PHYS P331, PHYS P332, and PHYS P340 are recommended for students who plan to become physics majors at the Bloomington campus and other students who need a rigorous background in physics.

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ASTRONOMY

Course listings in astronomy include AST A100, AST A105, and AST A200.

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Department of Communication

Communication
Telecommunications
Journalism

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COMMUNICATION

About the Program
Major in Communication
Minor in Communication
Interdepartmental Major in Afro-American Studies and Communication
Associate of Arts—Concentration in Communication

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Communication

The communication program provides students with an opportunity to investigate communication processes as they occur within and among individuals, groups, organizations, and societies. Students analyze the human communication process, develop communication skills, and learn how to facilitate the communication of others. For purposes of organization and utility, courses in speech, communication, journalism, and telecommunications have been combined into a single administrative unit within the department.

The major in communication provides the student with a broad-ranged understanding of human communication processes and the ability to apply basic principles, methods, and findings of human communication research in a variety of settings. The major serves as a foundation for professional fields such as public relations, personnel, sales, and training as well as providing excellent preparation for graduate study in communication, law, the ministry, public administration, and business.

Communication (COMM), Journalism (JOUR), Speech (SPCH), and Telecommunications (TEL) courses are listed in separate sections.

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Major in Communication

Requirements
A minimum of 30 credit hours in courses labeled SPCH, COMM, TEL, or JOUR, including SPCH S121, SPCH S122, and a minimum of 15 credit hours at the 300-400 level. After completing 24 credit hours in the major, students must also take SPCH S400 (the capstone course).

Most of the courses fall into one of three informal emphasis areas. A minimum of 12 credit hours in one area constitutes an emphasis in that area. The emphasis areas are as follows:

Emphasis Areas for Communication Majors
Rhetorical and Organizational Communication

SPCH S223 Business and Professional Communication
SPCH S302 Rhetoric and Society
SPCH S320 Advanced Public Speaking
SPCH S321 Rhetoric and Modern Discourse
JOUR C327 Writing for Publication
SPCH S336 Topics: Radio Production and Direction
SPCH S405 Human Communication Theory
SPCH S424 Empirical Research Methods in Speech Communication
SPCH S427 Cross-Cultural Communication
SPCH S440 Organizational Communication
SPCH S450 Gender and Communication

Media Studies and Cultural Communication

TEL C200 Introduction to Mass Communication
JOUR C327 Writing for Publication
SPCH S336 Topics: Radio Production and Direction
COMM C351 TV Production I
SPCH S405 Human Communication Theory
SPCH S424 Empirical Research Methods in Speech Communication
SPCH S427 Cross-Cultural Communication
SPCH S450 Gender and Communication
COMM M460 Culture and Mass Communication
COMM C462 Media Theory and Criticism

Relational Communication
SPCH S322 Advanced Interpersonal Communication
SPCH S329 Discussion and Group Dynamics
SPCH S405 Human Communication Theory
SPCH S424 Empirical Research Methods in Speech Communication
SPCH S427 Cross-Cultural Communication
SPCH S440 Organizational Communication SPCH S450 Gender and Communication
SPCH S480 Personal Narrative Research and Performance

The Department of Communication is committed to making the communication major available to part-time and working students. Multiple courses are offered in the evening and during the summer to meet diverse scheduling needs. Communication majors must also complete the general education requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree in the College of Arts and Sciences as well as general university requirements.

Internships
Internships are available for communication majors, mostly during fall semester. SPCH S490 requirements include minimums of junior or senior standing, 21 credit hours of completed communication courses, a 3.0 grade point average in the major, an overall 2.5 grade point average (or higher), faculty supervision, and departmental approval. Internship credit hours count as electives toward the total number of credit hours needed for graduation, but do not count in the major.

Minor
Communication majors are required to augment their academic program in communication with a minor (minimum of 15 credit hours) in another discipline. In consultation with a faculty advisor, the student selects the minor area.

Minor in Communication

Requirements
SPCH S121, SPCH S122, and SPCH S223 plus a minimum of 6 credit hours at the 300-400 level.

With careful planning, it is possible for students to eventually earn a minor through successfully completing required courses offered during a combination of evenings, summer sessions, and weekends.

Interdepartmental Major in Afro-American Studies and Communication

The Departments of Communication and Minority Studies offer a thematically integrated major in Afro-American and Communication Studies. This interdepartmental major is designed for students who wish to combine substantial Afro-American studies with their work in the communication major. (Details available under the “Department of Minority Studies” section of this bulletin.)

Associate of Arts—Concentration in Communication

Requirements
SPCH S121, SPCH S122, and three 3 credit hour speech, communication, telecommunications, or journalism electives at the 200 level or above. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences. With careful planning, it is possible for students to eventually earn an Associate of Arts— Concentration in Communication through successfully completing required courses offered during a combination of evenings, summer sessions, and weekends.

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TELECOMMUNICATIONS

IU Northwest does not offer a major or minor in telecommunications at this time. Courses in Telecommunications are TEL R204 and TEL C200.

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JOURNALISM

IU Northwest does not offer a major or minor in journalism at this time. Courses offered in Journalism are JOUR J200 and JOUR C327.

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Department of Computer Information Systems (CIS)

Admission
Bachelor of Science
Minor in Computer Information Systems
Interdepartmental Major: CIS and Fine Arts
Interdepartmental Major: CIS and Mathematics
Associate of Arts—Concentration in Computer Information Systems
Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Computer Information Systems

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Admission

Admission to any of the programs in this department will be determined on a competitive basis. Consult department chairperson for specific details concerning application requirements and procedures.

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Bachelor of Science

Major in Computer Information Systems (CIS)

Requirements
  1. Complete a minimum of 120 credit hours. At least 36 of those credit hours must be at the 300-400 level.
  2. Complete distribution requirements.
    Group I: English Composition and Mathematics.
    1. English: ENG W131 Elementary Composition and ENG W231 Professional Writing Skills (6 cr.). ENG W231 will complete the Intensive Writing requirement.
    2. Mathematics: MATH M118 and either MATH M119 or MATH M215 (6-8 cr.).

    Group II: Foreign Language or Western Civilization (6 cr. for history option).
    May be completed by satisfactory completion of a course in a foreign language numbered 250 or above, or by satisfactory completion of HIST H113 and HIST H114.
    Group III: Distribution (22-23 cr.)
    1. Mathematics, physical sciences, geography, and life sciences (4-5 cr.). Must include a III-A laboratory course.
    2. Social and Behavioral Sciences (6-12 cr.). Course distribution between Groups III-B and III-C must total 18 credit hours.
    3. Humanities (6-12 cr.). Must include a III-C laboratory course. Course distribution between Groups III-B and III-C must total 18 credit hours.
    A complete list of courses that fulfill these requirements is located at the end of the College of Arts and Sciences section of the bulletin. Courses taken in the major (CIS) may not be applied to these requirements.
    Group IV: Culture Studies.
    May be satisfied by successful completion of one course in the cultures of minorities in the United States or Latin America or non-Western cultures. Such a course will be counted toward graduation in both categories, Group III and Group IV.
    Group V: Requirements for the Major—Computer Information Systems Core (45 cr.):

    CSCI C106, DPIS D150, CSCI A106 (CSCI A201 and CSCI A302) or (CSCI C201 and CSCI C307) or (CSCI C203 and CSCI C320) or (CSCI A210 and CSCI A346), CSCI C343, CSCI A247, the capstone requirement of either (DPIS D330 and DPIS D446) or (CSCI C445 and CSCI C446), DPIS D345, DPIS D350, CSCI Y398 or CSCI C390, electives.

    Group VI: Minor. Students must select a minor in any area.
    (A Business or SPEA minor is very marketable with the Computer Information Systems degree.)
    Group VII: Electives and Internship.
    Each student will be required to gain sufficient elective or internship credit to meet the minimum 120 credit hour requirement. A maximum of 6 credit hours may be awarded for successful completion of an internship. Credit not given for both COAS W398 and CSCI Y398 in excess of 6 credit hours. The exact number of credits awarded to each internship will be determined according to the perceived learning opportunities offered.
  3. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.
  4. Microcomputer Applications Proficiency Test.
    A microcomputer applications proficiency test allows students to test out of CSCI A106 Introduction to Computing (3 cr.). The test consists of online modules that measure the student's ability to perform various tasks upon actual computer files. Achieving a total minimum score of 70 percent would allow a student to test out of CSCI A106. However, in order to receive credit hours for the course, a student must satisfactorily complete either CSCI A285 or DPIS D290 with a C (2.0) or higher. Such a student will be eligible for 3 credit hours of special credit with a grade of S. It is the responsibility of the student to request that CIS forward this information to his or her division.

    Each module will be graded separately. Achieving a minimum score of 70 percent for a module would allow a student to test out of that particular module. CIS provides a method for students to receive instruction only in the areas where placement scores indicate that they are deficient by teaching three 1 credit hour courses taught concurrently with CSCI A106: CSCI A103 (word processing), CSCI A104 (spreadsheets), and CSCI A105 (relational database).

    Consult the department chairperson for specific details concerning registration requirements, procedures and testing schedules.

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Minor in Computer Information Systems

PC Applications Option (15 cr.)

Requirements:
CSCI C106, CSCI A106, and 9 hours at the 200 to 400 level. Students must also complete general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences. Please see a CIS Department advisor for combinations of classes if you have a specific interest in a particular area.

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Interdepartmental Major: CIS and Fine Arts

Bachelor of Science in Computer-based Graphic Arts

Computer-based graphic artists are sought-after in the job market. The students who graduate with this degree will have a strong background in artistic (fine arts) and computer (CIS) skills. Computer-based graphic arts are widely used tools in business, industry, and the arts.

The student will have two official advisors—one in the Department of Fine Arts and one in Computer Information Systems—who will help plan the course of study in detail and with frequent consultations.

The general degree requirements are the same as for the Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems, except that the Group I requirement consists of only W131, W231, and M118 and Group V Major requirements are replaced by the following:

Group V Interdepartmental Major Requirements (45-47 cr.)

Department of Fine Arts (31-38 cr.)
FINA F100 or FINA F102, 3 credit hours in the A100 series (history of art), 3 credit hours of 300- or 400- level art history, FINA S250, FINA S351, FINA S352, S353, S400 (1-3 cr.), S413, S414, S415, FINA A435, and 1 to 3 credit hours of FINA S497. Complete requirements 5-7 for Major in Studio Practice.

Computer Information Systems (18 cr.)
CSCI A106, CSCI A250, CSCI A348 (CSCI A340, or DPIS D250, or DPIS D490) and 6 credit hours of CSCI C390.

The capstone course requirement for the degree will be fulfilled by completing FINA A435, FINA S497, and by participating in the graduating senior exhibition.
For Bachelor of Science degrees, all students must complete the group VI minor.

There is a Bachelor of Arts version of this interdepartmental degree. See the Fine Arts Department section for details.

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Interdepartmental Major: CIS and Mathematics

Bachelor of Science in Simulation/Modeling Analysis

The students who graduate with this degree will have a strong background in theoretical (mathematics) and practical (CIS) skills. Modeling and computer simulation are widely used tools in business, industry, and research. Computer simulation allows an investigator to test proposed alterations to existing systems as well as proposed designs for entirely new systems.

Work in this area requires strong mathematical, statistical, and computer skills. This program should appeal to students interested in mathematics, computers, business, and the sciences.

The student will have two official advisors—one in Mathematics and one in Computer Information Systems—who will help plan the course of study in detail.
The general degree requirements are the same as for the Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems, except that the Group V major requirements are replaced by the following:

Group V Interdepartmental Major Requirements (43-45 cr.)

Department of Mathematics (22 cr.)
MATH M215, MATH M216, MATH M301, MATH M360, MATH M447, and MATH M448.

Computer Information Systems (21-23 cr.)
CSCI C106, DPIS D150, CSCI C201 or CSCI A201, CSCI C307 or CSCI A302, CSCI C343, DPIS D410, and 1 to 3 credit hours of CSCI C390 or DPIS D390.

The capstone course requirement for the degree will be the course CSCI C390 or DPIS D390 for which the student will write a complete project-thesis starting with a theoretical model of a problem and then writing a computer program solution in C++, Java, or appropriate computer language. The possibility of internships also exists, since the degree is highly application-oriented. An especially rewarding situation would combine the internship and the capstone experience into a single project-thesis.

For Bachelor of Science degrees, all students must complete the Group VI minor.

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Associate of Arts—Concentration in Computer Information Systems

Requirements (16-17 cr.)
CSCI C106, DPIS D150, CSCI A106, (CSCI A201 and CSCI A302) or (CSCI C201 and CSCI C307) or (CSCI A210 and CSCI A346) or (CSCI C203 and CSCI C320). Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Computer Information Systems (30cr.)

A postbaccalaureate certificate in computer information systems is offered for students with baccalaureate degrees in another discipline who wish to complement their undergraduate education with course work similar to the requirement for a Bachelor of Science degree in computer information systems.

The postbaccalaureate certificate program enables the holder of a bachelor’s degree with a major in another field to obtain formal recognition of training in the computer field. Students select one of five options after successfully meeting or completing the following prerequisites: ENG W131 and ENG W231 and MATH M118.

Requirements
CSCI C106, CSIC A106, DPIS D150 and seven more courses with at least four of those courses taken at the 300 to 400 level. Please see a CIS department advisor for combinations of classes if you have a specific interest in a particular area.

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Department of Economics

The economics program is housed in the School of Business and Economics. Degrees in economics are awarded by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Major in Economics

Requirements
ECON E103; ECON E104; ECON E270; ECON E321 or BUS G300 or equivalent course work; ECON E322 or equivalent course work; and sufficient additional hours in Economics to total a minimum of 27 credit hours. Students may not count ECON E309 for credit toward the economics major. Students interested in majoring in economics should consult with a member of the economics faculty for additional information. Students planning to pursue a graduate degree in economics should plan a program of study, in consultation with a departmental advisor, that includes course work in economic theory and additional course work in mathematics and statistics. Students are responsible for completing the prerequisites for all economics courses and for fulfilling the general education requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Minor in Economics

Requirements
ECON E103; ECON E104; ECON E270; ECON E321 or BUS G300 or equivalent course work; and sufficient additional course work in economics to total a minimum of 18 credit hours.

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Department of English

Major in English
Interdepartmental Major in Afro-American Studies and English
Minors in English
Associate of Arts—Concentration in English
Courses in English

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Major in English

Requirements
At least 10 courses above the 100 level, of which at least five must be on the 300-400 level; total of 30 credit hours.

There are four area requirements:

  1. English literature before 1700, to be satisfied by ENG L211 or by two courses from the sequence of courses from ENG L303 to ENG L320.
  2. English literature since 1700, to be satisfied by ENG L212 or by two courses from the sequence of courses from ENG L325 to ENG L348.
  3. Major plays of Shakespeare, ENG L315.
  4. American literature, to be satisfied by one course from the sequence of courses from ENG L350 to ENG L363.
  5. ENG L440 (also fulfills capstone requirement).
  6. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.
Writing courses (ENG W231, ENG W233, ENG W301, ENG W303, and ENG W350) count as English electives.

Recommendation
The department recommends that majors considering graduate work in English take elective courses in a variety of periods of English and American literature.

Students who expect to go on to graduate work are advised to take substantial work in at least one foreign language.

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Interdepartmental Major in Afro-American Studies and English

The Departments of Minority Studies and English offer a thematically integrated major in English and Afro-American studies. This interdepartmental major is designed for students who wish to combine substantial Afro-American studies with their work in the American and English literature major. (Details are available under the Department of Minority Studies section of this bulletin.)

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Minors in English

Students must complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences. Following are the requirements for three options for minors.

Literature Option

  1. ENG L202 or ENG L203 or ENG L204 or ENG L205
  2. ENG L211 and ENG L212
  3. ENG L351 or ENG L352 or ENG L354
  4. One 300-level course in English literature
Writing Option
  1. ENG W231 and ENG W233 or ENG W350
  2. ENG W301 or ENG W303
  3. 6 credit hours from among ENG L202, ENG L203, ENG L204, ENG L205, ENG W132 and either ENG W233 or ENG W350-if both are taken.
Professional Writing Option
  1. ENG W132 or ENGW233 or SPCH S223 or PHLS P306
  2. ENG W231 and ENGW490
  3. ENGW233 (if not taken under number 1 above) or ENG W350.
  4. ENGW398

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Associate of Arts—Concentration in English

Requirements
ENG L101, L102, and any three of the following courses: ENG L202, ENG L203, ENG L204, ENG L205, ENG L207, ENG L211, or ENG L212. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Courses in English

Developmental
ENG W031 is an English developmental course.

Composition
Courses in composition include ENG W130, ENG W131, ENG W132, and ENG W140.

Students are not permitted to register for ENG W131 until they have taken English placement exams administered by the University Division. On the basis of the placement test scores, the student may be counseled to take ENG W031 or ENG W130 prior to ENG W131.

Writing
Courses in writing include ENG W201, ENG W231, ENG W233, ENG W301, ENG W303, ENG W350, ENG W398, and ENG W490. Before students are eligible to take further courses in writing, they must have completed ENG W131.

Literature
Courses in literature include ENG L101, ENG L102; the following courses are open to sophomores, juniors, seniors, and to second-semester freshmen who have completed either ENG L101 or ENG L102: ENG L201, ENG L202, ENG L203, ENG L204, ENG L205, ENG L207, ENG L211, ENG L212, ENG L295.

The following courses are ordinarily recommended for juniors and seniors: ENG L305, ENG L308, ENG L311, ENG L315, ENG L326, ENG L332, ENG L335, ENG L345, ENG L346, ENG L347, ENG L348, ENG L351, ENG L352, ENG L354, ENG L355, ENG L357, ENG L358, ENG L364, ENG L365, ENG L366, ENG L369, ENG L370, ENG L381, ENG L382, ENG L390, ENG L440, ENG L495.

Language
Courses in the English language include ENG G205, ENG G207, and ENG G310.

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Department of Fine Arts

Fine Arts

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FINE ARTS

Two types of courses are offered: history of art, taught by illustrated lectures and class discussion; and practice of art, consisting of studio work on creative and technical problems.

Major in Studio Practice
Interdepartmental Major: CIS and Fine Arts
Minor in Art History (15 cr.)
Minor in Fine Arts (15 cr.)
Associate of Arts—Concentration in Fine Arts
Courses in Fine Arts

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Major in Studio Practice

The studio practice program enables the student to see, to formulate, and to articulate visual concepts through the manipulation of forms and materials. Its basic aim is to develop an awareness of visual expression within the humanist tradition.

Requirements

  1. 6 credit hours in the A100 series (history of art).
  2. 6 credit hours in art history at the 300 and 400 level.
  3. 9 credit hours of fundamental studio.
  4. 25 to 34 credit hours of studio courses above the 100 level; must include a minimum of three and a maximum of six of the introductory (200-level) courses.
  5. FINA A435 Art Theory for Graduating Seniors must be taken during the fall semester. During the final year, each student must assume full responsibility for mounting a personal exhibit that will include terminal and representative work in the major field and, if applicable, in the minor field as well. To meet this requirement, the student must
    1. File in the departmental office an "Intent to Graduate" one calendar year prior to the intended completion date. You must meet with your principal teacher to determine if you are prepared to enroll in FINA S497.
    2. Submit a portfolio of the most recent and best work in the major discipline to the departmental office before the completion of the fall semester, prior to enrolling in FINA S497. The studio program in the final year shall be coordinated with the evaluation of the portfolio.
    3. Enroll in FINA S497 Independent Study in Studio Art for the spring semester during the final year.
    4. Prepare the exhibit under the principal teacher's guidance. This will include drafting a descriptive statement about the work in the exhibit: goals, intent, approach, techniques, etc.
    5. Be prepared to exhibit in accordance with the departmental schedule at any time during the final semester.
      FINA A435 and FINA S497 fulfill the capstone requirement.
  6. Graduating Senior Exhibit.
  7. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.
A faculty committee whose evaluation will be used to determine the studio course grade in the final semester will judge the Graduating Senior Exhibit and the descriptive statement.

Transfer Credit in Studio
All incoming students who want to transfer studio credit from another institution must submit a portfolio. This should be in the form of slides, photographs, or compact discs, and should
include the better work done in each course for which credit transfer is desired. The faculty shall devise a minimal studio program in residence, specifically based upon evaluation of the portfolio, for each transfer student.

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Interdepartmental Major: CIS and Fine Arts

Bachelor of Arts in Computer-based Graphic Arts

The student will have two official advisors, one in the Department of Fine Arts and one in Computer Information Systems, who will help plan the course of study in detail with frequent consultations.

Requirements in Computer Information Systems (18 cr.)
CSCI A106 Introduction to Computing (3 cr.)
CSCI A250 Introduction to Digital Application (3 cr.)
CSCI A348 Mastering the World Wide Web (3 cr.)
CSCI A340 An Introduction to Web Programming (3 cr.)
or DPIS D250 Multimedia (3 cr.)
or DPIS D490 Current Directions in Data Processing and Information Systems (3 cr.)
CSCI C390 Individual Programming Laboratory (6 cr.)

Requirements in Department of Fine Arts (31-41 cr.)
FINA F100 Fundamental Studio-Drawing (3 cr.)
or FINA F102 Fundamental Studio-2D (3 cr.)
3 credit hours in the FINA A100 series (history of art)
3 credit hours of FINA 300-or 400-level art history
FINA S250 Introduction to Design Practice (3 cr.)
FINA S351 Graphic Design II (3 cr.)
FINA S352 Production for Graphic Design (3 cr.)
FINA S353 Graphic Design IV (3 cr.)
FINA S400 Independent Studio Projects (1-6 cr.)
FINA S413 Typography (2 cr.)
FINA S414 Layout (2 cr.)
FINA S415 Package Design (2 cr.)
FINA A435 Art Theory (2 cr.)
FINA S497 Independent Study in Fine Arts (1-6 cr.)
Complete requirements 5-7 for major in studio practice

There is a Bachelor of Science version of this interdepartmental degree. See the Computer Information Systems Department section for details.

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Minor in Art History (15 cr.)

6 credit hours of FINA A100 level art history courses 9 credit hours of 300- or 400-level art history courses, excluding FINA A435

Minor in Fine Arts (15 cr.)

Six options: Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Photography, Sculpture/Ceramics, Graphic Design

Required courses in all options:
One of the following: FINA F100, FINA F101, or FINA F102—3 credit hours
Art history (A100 level)—3 credit hours
Studio art—9 credit hours
Plus electives with emphasis in option area (see department for elective courses)

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Associate of Arts—Concentration in Fine Arts

Requirements
One course in FINA A100 level art history (FINA A101 or FINA A102), one course in fundamental studio art (FINA F100 or FINA F101 or FINA F102), three to four courses in studio in one medium or in a variety of media to be chosen from drawing, painting, photography, ceramics, sculpture, printmaking, graphic design. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Courses in Fine Arts

Courses classified as History of Art include
FINA A101, FINA A102, FINA A160, FINA A331, FINA A332, FINA A340, FINA A341, FINA A342, FINA A435, FINA A442, and FINA A449.

Courses classified as Practice of Art include FINA F100, FINA F101, FINA F102, FINA S200, FINA S230, FINA S240, FINA S250, FINA S260, FINA S270, FINA S291, FINA S301, FINA S331, FINA S337, FINA S338, FINA S341, FINA S344, FINA S351, FINA S352, FINA S353FINA S361, FINA S371, FINA S392, FINA S400, FINA S401, FINA S413, FINA S414, FINA S415, FINA S420, FINA S431, FINA S438, FINA S441, FINA S444, FINA S447, FINA S451, FINA S461, FINA S471, FINA S490, FINA S492, FINA S497, FINA H100.

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Department of Geosciences

(Geography, Geology, and Valparaiso-Indiana Geography and Geology Association)

Geography
Geology
Minors in Geology and Earth Science
Associate of Arts—Concentration in Geology
Valparaiso-Indiana Geography and Geology Association (VIGGA)

Geography

No major is offered in geography at IU Northwest. The program in geography is designed to serve the following purposes: (1) contribute to the development of an informed citizenry; (2) provide specific skills and knowledge of the discipline for those who plan to pursue careers in (a) teaching geography, social studies, and/or earth science, (b) cartography and/or air photo analysis, (c) urban and/or regional planning; (3) provide the background for graduate study.

Geology

The Department of Geosciences offers the B.A. and B.S. degrees and furnishes training for (1) those who desire to become professional geoscientists and seek careers in university or college teaching, in industry, in research laboratories, or in federal or state geological surveys; (2 those who wish to teach earth science at the secondary school level; and (3) those who seek a general knowledge of the geosciences and their relationship to the other sciences. The department offers the learning experience through the traditional lecture series, laboratories, seminars, independent study in the field, laboratory and library, and through field trips to local sites and to geologically intriguing areas of North America. Each course for majors contains a field trip, and the department conducts one trip of two weeks duration after the spring semester.

Major in Geology—B.A.
Major in Geology—B.S.

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Major in Geology—B.S.

Degree Requirements

  1. Complete a minimum of 120 credit hours
  2. ENG W131 Elementary Composition I
  3. Fulfill one of the following: Two semesters of modern language at second-year level or Western Civilization I and II, HIST H113-HIST H114
  4. Arts and humanities, minimum 6 credit hours; social and behavioral sciences, minimum 6 credit hours with a total of 18 credit hours in these two categories.
  5. Geological Sciences Core Courses (32-34 credit hours)
  6. Any one of the following 100-level courses and GEOL G102 laboratory: GEOL G101 Introduction to Earth Science (3 cr.)
    and
    G102 Introduction to Earth Science Lab (1 cr.)
    GEOL G107 Environmental Geology (3 cr.)
    and
    G102 Introduction to Earth Science Lab (1 cr.)
    GEOL G103 Earth Materials and Processes (3 cr.)
    and G102 Introduction to Earth Science Lab (1 cr.)
    GEOL G209 History of the Earth (4 cr.)
    GEOL G221 Introductory Mineralogy (4 cr.)
    GEOL G222 Introduction to Petrology (4 cr.)
    GEOL G317 Field and Laboratory Techniques (3 cr.)
    GEOL G323 Structural Geology (4 cr.)
    GEOL G334 Principles of Sedimentation and Stratigraphy (4 cr.)
    GEOL G429 Field Geology in the Rocky Mountains (6 cr.)
    or other chairperson-approved geology field camp (5-6 credits) (fulfills capstone requirement for B.S. in Geology)
    GEOL G490 Undergraduate Seminar (fulfills capstone requirement for B.S. in Geology)
  7. Option 1 or 2:
  8. Complete one of the following:
    Two 400-level lecture-based geology courses (6-8 cr.) or
    One 400-level lecture-based geology course (3-4 cr.) and one semester of research or internship fulfilled by one of the following courses:
    G407 Senior Science Project (3 cr.)
    G408 Senior Science Project (3 cr.)
    G460 Internship in Geology (3 cr.)
  9. Allied Sciences
  10. Chemistry (10 cr.) CHEM C105-CHEM C106, CHEM C125-CHEM C126
    Physics (10 cr.) PHYS P221, PHYS P222 Mathematics (10 cr.) MATH M215, MATH M216 Biology (3 cr.)
  11. A 300- or 400-level math, chemistry or physics course.
  12. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.
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Major in Geology—B.A.

Degree Requirements

  1. Geological Sciences Core Courses (25 cr.)
  2. Any one of the following 100-level courses and GEOL G102 laboratory:
    GEOL G101 Introduction to Earth Science (3 cr.)
    and G102 Introduction to Earth Science Lab (1 cr.)
    GEOL G107 Environmental Geology (3 cr.)
    and
    G102 Introduction to Earth Science Lab (1 cr.)
    GEOL G103 Earth Materials and Processes (3 cr.)
    and
    G102 Introduction to Earth Science Lab (1 cr.)
    GEOL G209 History of the Earth (4 cr.)
    GEOL G221 Introductory Mineralogy (4 cr.)
    GEOL G222 Introduction to Petrology (4 cr.)
    GEOL G317 Field and Laboratory Techniques (3 cr.)
    Any two 300- or 400-level lecture-based geology courses.
    (The following GEOL (geology) courses fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences capstone requirement for the B.A. in Geology: G323, G406, G413, G415, G435, G451, G490)
  3. Ancillary Sciences (15 cr.): Students must complete one of the following sequences
  4. CHEM C105-CHEM C125 and 10 additional credit hours of chemistry, mathematics, or physics or
    Two semesters of college-level chemistry with corresponding laboratories and 5 credit hours of mathematics (mathematics courses must be at or above the 100 level; MATH M100 and T-courses are excluded), or physics.
  5. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Minors in Geology and Earth Science

(16 credit hours)

A minor in geology offers students majoring in other disciplines a solid background in the geological sciences. It should prove especially useful for students seeking careers with interdisciplinary emphasis (e.g., chemistry or biology). The earth science minor is designed to provide students planning careers involving the management of resources with sufficient background to understand basic geologic principles and their relationships to human activities on the earth.

Geology Minor (16cr.)
Any one of the following 100-level courses and GEOL G102 laboratory:
GEOL G101 Introduction to Earth Science (3 cr.)
and G102 Introduction to Earth Science Lab (1 cr.)
GEOL G107 Environmental Geology (3 cr.)
and G102 Introduction to Earth Science Lab (1 cr.)
GEOL G103 Earth Materials and Processes (3 cr.)
and G102 Introduction to Earth Science Lab (1 cr.)
GEOL G209 Additional course work may be chosen in conjunction with a geology advisor but must consist of at least two lecture-based GEOL (geology) courses.

Earth Science Minor (16cr.)
Any one of the following 100-level courses and GEOL G102 laboratory:
GEOL G101 Introduction to Earth Science (3 cr.)
and
G102 Introduction to Earth Science Lab (1 cr.)
GEOL G107 Environmental Geology (3 cr.)
and
G102 Introduction to Earth Science Lab (1 cr.)
GEOL G103 Earth Materials and Processes (3 cr.)
and G102 Introduction to Earth Science Lab (1 cr.)
GEOG G110 (3 cr.)
GEOL G209 (4 cr.)

Additional course work may be chosen in conjunction with a geology advisor but must consist of at least two lecture-based GEOL (geology) or GEOG (geography) courses.

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Associate of Arts—Concentration in Geology

Requirements
Any one of the following 100-level courses and GEOL G102 laboratory:
GEOL G101 Introduction to Earth Science (3 cr.)
and G102 Introduction to Earth Science Lab (1 cr.)
GEOL G107 Environmental Geology (3 cr.)
and G102 Intro. to Earth Science Lab (1 cr.)
GEOL G103 Earth Materials and Processes (3 cr.)
and G102 Introduction to Earth Science Lab (1 cr.)
GEOL G209 (4 cr.)
GEOL G221 (4 cr.)

One additional lecture-based course in GEOL (geology) or GEOL G317 Field and Lab Techniques. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Valparaiso-Indiana Geography and Geology Association (VIGGA)

The purpose of this association is to provide educational opportunities on the undergraduate level in the geological and geographical sciences to the students enrolled at Valparaiso University and IU Northwest. Provisions are made for full-time undergraduate students in those academic disciplines to enroll for the fall, spring, and summer under the following conditions:

  1. Students may take a maximum of two courses per semester at the other participating institution.
  2. Those courses will be treated as part of the student’s normal load at his or her home institution, and tuition and fees will be paid accordingly.
  3. The total number of credit hours to be taken will be determined by the home institution.
  4. Students at IU Northwest who wish to take courses at Valparaiso University should obtain the recommendation of the chairperson of the Department of Geosciences at IU Northwest.
  5. Grades earned shall be recorded at the home institution.
  6. A grade point average of 2.0 must be achieved in VIGGA courses to qualify the student to register for courses at the host institution for the following semester.

Students matriculating at IU Northwest may take courses among the following offered at Valparaiso: 101, World Human Geography; 102, Geography of the Non-Industrialized World; 104, Geomorphology; 200, American Ethnic Geography; 201, Economic Geography; 210, Current Themes in Geography; 215, Introduction to Geographic Information Systems; 225, Cartography; 230, Remote Sensing in Geography; 260, Environmental Conversation; 274, North American Indian on Film; 301, Regional Geographies of the World; 318, Field Study in European Geography; 320, Urban Geography; 321, Urban and Regional Planning; 360, Statistical Analysis in Geography; 361, Research Design; 385/585, Field Study; 414/515, Advanced Geographic Information; 466/566, Profession of Geography; 470/570, Political Geography; 474/574, Historical Geography of the United States; 486, Internship in Geography; 490/590, Selected Topics in Geography; 495, Independent Study; 497, Honors Work in Geography; 498, Honors Candidacy in Geography. See the Valparaiso University catalog for course descriptions.

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Health Information Technology

Educational Program
Admission

Affiliated with all Lake County hospitals and several others.
The health technician is a professional skilled in the collection, analysis, and reporting of health care data and provision of clinical data support to health care information systems operation.

The graduate health information technician generally works in the health information department of a hospital, ambulatory care facility, or other type of health care facility. Some of the functions are supervising within the health information department; coordinating flow of health information to all departments of the hospital; compiling statistics, analyzing health record data for electronic completeness and accuracy; coding and classifying diagnoses and procedures that impact facility reimbursement; assigning diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) or ambulatory payment classifications (APCs); operating a cancer registry; functioning as a primary officer for the facility; preparing special studies and tabulating data for research; and performing quality, management and utilization management activities, and other performance improvement activities.

Graduates are eligible to apply to write the American Health Information Management Association National Certification exam. Upon passing this exam, they may use the initials RHIT, Registered Health Information Technician.

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EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM

Length of the Program
The Health Information Technology Program is two years in length if the student attends on a full-time basis. Opportunities are available for progression through the program on a part-time basis.

Structure of the Professional Program
Health Information Technology core courses are offered primarily during the day. General-education courses are offered both day and evening.

Design of the Professional Curriculum
Students accepted into the Health Information Technology Program typically begin the course of study in the fall semester. The curriculum consists of general-education courses, technical courses in health information technology, and clinical experience in health care facilities in the Lake County area. The Health Information Technology Program is designed to:

  • Provide educational experiences to prepare students for beginning a career as a health information technician.
  • Provide concentrated clinical experiences by a rotation schedule through the hospitals and other health care institutions in the community.
  • Provide the medical community with individuals qualified to effectively carry out the functions of the health information management discipline.
  • Contribute to the liberal education of the students by providing a core of general education courses.
  • Qualify students for progression to a baccalaureate degree in specific areas.
  • Assist students in reaching their goals by providing
    academic, occupational, and personal guidance.

Location of Clinical Sites
The program utilizes all hospitals in Lake County, Indiana; one hospital in Porter County; two hospitals in LaPorte County; and two hospitals in Cook County, Illinois. Additional nonacute care facilities throughout the county are also utilized.

Additional Cost
In addition to regular university fees, students are responsible for the cost of a physical examination before attending clinical sites. They are also responsible for any travel expenses incurred as part of the clinical experience.

Opportunity for Students to Work
Many students accept part-time employment in local health care facilities while completing the professional course work.

Program Facilities
The Health Information Technology Program offices and classrooms are located in Hawthorn Hall at IUNorthwest.

Accreditation
The Health Information Technology Program of IU Northwest is fully accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education.

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ADMISSION

General Information
Admission to the program is competitive; therefore, completion of the corequisites does not guarantee admission to the program.

Criteria Used for Selection of Class
Students may apply for admission to the Health Information Technology Program after qualifying for regular admission to Indiana University. Admission to the program is based upon each applicant’s high school and/or college grade point average, SAT scores, and a personal interview.

Class Size
24 students each fall semester.

Specific Requirements
In addition to the Allied Health Sciences admission policies and procedures found at the beginning of the bulletin, the following admission policies apply to the Health Information Technology Program at IU Northwest:

Application Deadline
April 1 of the year of anticipated entry.

Total Number of Prerequisite Credit Hours
This is a direct high school entry program.

Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average
C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale). Grades from remedial courses are not figured into the cumulative grade point average.

Distribution of Credit Hours in Specific Areas
Students must complete 26 credit hours in liberal arts as part of the degree requirements.

Limitations of Course Work
Remedial courses may not be counted as credit hours toward a degree. Courses completed in the former Division of General and Technical Studies do not count toward a degree.

Minimum Specific Grade Point Average
The program computes a selected course grade point average based on courses the student may have taken that are required by the program. Grades from remedial course are not included.

Interview
All qualified applicants must participate in an interview.

Technical Standards
See Allied Health Sciences technical standards.

Medical Requirement
Documentation of completion of a physical examination is required prior to placement at a clinical site.

Indiana Residents Preference Policy
See Allied Health Sciences policy.

Volunteer Experience
While volunteer experience is not required, it is very helpful in making a career choice.

Health Information Technology Curriculum (65 cr.)

Course No. Title Credit Hours
Fall Semester
ENG W131 Elementary Composition I 3
PHSL P261 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4
AHLT M1951 Medical Terminology  3
AHLT M1201 Health Statistics 2
CSCI A106 Introduction to Microcomputers and Computing  3
15
Spring Semester
PHSL P262 Human Anatomy and Physiology II  4
AHLT M1011 Introduction to Health Records  5
AHLT M1 071 Computer Applications in Health Information Technology 2
PSY P101 Introductory Psychology I  3
14
Summer Session I
AHLT M1021 Professional Practice Experience I 3
Fall Semester
AHLT M2011 Coding and Classification Systems 5
AHLT M2022 Professional Practice Experience II 5
AHLT M2451 Health Record Law  2
AHLT R2002 Pathology 3
SOC S161 Principles of Sociology 3
18
Spring Semester
AHLT M2001 Supervision in Health Information Services 3
AHLT M2031 Health Care Delivery and Quality Management 4
AHLT M2042 Professional Practice Experience III 2
BUS Z302 Managing and Behavior in Organizations 3
SPCH S121 Public Speaking or 3
SPCH S122 Interpersonal Communication 15

1 Professional core course: A grade of C (2.0) or higher is required in order to take professional core courses that occur later in the course sequence for this major.
2 Core course: A grade of C or higher is required for graduation from this program.

Department of History/Philosophy and Religious Studies

History

The Department of History offers students a wide range of courses in American, European, and Asian history, along with other courses in non-Western history and historiography. The department also crosslists courses with Minority Studies and Women’s Studies. The goals of the department are to teach analysis of texts, research skills, and critical thinking, along with the local, national, and global interconnectedness of historical events.

Major in History
Major in History with an Associate of Arts in Latino Studies
Minor in History
Associate of Arts—Concentration in History
Departmental Honors Program
Courses in History
Philosophy and Religious Studies
Major in Philosophy
Minor in Philosophy
Associate of Arts—Concentration in Philosophy
Courses in Philosophy

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Major in History

Requirements
HIST H105-HIST H106 and 24 additional credit hours in history courses numbered 200-499, including a minimum of one course in United States history, one course in European history (from the Middle Ages to the present), and one course in other areas or topics in history (e.g., ancient, non-European, non-U.S.). Before the final semester of senior year, majors must also take at least two HIST J495 proseminar courses (HIST J495 fulfills capstone requirement.

The Department of History accepts any Latino studies courses with history designations toward the B.A. in history. Additionally, we will accept one CHRI number taken by students toward an A.A. in Latino studies and apply it to the B.A. in history toward completion of the required 24 credits of history courses at the 200 level and above.

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Major in History with an Associate of Arts in Latino Studies

The Latino Studies program in conjunction with the Department of History offers a program of study leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree (major) in history and an Associate of Arts degree in Latino Studies.
The Department of History accepts any Latino studies courses with history designations toward the B.A. in history. Additionally, we will accept one CHRI number taken by students toward an A.A. in Latino studies and apply it to the B.A. in history toward completion of the required 24 credits of history courses at the 200 level and above.
Latino Studies (a) CHRI C101 Introduction to Latino Studies and 12 additional credit hours from Latino Studies course listings (Required); (b) Recommended course of study for program articulating Latino Studies A.A. to history major will include CHRI C352 History of Latinos in the U.S. (this course may be used to meet requirements for the History major component) and one course from CHRI C301 History of Puerto Rico or CHRI C444 History of Mexico or CHRI C490 Chicano Labor History.

Minor in History

Requirements
The department offers four minor concentrations in history for nonmajors. All of them require 15 credit hours in 200-499 history courses. A general minor consists of one course in United States history, one course in European history, one course in another area or topic, one elective, and one HIST J495 proseminar. A United States history minor consists of three courses in United States history, one non-United States history course, and one HIST J495 proseminar. A European history minor consists of three courses in European history, one non-European history course, and one HIST J495 proseminar. An Asian history minor consists of three courses in Asian history, one non-Asian history course, and one HIST J495 proseminar.

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Associate of Arts—Concentration in History

Requirements
 15 credit hours in 200-499 history courses, including at least 3 credit hours in each of the following areas: American history, modern European history, and in other areas, but not including HIST J495. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Departmental Honors Program

Superior students are encouraged to pursue independent study and research through reading for honors courses at the junior and senior levels. Students with a grade point average of 3.4 in courses in history may write an honors thesis in their senior year with the consent of the department. Proposals should be submitted to the chairperson in the semester before the thesis is to be undertaken. Further information about advanced placement and the honors program may be obtained from the Department of History and Philosophy.

The Paul J. Urcan Memorial Prize Award
Each year the faculty of the Department of History and Philosophy selects a student, usually a graduating senior, who has done outstanding work in history to be awarded the Paul J. Urcan Memorial Prize.

Rhiman A. and Brenda Rotz Memorial Scholarship
Each year, junior and senior students may submit a proposal for the scholarship, according to department guidelines. A committee of department faculty chooses the recipient.

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Courses in History

Note: Where courses are marked “I-II,” the student need not have taken “I” to register for “II.”

The subject matter for the topics courses (HIST H225- HIST T425/HIST T426) in any semester will be indicated in the Schedule of Classes published for registration.

The Latino Studies Program offers HIST A352, HIST A391, HIST A392, HIST A446, HIST F301, and HIST F444. See Department of Minority Studies.. See Department of Minority Studies.

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Philosophy and Religious Studies
(see History, p.58)

The curriculum of the philosophy program is designed to contribute to the intellectual training of all under­graduates and to acquaint them with some of the most important developments in the history of ideas. Courses in the program emphasize clear and cogent thinking about fundamental problems, locate the origins of these problems in the writings of the great philosophers, and provide in-depth examinations of proposed solutions. The department also offers courses in ethics designed for business and medical students.

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Major in Philosophy

Requirements
A minimum of 30 credit hours in philosophy. No more than 9 credit hours at the 100 level may be included. At least 9 credit hours must be taken at Purdue University Calumet. (No more than 12 credit hours from Purdue University Calumet can be counted toward fulfilling the major requirements unless waived by the department and the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences) Three courses from the sequence in the history of philosophy: PHIL P201, PHIL P211, PHIL P302, PHIL P304 or their Purdue equivalents. One course in logic and one course above the 100 level in each of the following four areas: (1) ethics, (2) metaphysics or epistemology, (3) twentieth-century philosophy, and (4) either PHIL P383 or PHIL P490 to fulfill the capstone requirement. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Students majoring in philosophy may register at IU Northwest for philosophy courses offered at Purdue University Calumet. Please see the chairperson of the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies for details.

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Minor in Philosophy

Requirements
PHIL P100; one course in logic (PHIL P150); one course in ethics or social and political philosophy (e.g., PHIL P140 or PHIL P343); one course at 200 level or above; one elective 3 credit hour course in philosophy.

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Associate of Arts—Concentration in Philosophy

Requirements
15 credit hours in philosophy including PHIL P100 Introduction to Philosophy, PHIL P140 Elementary Ethics, PHIL P150 Elementary Logic, PHIL P201 Ancient Greek Philosophy, and one of the following: PHIL P211 Modern Philosophy, PHIL P301 Medieval Philosophy, PHIL P304 Nineteenth-Century Philosophy, or PHIL P316 Twentieth-Century Philosophy. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Courses in Philosophy

General introductory courses include PHIL P100, PHIL P135, and PHIL P221. Courses in logic include PHIL P150 and PHIL P250. Philosophy history courses include PHIL P201, PHIL P211, PHIL P301, PHIL P304, and PHIL P316. Courses in ethics include PHIL P140, PHIL P342, and PHIL P393. PHIL P310 is classified as an epistemology and metaphysics course. PHIL P343 is classified as a social and political course. Special philosophy courses include PHIL P246, PHIL P306, PHIL P335, PHIL P346, PHIL P360, PHIL P371, PHIL P383, and PHIL P490.

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Department of Mathematics

About the Program
Major in Mathematics—B.A.
Major in Mathematics—B.S.
Major in Actuarial Science—B.S.
Interdepartmental Major in Simulation/Modeling Analysis—B.S.
Minor in Mathematics
Associate of Arts—Concentration in Mathematics
Program for Secondary School Provisional Certificate in Mathematics
Programs for Applications
Courses in Mathematics

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About the Program

The Department of Mathematics serves students interested in one or more of the following:

  1. Applications of mathematics to the sciences, business, public and environmental affairs, actuarial science, etc.
  2. Mathematics teaching at any level
  3. Graduate study in mathematics
  4. Mathematical research

Students in college-level mathematics courses are generally assumed to have completed two years of high school algebra. Those unable to do mathematics at this level should begin with MATH M007 (elementary algebra), or MATH M014 (basic algebra). Students who have completed one year of high school algebra, or MATH M007, or the equivalent, and who intend to take no additional mathematics, may enroll in MATH M100 or MATH M110.
Placement testing and counseling are available through the Office of Admissions.

Placement testing and counseling is available through the Office of Admissions.

The order in which courses should be taken is shown in the following tree diagram, going from left to right:1, 2, 3, 4, 5

math


1 MATH M007-MATH M0 14. For students who lack the background in algebra for freshman-level college mathematics.
2 MATH M100 and MATH M110. Terminal courses for students in the humanities and the Allied Health sciences. Fulfills the Group I mathematics requirement in the College of Arts and Sciences.
3 MATH M118, MATH M119. May be taken in either order. Primarily for majors in business and the social sciences.
4 MATH M125-MATH M126. Preparation for calculus. Need not be taken by students with a strong background in algebra (including analytic geometry and logarithms) and trigonometry may be taken concurrently.
5 MATH M215 Calculus. Intended for students majoring in mathematics and the sciences. Recommended as a strong elective in mathematics for others.

In addition to mathematics courses, all majors are strongly encouraged to study another discipline, in depth, which uses mathematics. Courses in physics, chemistry, computer science, and business are recommended. Students must also complete the general requirement of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Major in Mathematics—B.A.

Requirements (28-29 cr.)
MATH M215, MATH M216, (MATH M301 or MATH M303), MATH M311, MATH M360, MATH M393, MATH M403, MATH M413. MATH M311 should be taken as soon after completion of MATH M216 as possible.

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Major in Mathematics—B.S.

Requirements (41-44 cr.)

  1. Required core courses (22-23 cr.):
    MATH M215, MATH M216, MATH M301, MATH M311, MATH M360 and MATH M391 or MATH M393.
  2. Applications (12 cr.):
    at least four additional 300- 400 mathematics courses not used for A, C, or D.
  3. Senior Concentration (6 cr.):
    choose two courses from: MATH M403, MATH M404, MATH M405, MATH M413, MATH M414.
  4. Senior Thesis in Mathematics (1-3 cr.):
    MATH M493.
Requirements for the minor (15-20 cr.)
  1. Arts and Sciences Option:
    Mathematics majors are required to augment their academic program with a minor (minimum 15 credit hours) in another discipline. The student in consultation with a faculty advisor selects the minor area.
  2. Secondary Education Option:
    For students graduating with both, Secondary Education with major in mathematics and Bachelor of Science in mathematics, the minor requirement is waived.
Consult the Mathematics Department or the appropriate department for details.

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Major in Actuarial Science—B.S.

Requirements (57-60 cr.)

  1. Mathematics core courses (22 cr.): MATH M215, MATH M216, MATH M301/ MATH M303, MATH M311, MATH M360, and MATH M366
  2. Actuarial Science core courses (7-9 cr.): MATH M320, MATH M325, and MATH M485
  3. Computer Science core courses (7-8 cr.): CSCI C201 and CSCI C307, or CSCI A201 and CSCI A302
  4. Economics and Business core courses (21 cr.): ECON E103, ECON E104, BUS A201, BUS A202, ECON E270, BUS F301, BUS F420
  5. Technical Electives (9 cr.): three courses not used for Computer Science core from:
    Mathematics: MATH M312, MATH M315, MATH M325 (MATH M325 serves as a technical elective only when taken a second time in a different subject), MATH M343, MATH M371, MATH M409, MATH M447, MATH M448, MATH M477
    Computer science: CSCI A201, CSCI A302, CSCI C201, CSCI C203, CSCI C307, CSCI C320, CSCI C343, CSCI C390
    Business: BUS L201, BUS N300, BUS P301, BUS M301, BUS M303, BUS A311, BUS A312, BUS A322, BUS A325, BUS A328, BUS A424
    Sociology: SOC S205
  6. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences for the Bachelor of Science degree.
For details concerning exact requirements, please consult the Department of Mathematics and Actuarial Science.

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Interdepartmental Major in Simulation/Modeling Analysis—B.S.

Students who graduate with this degree will have a strong background in theoretical (Mathematics) and practical (Computer Information Systems) skills.

Requirements:

  1. 22 credit hours in Mathematics: MATH M215-MATH M216, MATH M301, MATH M360, MATH M447, and MATH M448
  2. 21-23 credit hours in Computer Information Systems: CSCI C106, DPIS D150, (CSCI C201 or CSCI A201), (CSCI C307 or CSCI A302), CSCI C343, DPIS D410, and a capstone course (CSCI C390 or DPIS D390).
  3. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences for the Bachelor of Science degree. (See the Computer Information Systems section of this bulletin for more details.)

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Minor in Mathematics

An arts and sciences minor in mathematics consists of the courses MATH M215, MATH M216, and either (1) (CSCI C201 or CSCI A201) and 6 credit hours above the 200 level in mathematics or (2) 9 credit hours above the 200 level in mathematics. MATH M301, MATH M311, and MATH M343 are recommended.

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Associate of Arts—Concentration in Mathematics

Requirements
MATH M215 and MATH M216, plus either (1) at least 3 credit hours above the 100 level in computer science or data processing and 3 credit hours at the 300 level in mathematics or (2) 6 credit hours at the 300 level in mathematics. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Program for Secondary School Provisional Certificate in Mathematics

(See School of Education requirements.) Required: CSCI C210, MATH M215, MATH M216, MATH M301, MATH M311, (MATH M391 or MATH M393), MATH M360, (MATH M366 OR MATH K200), MATH T336, MATH M436, MATH M447, MATH T493 and two courses selected from MATH M371, MATH M405, MATH M413, MATH M420, MATH M425, MATH M448, MATH M483. In order to finish this program in four years, the courses must be taken in the sequence and at the times recommended by the mathematics department. Most 300- and 400-level mathematics courses are offered every other year.

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Programs for Applications

The kinds and numbers of courses needed in applications of mathematics vary greatly, depending on the application. Students should consult their major department for such information. Some of the mathematics courses most useful for applications are MATH M215, MATH M216, MATH M301, MATH M311, MATH M343, MATH M360, MATH M366, MATH M371, MATH M447, MATH M448, MATH M463, MATH M477. Courses in computer science, business, and information systems are recommended, as well as courses in economics and the natural sciences.

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Courses in Mathematics

Mathematics developmental courses include MATH M007 and MATH M014.

Courses for nonmajors include MATH M100, MATH M110, MATH M118, MATH M119, MATH M125, MATH M126, MATH K200, MATH K300, MATH T101, MATH T102, MATH T103, MATH T490 and MATH T493.

Courses recommended for mathematics majors include MATH M215-MATH M216, MATH M295, MATH M301, MATH M311, MATH M312, MATH M315, MATH M343, MATH M360, MATH M366, MATH M371, MATH M391, MATH M393, MATH M403, MATH M405, MATH M406, MATH M413, MATH M420, MATH M425, MATH M435, MATH M436, MATH M447-MATH M448, MATH M451, MATH M463, MATH M477, MATH M483, MATH M493, MATH T336, MATH T403, MATH T490, MATH Y398.
Courses for actuarial science include MATH M320, MATH M325, MATH M485, and MATH M486.

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Department of Minority Studies

The Department of Minority Studies offers programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree in Afro-American studies. The curriculum is designed to acquaint the student with the unique worldviews and experiences of blacks and Latinos and the problems of minority groups in general. It prepares the student for the fields of community development, social services, minority group relations, and graduate study.

The university possesses a large and continuously growing library collection covering African, West Indian, and American experiences.

Afro-American Studies
Latino Studies
Postbaccalaureate Certificates

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AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES

The curriculum leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree in Afro-American Studies is oriented toward professional preparation and graduate study. The two program sequences, Human Services and Community Development, place a heavy emphasis on education that is directly related to employment opportunities and graduate-level study. The department also offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in Afro-American Studies with a concentration in Latino Studies.

Major in Afro-American Studies
Interdepartmental Major in Afro-American Studies and Communication
Departments of Minority Studies and Communication: Requirements for Interdepartmental Majors
Interdepartmental Major in Afro-American Studies and English
Department of Minority Studies and English: Requirements for Interdepartmental Majors
Minor in Race-Ethnic Studies
Minor in Afro-American Studies
Associate of Arts—Concentration in Afro-American Studies

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Major in Afro-American Studies

A minimum of 30 credit hours with AFRO A103, AFRO A301, AFRO A343, and AFRO A398 or AFRO A493 required. A 3 credit hour introductory course is required from one of the following two courses: AFRO A150 Survey of the Culture of Black Americans or AFRO A151 Minority People in the United States. Six credit hours of Afro-American History and Culture are required from the five courses listed: AFRO A355 Afro-American History I or AFRO A379 Early Black American Writing and AFRO A356 Afro-American History II, or AFRO A370 Recent Black American Writing or AFRO A380 Contemporary Black American Writing. Other courses in Afro-American studies or approved courses in sociology, psychology, or history may be taken to complete the major. Twenty-five (25) credit hours of 200-400 level courses are required. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Interdepartmental Major in Afro-American Studies and Communication

The Departments of Communication and Minority Studies offer an interdepartmental major in Afro-American studies and communication that reflects an interdisciplinary and substantive field of study. An interdepartmental major in communication and Afro-American studies focuses the specialization of the study of the human communication process within the Afro-American experience. This focus enhances the application of principles, methods, and findings of communication studies in light of the history, culture, and theories of the Afro-American experience, including an Africana perspective. Students will integrate their communication studies emphasis (public and rhetorical communication, relational communication, media studies, or communication and culture) into the Afro-American studies major to create a systematic and coherent field of study.

Departments of Minority Studies and Communication: Requirements for Interdepartmental Majors

The chairpersons of the Departments of Minority Studies and Communication must jointly advise the interdepartmental major. Students must complete a total of 45 credit hours in the interdepartmental major. Students must complete 18 credit hours in Afro-American studies to include (AFRO A150 or AFRO A151), (AFRO A355 or AFRO A379), (AFRO A356 or AFRO A370 or AFRO A380) as well as a total of 9 credit hours of Afro-American studies electives of which 6 credit hours should be in courses numbered at the 300 or 400 level. Students must complete 24 credit hours in communication (speech, communication, journalism, telecommunications), including SPCH S121 and SPCH S122; 12 of these 24 additional credit hours in speech, communication, journalism, and telecommunications should be courses at the 300 or 400 level. In addition to the requirements listed above, students must complete SPCH S400 and/or AFRO A493. Courses cross-listed in both departments may be taken in either department, but students may not receive credit in both departments for the same course. Students may not receive credit toward the major for both SPCH S424 and AFRO A398.

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Interdepartmental Major in Afro-American Studies and English

The Departments of Minority Studies and English offer a thematically integrated major in Afro-American Studies and English. This interdepartmental major is designed for students who wish to combine substantial Afro-American Studies with their work in the American and English literature major. Afro-American Studies is importantly multidisciplinary, requiring students to be familiar with the connected history and theories of the Afro-American experience across disciplines, including an Africana perspective. The interdepartmental major in Afro-American Studies and English provides students with this background as well as with an understanding of Afro-American literature, seen in the context of American and English literature. With this course of study, students will be able to integrate and synthesize knowledge and understanding of the total Afro-American experience as it coexists with English language and literature studies.

Departments of Minority Studies and English: Requirements for Interdepartmental Majors

The chairpersons of the Departments of Minority Studies and English must jointly advise the interdepartmental major. A combined minimum of 45 credit hours is required.

Eighteen (18) credit hours must be in Afro-American Studies, and 27 credit hours must be in English.

A minimum of 18 credit hours of Afro-American Studies courses must be at the 300 level or above, including AFRO A355, AFRO A356, AFRO A493 (multidisciplinary capstone course), and 9 credit hours from the following 12 credit hours: AFRO A370/ENG L370, AFRO A379, AFRO A380, and AFRO A392. The minimum of 27 credit hours in English must include the following courses: ENG L202, ENG L212, and ENG L315; one from ENG L351, ENG L352, and ENG L355; one from ENG L354, ENG L357, and ENG L358; and ENG L440.

A 2.0 cumulative grade point average is required in the courses taken in the interdepartmental major. Only courses with a grade of C– or higher will be counted in the major.

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Minor in Race-Ethnic Studies

Race-Ethnic Studies allows students interested in Afro-American and Latino Studies to develop a focus of study in both programs. This field leads to a broad understanding of the minority experience in the United States and those of diaspora peoples; how the phenomena of race, gender, and class have influenced communities and individuals; how minority groups define themselves and what strategies they have utilized for survival; who the people called African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and Asian Americans are.

Credit Hours Required—A minimum of 15 credit hours required.

Requirements
AFRO A151/CHRI C151 Minority People in the United States; four courses from the listings for the Department of Minority Studies (IU Northwest Bulletin); and meeting the following distribution pattern: two courses from course listings in Afro-American studies, at least one course at 200, 300, or 400 level; two courses from course listings in Latino Studies, at least one course at 200, 300, or 400 level.

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Minor in Afro-American Studies

Requirements
AFRO A150 or AFRO A151, and four additional courses in Afro-American studies to be selected in consultation with the departmental advisor.

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Associate of Arts—Concentration in Afro-American Studies

A minimum of 18 credit hours distributed as follows.

Requirements
AFRO A103, AFRO A150. Four of the following courses: AFRO A101, AFRO A210, AFRO A240, AFRO A255, AFRO A260, AFRO A261, AFRO A280, AFRO A282, AFRO A355, AFRO A356, AFRO A370, AFRO A379, AFRO A380.

Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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LATINO STUDIES

Latino studies is an interdisciplinary program designed to acquaint the student with the worldview and experience of Chicanos and Puerto Ricans in the United States. The curriculum emphasizes the history, culture, and socioeconomic conditions of Latino people while also examining the nature of minority groups in American society. An Associate of Arts degree (15 credit hours) in Latino studies is available to every student at IU Northwest. The program also offers courses for the bilingual education endorsement in the School of Education, the education minor in ethnic and cultural studies, and the education major with bilingual emphasis.

Minor in Latino Studies
Associate of Arts—Concentration in Latino Studies
Literature
Major in Afro-American Studies with an Associate of Arts in Lation Studies Major in History with an Associate of Arts in Latino Studies
Major in Spanish with an Associate of Arts in Latino Studies
Major in Sociology with an Associate of Arts in Latino Studies

Minor in Latino Studies

Requirements
CHRI C101, CHRI C151, and 12 credit hours from the course listings (course numbers in parentheses indicate cross-listing in the Department of History).

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Associate of Arts—Concentration in Latino Studies

Requirements
CHRI C101 and 12 credit hours from the course listings. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Literature

The following courses in the Department of Modern Languages may be counted in the concentration requirement. Check this bulletin for description: SPAN S412, SPAN S413, SPAN S435.

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Major in Afro-American Studies with an Associate of Arts in Latino Studies

The Department of Minority Studies offers a program of study leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree (major) in Afro-American Studies and an Associate of Arts degree in Latino Studies.

Requirements (Afro-American Studies)
The requirements for the Afro-American Studies B.A. component of this program are the same as for the regular major and listed above.

Requirements (Latino Studies): (a)
CHRI C101 Introduction to Latino Studies and 12 additional credit hours from the Latino Studies course listings (required); (b) Recommended course of study for program articulating Latino Studies A.A. to Afro-American Studies major will include CHRI C151 Minority People in the U.S. and AFRO A208 The African Caribbean.

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Major in History with an Associate of Arts in Latino Studies

The Latino Studies program in conjunction with the Department of History offers a program of study leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree (major) in History and an Associate of Arts degree in Latino Studies.
The Department of History accepts any Latino Studies courses with History designations toward the B.A. in History. Additionally, we will accept one CHRI number taken by students toward an A.A. in Latino Studies and apply it to the B.A. in History toward completion of the required 24 credits of History courses at the 200 level and above.

Latino Studies (a)
CHRI C101 Introduction to Latino Studies and 12 additional credit hours from Latino Studies course listings (required); (b) Recommended course of study for program articulating Latino Studies A.A. to History major will include CHRI C352 History of Latinos in the U.S. (this course may be used to meet requirements for the History major component) and one course from CHRI C301 History of Puerto Rico or CHRI C444 History of Mexico or CHRI C490 Chicano Labor History.

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Major in Spanish with an Associate of Arts in Latino Studies

Latino Studies program in conjunction with the Modern Languages Department offers a program of study leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree (major) in Spanish and an Associate of Arts degree in Latino Studies.

Requirements (Spanish)
The requirements for the Spanish B.A. component of this program are the same as for the regular Spanish major. They are listed in the Modern Languages section of this bulletin.

Requirements (Latino Studies) (a)
CHRI C101 Introduction to Latino Studies and 12 additional credit hours from the Latino Studies course listings (required); (b) Recommended course of study for program articulating Latino Studies A.A. to Spanish major will include CHRI C351 Latino Culture and Society and CHRI C301 History of Puerto Rico or CHRI C444 History of Mexico.

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Major in Sociology with an Associate of Arts in Latino Studies

The Latino Studies program in conjunction with the Sociology Department offers a program of study leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree (major) in Sociology and an Associate of Arts degree in Latino Studies. Courses required for the Latino Studies component also meet (articulate) course requirements for the Sociology B.A.

Requirements (Sociology)
The requirements for the Sociology component of this program articulating the B.A. with a Latino Studies A.A. are the same as for the regular Sociology major and listed in the Sociology and Anthropology Department section of this Bulletin.

Requirements (Latino Studies) (a)
CHRI C101 Introduction to Latino Studies and 9 additional credit hours from Latino Studies course listings, that include; (b) CHRI C213 Politics of Chicano Cultural Identity or CHRI C351 Latino Culture and Society; and (c) SOC S335 Race and Ethnic Relations or SOC S419 Social Movements and Collective Action.

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Postbaccalaureate Certificates

Community Development/Urban Studies
Race-Ethnic Studies

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Community Development/Urban Studies

This certificate is for students who have completed an undergraduate degree and would like formal recognition of a proficiency in the field of Community Development and Urban Studies. The focus of study will be on community development, community economic development, and urban studies within a matrix of the minority experience. This certificate has wide appeal from educators to practitioners in fields such as community development, planning, and public policy. This certification meets a specific need for persons intending to hold or holding positions in the field beyond the entry level, such as Community Development Planner II; or entry-level positions that require postbaccalaureate certification and/or experience.

Requirements
Eighteen (18) credit hours from the Department of Minority Studies or approved courses from other departments. AFRO A150 or AFRO A151/ CHRI C151 Minority People (3 cr.)

Twelve (12) credit hours from the Department of Minority Studies must be distributed among community development, urban studies and economic policy. (AFRO A103, AFRO A230, AFRO A240, AFRO A301, AFRO A302, AFRO A304, AFRO A341, AFRO A343, AFRO A398).
Three (3) credit hours in capstone, research or project course. .

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Race-Ethnic Studies

This certificate is for students who have completed an undergraduate degree and would like formal recognition of a proficiency in the field of Race-Ethnic Studies (see Minor in Race-Ethnic Studies). This certificate has wide appeal from educators to those in business.

Requirements
AFRO A151/CHRI C151 Minority People (3 cr.)

Twelve (12) credit hours from the Department of Minority Studies, must be distributed between Latino Studies and Afro-American Studies.

Three (3) credit hours in capstone or research course, must be interdisciplinary.

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Department of Modern Languages, Comparative Literature, and Linguistics

French
Germanic Languages
Spanish

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French

Major in French
Minor in French
Associate of Arts—Concentration in French
Foreign Study
Courses in English

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Major in French

The program in French embraces courses at all levels, elementary through advanced, and includes the culture and literature of France, Québec, and other Francophone regions of Africa and the Caribbean.

Requirements
30 credit hours in courses above FREN F150 including FREN F328, FREN F380, and
6 credit hours to be chosen among FREN F300, FREN F305, and FREN F306; 9 credit hours in 400-level courses, and 3 credit hours to be chosen from the following list of culture options: SPAN S230, SPAN S231, SPAN S240, SPAN S241, SPAN S251, SPAN S260, SPAN S290, CDNS C101, CDNS C301, CDNS C350, CDNS C400, CDNS C495, and CMLT C340.

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Minor in French

Requirements
FREN F200-FREN F250 or equivalent earned through special credit and three courses at the third-year level chosen from FREN F300, FREN F305, FREN F306, FREN F326, FREN F328, and FREN F380.

Special Credit
A student who places at the third-year level on the language placement test and receives a grade of C or higher in the validating third-year level course will be eligible to receive 6 hours of special credit with a grade of S. A student who places in the second semester of the second year and completes the validating course with a grade of C or higher will be eligible to receive 3 hours of special credit with a grade of S. The course numbers FREN F200-FREN F250 will be used to designate this credit.

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Associate of Arts—Concentration in French

Requirements
FREN F100, FREN F150, FREN F200, and FREN F250 and one 300-level course. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Foreign Study

Outstanding students with a substantial command of French are eligible to apply for enrollment in the Overseas Study Program at Aix-en-Provence. Full credit will be received for the academic year spent abroad. Students may also apply to the six-week, 6 credit hour summer program in Paris, or the five-week, 6 credit hour summer program in Quebec.

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Courses in English

The following courses are taught in English: FREN F309, FREN 310, FREN F311, and FREN F312. No credit in French.

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GERMANIC LANGUAGES

Foreign Study
Outstanding students with a substantial command of German may apply for a year’s study, with full credit, at the Indiana-Purdue Center of Undergraduate Studies at the University of Hamburg. Juniors may, upon the recommendation of the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, take their third year abroad with Indiana University credit of 30 hours. Students must consult the departmental foreign study advisor before enrolling in foreign institutions.

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SPANISH

The program in Spanish embraces courses at all levels, elementary through advanced, in the language and literature of Spain and Latin America.

Major in Spanish
Minor in Spanish
Associate of Arts—Concentration in Spanish
Major in Spanish with an Associate of Arts in Latino Studies
Native Speakers
Undergraduate Study Abroad
Courses in English

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Major in Spanish

Requirements
30 credit hours in courses above SPAN S150, including SPAN S301, SPAN S302, and 6 credit hours to be chosen among SPAN S311, SPAN S312, and SPAN S317; 9 credit hours in 400-level courses, and 3 credit hours to be chosen from the following list of culture options: FREN F309, FREN 310 FREN F311, FREN F312, CMLT C261, CMLT C340, CDNS C101, CDNS C301, CDNS C350, CDNS C400, CMLT C460, and CDNS C495.

Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

The Department of Modern Languages will accept one CHRI course that is crosslisted with Spanish and taken by students toward an A.A. in Latino Studies and apply it to the B.A. in Spanish toward completion of the required 30 credits of Spanish courses at the 200 level and above.

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Minor in Spanish

Requirements
SPAN S200-SPAN S250 or equivalent earned through special credit and three courses at the third-year level chosen from SPAN S301-SPAN S302, SPAN S311, SPAN S312, and SPAN S317.

Special Credit
A student who places at the third-year level on the language placement test and receives a grade of C or higher in the validating third-year level course will be eligible for 6 hours of special credit with a grade of S. A student who places in the second semester of the second year and completes a validating course with a grade of C or higher will be eligible to receive 3 hours of special credit with a grade of S. The course numbers SPAN S200-SPAN S250 will be used to designate this credit.

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Associate of Arts—Concentration in Spanish

Requirements
SPAN S100, SPAN S150, SPAN S200 or SPAN S221, SPAN S250 or SPAN S276, and one 300-level course or equivalent. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Major in Spanish with an Associate of Arts in Latino Studies

Latino Studies program in conjunction with the Modern Languages Department offers a program of study leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree (major) in Spanish and an Associate of Arts degree in Latino Studies.

Requirements (Spanish)
The requirements for the Spanish B.A. component of this program are the same as for the regular Spanish major. They are listed in the Modern Languages section of this bulletin.

Requirements (Latino Studies) (a)
CHRI C101 Introduction to Latino Studies and 12 additional credit hours from the Latino Studies course listings (required); (b) Recommended course of study for program articulating Latino Studies A.A. to Spanish major will include CHRI C351 Latino Culture and Society and CHRI C301 History of Puerto Rico or CHRI C444 History of Mexico.

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Native Speakers

Students who are native speakers of Spanish must get permission from the department in order to enroll in SPAN S301-SPAN S302, SPAN S311-SPAN S312, or SPAN S317. Questions about the major or minor should be directed to the department chair.

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Undergraduate Study Abroad

IU Northwest, through the Office of Overseas Study at Indiana University Bloomington, provides various opportunities for students of Spanish to study in a Spanish-speaking country. Qualified students who want to participate in a one-year academic program are encouraged to apply for the program offered in Madrid, Spain. Through the Council on International Educational Exchange, in which Indiana University cooperates, undergraduate students may also apply to participate in a one-semester program in Seville, Spain. Summer study programs are available in Salamanca, Spain, and at the Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City. Credits earned in these programs can be used to fulfill requirements for the baccalaureate degree. In addition, the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC), of which Indiana University is a member, offers a summer study program in Guanajuato, Mexico. This program is intended primarily for students whose area of specialization is Spanish.

The Department of Modern Languages strongly recommends foreign study at the undergraduate level for those students who plan to become teachers of Spanish. In all cases where credit is sought for work done abroad, the student must consult the department chairperson before enrolling in foreign institutions. Information and applications for foreign study programs can be obtained from the campus coordinator for the Office of Overseas Study.

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Courses in English

The following Spanish courses are taught in English: SPAN S230, SPAN S231, SPAN S240, SPAN S241, SPAN S251, SPAN S260, SPAN S284, SPAN S290. No credit in Spanish.

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Department of Performing Arts

PERFORMING ARTS

Major in Theatre Requirements
Minor in Theatre Requirements
Associate of Arts--Concentration in Theatre
Music
Courses in Music and Dance
Political Science

Performing arts provides academic curricula in music, theatre, and dance for students who seek to develop careers in these areas. Extensive performance programs provide practical experiences that complement classroom study.

Requirements for the Theatre Major
The Department of Performing Arts (THTR) recognizes a symbiotic relationship between theatre production experience and classroom study. Requirements for the Major in Theatre are therefore distributed between practicum, production laboratory, and academic courses in the performing arts.

Major in Theatre Requirements (38-45 cr.)

  1. 11 credit hours Theatre CORE courses:
    THTR T120 Acting I (3cr.)
    THTR T228 Design for the Theatre (3cr.)
    THTR T340 Directing I (3cr.; prerequisite T120 or T228)
    THTR T438 Senior Performance Project and Capstone Seminar (2 cr., senior standing and consent of instructor; courses meet simultaneously)
  2. 6 credit hours in each of the following 3 areas (18 cr.):
    PRODUCTION EXPERIENCE
    THTR T168 Practicum (1-3 cr. per semester,sophomore standing or consent of instructor)*
    LABORATORY EXPERIENCE select two from the following:
    THTR T225 Stagecraft I(3 cr.)
    THTR T230 Costuming I(3 cr.)
    THTR T335 Stage Lighting (3 cr.)
    HISTORY, LITERATURE, THEORY
    At least one semester (3 cr.) of Theatre and Society (THTR T470/T471) required for all Theatre Majors.
  3. 9 additional credit hours 300 level or higher. Students are advised to determine an AREA OF CONCENTRATION in consultation with a principal teacher in their chosen area (acting, directing, design, stage management, technical production, dramaturgy, etc.)

*Practicum credit is given for approximately 40 hours assigned work on any Theatre Northwest production. Assignments are finalized in the first week of the semester. Students are encouraged to apply for significant creative and crew positions prior to semester of production.

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Minor in Theatre (15 cr.)

Requirements
3 credit hours Practicum (THTR T168)
3 credit hours Design for the Stage (THTR T228) or Acting I (THTR T120)
3 Lab course credit hours (THTR T225 or T230 or T335)
3 credit hours THTR Theatre and Society (THTR T470 or T471)
3 credit hours THTR elective

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Associate of Arts—Concentration in Theatre

Requirements
3 credit hours THTR T168 and THTR T120, THTR T225, THTR T230, THTR T228 and either THTR T470 or T471. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Science.

Music

Undergraduates may pursue programs in the School of Music on the Bloomington campus leading to the degrees Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Music Education, or Bachelor of Science in music. Completion of the curricula for the Bachelor of Music Education degree qualifies students for the provisional teaching certificate. In addition, classes in music appreciation and instruction in piano and voice are available to non-music majors. Details of entrance requirements, curricula, and graduation requirements may be found in the School of Music Bulletin, Bloomington campus.

In addition to the required courses in English composition and physical education, all students in the School of Music must enroll in a major ensemble for each period of registration.

Courses in Music and Dance

MUS M174 is a music history and literature course. Ensemble courses include MUS J100, MUS J200, MUS J210, MUS J405, and MUS J320. Applied music courses include MUS P100 and MUS V100.

Political Science Program

Major in Political Science
Minor in Political Science

(Housed in Division of Public and Environmental Affairs and Political Science—Bachelor of Arts in Political Science is an Arts and Sciences degree)

Political Science offers an opportunity for the systematic study of political institutions and processes leading to a degree in political science. Courses are offered in the following areas of study: 1) Political theory and philosophy, 2) American political institutions and processes, 3) international relations and foreign policy, and 4) comparative politics. Special features of the department’s program include opportunities for field research, internships in governmental agencies, and a senior seminar for all political science majors.
A degree in political science is a liberal arts degree, and as such prepares students to assume the duties of citizenship; provides special knowledge and skills useful in public service, law, business and other careers; and lays a foundation for the scholarly study of government and politics.
Prospective political science students and/or majors are invited to discuss their interests with any member of the political science faculty
.

Major in Political Science

Requirements
 Political science majors are required to meet all of the general requirements for the Arts and Sciences degree. Political science majors should consult the “College of Arts and Sciences” section of this bulletin.
Political science majors must take 36 credit hours in political science including POLS Y103, Introduction to American Politics,
Majors are required to take the following courses: POLS Y205, POLS Y372, and POLS Y490. In addition, majors must take 6 credit hours in international relations and comparative politics from the following
courses: POLS Y360, POLS Y362, POLS Y366, POLS Y335; 6 credit hours in American institutions and processes from the following courses: POLS Y200, POLS Y 301, POLS Y304 or Y305, POLS Y302 or Y308, POLS Y318, POLS Y319, POLS Y401; and 6 credit hours in political theory and philosophy from the following courses: POLS Y381, POLS Y382, POLS Y383, POLS Y384.
One course in statistics is also required of political science majors. ECON 270 would satisfy this requirement as well as the Arts and Sciences requirements.

Recommended
In addition to meeting departmental and general requirements, the Political Science Department strongly suggests that political science majors take supporting courses in economics and history, especially American history.

Minor in Political Science

In addition to POLS Y103, 15 credit hours, 6 of which must be in the field of American institutions and/or domestic politics; 6 of which must be in the field of international relations and/or comparative politics, and/or political theory and philosophy; and 3 credit hours in any field of political science are required for a minor in political science.

Department of Psychology

About the Program
Major in Psychology—B.A.
Major in Psychology—B.S.
Major in Psychology with a Concentration in Women’s Studies—B.A.
Minor in Psychology
Associate of Arts—Concentration in Psychology
Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Drug and Alcohol Counseling

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About the Program

The Department of Psychology offers a major in psychology leading to the B.A. degree and the B.S. degree, a major in psychology with a concentration in women’s studies leading to the B.A. degree, and provides course work for undergraduates who want to satisfy distribution requirements. As a science, psychology seeks to understand the basic principles by which living organisms adapt their behavior to the changing physical and social environments in which they live. The breadth of the discipline, with its links to the humanities, mathematics, and other social and natural sciences, encourages the development of broad problem-solving skills through exposure to experimental methodology and statistical analysis and contributes to personal growth and the development of communicative skills. Psychological knowledge, techniques, and skills obtained in the B.A. and B.S. programs are applied in many careers and provide background for students entering graduate work in psychology and related areas, as well as the professions of medicine, dentistry, law, and business.

Career opportunities for psychology majors at the bachelor’s degree level exist in mental health clinics, social welfare agencies, government, personnel departments, and business and industry. A wider range of professional opportunities is open to those who complete master’s or doctoral degrees. It is strongly recommended that prospective majors discuss their career objectives with a member of the Department of Psychology early so that appropriate course planning can be accomplished.

The Department of Psychology maintains a chapter of Psi Chi, the national honorary society in psychology. With both academic and social interests, the chapter sponsors speakers, workshops, films, and field trips. Students interested in joining should contact the department chairperson.

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Major in Psychology—B.A.

Requirements
Majors complete 30 credit hours including the following courses in psychology.

  1. PSY P101 and PSY P102 are prerequisites for all courses.
  2. PSY P211 and PSY K300 are prerequisites for all 400-level laboratory courses.
  3. Area A. A minimum of two of the following: PSY P325, PSY P326, PSY P327, PSY P329, PSY P335, PSY P388, PSY P407, PSY P417.
  4. Area B. A minimum of two of the following: PSY P303, PSY P314, PSY P316, PSY P319, PSY P320, PSY P324, PSY P336, PSY P389, PSY P425, PSY P430.
  5. Advanced laboratory. One from the following: PSY P421, PSY P424, PSY P429, PSY P435
  6. Elective at the 300-400 level.
  7. PSY P421 or PSY P424 or PSY P429 or PSY P435 satisfies the capstone requirement.
Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Recommended
In addition to meeting departmental and general requirements, the department suggests that psychology majors take supporting courses in mathematics and the natural sciences. We recommend the following courses for all majors: Introductory Biology and Introductory Chemistry. It is also important to obtain a broadly based education in the humanities, social sciences, and fine arts. Students should not concentrate all their electives in psychology or any other single subject area. Courses such as logic, philosophy, sociology, chemistry, and computer science are especially appropriate. Prospective psychology students and/or majors are invited to discuss their interests with any member of the psychology faculty.

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Major in Psychology—B.S.

Purpose
The Bachelor of Science in Psychology degree provides students with a rigorous general background in the field of psychology and allied disciplines. The degree is designed for students who
wish to prepare for graduate or professional school training in psychology or related fields. The more extensive requirements in biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics have been selected to optimize the student’s future opportunities.

Requirements
Majors complete 36 credit hours including the following classes.

  1. PSY P101 and PSY P102 are prerequisites for all courses.
  2. PSY P211 and PSY K300 are prerequisites for all 400 level laboratory courses.
  3. Area A. A minimum of three of the following: PSY P325, PSY P326, PSY P327, PSY P329, PSY P335, PSY P388, PSY P407, PSY P417.
  4. Area B. A minimum of two of the following: PSY P303, PSY P314, PSY P316, PSY P319, PSY P320, PSY P324, PSY P336, P389, PSY P425, PSY P430.
  5. Advanced laboratory. One from the following: PSY P421, PSY P424, PSY P429, PSY P435.
  6. Elective. Any two additional psychology courses at the 300-400 level.
  7. Capstone: Psychology PSY P421 or PSY P424 or PSY P429 or PSY P435 satisfies the capstone requirement.
  8. Allied science: Biology BIOL L101, BIOL L102, CHEM C 105, CHEM C 106, CHEM C 125, CHEM C126, plus 28 credit hours listed under the category Group IIIA at the 100 level or above. One or two of the following MATH courses may be counted toward the 28 hours: M118, M119, M125, or M126. Suggested courses include: BIOL L211, BIOL L311, BIOL L312, BIOL Z374, BIOL Z406, BIOL M310, BIOL M315, CHEM C341, CHEM C342, CHEM C343, CHEM C344, CHEM C483, MATH, M215, MATH M216, MATH M301, MATH M311, MATH M312, MATH M360, MATH M366, PHYS P201, PHYS P202, PHYS P221, PHYS P222.
In addition to the above courses, the student is responsible for fulfilling the general requirements of the Bachelor of Science degree as established by the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Major in Psychology with a Concentration in Women’s Studies—B.A.

Purpose
The Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology with a concentration in women’s studies provides a solid background in applied and basic psychology along with a focus on and experiences in the psychology of women and women’s issues.

Requirements
Majors complete 36 credit hours including the following classes.
  1. PSY P101 and PSY P102 are prerequisites for all courses.
  2. PSY P211 and PSY K300 are prerequisites for all 400-level laboratory courses.
  3. Area A. A minimum of one of the following: PSY P325, PSY P326, PSY P327, PSY P329, PSY P335, PSY P388, PSY P407, PSY P417.
  4. Area B. A minimum of two of the following: PSY P303, PSY P314, PSY P316, PSY P319, PSY P320, PSY P324, PSY P336, PSY P389, PSY P425, PSY P430.
  5. Advanced laboratory: one from the following: PSY P421, PSY P424, PSY P429, PSY P435.
  6. Capstone: Psychology PSY P421 or PSY P424 or PSY P429 or PSY P435 satisfies the capstone requirement.
  7. Two Psychology courses focused on women’s issues: PSY P460 and PSY P432.
  8. One Women’s Studies core course: WOST W200 or WOST W400.
  9. One Practicum in Women’s Studies of Psychology W480 or B309 (if focus is on women’s issues)

In addition to the above courses, the student is responsible for fulfilling the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Minor in Psychology

Requirements
Students who elect to minor in psychology must complete the following:

PSY P101, PSY P102, and any three additional courses in psychology for which the student has the prerequisites.

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Associate of Arts—Concentration in Psychology

Requirements
(1) PSY P101, PSY P102, PSY P211; (2) one course from Area A (PSY P325, PSY P326, PSY P327, PSY P329, PSY P335), PSY P388, PSY P407, PSY P417; and (3) one course from Area B (PSY P303, P314, PSY P316, PSY P319, PSY P320, PSY P324), PSY P336, PSY P389, PSY P425 and PSY P430. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Drug and Alcohol Counseling

The Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Drug and Alcohol Counseling is designed for individuals interested in entering the demanding and rewarding field of alcohol and drug abuse counseling, as well as individuals who already work in the general field of drug and alcohol treatment in order to gain accreditation and advance in their professions.

The program provides comprehensive classroom instruction and practical field experience needed to succeed in the field. The program recognizes that drug
and alcohol addiction and treatment are complex topics driven by an array of biological, genetic, neural, psychological, social, and cultural forces. The classroom instruction is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of many of these forces, an array of drug and alcohol treatment procedures, theories of drug use and abuse, the addiction process and its mental health connections, pharmacology, core counselor functions, strategies for addressing addiction, and ethical considerations. The in-field training is designed to enable students to apply this information and to practice all of the core counselor functions including screening, intake, assessment, treatment planning, counseling, case management, crisis intervention, client education, and record keeping.

The program requires completion of 27 credit hours divided into three general areas, 9 credit hours in core courses (Core Courses—must complete all three, PSYC P324, PSYC P407, SWK S686), 9 credit hours in practica (Practica—must complete 9 credit hours PSYC B309 and/or PSYC P691), and 9 credit hours in electives (Electives—must complete 3 courses from the following PHIL P393, PSYC P314, PSYC P326, PSYC P390, PSYC P401, PSYC P425, PSYC P430, PSYC P495, SOC S420).

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Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Sociology
Anthropology

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SOCIOLOGY

About the Program
Major in Sociology
Minor in Sociology
Emphasis Areas for Sociology Majors
Major in Sociology with Concentration in Women’s Studies
Associate of Arts—Concentration in Sociology
Major Sociology with an Associate of Arts in Latino Studies
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SOCIOLOGY

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology offers its sociology curriculum to undergraduate students who want to pursue the systematic study of society from the microlevel (the individual in society) to the macrolevel (the study of institutions). Anthropology courses provide a global perspective on the nature and origins of human cultural and biological diversity; different anthropology courses can be used as natural science, social science, or humanities electives. At the junior/senior level some students may be eligible to enroll in independent study courses: (1) Individual Readings in Sociology and Anthropology (2) the Internship Program (where the student integrates a work experience with course work). Students graduating with a major in sociology may enter graduate programs in sociology, anthropology, and social science; enter professional schools, such as law and social work; or enter careers requiring a bachelor’s degree in the liberal arts. Sociology majors are encouraged to draw upon the resources of other departments in social and behavioral sciences, as well as the humanities and physical/natural sciences. Counseling on programs and career choices is available within the department.

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology maintains a chapter of Alpha Kappa Delta International Sociology Honor Society (Iota of Indiana Chapter). Students are selected on the basis of excellence in research.

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Major in Sociology

Emphasis Areas for Sociology Majors

Requirements
Majors must complete 30 credit hours as follows:

  1. four basic courses in sociology: SOC S161, SOC S215, SOC S230, and SOC S261;
  2. one course in methods: SOC S262 (quantitative) or SOC S254 (qualitative)*
  3. one course in deviance or in inequality; choose from: SOC S310, SOC S317, SOC S320, SOC S325, SOC S328, SOC S331, SOC S335, SOC S337, or SOC S420;
  4. one course in organization or in communication, choose from SOC S309, SOC S311, SOC S313, SOC S314, SOC S315, SOC S316, SOC S410, SOC S416, SOC S418, SOC S419, SOC S431, or SOC S447;
  5. one course in theory (counts as capstone): SOC S340 or SOC S441**;
  6. any two additional sociology courses, whether listed above or not; at least one of them must be at the 300 or 400 level.

In addition to the requirement of 30 credit hours in the major, students must also take one course in cultural anthropology (ANTH A104 or ANTH A304) and one course in human origins (ANTH A105 or ANTH A303); these may be counted towards fulfilling Group III distribution requirements. Courses in the major cannot be used to satisfy Group III distribution.
Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

* SOC S262 is recommended for students going on to graduate school in sociology and is required for admission to most Master of Social Work programs, including IU Northwest’s.
** SOC S340 is a traditional survey of sociological theory, while SOC S441 provides an interdisciplinary examination of both sociological and anthropological qualitative theories.

Emphasis Areas for Sociology Majors

With careful planning, students may be able to select courses that concentrate in one of two general emphasis areas: traditional sociology or anthropology:

The Sociology emphasis would include S262, S340, and additional courses that emphasize a theme such as:

deviance or inequality (include several from (c) above as electives);
social organization (include several from (d) above as electives);
medical sociology (include SOC S314, SOC S331, SOC S362 Medical Anthropology);
gender (include courses such as SOC S164, SOC S310, SOC S337, or topics courses on gender);
family studies (include courses such as SOC S164, SOC S316, SOC S416);
social movements (include courses such as SOC S218, SOC S311, SOC S418, SOC S419);
qualitative/ethnographic methods (S254 instead of, or in addition to, S262; S431; S441 instead of, or in addition to, S340)

The Anthropology emphasis would include S254, S431, S441, and two S362 electives; all of these are courses that are cross-listed as anthropology courses. In addition students in the anthropology track could also take one more anthropology course as a Group III elective in addition to A104 and A105, and one more as a Group IV-2 elective. One additional anthropology course could give a student a Minor in Anthropology to go with the Sociology B.A. degree, and such students would have the course equivalent of a B.A. in Anthropology at many universities. Several IU Northwest graduates have taken similar course selections and been accepted to graduate programs in anthropology.

In addition to the requirement of 30 credit hours in the major, students must also take one course in cultural anthropology (ANTH A104 or ANTH A304) and one course in human origins (ANTH A105 or ANTH A303); these may be counted towards fulfilling Group III distribution requirements. Courses in the major cannot be used to satisfy Group III distribution.

Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Major in Sociology with Concentration in Women’s Studies

Requirements
Majors must complete 30 credit hours as follows:

  1. Basic Sociology: four courses: S161; S215; S230; S261
  2. Methods: one course—S262 OR S254
  3. Deviance/Inequality: one course: Soc S337 (Women and Crime) or S420 (Topics in Deviance, when topic is women, such as Women and Deviance)
  4. Organization: one course—S310, Sociology of Women in America, or S410 Topics in Social Organization when topic is women, such as Women and Religion
  5. Theory: one—S340 (SOC) or S441 (Topics in Theory, Anthropology)
  6. Electives in areas of Sociology/Anthropology Women’s Studies: two appropriate courses at the 300-400 level, such as any additional of S337, S420, S310, S410 as above, and/or any of: S495 Individual Readings and Research when topic is women; S398, Internship in Behavioral Sciences, when agency serves women, such as battered women’s shelters, women’s transitional houses, etc.; or S362, Native American Women

Outside Electives
Include WOST 200 (Introduction to Women’s Studies) and one WOST W400 course, such as P460/W400, Psychology of Women or P432/W400, Women and Madness or appropriate cross-listed courses from other disciplines.

Students must also complete all the requirements for the regular B.A. in Sociology and College of Arts and Sciences B.A. general requirements.

Minor in Sociology

Requirements
Minors must complete 15 credit hours as follows:

SOC S161; one from SOC S163, SOC S164, or SOC S230; any two 300 or 400 level sociology courses; any other one additional sociology course.

Students pursuing a minor may wish to select courses that emphasize a theme such as:

deviance or inequality (include two or three from (c) above);
organization (include two or three from (d) above); medical sociology (include SOC S314 and SOC S331);
gender (include two or three from SOC S164, SOC S310, SOC S337, or topics courses on gender);
family studies (include two or three from SOC S164, SOC S316, SOC S416);
social movements (include two or three from SOC S218, SOC S311, SOC S418, SOC S419).

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Associate of Arts—Concentration in Sociology

Requirements
(a) SOC S161, SOC S230, SOC S261, and (b) an elective of any two sociology courses. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Major in Sociology with an Associate of Arts in Latino Studies

The department, in conjunction with the Latino Studies Program, offers a course of study that articulates a Bachelor of Arts (major) in sociology and an Associate of Arts (A.A.) in Latino studies. Courses required for the Latino studies component also meet (articulate) course requirements for the sociology B.A.

Requirements (Sociology)
The requirements for the sociology component of this program articulating the B.A. with a Latino studies A.A. are the same as the regular sociology major.

Requirements (Latino Studies)
(a) CHRI C101 Introduction to Latino studies and 9 additional credit hours from Latino studies course listings, that include; (b) CHRI C213 Politics of Chicano Cultural Identity or CHRI C351 Latino Culture and Society and (c) SOC S335 Race and Ethnic Relations or SOC S419 Social Movements and Collective Action.

ANTHROPOLOGY

About the Program
Four Year Program
Minor in Anthropology
Associate of Arts—Concentration in Anthropology

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About the Program

Anthropology gives students a holistic understanding of human existence in an ecological, evolutionary perspective. It studies the interrelationships of human biology and human behavior, particularly that behavior which we call culture, both in the past and in the present. In its four traditional subfields of cultural anthropology, physical anthropology, archaeology, and linguistics, anthropology covers all of the aspects of being human, making use of almost all of human knowledge. Anthropology is also the only discipline that focuses on the study of the origin and nature of human biological and cultural diversity. Courses in anthropology are thus of value to students in virtually all fields; they relate those disciplines to a broader view of humankind as a whole.

Students are advised to take either ANTH A104 or ANTH A105 as a first course in anthropology; juniors and seniors may take ANTH A303 or ANTH A304 as introductory courses instead.

Four-year Program

Upon completion of the IU Northwest A.A. Concentration in Anthropology, students are invited to continue on in the IU Northwest B.A. in sociology program, and take advantage of the anthropology emphasis track to that degree. Almost all the courses taken for the A.A. fulfill requirements for that emphasis, and students can continue to take additional anthropology courses in that program that fulfill requirements for that B.A. See the previous section, “Major in Sociology,” for more details.

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Minor in Anthropology

Requirements
Students interested in a minor in anthropology must take 15 credit hours in anthropology, including: (a) at least one course selected from: ANTH A104 (or ANTH A304), ANTH A105 (or ANTH A103 or ANTH A303); (b) at least one course selected from ANTH B200, ANTH E200, ANTH L200, ANTH P200; (c) at least one 300- or 400- level course other than ANTH A303, ANTH A304, ANTH B400, ANTH E400, ANTH A495.

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Associate of Arts—Concentration in Anthropology

Requirements
Students interested in an A.A. Concentration in Anthropology must take 15 credit hours in anthropology, including: (a) ANTH A105 (or ANTH A303); (b) ANTH A104 (or ANTH A304); (c) at least one course selected from ANTH B200, ANTH E200, ANTH L200, ANTH P200. Students must also complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Women's Studies Program

About the Program
Minor in Women's Studies
Associate of Arts—Concentration in Gender and Women's Studies
Bachelor of Arts in Psychology—with a concentration in Women’s Studies
Bachelor of Arts in Sociology—with a concentration in Women’s Studies

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About the Program

Women’s studies is an interdisciplinary program focusing on the importance of gender as a category of social analysis. Women’s studies courses consider gender systems across cultures, examining the way those systems develop, function, and change. Women’s studies draws upon a variety of academic disciplines.

A women’s studies minor, an Associate of Arts degree with a concentration in Gender and Women’s Studies, or Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Psychology or Sociology and a concentration in Women’s Studies provides a valuable foundation for students entering the workforce. Women’s Studies courses will benefit those who enter jobs in business, education, nursing, and public affairs, as well as those who study traditional fields such as history, sociology, psychology, the arts, and literature. Most of the courses in the program satisfy distribution requirements.

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Minor in Women's Studies

The minor consists of a minimum of 15 credit hours, distributed as follows: 6 credit hours of Core Courses, 3 credit hours from Women in Diverse Cultures, 3 credit hours from Women in the Social Sciences, and 3 credit hours from Women in the Humanities. (The course taken to fulfill the requirement of Women in Diverse Cultures cannot be used to fulfill the requirements in Women in the Social Sciences and Women in the Humanities.)

Core Courses:

Either WOST W200 Women in American Society (3 cr.) (Social Sciences)
or WOST W201 Women in American Culture (3 cr.) (Humanities)
either WOST W400 Topics in Women's Studies (3 cr.) (Social Sciences)
or W401 Topics in Women's Studies (3 cr.) (Humanities)

Women in Diverse Cultures:

WOST W301 International Perspectives on Women (3 cr.)
AFRO A210 Black Women in the Diaspora (3 cr.)
AFRO A406 Literature by American Women of Color (3 cr.)
AFRO A410 The Black Woman and the Afro-American Experience (3 cr.)
CHRI C490 Topic: The Latino Woman (3 cr.)
CMLT C340 Women in World Literature (3 cr.)
HISP S284 Women in Hispanic Culture (3 cr.)
HISP S470 Women in Hispanic Literature (3 cr.)

Women in the Social Sciences:

WOST W301 International Perspectives on Women (3 cr.)
WOST W480 Women's Studies Practicum (3 cr.)
AFRO A210 Black Women in the Diaspora (3 cr.)
AFRO A410 The Black Woman and the Afro-American Experience (3 cr.)
CHRI C490 Topic: The Latino Woman (3 cr.)
SPAN S470 Women in Hispanic Literature (3 cr.)
LSTU L210 Workplace Discrimination and Fair Employment (3 cr.)
LSTU L290 Topics in Labor Studies (1-3 cr.)
LSTU L390 Women and Work (1-3 cr.)
LSTU L385 Race, Class, Gender, and Work (3 cr.)
PSY P460 Women: A Psychological Perspective (3 cr.)
SOC S310 The Sociology of Women in America (3 cr.)
SOC S337 Women and Crime (3 cr.)
SPCH S450 Gender and Communication (3 cr.)

Women in the Humanities:

WOST W301 International Perspectives on Women (3 cr.)
AFRO A406 Literature by American Women of Color (3 cr.)
CMLT C340 Women in World Literature (3 cr.)
ENG L201 Films by Women (3 cr.)
ENG L207 Women in Literature (3 cr.)
ENG L295 American Film Culture (3 cr.) (When topic is women)
ENG L381 Recent Writing (3 cr.) (When topic is women)
ENG L440 Seminar in English and American Literature (3 cr.) (When topic is women)
HISP S470 Women in Hispanic Literature (3 cr.)
HIST H260/HIST H425 History of Women in the U.S. (3 cr.) (Colonial to Nineteenth Century)
HIST H262/HIST H425 American Women's History: Twentieth Century

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Associate of Arts—Concentration in Gender and Women's Studies

A minimum of 15 credit hours distributed as follows: Core Courses: either WOST W200 or WOST W201 and WOST W400 or WOST W401; 3 credit hours from Women in Diverse Cultures; 3 credit hours from Women in the Social Sciences; and 3 credit hours from Women in the Humanities. (The course taken to fulfill the requirement of Women in Diverse Cultures cannot be used to fulfill the requirements in Women in the Social Sciences and Women in the Humanities).

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Bachelor of Arts in Psychology—with a concentration in Women’s Studies

Purpose
The Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology with a concentration in women’s studies provides a solid background in applied and basic psychology along with a focus on and experiences in the psychology of women and women’s issues.

Requirements
Majors must complete 36 credit hours including the following classes.
  1. PSY P101 and PSY P102 are prerequisites for all courses.
  2. PSY P211 and PSY K300 are prerequisites for all 400-level laboratory courses.
  3. Area A. A minimum of one of the following: PSY P325, PSY P326, PSY P327, PSY P329, PSY P335, PSY P407, PSY P417.
  4. Area B. A minimum of two of the following: PSY P314, PSY P316, PSY P319, PSY P320, PSY P324, PSY P336, PSY P389, PSY P425, PSY P430.
  5. Advanced laboratory: one from the following: PSY P421, PSY P424, PSY P429, PSY P435.
  6. Capstone: PSY P421 or PSY P424 or PSY P429 or PSY P435 satisfies the capstone requirement.
  7. Two psychology courses focused on women’s issues: PSY P460 and PSY P432
  8. One women’s studies core course: WOST W200 or WOST W400
  9. One practicum in women’s studies or psychology W480 or B309 (if focus is on women’s issues)

In addition to the above courses, the student is responsible for fulfilling the general requirements of the B.A. degree as established by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology—with a Concentration in Women’s Studies

Requirements
Majors must complete 30 credit hours as follows:

  1. Basic Sociology: four courses: S161; S215; S230; S261
  2. Methods: one course—S262 or S254
  3. Deviance/Inequality: one course: SOC S337 Women and Crime or S420 Topics in Deviance, when topic is women, such as Women and Deviance
  4. Organization: one course—S310 Sociology of Women in America, or S410 Topics in Social Organization—when topic is women, such as Women and Religion
  5. Theory: one – S340 (SOC) or S441 (Topics in Theory, Anthropology)
  6. Electives in areas of sociology/anthropology/ women’s studies: two appropriate courses at the 300-400 level, such as any additional of S337, S420, S310, S410 as above, and/or any of S495 Individual Readings and Research when topic is women; S398 Internship in Behavioral Sciences, when agency serves women, such as battered women’s shelters, women’s transitional houses, etc.; or S362 Native American Women

Outside Electives
Include WOST 200 (Introduction to Women’s Studies) and one WOST W400 course, such as P460/W400 Psychology of Women or P432/W400 Women and Madness or appropriate cross-listed courses from other disciplines.
In addition to the above courses, the student is responsible for fulfilling the general requirements of the B.A. degree as established by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Minors in Business or Public and Environmental Affairs (Optional)

About the Minor(s)
Optional (Business Minors)
Optional (Public and Environmental Affairs Minors)

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About the Minor(s)

Students majoring in the College of Arts and Sciences have the option of pursuing a minor field in business or public and environmental affairs.

Recognizing that many candidates for a degree in the College of Arts and Sciences will seek a career in business, commerce, industry, government, or other agencies, or will continue their education in a professional or graduate school, the College of Arts and Sciences recommends the completion of a minor in business for students who want to develop some basic skills in areas that may enhance their chances for finding gainful employment upon graduation with a bachelor’s degree in one of the arts and sciences disciplines. All economics courses count as courses inside the College of Arts and Sciences. A total of 15 credit hours outside the division may be counted toward the 120 credit hour minimum required for graduation.

The faculty in the School of Business and Economics have agreed to counsel any College of Arts and Sciences students having career goals to which courses in business are relevant.

In addition, a minor in public and environmental affairs is an option to arts and sciences students who are interested in the areas of the environment, public policy, and management.

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Optional (Business Minors)

Minor in Accounting
Course requirements are BUS A201, BUS A202, BUS A311, BUS A312, and BUS A325.

Minor in Business Administration
Course requirements are BUS A201, BUS A202, BUS L201, BUS F260 or BUS M200, BUS W100, and BUS Z302.
The prerequisite and academic policies of the School of Business and Economics will be enforced. A student must have a C (2.0) cumulative grade point average in the courses required in any minor. Non-business students must notify the recorder for the division in which their records are located as well as the assistant to the director in the School of Business
and Economics that they are pursuing one of these business minors. Correspondence courses will not be accepted for credit toward any minor. Successful completion of a minor will be indicated on the student’s official academic transcript. No more than half of the required courses for either minor may be transfer credit from another institution.

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Optional (Public and Environmental Affairs Minors)

Requirements
(five courses) SPEA V170, SPEA E272; and three of the following: SPEA E400, SPEA V263, SPEA V366, SPEA V373, SPEA V376, SPEA V432, SPEA V444, or SPEA V450.

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Approved Group III Distribution Courses by Discipline



Group III-A: Group III-B: Group III-C:
Discipline Physical and Life Sciences Social and Behavioral Sciences Humanities

Afro-American Studies
A101, A103, A204, A206, A230, A240, A250, A260, A261, A280, A282, A301, A302, A304, A341, A398, A401, A410, A498 A150, A151, A169, A208, A210, A249, A255, A290, A355, A356, A370, A379, A380, A392, A406, A440, A494

Anthropology A105, A303, B200, B201, B206, B250, B264, B266, B400, B464, B466 Laboratory Designation: B201 A104, A106, A200, A304, A360, E200, E400, E445, L200, L300, P200, P210 E108, E120, E300, E320, E323, P260, P360

Astronomy A100, A105, A200


Biology L100, L101, L102, L104, L200, L215, L300, L302, L310, L311, L312, L316, L321, L331, L350, L363, L378, M200, M310, M315, P130, P261, P262, P416, Z370, Z380, Z406, Z460, Laboratory Designation: B300, B355, L100 as a 5 credit hour class, L101, L102, L200, L215, L311, L312, L323, L391 when taken as a 1 or 2 credit hour lab M200, M215, M310, M315, P261, P262, P263 as a 1 credit hour lab, P431


Canadian Studies

C101, C301, C350, C400, C495, H230


Group III-A: Group III-B: Group III-C:
Discipline Physical and Life Sciences Social and Behavioral Sciences Humanities

Chemistry

C100, C101, C102, C105,
C106, C121, C122, C 125, C126
Laboratory Designation:
C120, C121, C122, C 125, and C126




Communications (Speech)

C320, S121, S122, S228, S229, S238, S322, S324, S329, S336, S405, S424, S440, S450,
S480

S321, S427

Comparative Literature

C145, C146, C190, C253, C255, C256, C340, C460

Computer Information Systems A201, A210, A302, C106, C201, C307, C311, C343, D345


Economics
E103, E104, E270

English

L101, L102, L201, L202, L203, L204, L205, L207, L211, L212, L295, L305, L308, L311, L315, L326, L332, L335, L345, L346, L347, L348, L351, L352, L354, L355, L357, L358, L364, L365, L366, L369, L370, L381, L382, L390, L391, L440, W301, W303
Laboratory Designation: English W301, W303


Group III-A: Group III-B: Group III-C:
Discipline Physical and Life Sciences Social and Behavioral Sciences Humanities

Fine Arts

A101, A102, A160, A331,
A332, A341, A342, A383, A396, A435, A442, A449, F100, F101, F102, H100, S200, S230, S240, S250, S260, S270, S291, S301, S331,S337, S338, S341, S344,S351, S352, S353, S361, S371, S392 Laboratory Designation: F100, F101, F102, S200, S230, S240, S250, S260, S270, and S291


French

F300, F305, F306, F424, F441, F443, F444, F450, F452, F453, F454, F463, F464
Laboratory Designation: French F300

Geography G304

G110, G120, G213, G250,
G313, G314, G315, G327



Geology

G101, G102, G103, G104,
G107, G108, G209, G210, G221, G222, G316, G317, G323, G334, G406, G413, G415, G418, G451
Laboratory Designation: G102, G103, G104, and G209




History
B391, H232, T426 A301, A303, A313, A314, A315, A317, A318, A321, A322, A323, A346, A347, A348, A352, A355, A356, A361, A363, A380, A382, A391, A392, A446, B351, B352, B353, B354, B356, B359, B361, B362, B363, B364, B393, C386, C388 C391, C392, D200, D300, D310, D325, D327, D409, D418, D426, D431, F301, F444, G368, G369, G383, G385, G387, H105, H106, H107, H201, H202, H203, H204, H205, H207, H209, H210, H215, H219, H220, H225, H227, H228, H230, H260, H262, J485,T425

Latino Studies
C213, C446 C101, C151, C301, C351, C352, C344

Linguistics
L103

Mathematics M100, M110, M118, M119, M215, M216, M301, M311, M320, M343, M344, M360, M366, M371, M391, M393, M403, M404, M405, M413, M414, M420, M425, M435, M436, M447, M448, M463, M477, M483, M485, M486, T336


Music

M174


Group III-A: Group III-B: Group III-C:
Discipline Physical and Life Sciences Social and Behavioral Sciences Humanities

Philosophy

P100, P135, P140, P150, P201, P206, P211, P221, P246, P250, P301, P304, P306, P310, P316, P335, P342, P343, P346, P360, P371, P383, P393, P490

Physics P101, P120, P201, P202, P221, P222 Laboratory Designation: P101, P102, P221, P222


Political Science
Y103, Y200, Y205, Y301, Y302, Y303, Y304, Y305, Y306, Y308, Y313, Y318, Y319, Y339, Y360, Y362, Y366, Y372, Y381, Y382, Y383, Y384, Y388, Y390, Y394, Y401

Psychology P326, P329, P407, P417 P101, P102, P211, P216, P303, P314, P316, P319, P320, P324, P325, P327, P335, P336, P388, P389, P430, P432, P460

Religious Studies

R160, R300, R340


Group III-A: Group III-B: Group III-C:
Discipline Physical and Life Sciences Social and Behavioral Sciences Humanities

Sociology
S161, S163, S164, S210, S215, S230, S250, S251, S254, S261, S262, S303, S309, S310, S311, S313, S314, S315, S316, S317, S320, S325, S328, S331, S335, S337, S340, S403, S410, S416, S418, S419, S420, S431, S441, S450, S470 S218

Spanish
S428 S301, S302, S411, S412, S413,S420, S435, S450, S470, S474, S479, S490

Telecommunications
C200

Theatre

T100, T115, T120, T220, T225, T230, T236, T270, T271, T302, T326, T335, T470, T471 Laboratory Designation: Theatre T120, T225, T230, T335

Women's Studies
W200, W301, W400 W201, W401

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Approved Group IV-2 Culture Studies Courses by Discipline


Discipline Culture Courses

Afro-American Studies A101, A103, A150, A151, A169, A204, A206, A208, A210, A230, A240, A249, A250, A255, A260, A261, A280, A282, A290, A301, A302, A304, A341, A355, A356, A370, A379, A380, A392, A398, A401, A404, A406, A410, A440, A493, A494, A498

Anthropology E120, E300, E320, E323, P260, P360

Communication (Speech) S238

Comparative Literature C253, C460

English L364, L370, L382

French F441

History A352, A355, A356, A391, A392, A446, C392, G369, G383, G385, G387, G468, G469, G483, G485, G487, G489, H203, H204

Latino Studies C101, C151, C213, C290, C301, C351, C352, C344, C446, C490, C495

Sociology S218, S335

Spanish S231, S284, S290, S412, S413, S435, S420, S479

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