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2006-2008 Undergraduate Studies Northwest Campus Bulletin: Table of Contents

2006-2008 Undergraduate Studies Northwest Campus Bulletin: Undergraduate Course Descriptions

 

 

Indiana University
Northwest 2006-2008
Undergraduate Studies
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Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL P100 Introduction to Philosophy (3 cr.)
Perennial problems of philosophy, including problems in ethics, in epistemology and metaphysics, in philosophy of religion. (Fall, Spring, Summer I and II)

PHIL P135 Introduction to Phenomenology and Existentialism (3 cr.)
Existentialism as a philosophical movement founded on phenomenology. Philosophical themes and their development, applications, or exemplifications in existentialist literature. Course presupposes no particular knowledge of philosophy. Readings from some or all of the following: Buber, Camus, Heidegger, Husserl, Jaspers, Kierkegaard, Marcel, Nietzsche, Sartre. (Occasionally)

PHIL P140 Introduction to Ethics (3 cr.)
Some ancient, medieval, or modern philosophers’ answers to ethical problems (e.g., nature of good and evil, relation of duty to self-interest, objectivity of moral judgments). (Fall, Spring, Summer I and II)

PHIL P150 Elementary Logic (3 cr.)
Development of critical tools for the evaluation of arguments. Not a prerequisite for PHIL P250. (Fall, Spring, Summer I and II)

PHIL P200 Problems in Philosophy (3 cr.)
A study of special, experimental, or timely topics drawn from the full range of philosophical discussion and designed to engage interests unmet in the regular curriculum. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (Occasionally)

PHIL P201 Ancient Greek Philosophy (3 cr.)
R: 3 credit hours of philosophy. Selective survey of ancient Greek philosophy (Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle). (Annually)

PHIL P206 Philosophy of Religion (3 cr.)
A survey of the main topics in the philosophy of religion, such as arguments for or against the existence of God, divine attributes, the problem of evil, miracles, immortality, and the connection between religion and morality. (Occasionally)

PHIL P211 Modern Philosophy: Descartes through Kant (3 cr.)
P: 3 credit hours of philosophy. Selective survey of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century philosophy, including some or all of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant. (Occasionally)

PHIL P221 Philosophy of Human Nature (3 cr.)
An introductory consideration of philosophical views about the origin, nature, and capabilities of human beings and of the effect of such views on private behavior and public policy. (Occasionally)

PHIL P246 Introduction to Philosophy and Art (3 cr.)
Introduction to the philosophical study of art and the relationship between art and philosophy. Topics include the nature of a work of art, the role of emotions in art, the interpretation and appreciation of art, and the way philosophy is expressed in art. (Occasionally)

PHIL P250 Introductory Symbolic Logic (3 cr.)
Propositional logic and first-order quantificational logic. (Occasionally)

PHIL P282 Women in Philosophical Thought (3 cr.)
A study of the classical and contemporary sources that influence and illustrate differing concepts of women. The aim is for students to clarify and assess the various concepts so as to better formulate and justify their concept of women.

PHIL P301 Medieval Philosophy (3 cr.)
P: 3 credit hours of philosophy. A survey, including Augustine, Boethius, Anselm, Abelard, Bonaventure, Aquinas, Duns Scotus, Ockham, and Nicholas of Cusa. (Occasionally)

PHIL P304 Nineteenth-Century Philosophy (3 cr.)
P: 3 credit hours of philosophy. Selective survey of post­Kantian philosophy including Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, Mill. (Occasionally)

PHIL P306 Business Ethics (3 cr.)
A philosophical examination of ethical issues that arise in the context of business. Moral theory will be applied to such problems as the ethical evaluation of corporations, what constitutes fair profit, and truth in advertising. (Fall, Spring, Summer I and II)

PHIL P310 Metaphysics of Existence (3 cr.)
P: 3 credit hours of philosophy. Topics such as existence, individuation, contingency, universals and particulars, Monism-pluralism, Platonism-nominalism, idealism-realism. (Occasionally)

PHIL P316 Twentieth-Century Philosophy (3 cr.)
A survey of representative philosophical approaches to problems of the present age, such as pragmatism, process and analytic philosophy, phenomenology, existentialism, neo-Marxism, and non-Western philosophy. (Occasionally)

PHIL P334 Buddhist Philosophy (3 cr.)
An examination of the basic philosophical concepts of early Buddhism and their subsequent developments in India, Japan, and Tibet. Implications of the Buddhist view of reality for knowledge, the self and ethical responsibility will be explored.

PHIL P335 Phenomenology and Existentialism (3 cr.)
P: 3 credit hours of philosophy. Selected readings from Buber, Camus, Heidegger, Husserl, Jaspers, Kierkegaard, Marcel, Nietzsche, Sartre, and others. (Occasionally)

PHIL P342 Problems of Ethics (3 cr.)
P: 3 credit hours of philosophy. May concentrate on a single large problem, such as whether utilitarianism is an adequate ethical theory or several more or less independent problems, such as the nature of goodness, the relation of good to ought, the objectivity of moral judgments. (Occasionally)

PHIL P343 Classics in Social and Political Philosophy (3 cr.)
P: 3 credit hours of philosophy. Readings from Plato and Aristotle to Hobbes, Locke, Hegel, and Marx. Topics include the ideal state, the nature and proper ends of the state, natural law and natural rights, the social contract theory, and the notion of community. (Occasionally)

PHIL P346 Philosophy and Art (3 cr.)
P: 3 credit hours of philosophy. Selected philosophical problems concerning art and art criticism. Topics such as the definition of art, expression, representation, style, form and content, and the aesthetic and the cognitive. (Occasionally)

PHIL P360 Introduction to Philosophy of Mind (3 cr.)
P: 3 credit hours of philosophy. Selected topics from among the following: the nature of mental phenomena (e.g., thinking, volition, perception, emotion); and the mind-body problem (e.g., dualism, behaviorism, materialism). (Occasionally)

PHIL P371 Philosophy of Religion (3 cr.)
P: 3 credit hours of philosophy. Topics such as the nature of religion, religious experience, the status of claims of religious knowledge, the nature and existence of God. (Occasionally)

PHIL P383 Topics in Philosophy (variable title) (3 cr.)
An advanced study of special, experimental, or timely topics drawn from the full range of philosophical discussion and designed to engage interests unmet in the regular curriculum. (Occasionally)

PHIL P393 Biomedical Ethics (3 cr.)
P: PHIL P140 or consent of instructor. A philosophical consideration of ethical problems that arise in current biomedical practice; for instance, abortion, euthanasia, determination of death, consent to treatment, and professional responsibilities in connection with research, experimentation, and health care delivery. (Fall, Spring, Summer I and II)

PHIL P490 Readings in Philosophy (1-3 cr.)
P: consent of instructor. Intensive study of selected authors, topics, and problems. (Occasionally)

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