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2006-2008 Undergraduate Studies Northwest Campus Bulletin: Table of Contents

2006-2008 Undergraduate Studies Northwest Campus Bulletin: Undergraduate Course Descriptions

 

 

Indiana University
Northwest 2006-2008
Undergraduate Studies
Bulletin

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History (HIST)


HIST A301 Colonial and Revolutionary America I (3 cr.)
European background of American history: discovery and exploration of New World by Spain, France, and England. Colonization: motives, causes, types. Social and intellectual developments in English colonies in seventeenth century. Birth of Republic. (Occasionally)

HIST A303 The United States, 1789-1865 (3 cr.)
Political, economic, and social conditions and changes from the age of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson to the Jacksonian era. (Occasionally)

HIST A313 Origins of Modern America, 1865-1917 (3 cr.)
Social, economic, cultural, and political ways in which Americans accommodated and resisted changes introduced by large-scale industrialization. Populism and progressivism receive special attention. (Occasionally)

HIST A314 United States, 1917-1945 (3 cr.)
Political, demographic, economic, and intellectual transformation during World War I, the twenties, the Great Depression, and World War II. (Occasionally)

HIST A315 Recent U.S. History (3 cr.)
Political, demographic, economic, and intellectual transformation after World War II, with special emphasis on the 1950s. (Occasionally)

HIST A317 American Social History, 1865 to Present (3 cr.)
Development of modern American social and intellectual patterns since 1880. Social thought, literature, science, arts, religion, morals, education. (Occasionally)

HIST A318 The American West (3 cr.)
Western expansion and development 1763-1900: economic, political, and social. Special attention to natural resources, Indian-white relations, and the role of the West in American myth and symbol. (Occasionally)

HIST A321 History of American Thought I(3 cr.)
P: HIST H105-HIST H106 or consent of instructor. Ideas that have influenced American history. Image of New World to challenge of Jacksonian democracy. (Occasionally)

HIST A322 History of American Thought II(3 cr.)
P: HIST H105-HIST H106 or consent of instructor. Ideas that have influenced American history. Transcendentalism to New Conservatism. (Occasionally)

HIST A346 American Diplomatic History II(3 cr.)
Foundations and evolution of American foreign policy with particular emphasis on the role of the United States as a world power in the twentieth century. (Occasionally)

HIST A347 American Urban History (3 cr.)
Development of cities and processes of urbanization in United States history. (Occasionally)

HIST A348 Civil War and Reconstruction (3 cr.)
Crisis of the Union; social, political, economic, and cultural factors leading to war and their influence in the war. Reconstruction and its consequences, in the South and in the nation. (Occasionally)

HIST A352 (CHRI C352) History of Latinos in the United States (3 cr.)
Latino experience in the United States; economic and social factors of the Latino role in a non-Latino nation.

HIST A355 (AFRO A355) Afro-American History I(3 cr.)
History of blacks in the United States. Slavery, abolitionism. Reconstruction, post-Reconstruction to 1900.

HIST A356 (AFRO A356) Afro-American History II (3 cr.)
History of blacks in the United States from 1900 to present. Migration north, NAACP, Harlem Renaissance, postwar freedom movement.

HIST A361 Studies in American History for Teachers I(3 cr.)
Contemporary bibliography and interpretations of major problems in United States history. (Occasionally)

HIST A363 Survey of Indiana History (3 cr.)
A survey of Indiana history and culture from the original inhabitants to recent times, with emphasis on the growth of a distinctive Hoosier culture.

HIST A380 The Vietnam War (3 cr.)
The story of America’s longest war—the battles, the protests, the movies, and the controversies. The Vietnam War was an epic event, the climax of the Cold War and the high-water mark of American power. Students will learn about the experiences of combatants on both sides, the reasoning behind American strategy, and the history of Vietnam’s struggle for independence. The course will also deal with the war’s legacies, its place in popular culture, and the war’s economic and political aftershocks. Credit given for only one of HIST A380 and HIST H228. (Occasionally)

HIST A382 The Sixties (3 cr.)
An intensive examination of the decade that tore apart post-World War II American society, beginning with the confident liberalism that believed the nation could “pay any price” and “bear any burden” in order to stop communism abroad and to promote reform at home, focusing on the internal contradictions and external challenges that destroyed this liberal agenda: civil rights and black power, the New Left, the counterculture, second-wave feminism, the sexual revolution, the Vietnam War, and the globalization of the economy, and finishing with the more conservative order that emerged in the early 1970s to deal with the conflicting realities of limited national power and wealth on the one hand, and rising demands for rights and opportunities on the other. (Occasionally)

HIST A391 (CHRI C391) History of Chicanos and Puerto Ricans in the U.S. I(3 cr.)
Analysis of the historical experiences of Chicanos and Puerto Ricans in American society from colonial times to 1900. Focuses on original Spanish settlements; colonial and Mexican societies; Mexican-American War; processes of subordination and proletarianization; development of Mexican culture in the United States; and the Spanish-American War.

HIST A392 (CHRI C392) History of Chicanos and Puerto Ricans in the U.S. II(3 cr.)
Analysis of the historical experiences of Chicanos and Puerto Ricans in American society from 1900 to present. Focuses on issues of immigration and migration; continued subordination; social and cultural adaptation; and political protest and organization.

HIST A446 (CHRI C446) Mexican and Puerto Rican Immigration and Migration (3 cr.)
Study of the migration of Mexicans and Puerto Ricans to the United States. Emphasis will be on push-pull factors of migration, the incorporation of both groups into the American socioeconomic structure, the role of federal legislation in patterns of migration, and the special plight of undocumented workers.

HIST B200 Issues in Western European History (3 cr.)
Study of analysis of selected historical issues and problems across more than one period of Western European history. Topics vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HIST B351 Western Europe in the Early Middle Ages (3 cr.)
Evolution of European civilization from the fall of Rome, development of Christianity, and the Germanic invasions through Charlemagne’s Empire and the subsequent development of feudalism, manorialism, papacy, and Romanesque architecture.

HIST B352 Western Europe in the High Middle Ages (3 cr.)
Expansion of European culture and institutions: chivalry, Crusades, rise of towns, universities, Gothic architecture, law, revival of central government. Violent changes in late-medieval Europe: overpopulation, plague, Hundred Years’ War, peasant revolt, crime, inquisition, and heresy.

HIST B353 The Renaissance (3 cr.)
Italian Renaissance as a political and cultural phase in the history of Western civilization: its roots in antiquity and the middle ages; its characteristic expression in literature, art, learning; social transformations; manners and customs. Expansion of Renaissance into France, Germany, and England. (Occasionally)

HIST B354 The Reformation (3 cr.)
Economic, political, social, and religious background of Protestant Reformation; Lutheran, Reformed, Anglican, and Anabaptist movements, with reference to their political and theological trends; Catholic Reformation. (Occasionally)

HIST B356 French Revolution and Napoleon (3 cr.)
Crisis of the Old Regime; middle class and popular revolt; constitutional monarchy to Jacobin commonwealth; the Terror and revolutionary government; expansion of Revolution in Europe; rise and fall of the Napoleonic Empire. (Occasionally)

HIST B359 Europe from Napoleon to the First World War (3 cr.)
Vienna settlement and period of reaction in Europe; liberalism and nationalism; revolutions; industrial revolution; capitalism; socialist movements; unification of Italy and Germany; clericalism and anticlericalism; struggles for political democracy; social legislation; imperialism, nationalist rivalries, and background of World War I. (Occasionally)

HIST B361 Europe in the Twentieth Century I(3 cr.)
Diplomatic, economic, intellectual, military, political, and social developments within Europe from World War I to present; changing relationships between Europe and other parts of the world.

HIST B362 Europe in the Twentieth Century II(3 cr.)
Diplomatic, economic, intellectual, military, political, and social developments within Europe from World War I to present; changing relationships between Europe and other parts of the world.

HIST B363 European Diplomatic History since 1870 I (3 cr.)
Nineteenth-century diplomatic theory and practice. European international developments leading to World War I. War and diplomacy. Twenty-years’ truce and seeds of new conflicts. World War II and its aftermath. (Occasionally)

HIST B364 European Diplomatic History since 1870 II(3 cr.)
Nineteenth-century diplomatic theory and practice. European international developments leading to World War I. War and diplomacy. Twenty-years’ truce and seeds of new conflicts. World War II and its aftermath. (Occasionally)

HIST B391 Themes in World History (3 cr.)
Contemporary bibliography and interpretations of major problems in world history.

HIST B393 German History from Bismarck to Hitler (3 cr.)
Social, political, and cultural developments from the middle-nineteenth through the middle-twentieth century, including the tragic efforts of liberalism and democracy to assert themselves against the opposing forces of militarism and nationalism. (Not open to students who have had HIST B378.)

HIST C386 Greek History (3 cr.)
Political, social, and economic developments in Greek world from age of Mycenae and Troy until Roman conquest (167 B.C.). Greek colonial world, Athens, and Sparta, career and legend of Alexander the Great, the Hellenistic Age. Archaeology as a source for political and social history.

HIST C388 Roman History (3 cr.)
History of Roman people, from legendary origins to death of Justinian (A.D. 565), illustrating development from city-state to world empire. Evolutionary stages exemplify transition from early kingship to republican forums, finally replaced by monarchy of distinctively Roman type.

HIST C391 Medieval Near East (3 cr.)
Rise of Islam to the end of World War I. Arab and Muslim empires, rise of Ottoman Turks, infiltration of the West into Near East. (Occasionally)

HIST C392 History of Modern Near East (3 cr.)
1774 to World War I; Ottoman Empire; the Eastern Question; suppression of rebellious elements; reform and reorganization of empire; Crimean War; spread of doctrinaire nationalism; Young Turk movement; World War I. Iran: relations with Russia, Britain, Turkey, and Afghanistan; Babism; tobacco monopoly; constitutional revolution; World War I. (Occasionally)

HIST D303 Heroes and Villains in Russian History (3 cr.)
Biographies of a number of Russia’s most colorful personalities and the times in which they lived, among them Ivan the Terrible, Pugachev, Peter the Great, Catherine the Great, Bakunin, Tolstoy, Lenin, Trotsky, Stalin.

HIST D310 Russian Revolutions and the Soviet Regime (3 cr.)
Russia on the eve of World War I; revolutions that have swept Russia; principal developments in government, economy, cultural and social life, and international policy under the Communist regime; expansion of Russian and Communist power, particularly since 1945.

HIST D325 History of the Balkans: 1804-1923 (3 cr.)
Breakup of Ottoman Empire, role of Great Powers in the Balkans, growth of nationalism, establishment of independent Balkan states.

HIST D327 Habsburg Empire: 1780-1918 (3 cr.)
Enlightened despotism; Metternichian system; struggle for German unification; Habsburg culture and civilization. German-Austrian, Hungarian, Czechoslovak, South Slavic, Rumanian, and Polish nationalism. Industrialization; Christian Socialism and Austro-Marxism; murder at Sarajevo; destruction of the empire; its legacy to Europe. (Occasionally)

HIST D409 Road to Revolution: Russia 1801-1917 (3 cr.)
Political, religious, intellectual, economic, and diplomatic development of Russia, as a European and Asian state from reign of Alexander I to World War I. Emphasis on cultural history and conflict between established and revolutionary views.

HIST D418 Russian and Soviet Foreign Policy in the Twentieth Century (3 cr.)
Expansion and war in Far East; World War I and revolution; international communism; interwar problems in Europe and Asia; World War II; postwar relations with China, United States, and Eastern Europe.

HIST D426 History of Balkans 1914 to Present (3 cr.)
First World War in the Balkans; politics, economies, and societies in the Balkan countries during the twentieth century; Balkan unity movements; Macedonian question; international events and World War II; rise of socialism in the region; era of Cold War and detente.

HIST D431 Eastern Europe since World War II(3 cr.)
World War II; communist movement; political, economic, and social changes; inter-bloc relationships; foreign policy.

HIST F301 (CHRI C301) History of Puerto Rico (3 cr.)
Colonization by Spain; international development; Spanish-American War; occupation by United States; economic, social, and political development; migration to the mainland; debate on independence, autonomy, and statehood.

HIST F444 (CHRI C444) History of Mexico (3 cr.)
Brief survey of the colonial period and independence movement. Ideological conflicts within the republic. Revolution of 1910. Relation with United States from Mexican viewpoint.

HIST G368 Early Modern Japan (3 cr.)
Samurai culture, expansion of Buddhism; high feudalism, unification, and the Tokugawa era. Encounter with European civilization, closed country. Urbanization, social and cultural change, rise of agrarian prosperity in the Edo period to about 1800.

HIST G369 Modern Japan (3 cr.)
Western impact and social and intellectual change in late Tokugawa Japan from about 1720. The Meiji Restoration. State capitalism and the Japanese development process. Empire, war defeat, U.S. occupation, and renewal in the twentieth century. Japan’s rise to the front rank of world economic powers after World War II.

HIST G383 Imperial China (3 cr.)
The Chinese empire from the Song through the middle Qing dynasties (tenth to eighteenth centuries, A.D.). Relations among demographic patterns, political forms, social classes, economic developments, philosophical movements, and cultural diversification, investigated through secondary and translated primary sources.

HIST G385 Modern China (3 cr.)
A survey of the final century of dynastic rule and the rise to power of the Nationalist and Communist parties, highlighting social and cultural developments, the impact of Western imperialism, and the evolution of revolutionary ideologies.

HIST G387 Contemporary China (3 cr.)
A survey of recent Chinese history focusing on social, cultural, and political life in the People’s Republic of China and post-1949 Taiwan. Events covered include the Long March, the Cultural Revolution, and the Tiananmen Square Protests of 1989.

HIST H105 American History I(3 cr.)
Colonial period, Revolution, Confederation and Constitution. National period to 1865. Political history forms the framework, with economic, social, cultural, and intellectual history interwoven. Introduction to historical literature, source material, and criticism. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)

HIST H106 American History II(3 cr.)
1865 to present. Political history forms the framework, with economic, social, cultural, and intellectual history interwoven. Introduction to historical literature, source material, and criticism. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)

HIST H107 American History: General Course III (3 cr.)
A thematic approach to the study of American history, 1600 to the present. Each section will deal with one or more topics, according to the interests of the instructor. Topics might be, for example, a study of American character, race and ethnicity, violence, women and sexism, or mobility and change. (Occasionally)

HIST H113 History of Western Civilization I(3 cr.)
Rise and fall of ancient civilizations; barbarian invasions; rise, flowering, and disruption of medieval Church; feudalism; national monarchies; rise of middle class; parliamentary institutions; liberalism; political democracy; industrial revolution; capitalism and socialist movements; nationalism, imperialism, and international rivalries; wars. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)

HIST H114 History of Western Civilization II(3 cr.)
Rise and fall of ancient civilizations; barbarian invasions; rise, flowering, and disruption of medieval Church; feudalism; national monarchies; rise of middle class; parliamentary institutions; liberalism; political democracy; industrial revolution; capitalism and socialist movements; nationalism, imperialism, and international rivalries; wars. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)

HIST H201 Russian Civilization I(3 cr.)
Russian society from Kievan state to Khrushchev era. Emphasis on social, institutional, and cultural developments, as well as growth of political power and the state. Russia to 1861. Not open to students who have completed HIST D403, HIST D404, HIST D409, HIST D410, or HIST D411.

HIST H202 Russian Civilization II(3 cr.)
Russian society from Kievan state to Khrushchev era. Emphasis on social, institutional, and cultural developments, as well as growth of political power and the state. Russia from 1861 to present. Not open to students who have completed HIST D403, HIST D404, HIST D409, HIST D410, or HIST D411.

HIST H203 Islamic Civilization to 1600 (3 cr.)
Religious, social, political, scientific, and cultural life of Islamic peoples; development of Islam from early Arabian origins to Hellenistic, Persian, Turkish, Hispanic, early Ottoman, Safavid, and Mogul empires and other influences.

HIST H204 Islamic Civilization II(3 cr.)
Mamluks of Egypt, Ottoman Turks, Persian Safavids; development of Islam in East, West, and North Africa, and in India. Impact of Western Europe on Islam and Middle East. Trade, technology, developments in art, architecture, and literature. Growth of Arab, Iranian, and Turkish nationalism; Zionism and the Arab-Jewish conflict. From 1300 to present. (Occasionally)

HIST H205 Ancient Civilization (3 cr.)
Political, cultural, and economic development of ancient Near East, Greece, and Rome from Bronze Age to end of classical period.

HIST H207 Modern East Asian Civilization (3 cr.)
Contrasting patterns of indigenous change and response to Western imperialism in East Asia during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. China and Japan receive primary consideration. Emphasis on the rise of nationalism and other movements directed toward revolutionary change.

HIST H209 English History: General Course I(3 cr.)
England to 1688. Political and constitutional developments, particularly in relation to Henrician Reformation and Puritanism. (Occasionally)

HIST H210 English History: General Course II(3 cr.)
England from 1688 to present. Political and economic movements such as liberalism and socialism arising out of industrialization of Britain. (Occasionally)

HIST H215 Proseminar in History (3 cr.)
P: freshmen and sophomores with consent of instructor. Selected topics of history. May be taken three times.

HIST H219 Origins and History of the Second World War (3 cr.)
Nazi and fascist aggression, collective security, appeasement and outbreak of war in Europe. German blitzkrieg; Russian front; North African, Italian, and Normandy campaigns; Hitler’s racial policies; Japanese-American hostility; Pearl Harbor; island hopping; the atomic bomb. Roosevelt, Stalin, and Churchill at Teheran, Yalta, and Potsdam. War-crime trials. (Occasionally)

HIST H220 American Military History (3 cr.)
From settlement of colonies to present. European background, colonial militia, Indian fighting. Principal foreign wars and their strategic objectives. Technological changes and effect of military on American society. Army is emphasized, with some attention to Navy, Marines, and Air Force. (Occasionally)

HIST H225 Special Topics in History (3 cr.)
Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects which cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated once for credit.

HIST H227 African Civilization (3 cr.)
Introduction to African culture; African environment; early humans in Africa; pre-colonial history; traditional political, economic, and social systems; language, religion, art, music, literature. (Occasionally)

HIST H228 The Vietnam War (3 cr.)
Indochinese history; French colonialism; Cold War dynamics; U.S. military-political actions; domestic U.S. politics; U.S. disengagement; Indochinese and American legacies.

HIST H230 History of Canada (3 cr.)
Canada as a French colony, as a British colony, and as a nation evolving through dominion status as an independent entity (with ties to both Anglophone and Francophone nations) and seeking a viable existence with the United States despite the vast difference in population size. (Occasionally)

HIST H232 The World in the Twentieth Century (3 cr.)
Shaping of the contemporary world, with emphasis on the interaction of the West, particularly Western imperialism and Western political and social ideas, with non-Western lands. Examination of revolutionary, national, ideological, social, and/or religious movements in Japan, China, India, Mexico, Russia, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, Africa. Today’s political, social, and economic institutions.

HIST H260 History of Women in the U.S. (3 cr.)
Colonial to nineteenth century. An examination of the social, economic, and political factors which have created and recreated women’s role in American history from the colonial period to the nineteenth century. (Fall)

HIST H262 American Women’s History: Twentieth Century (3 cr.)
An extension of HIST H260, examines the social, economic and political issues affecting women from 1890-2000 including the rise and diversity of feminist ideology in the second half of the twentieth century. (Spring)

HIST H425 Topics in History (3 cr.)
Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope from the perspective of arts and humanities. Topics will vary but will ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated for credit.

HIST H495 Undergraduate Readings in History (1-12 cr.)
P: at least junior standing and 12 credit hours of related course work. Prior arrangement with individual faculty member. Faculty-supervised experience in museum work, historic preservation, historical societies, oral history, or other history-related fieldwork in private and public institutions.

HIST J485 Historiography (3 cr.)
Principles, methodology, and practice of historical study, with emphasis on the varieties of history, the writing of history, and historical literature. (Occasionally)

HIST J495 Proseminar for History Majors (3 cr.)
Selected topics of history. May be taken three times. (Fall, Spring)

HIST K493 Reading for Honors (12 cr. max.)
P: approval of departmental honors committee.

HIST K499 Senior Honors Thesis (3 cr.)
Senior-level course for honors students only. Training in research and writing, culminating in honors thesis to be written under direction of faculty member. Oral examination over thesis conducted by three faculty members.

HIST T425 Topics in History (3 cr.)
Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope from the perspective of arts and humanities. Topics will vary but will ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated for credit.

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