Curriculum

[ Overview ] - [ Current Courses ] - [ Future Courses ] - [ Past Courses ]

The Center is currently designing an interdisciplinary undergraduate curriculum which combines three focal areas:

  1. Security Law and Policy
  2. Organizational and Social Aspects of Security
  3. System and Network Security

The curriculum contains five courses, the first of which was introduced in the Spring of 2004.

  1. Introduction to Cybersecurity
  2. Organizational and Social Aspects of Security
  3. Security Law and Policy
  4. System Security
  5. Network Security

Current Courses

Fall 2006

I130 Introduction to Cybersecurity
1 credit hour

Description: Introduction to Cybersecurity is designed to provide undergraduate students with a 10,000 ft overview of both cybersecurity as a concept and an area of study. The course will provide an opportunity to hear not only the faculty but also the professionals who protect the Indiana University network. Participation does not require understanding more than the lecture; as there are no technical requirements for taking the course. The course is ideal for those students who are enrolled in Informatics or Computer Science; but it is also extremely accessible to those who are simply curious as to the risks they face on the network. The material will be targeted at a level appropriate for freshman, and clarifying questions are more than welcome.

http://www.ljean.com/classes/06_07/I130/Prospectus_130.html

I537 Social Informatics of Security
3 credit hours

Descritpion: Social Informatics of Security is a course targeted at graduate students with no previous expertise in security. Social Informatics of Security is designed as a conversation about the interaction between the social, organizational and technical elements of security. The course is organized around a series of major topics.
Organizational processes embed implicit and explicit decisions and information control. Security technologies and implementations make explicit organizational choices that determine individual autonomy within an organization. Security implementations allocate risk, determine authority over processes, make explicit relationships in overlapping hierarchies, and determine trust extended to organizational participants.

http://www.ljean.com/classes/06_07/537/Prospectus_537.html

I590 Cryptographic Protocols
3 credit hours

Description: This is a class whose goal it is to teach a basic understanding of computer security by looking at how things can go wrong, and how people can abuse the system. This is a matter of creative cheating: to find loopholes and exploit these. It is first after one has understood how to attack the system that it is possible to propose ways to make the system secure. This class will emphasize the first aspect (cheating) but also touch on the second aspect (protecting against cheating.)

http://www.informatics.indiana.edu/markus/i400

B538 Computer Networks
Pre-requisites: Undergraduate course in Operating Systems or Networking. Some experience with sockets programming is required
3 credit hours

Description: Our goal in this class is to learn about computer networks. We will do this by understanding how the networks work today and why they are designed the way they are. The course will primarily focus on the Internet but will also cover other past and present network technologies to put things in perspective. Since applications play an important role in the evolution of the Internet we will also study DNS, peer-to-peer networks, multicast, and security.

Topics to be covered include: Error control, medium access, routing, congestion control, end-to-end transport, TCP/IP, IEEE 802.11 networks, security, and applications.

http://www.cs.indiana.edu/classes/b538

Past Courses

Spring 2005

Organizational and Social Aspects of Security
Pre-requisites: Introduction to Cybersecurity
3 credit hours

Security Law and Policy
Pre-requisites: Introduction to Cybersecurity
3 credit hours

Fall 2004

Introduction to Cybersecurity
Pre-requisites: none
1 credit hour

Network Security
Pre-requisites: System Security
3 credit hours

Spring 2004

CSCI B490: System Security
Pre-Requisites: CSCI A338/A538 or CSCI P436 or consent of instructor
3 credit hours

CSCI B649: Introduction to Computer Security
Pre-requisites: Computer Science graduate student
3 credit hours
Meeting times: T,H 1-2:15 pm, LH102
Instructor: Kay Connelly
URL: http://www.cs.indiana.edu/~connelly/b649_Spring04.html

Future Courses

Spring 2007

I130 Introduction to Cybersecurity
1 credit hour

Description: Introduction to Cybersecurity is designed to provide undergraduate students with a 10,000 ft overview of both cybersecurity as a concept and an area of study. The course will provide an opportunity to hear not only the faculty but also the professionals who protect the Indiana University network. Participation does not require understanding more than the lecture; as there are no technical requirements for taking the course. The course is ideal for those students who are enrolled in Informatics or Computer Science; but it is also extremely accessible to those who are simply curious as to the risks they face on the network. The material will be targeted at a level appropriate for freshman, and clarifying questions are more than welcome.

http://www.ljean.com/classes/06_07/I130/Prospectus_130.html

I330 Organizational and Social Informatics of Security
3 credit hours

Description: Organizational Informatics includes theories of organizations and an introduction to analytical tools with emphasis on intuition rather than application. Organizational Informatics of security requires understanding security as a strategic technology, rather than as a neutral technology. Social informatics of security requires understanding security as a technology of control, as one element of a larger cultural, social or political reality.

http://www.ljean.com/classes/06_07/330/Prospectus_330.html

B438 Computer Networks
Pre-requisites: Undergraduate course in Operating Systems or Networking. Some experience with sockets programming is required
3 credit hours

Description: Our goal in this class is to learn about computer networks. We will do this by understanding how the networks work today and why they are designed the way they are. The course will primarily focus on the Internet but will also cover other past and present network technologies to put things in perspective. Since applications play an important role in the evolution of the Internet we will also study DNS, peer-to-peer networks, multicast, and security.

Topics to be covered include: Error control, medium access, routing, congestion control, end-to-end transport, TCP/IP, IEEE 802.11 networks, security, and applications.

http://www.cs.indiana.edu/classes/b438-gupt



Spring 2008

B649 Internet Services and Protocols
Pre-requisites: A graduate/senior level networking course (B538 or equivalent)
                             An operating systems course (B534 or similar)
3 credit hours

Description: The Internet has experienced an unprecedented growth in the past few years. To the credit of its designers its core protocols have continued to perform reasonably well in the face of growth, application heterogeneity, changed trust relationships among its users, and higher available bandwidths. Networking research, both in the industry and academia, is actively trying to understand how the Internet scales and performs under the ever-evolving demands; and what should the next generation Internet services and protocols be like. Our goals in this course are the following:
  • To understand the various issues facing the Internet today through research papers and RFCs available online.
    • Topics to be covered include (but are not limited to):
    • IP routing behavior and anomalies
    • new TCP congestion control architectures
    • Internet traffic characteristics and traffic engineering
    • Internet worms and other security concerns
    • application layer "overlays" and their novel uses
    • issues in mobile networking
    • new proposals for Internet architectures and services
  • To investigate a research problem in networking through a semester long research project.

http://www.cs.indiana.edu/classes/b649-gupt/index.html