Staff

IU Faculty Associates

CEEP has a strong network of affiliated faculty who provide specialized content area expertise as needed. These faculty affiliates include general education faculty, STEM education faculty, and faculty in STEM disciplines. In addition, as part of one of the leading schools of education and research universities in the country, CEEP has access to experts in a wide range of other content areas.

A selection of CEEP’s Faculty Associates is found below.


Thomas A. Brush, Ph.D.

Send email to tbrush@indiana.edu
Vita (PDF)

Dr. Thomas Brush is the Barbara B. Jacobs Chair in Education and Technology within the School of Education at IU. Dr. Brush’s research interests focus on developing methods and strategies to promote inquiry-oriented learning, particularly with more open-ended instruction. This involves studying methods for integrating tools to promote cooperative, collaborative, and problem-based learning strategies into the learning environment and developing alternative techniques to deliver instruction to students. He has authored or coauthored more than 50 publications related to these interests. Dr. Brush has extensive experience as a principal investigator or co-principal investigator for over a half-dozen competitively-funded projects including an evaluation of Indiana’s Enhancing Education Through Technology (EETT) grant program.


Suzanne Eckes, Ph.D.

Send e-mail to seckes@indiana.edu
Vita (PDF)

Dr. Suzanne Eckes is an assistant professor in educational leadership and policy studies at the IU School of Education. Dr. Eckes has written recent articles dealing with school legal issues surrounding sexual orientation, cyber charter schools, compliance with federal Title IX requirements, and desegregation. A recent book, Principals Teaching the Law: 10 Legal Lessons Your Teachers Must Know (Corwin Press, 2011), was co-authored by Eckes, David Schimmel, professor emeritus of education at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and adjunct lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and Matthew Militello, associate professor of education at North Carolina State University, and features chapters and lessons on school liability for injuries, religious considerations, bullying, student records, and out-of-school conduct.


Peter Kloosterman, Ph.D.

Send email to klooster@indiana.edu
Vita (PDF)

Dr. Kloosterman joined the IU faculty in 1984 and served as chair of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction from 1996 to 2001 and executive associate dean of the School of Education from 2003 to 2008. Dr. Kloosterman is known for his work in the area of student beliefs and motivation in mathematics although most of his current work focuses on secondary analysis of mathematics data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). This work shows how performance of 4th, 8th, and 12th grade students has changed on a wide range of mathematics topics since the 1970s and how those changes correlate with changes in curriculum and policy over that period. Because this research is based on data collected from every state, recommendations for curriculum and teaching from the work are valid in schools and teacher education programs across the United States. Dr.  Kloosterman has been active in numerous national projects and groups, including co-chair of the student assessment group of the Research Agenda Project of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (2008-2009), associate editor of the Journal for Research in Mathematics Education (1991-1995), and secretary of the Special Interest Group for Research in Mathematics Education (1991-1993). He currently serves as PI for a NSF-funded three-year study analyzing past and present student performance in mathematics.


Adam V. Maltese, Ph.D.

Send email to amaltese@indiana.edu
Vita (PDF)

Dr. Maltese  is an assistant professor of Science Education and Adjunct faculty in the Department of Geological Sciences. He has experience teaching both education and geology courses at the secondary and post-secondary levels. As an undergraduate he participated in a summer research experience and as a Master’s student provided mentoring for a few undergraduates conducting petrology research. During graduate school at the University of Virginia he worked with Robert Tai and managed qualitative data collection for the NSF-funded Project Crossover. His current research focuses on various aspects of student persistence in the STEM pipeline from middle school through graduate school. He is currently the lead evaluator for two separate projects in Chicago Public Schools funded by NASA and the U.S. Department of Education.


David Rutkowski, Ph.D.
Send email to drutkows@indiana.edu
Vita (PDF)

Dr. Rutkowski is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. Before coming to Indiana University in 2009, he spent several years working for the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) in Hamburg, Germany. Dr. Rutkowski has expertise in international educational policy and large-scale assessment and has worked on several large scale projects and international thematic reports using large-scale data. His work has covered a range of topics to include educational quality, private and public education, school use of technology and globalization effects on national education systems. Dr. Rutkowski co-authored two recent CEEP reports, “UNESCO Without U.S. Funding? Implications for Education Worldwide” and “College Admission Tests as Measures of High School Accountability.”


Leslie Rutkowski, Ph.D.
Send email to lrutkows@indiana.edu
Vita (PDF)

Dr. Rutkowski joined the faculty of Indiana University’s School of Education in 2010 as assistant professor in the Department of Counseling and Educational Psychology.  With experience in large-scale, international assessments, she helped to develop IU’s new doctorate program in inquiry methodology. Prior to joining IU, Dr. Rutkowski worked as a research associate for the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA). The IEA created and administers the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) and Trends in International Math and Science Survey (TIMSS), which collect data from more than 60 countries to assess student learning.  Dr. Rutkowski has also recently authored, or co-authored, publications in Educational Research and Evaluation, The Sport Psychologist, Journal of Curriculum Studies and the Journal of Educational Measurement.


Hannah Schertz, Ph.D.
Send email to hschertz@indiana.edu
Vita (PDF)

Dr. Schertz joined the faculty of Indiana University’s School of Education in 2008 following a faculty appointment at the University of Northern Colorado and earlier extended experience coordinating services for families of young children with disabilities. In her practitioner role she developed and directed Early Intervention/Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE) services and supports in a regional area, implementing evidence-based practices, and procuring external support for a variety of inclusive and family supportive projects. In her academic positions she developed, coordinated, and taught graduate programs in Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE) and in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Dr. Schertz completed a three-year research study of the Joint Attention Mediated Learning intervention, funded by Autism Speaks. She currently serves on the Executive Board of the Division for Early Childhood of the Council for Exceptional Children and serves as a reviewer for ECSE and ASD journals. She recently edited a Young Exceptional Children monograph focused on intervention practices for young children with ASD. Dr. Schertz currently serves as PI for a four-year NSF-funded study in Early Intervention and Early Learning in Special Education.


Russell Skiba, Ph.D.

Send e-mail to skiba@indiana.edu
Vita (PDF)

Within CEEP, Dr. Russell Skiba directs the Equity Project, a consortium of research projects offering evidence-based information to educators and policymakers on equity in special education and school discipline.  Dr. Skiba is a Professor in the School Psychology program at Indiana University. He has worked with schools across the country in the areas of disproportionality, school discipline, and school violence, has been project director or principal coordinator on numerous federal and state grants, and has published extensively in the areas of school violence, zero tolerance, and equity in education. He was a member of the writing team that produced the U.S. Department of Education's document on school safety Early Warning, Timely Response, and a member and lead author of the American Psychological Association’s Task Force on Zero Tolerance. In Indiana, he served in 2008 as co-chair of the Education Subcommittee of the Indiana Commission on Disproportionality in Youth Services. He was awarded the Push for Excellence Award by the Rainbow Coalition/Operation PUSH for his work on African American disproportionality in school suspension. Dr. Skiba has testified before the United States Civil Rights Commission, spoken before both Houses of Congress on issues of school discipline and school violence, and in 2008, acted as a special consultant to OSEP on issues of disproportionality and equity in special education.