School of Global and International Studies

Central Eurasian Studies

CEUS Ph.D Degree Requirements


ADVISING

The Department of Central Eurasian Studies stresses the importance of faculty advising throughout a student's career at Indiana University.  Entering students must consult with the Department's Director of Graduate Studies in planning their first semester's program. The student is required to establish a three-member Graduate Advisory Committee (GAC), headed by the student's likely thesis adviser no later than the start of their third semester. For Ph.D. students the structure of the advisory committees is mandated in the University Graduate School Bulletin. The student must meet with his or her advisor at least once a semester while in residence at the University, in order to have courses for the subsequent semester approved and to plan a well- integrated program of study at both the M.A. and Ph.D. levels.

 

GRADUATE CURRICULUM

The Department offers the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy.The general University requirements for these degrees are set forth in the chapter "General Requirements" of the University Graduate School Bulletin. Students should read this chapter carefully, especially the section on foreign language requirements. In addition, they should note that no course may be used to satisfy more than one requirement.

NOTE: The requirements set forth in the current document supersede those listed in the April 2003 version of this document.

 

Ph.D. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Summary of Ph.D Requirements

      1. Region of Specialization (12 cr.)............................................................................................ 12
      2. Language of Specialization and Linguistics (9 cr.)..................................................................... 9
      3. One 700-level Seminar (3 cr.)................................................................................................. 3
      4. Minor Field (12 cr.).............................................................................................................. 12
      5. Electives (12 or more cr.)..................................................................................................... 12
      6. Thesis Research (12 cr. Of R890 or additional elective courses)…….....................................12
      7. Research Language I (no cr.)
      8. Research Language II (no cr.)
      9. Ph.D. Examination (no cr.)
      10. Ph.D. Dissertation (no cr.)
      11. Defense of Dissertation (no cr.)

      Total (minimum) credit hours at the Ph.D. level    60
      Total (minimum) credit hours at the M.A. level     30
      Total (minimum) credit hours for a Ph.D. degree... 90

      Major Field

      A candidate must complete 48 credit hours beyond those hours used to satisfy M.A. requirements in his or her field of specialization, distributed as described below.  No course may be used to satisfy more than one requirement.

      Students normally complete the remainder of the 90 credit hours required by the College of Arts and Sciences by enrolling R890 Ph.D. Thesis. The grades (and credit) for these courses is deferred until the completion of the dissertation. Students may, of course, take additional standard courses for credit as part of their examination or dissertation preparation.

A. Region of Specialization (ROS) Courses

Four Department courses relevant to the student's Region of Specialization (12 cr.).  

Baltic and Finnish

R501 Baltic States since 1918 
R502 Finland in the 20th Century 
R504 Modern Finnish Literature
R508 Estonian Culture and Civilization 
R509*Topics in Baltic-Finnish
R592 Uralic Peoples and Cultures
R600*Advanced Readings in Baltic-Finnish Studies 

R694 Uralic Linguistics
R698 Empire and Ethnicity in Modern Russian History

Central Asia

R510 Introduction to Central Asian History 
R511 Travelers and Explorers in Central Asia
R512 Shrine and Pilgrimage in Central Asian Islam 
R513 Islam in the Soviet Union and Successor States 
R514 Islamization in Inner Asia
R515 Politics and Society in Central Asia 
R516 Peoples and Cultures of Central Asia 
R528 Post-Soviet Transition in Central Asia 
R529*Topics in Central Asian Studies 
R530 Politics in Modern Xinjiang
R531 Grave Robbers, Missionaries, and Spies: Foreign Adventurers in Chinese Turkistan
R532 From Kingdom to Colony to Province: History of Xinjiang to 1911 
R533 Cultures and Civilization of Xinjiang
R593 The Mongol Century
R594 Environmental Problems & Soc Constraints in Northern & Central Eurasia 
R595 Politics of Identity in China and Inner Asia
R596 Rus, Khazars & Bulgars
R610*Advanced Readings in Central Asia Studies 
R611 Ethnic History of Central Asia
R612 Central Asia under Russian Rule
R613 Islamic Central Asia 16th-19th Centuries 
R614 Yasavi Sufis and Central Asian Islam
R615 The Naqshbandi Sufi Tradition in Central Asia 
R616 Religion and Power in Islamic Central Asia 
R627 Islam and Modernity in Central Eurasia
R628 Russia's Orient 1552-1924
R629 Islamic Hagiography of Central Asia
R693 Theorizing Central Eurasia: The Problems of Nationalism 
R697 Soviet and Post-Soviet Nationalities and Problems
R698 Empire and Ethnicity in Modern Russian History
R699 Central Eurasian Languages

Hungarian

R540 Intro to Hungarian Studies
R542 Roma (Gypsy) History and Culture
R547 East Central European Cities in Comparative Perspective 
R549*Topics in Hungarian Studies
R592 Uralic Peoples and Cultures 
R640*Advanced Readings in Hungarian Studies
R641 Art & Music of 19th & 20th Century Hungary 
R642 Bela Bartok: Composer in Context
R649 The Roma Through History, Music, and Film 
R694 Uralic Linguistics

Iranian 

R510 Introduction to Central Asian History
R516 Peoples and Cultures of Central Asia
R551 Prophets, Poets, and Kings: Iranian Civilization 
R552 Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East
R554 Persian Literature in Translation: Literature & Cinema of Modern Iran
R559*Topics in Iranian Studies
R580 Literature of the Ottoman Court in Translation 
R593 The Mongol Century
R613 Islamic Central Asia 16th-19th Centuries
R614 Yasavi Sufis and Central Asian Islam
R615 The Naqshbandi Sufi Tradition in Central Asia
R629 Islamic Hagiography of Central Asia
R650*Advanced Readings in Iranian Studies
R693 Theorizing Central Eurasia: The Problems of Nationalism

Mongolian

R560 Modern Mongolia
R561 Mongolia's Middle Ages
R562 Mongolian Civilization and Folk Culture 
R563 Mongolian Historical Writings
R564 Shamanism and Folk Religion of the Mongols 
R569*Topics in Mongolian Studies
R570 Introduction to the History of Tibet 
R572 Sino-Tibetan Relations
R593 The Mongol Century
R595 Politics of Identity in China and Inner Asia 
R660*Advanced Readings in Mongolian Studies 
R661 Mongolian Literature and Folklore 
R662 Modern Inner Mongolia
R666 Mongolian Languages and Dialects 
R667 Mongolic Writing Systems
R693 Theorizing Central Eurasia: The Problems of Nationalism 
R696 Manchu Historical Sources
R697 Soviet and Post-Soviet Nationalities and Problems 
R699 Central Eurasian Languages 

Post-Communism & Nationalism 

R501 Baltic States since 1918
R508 Estonian Culture and Civilization
R513 Islam in the Soviet Union and Successor States 
R515 Politics and Society in Central Asia
R516 Peoples and Cultures of Central Asia 
R528 Post-Soviet Transition in Central Asia 
R501 Baltic States since 1918
R508 Estonian Culture and Civilization 
R560 Modern Mongolia
R572 Sino-Tibetan Relations
R594 Environ Probs & Soc Constraints in Northern & C Eurasia 
R662 Modern Inner Mongolia
R697 Soviet and Post-Soviet Nationalities and Problems 
R698 Empire and Ethnicity in Modern Russian History

Tibetan 

R560 Modern Mongolia
R562 Mongolian Civilization and Folk Culture 
R563 Mongolian Historical Writings
R570 Introduction to the History of Tibet 
R571 Tibet and the West
R572 Sino-Tibetan Relations 
R573 Religions of Tibet 
R579*Topics in Tibetan Studies 
R593 The Mongol Century
R595 Politics of Identity in China and Inner Asia 
R661 Mongolian Literature and Folklore 
R670*Advanced Readings in Tibetan Studies
R693 Theorizing Central Eurasia: The Problems of Nationalism 
R699 Central Eurasian Languages

Turkish 

R515 Politics and Society in Central Asia 
R516 Peoples and Cultures of Central Asia 
R552 Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East
R580 Literature of the Ottoman Court in Translation
R582 Cultural History of the Ottoman Empire and Modern Turkey 
R583 Ten Sultans, One Empire: Ottoman Classical Age 1300-1600 
R584 From Grandeur to Collapse: Ottoman, State & Society in the Post-Classical Age
R589*Topics in Turkish Studies 
R593 The Mongol Century 
R596 Rus, Khazars & Bulgars
R516 Peoples and Cultures of Central Asia 
R627 Islam and Modernity in Central Eurasia 
R680*Advanced Readings in Turkish Studies

*If used to satisfy the ROS requirement, these courses must be approved by a student's Graduate Advisory Committee.

In exceptional circumstances, other departmental courses may be used to fulfill the requirements of a particular ROS with the approval of the student’s advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies or the Department Chairperson

Individualized ROS

A student may create a major which covers an Individualized Region of Specialization (where faculty expertise exists) or includes more than one Region of Specialization. Such majors must be approved by the student’s advisory committee.A variety of areas is possible (e.g., Volga-Kama region, Siberia, or Xinjiang) and may include languages taught occasionally in the Department (e.g., Sami [Lappish]; a Samoyed language; Yakut, Kyrgyz, Chagatay, Turkmen, or Chuvash; Buriat or Kalmyk; Manchu or Evenki; and Paleo-Siberian languages such as Yukagir and Ket).Students should expect to study their language(s) of choice for at least two years.

B. Language of Specialization (LOS) Courses

Nine credit hours in Language of Specialization (LOS) courses and Linguistics.

Besides advanced level LOS courses, these may include any courses below from (a) LOS Advanced Readings, (b) Classical and Early Form of the LOS, and (c) Linguistics, or T699- T799 courses which are approved by the student’s advisory committee to fulfill this requirement. Courses which currently satisfy this requirement are:

a) Advanced Readings Courses

R563 Mongolian Historical Writings 
T676 Readings in Modern Tibetan Texts

b) Classical and Early Forms of LOS:

T623 Chaghatay
T656 Middle Iranian Languages 
T658 Old Iranian Languages
T663-664 Classical Mongolian I or II
T673 Old Tibetan
T685-686 Introductory Ottoman Turkish I or II
T687-688 Advanced Ottoman Turkish I or II
T690 Introduction to Manchu
T691 Old Turkic

c) Linguistics

Baltic-Finnish Region

R694 Uralic Linguistics
T699* Introductory Central Eurasian Languages 
T799* Intermediate Central Eurasian Languages

Central Asian Region

T691 Old Turkic
T693* Introduction to Sakha (Yakut) 
RTBA Altaic Linguistics
T699* Introductory Central Eurasian Languages 
T799* Intermediate Central Eurasian Languages

Hungarian Region

T694 Uralic Linguistics
T699* Introductory Central Eurasian Languages 
T799* Intermediate Central Eurasian Languages

Mongolian Region 

R666 Mongolian Languages and Dialects 
T690 Introduction to Manchu
T691 Old Turkic 
RTBA Altaic Linguistics
T699* Introductory Central Eurasian Languages 
T799* Intermediate Central Eurasian Languages

Tibetan Region

T673 Old Tibetan
T699* Introductory Central Eurasian Languages 
T799* Intermediate Central Eurasian Languages

C. Seminar

This is normally a 700-level course taught inside the department or in the student’s minor field with the approval of the student’s advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies.A course without a 700 number may also be used to fulfill this requirement provided it is conducted as a seminar. A seminar is a course in which advanced graduate students have the opportunity to write, present, and revise a substantial research paper (normally 20-25 pages). Normally, students will present a prospectus or preliminary draft of a paper before the professor and other members of the seminar.  Based on the response to the prospectus or draft, the student then revises and expands the paper. The essential element is revising the paper in response to peer review and criticism. To use a non-100-level course, the student will need to submit evidence that the course meets criteria and have it approved by both his/her advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies prior to registration.  Note that this course cannot be used to fulfill any other requirement, either for the ROS or for the minor.


R700   Seminar in Baltic-Finnish Studies 
R710   Seminar in Central Asian Studies
R711   Seminar on Comparative Study of Central Asian and Middle East 
RTBA Central Asian Nomadic Pastoralism
R713   Sources for the Study of Central Asian History 
R740   Seminar in Hungarian Studies
R750   Seminar in Iranian Studies 
R760   Seminar in Mongolian Studies 
R761   Ordos Documents
R770   Seminar in Tibetan Studies
R771   Intro to Chinese Sources for Tibetan Studies 
R780   Seminar in Turkish Studies
R790   Seminar in Central Eurasian Studies

D. Outside Minor

A candidate must complete a minimum of 12 credit hours in an outside minor field. The minor department or program determines which courses satisfy this requirement.The minor is normally in a disciplinary department. It should complement the student’s research interests and should be chosen in consultation with his/her advisor.

E. Electives

Electives or “open” courses may include any graduate-credit Department courses at the 500- level or above not used to satisfy other requirements, or any other graduate-level courses, including Advanced Readings courses (12 cr.).

F. Dissertation Research

Students complete the remainder of the 90 credit hours required by the College of Arts and Sciences by enrolling in CEUS-R 890 Ph.D Thesis. The grades (and credit) for these courses are deferred until the completion of the dissertation.

 

Research Languages

Students must demonstrate reading proficiency in two modern scholarly research languages, in accordance with the regulations of the University Graduate School. This may be done by taking proficiency examinations through the relevant departments, or by completing with a "B" grade or better the 491-492 courses offered in some of these languages. According to Graduate School regulations, these credit hours do not count toward the over-all Ph.D. requirement of 90 hours.  Completion of one of the two Research Language requirements is a prerequisite for admission to the Ph.D. program.

G. Research Language I

Reading proficiency in a modern research language such as French, German, or Russian. The student must have acquired the first research language at the M.A. level of study.

H. Research Language II

Reading proficiency in a second research language most relevant to the student’s field of specialization. The second language may be French, German, or Russian, or an appropriate language may be substituted with the written approval of the majority of the student's advisory committee. For example, Swedish may be an appropriate research language for a student in Finnish, or Japanese may be appropriate for Mongolian studies, depending on the particular subject of study within the major. Determination of proficiency is made on a case-by- case basis.

 

Examination

The student may take the Ph.D. examination only after fulfilling all the requirements for the Ph.D. (M.A. degree, specified Ph.D. courses, outside minor, and both research languages).

Ph.D. Examination: Written and Oral

The student will be examined in two fields with a separate faculty examiner for each field. The written portion of the qualifying examination will be two hours long for each of the two fields in which the student is to be examined.Prior to the exam, the student, in consultation with his/her examiners, will prepare an examination reading list for each field.These reading lists must include works in both the language of specialization and the research languages. These reading lists will be kept on file with the examinations.Each of the faculty examiners will prepare three or four questions, of which the student will answer two, allowing approximately one hour for each questions.

Students should check with their minor department about its policy on Ph.D. qualifying exams. If no examination is required for the minor, the student should ask for an official waiver.

The oral examination will be given within two weeks of the written examination.At least three examiners must be present at the oral examination.Students with waiver for the outside minor must secure a third faculty member from the Department as an examiner at the orals. Oral examinations will be scheduled for two hours and will last no less than 90 minutes.

Unsatisfactory performance in one field of the written examination will require that the student successfully complete that part of the examination at a later time, before the oral examination can be taken. Failing marks in two fields of the written examination will constitute failure in the written part.The student may not take that part again in the same semester. Two failures in the written examination result in withdrawal of permission for the student to work toward a degree in the Department. Unsatisfactory performance in one field of the oral examination will require repetition of that part of the examination. Failing marks in two fields of the oral examination will constitute failure in the oral part and the student will not be allowed to take that part again in the same semester. Two failures in the oral part of the examination will result in withdrawal of permission for the student to work toward a degree in the Department.

 

Dissertation

The student must follow the regulations stated in the University Graduate School Bulletin and in the "Guide to the Preparation of Theses and Dissertations."

 

J. Ph.D Dissertation

The student must submit a dissertation to his or her Ph.D. research committee and obtain its approval of the finished product.

 

K. Defense of the Dissertation

As a final examination, the student must defend the dissertation before his or her research committee and other University members who may wish to attend. A successful defense and submission to the Graduate School of the completed and corrected dissertation results in the awarding of a Ph.D. degree in Central Eurasian Studies.

 

Summary of Ph.D Requirements

      1. Region of Specialization (12 cr.)............................................................................................ 12
      2. Language of Specialization and Linguistics (9 cr.)..................................................................... 9
      3. One 700-level Seminar (3 cr.)................................................................................................. 3
      4. Minor Field (12 cr.).............................................................................................................. 12
      5. Electives (12 or more cr.)..................................................................................................... 12
      6. Thesis Research (12 cr. Of R890 or additional elective courses)…….....................................12
      7. Research Language I (no cr.)
      8. Research Language II (no cr.)
      9. Ph.D. Examination (no cr.)
      10. Ph.D. Dissertation (no cr.)
      11. Defense of Dissertation (no cr.)

      Total (minimum) credit hours at the Ph.D. level    60
      Total (minimum) credit hours at the M.A. level     30
      Total (minimum) credit hours for a Ph.D. degree... 90

 

 

 

 

Department of Central Eurasian Studies
Global and International Studies Building 3024
East Building, 3rd Floor
355 North Jordan Ave.
Bloomington, IN 47405-1105

Phone: (812) 855-2233
Fax: (812) 855-7500