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Indiana University Bloomington

College of Arts and Sciences Center for Research on Race and Ethnicity in Society
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CRRES Affiliated Faculty

Affiliated FacultyThe CRRES Affiliated Faculty is a diverse group of scholars from Indiana University who have a central interest in the study of race and ethnicity. Membership as a faculty affiliate is open to all IUB tenure-track faculty members, IUB lecturers who have acquired a Ph.D., and Emeritus IUB faculty whose teaching and/or research activities involve the topic of race and ethnicity. Affiliates bring a wide range of professional research experiences to CRRES. They are, therefore, relied upon to provide input to help shape the future direction of CRRES.

Osita Afoaku

Osita Afoaku
osafoaku@indiana.edu
Clinical Professor, School of Public and Environmental Affairs
Dr. Afoaku received his Ph.D. from Washington State University in 1991. He is engaged in research on human rights, sustainable development, democratization and state reconstruction in Africa, U.S.-African/Third World relations, and UN Security Council reform.

Marlon M. Bailey

Marlon M. Bailey
baileymm@indiana.edu
Associate Professor, Departments of American Studies & Gender Studies
Dr. Bailey earned his Ph.D. in African Diaspora Studies with a designated emphasis in Gender, Women, and Sexuality from UC Berkeley. He is also a Visiting Professor at the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies (CAPS) in the Department of Medicine at UC San Francisco. Dr. Bailey’s book, Butch Queens Up in Pumps: Gender, Performance, and Ballroom Culture in Detroit, (U of Michigan P), was recently nominated for the Lambda Literary Book Award in LGBT studies.

Jeannine Bell

Jeannine Bell
jeabell@indiana.edu
Professor, School of Law and Louis F. Niezer Faculty Fellow
Dr. Bell earned her Ph.D. and J.D. from the University of Michigan. She is a founding member of the Michigan Journal of Race and Law. Dr. Bell is a nationally recognized scholar in the area of policing and hate crime. She engages in interdisciplinary research in both political science and law.

Claudia Breger

Claudia Breger
clbreger@indiana.edu
Professor, Departments of Germanic Studies & Gender Studies
Dr. Breger received her doctorate in German Literature from Humboldt University. Her research interests include 20th- and 21st-century literature, film and culture, with an emphasis on literary, media, and cultural theory, as well as the intersections of gender, sexuality, and race.

Cara Caddoo

Cara Caddoo
ccaddoo@indiana.edu
Assistant Professor, Department of American Studies
Dr. Caddoo received her Ph.D. in History from CUNY in 2013. Her research examines popular culture, print and visual media, religion, and historical intersections of race, gender, and ethnicity with a particular emphasis on nineteenth and twentieth century social, political, and institutional formations organized around the idea of blackness, and how African Americans and Asian Americans contributed to these developments.

Claude Clegg

Claude Clegg
cclegg@indiana.edu
Professor, Department of History
Dr. Clegg earned his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1995. His research and teaching interests focus on the African diaspora of the Atlantic world and the ways in which people of African descent have created and communities and identities outside of Africa, particularly in the slave and post-emancipation societies of North America and the Caribbean.

Deborah Cohn

Deborah Cohn
dncohn@indiana.edu
Professor, Departments of American Studies & Spanish and Portuguese
Dr. Cohn received her Ph.D. in Hispanic Studies from Brown University in 1996. Her research interests include comparative literatures of the Americas, the Mexican Intelligentsia, and the Global South.

Christopher DeSante

Christopher DeSante
cdesante@indiana.edu
Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science
Dr. DeSante received his degree in Political Science from Duke University in 2012. His research examines race and racism in America, American political partisanship, and political methodology. His recent article “Working Twice as Hard to Get Half as Far: Race, Work Ethic and America's Deserving Poor" was published in the April 2013 issue of the Journal of Political Science.

Donna Eder

Donna Eder
eder@indiana.edu
Professor, Department of Sociology
Dr. Eder earned her degree in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin. She has served as the co-facilitator for the Race, Class, and Gender Workshop for several years. Her research areas include the sociology of education, race and ethnicity, gender socialization, and sociolinguistics. Dr. Eder’s vision for making research on race and ethnicity more visible on the Bloomington campus facilitated the founding of CRRES.

Bernard Fraga

Bernard Fraga
bfraga@indiana.edu
Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science
Dr. Fraga received his Ph.D. in Government and Social Policy from Harvard University in 2013. His research interests are in the areas of American political behavior, electoral politics and policy, and racial and ethnic politics. He is particularly interested in how electoral institutions, partisanship, and racial/ethnic context shape vote choice and voter turnout.

Shane Greene

Landon Shane Greene
lsgreene@indiana.edu
Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology
Dr. Greene earned his Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Chicago in 2004. He is the Director of the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies. His research is motivated by an interest in movements for social justice and political transformation, which he examines through projects on urban subcultures, ethnicity, the environment, and the politics of culture in the Latin American context.

Valerie Grim

Valerie Grim
vgrim@indiana.edu
Professor, Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies
Dr. Grim earned a Ph.D. in History with a focus on agricultural and rural history from Iowa State University. Her research focuses on African American history, agricultural history, black rural communities, and the black family.

Vivian Nun Halloran

Vivian Nun Halloran
vhallora@indiana.edu
Associate Professor, Departments of American Studies & English
Dr. Halloran specializes in Caribbean literature and her research explores the connections between art, history, literature, and performance. Her work has focused on plays as vehicles through which the political history of various islands has impacted how contemporary Caribbean writers throughout the diaspora think through and perform their national and/or collective Caribbean identities. In addition she engages in work on Literary Food Studies, examining culinary memoirs related to the slave trade.

Matthew Hayes

Matthew Hayes
mh34@indiana.edu
Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science
Dr. Hayes received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Illinois in 2013. His research and teaching interests primarily focus on political behavior and racial and ethnic politics with a particular interest in issues of representation and how institutions can shape individual political behavior.

Raquel Hill

Raquel Hill
ralhill@cs.indiana.edu
Associate Professor, School of Informatics and Computing
Dr. Hill earned her doctorate in Computer Science from Harvard University in 2002. Her primary research interests are in the areas of trust and security of distributed computing environments and data privacy with a specific interest in privacy protection mechanisms for medical-related social science datasets.

Sarah Imhoff

Sarah Imhoff
seimhoff@indiana.edu
Assistant Professor, Department of Religious Studies & Borns Jewish Studies Program
Dr. Imhoff received her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 2010. Her research interests include: Gender and American Jewish History, race and Jewishness, Rabbinic Literature, and American religious history. One of her current research projects deals with the relationship of race and DNA in defining Jewish identity and community. She is currently completing her first monograph, Masculinity and the Making of American Judaism.

Karen Inouye

Karen Inouye
kinouye@indiana.edu
Assistant Professor, Department of American Studies
Dr. Inouye earned her doctorate from Brown University in 2008. Her research interests focus on Asian American and Asian Canadian Studies, transnational American Studies, 20th Century United States History, and critical race studies. She is currently preparing a book manuscript titled The Long Afterlife of Wartime Incarceration in Canada and the United States.

Pamela Braboy Jackson

Pamela Braboy Jackson
pjackson@indiana.edu
Professor, Department of Sociology
Dr. Jackson earned her Ph.D. in Sociology from Indiana University and her research focuses on the impact of work and family roles on well-being. She served as the inaugural director for CRRES from 2012-14 and during that time established a speaker series, research and travel grant programs, and the CRRES Postdoctoral Fellowships. She has several projects underway including a book manuscript Family Stories, with Dr. Rashawn Ray (Sociology, Maryland) which uses narrative accounts of family situations to reveal the way in which adults navigate through the social system we call the family.

Jennifer Lee

Jennifer Lee
lee484@indiana.edu
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
Dr. Lee received her Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Minnesota in 2007. Her research and teaching interests include sociology of education, work and labor market stratification, and Asian American communities. She has recently published research on high school employment and dropout, and her current work investigates Asian employment in ethnic economies in the United States. In other research, she examines high school employment patterns and educational attainments of children of immigrants.

Jack Martin
jkmartin@indiana.edu
Director, Karl F. Schuessler Institute for Social Research
Dr. Martin’s research interests include mental health, alcohol use, work, and race.

Michael T. Martin

Michael T. Martin
martinmt@indiana.edu
Professor, Department of Communication and Culture
Dr. Martin received his doctorate from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He is currently the Director of the Black Film Archives. His research interests include: Diasporic and émigré formations, transnational migration, and diasporic and postcolonial film.

Sylvia Martinez

Sylvia Martinez
symartin@indiana.edu
Associate Professor, Department of Education Leadership and Policy Studies, School of Education
Dr. Martinez received her Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Chicago. Her research interests include women’s work experiences, Latino/a sociology, and the sociology of education. Current work examines what Latino/a high school students know about accessing a post secondary education and how they access that information. Dr. Martinez has also served as the assistant director of CRRES.

Rasul Mowatt

Rasul Mowatt
ramowatt@indiana.edu
Associate Chair, Department of Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies, School of Public Health
Dr. Mowatt received his Ph.D. in Leisure Studies from the University of Illinois. He is an Affiliate Faculty Member in the Departments of American Studies and the Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies. His primary research interests are leisure behavior, social justice, cultural studies, and critical pedagogy.

Michelle Moyd

Michelle Moyd
mimoyd@indiana.edu
Assistant Professor, Department of History
Dr. Moyd completed her doctorate in 2008 at Cornell University. Her research interests include African military history, militaries and labor, the everyday history of colonialism, and power and its expressions. Recently, she has conducted research examining the social and cultural history of soldiers in the colonial army of German East Africa, today’s Tanzania.

Maresa Murray

Maresa Murray
marjmurr@indiana.edu
Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Applied Health Science, School of Public Health
Dr. Murray completed her doctorate at Michigan State University in Family and Child Ecology. Her primary area of research focuses on understanding resiliency traits and support systems within African American families and explores the interaction between African American families and religiosity/spirituality, media usage, and social resources. Her recent projects have investigated the impact of African American family and community cultural beliefs on nutrition and health and how popular media depictions of African American sexuality influences families.

Amrita Chakrabarti Myers

Amrita Chakrabarti Myers
apmyers@indiana.edu
Associate Professor, Department of History
Dr. Myers completed her Ph.D. at Rutgers University. Her research interests focus on race, gender, freedom, and citizenship and the ways in which these constructs intersect with one another in the lives of black women in the Old South. Dr. Myers’ recent book, Forging Freedom: Black Women and the Pursuit of Liberty in Antebellum Charleston, (UNC Press, 2011) illuminates the lives of free black women, both legal and de facto, in Charleston, South Carolina, from 1790-1860. Her current book project examines interracial families and relationships in the antebellum South.

AshlynNelson

Ashlyn Aiko Nelson
ashlyn@indiana.edu
Associate Professor, School of Public and Environmental Affairs
Dr. Nelson completed her doctorate in Economics of Education at Stanford University. Her research interests include the causes and consequences of inequality in the overlapping areas of housing and education.

John Nieto-Phillips

John Nieto-Phillips
jnietoph@indiana.edu
Associate Professor, Department of History
Dr. Neito-Phillips completed his Ph.D. at UCLA. His research interests center on U.S. Latina/o history, race and citizenship, and Latin America and the Caribbean. In the classroom and in his research, he explores the various means by which Latinas and Latinos have sought full citizenship and equality in the schools, in politics, and in public spaces.

Dina Okamoto

Dina Okamoto
dokamoto@indiana.edu
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
Dr. Okamoto received her Ph.D. from the University of Arizona. Her research focuses on understanding how group boundaries and identities shift and change, which has broader implications for racial formation, immigrant incorporation, as well as intergroup conflict and cooperation.  Her recent book, Redefining Race: Asian American Panethnicity and Shifting Ethnic Boundaries (Russell Sage Foundation, 2014), traces the complex evolution of “Asian American” as a panethnic label and identity.

Alan C. Roberts

Alan C. Roberts
alarober@indiana.edu
Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences
Dr. Roberts received his Ph.D. from the University of Louisville. His research interests focus on personality and individual differences in vulnerability to eating pathology and weight disorders. Recent projects have examined whether images of female beauty and idea body type have changed over time.

Robert Victor Robinson

Robert Victor Robinson
robinsor@indiana.edu
Class of 1964 Chancellor’s Professor, Department of Sociology
Dr. Robinson completed his Ph.D. at Yale University. His research interests include: social stratification, economic history, religion, political sociology, and historical and comparative methods. His recent work with Nancy Davis focuses on the common strategies deployed by religiously orthodox movements around the world. Their 2012 book, Claiming Society for God: Religious Movements and Social Welfare in Egypt, Israel, Italy, and the United States (IU Press), has received numerous awards and is currently undergoing translation to both German and Turkish.

Fabio Rojas

Fabio Rojas
frojas@indiana.edu
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
Dr. Rojas completed his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago. His research interests include organizational analysis, political sociology of social movements, sociology of education, and mathematical sociology. His recent work focuses on how the Black Power Movement became an academic discipline and a variety of topics related to the anti-war movement.

Micol Seigel

Micol Seigel
mseigel@indiana.edu
Associate Professor, Departments of American Studies & History
Dr. Seigel received her doctorate from NYU. Her research interests include: policing, prisons, and race in the Americas; critical ethnic studies; popular culture; Latin American studies; postcolonial and queer theory; and cultural studies. She is a member of Critical Prison Studies caucus of the American Studies Association, the organizing collective of the Tepotzlán Institute for Transnational Studies of the Americas, and the Bloomington Faculty Council progressive slate. She also leads the IU Global Moral Panics Working Group and is involved with the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program.

Christina Snyder

Christina Snyder
snyderch@indiana.edu
Thomas and Kathryn Miller Professor of History
Dr. Snyder earned her doctorate from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She chairs the Committee on Native American and Indigenous Studies. Her research focuses on Native American Studies, race, slavery, and colonialism. She is currently at work on a book on Choctaw Academy, the first national Indian boarding school in the United States.

Jesse Steinfeldt

Jesse Steinfeldt
jesstein@indiana.edu
Associate Professor, Department of Counseling & Educational Psychology, School of Education
Dr. Steinfeldt earned his doctorate in Educational Psychology at the UW-Milwaukee. His research interests center on the intersection of multicultural psychology, sport psychology, the psychological study of men/masculinities, and social justice issues. Recent projects include examinations of the psychological impact of Native-themed mascots, nicknames, and logos in sports. Dr. Steinfeldt is also the Director of Clinical Training for the Sport and Performance Psychology programs that provide services for the IU Athletic Department and local high schools.

Marvin Sterling

Marvin Sterling
mdsterli@indiana.edu
Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology
Dr. Sterling completed his Ph.D. at UCLA. His research interests include contemporary Japan, African Diaspora, race, social identity, Afro-Asia, Performance Studies, transnationalism, and human rights. Recently, he has examined the Japanese community in Jamaica and developed a new line of research, which traces the development of human rights discourse in Jamaica.

Jacinda Townsend

Jacinda Townsend
townsjac@indiana.edu
Assistant Professor, Department of English
Professor Townsend completed her M.F.A. at the University of Iowa and her J.D. at Duke University. She is the author of numerous works of fiction including novels that address political issues shaped by African-American and feminist traditions.

Jakobi Williams

Jakobi Williams
jakowill@indiana.edu
Associate Professor, Departments of History & African American and African Diaspora Studies
Dr. Williams completed his Ph.D. at UCLA. His research interests are centered on questions of resistance and the social justice revolutions found within the historic African American community. Recent work has examined the Illinois Black Panther Party’s Rainbow Coalition and racial coalition politics in Chicago.

Joel Wong

Y. Joel Wong
joelwong@indiana.edu
Associate Professor, Department of Counseling & Educational Psychology, School of Education
Dr. Wong completed his doctorate in Educational Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. His research interests are in the areas of Asian/Asian American psychology, the psychology of men and masculinities, and positive psychology (particularly gratitude and encouragement).

Ellen Wu

Ellen Wu
wue@indiana.edu
Associate Professor, Department of History
Dr. Wu received her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. Her research interests include 20th Century United States History, Asian American History, race and ethnicity, citizenship, migration, and Chinese diaspora. Her research asks questions regarding issues of race, immigration, citizenship, and nation through the lens of Asian American history. Her recent research has examined the transformation of Asians in the United States from the “yellow peril” to “model minorities.”