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Indiana University Bloomington

College of Arts and Sciences Center for Research on Race and Ethnicity in Society
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CRRES Student Affiliates

Applying to Become a Student AffiliateThe CRRES Student Affiliates are a diverse group of students who have a central interest in the study of race and ethnicity. Research conducted by current CRRES graduate student affiliates ranges from examining racial disparities in educational gaps on a national level to investigating the racialized experiences of immigrant women in new immigrant destinations in the South and Midwest.

Ryan J. Davis

Ryan J. Davis  ryjdavis@indiana.edu
Ph.D. Student, Higher Education (School of Education)

Ryan's research interests focus on understanding pedagogies that influence learning and success in STEM disciplines, particularly among underrepresented students of color. He coauthored the monograph Racial and Ethnic Minorities Students’ Success in STEM Education (Jossey-Bass) and he has coauthored 10 peer reviewed journal articles about the role of race in the experiences and outcomes of college students.

Samuel H. Kye

Samuel H. Kye  skye@indiana.edu
Ph.D. Student, Department of Sociology

Sam’s current research examines middle-class ethnic neighborhoods known as ethnoburbs: ethnic yet suburban neighborhoods of affluence, representing the outcome of unprecedented levels of minority population growth over the past quarter century and the continued movement of minority groups into the American “mainstream.” He is formulating quantitative analysis strategies to add to this growing research field at the nexus of sociology, political science, and American studies.

Elizabeth A. Martinez 

Elizabeth A. Martinez  martela@indiana.edu
Ph.D. Student, Department of Sociology

Elizabeth is interested in the experiences of racial/ethnic minorities within institutions of higher education. Her current research focuses on two main areas: a) the influence of social and cultural capital on educational outcomes for racial/ethnic minorities and b) the impact of racial campus climate on college students’ experiences.

Tilicia Mayo-Gamble

Tilicia Mayo-Gamble  tmayo@iupui.edu
Ph.D. Candidate, School of Public Health

Tilicia’s research focuses on healthcare seeking and healthcare utilization. In particular, she evaluates associations between knowledge, perceptions, attitudes, and beliefs regarding utilization of healthcare services in order to develop community-based interventions geared toward modifying behaviors associated with an increased burden of disease within the African American population.

Tamara Mitchell 

Tamara Mitchell  mitchetl@umail.iu.edu
Ph.D. Student, Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Tamara focuses on the residual effects of transnational politics and economics in society and literature. By considering texts such as Roberto Bolaño’s 2666, her research questions the ways in which international corporations and growing Neoliberal politics affect culture, and how literature can be engaged as a means of analyzing the increasingly transnational society in which we live.

Fileve T. Palmer

Fileve T. Palmer  ftpalmer@indiana.edu
Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Anthropology

Fileve’s dissertation, South Africa through a Coloured Lens: An Examination of Post-Apartheid Identity Formation, explores identity formation among Coloured (so-called "mixed-race") people in the New South Africa while challenging the validity of racial classification. Framing Colouredness as a process of a local instance of creolization she highlights the global processes and ideologies behind mixing and the eventual segregation, illustrating a theoretical sharing between the colonizers and the colonized.

Holly E. Schreiber

Holly E. Schreiber  heschrei@indiana.edu
Ph.D. Candidate, Departments of American Studies & Comparative Literature

Holly’s research focuses on the role of literary journalism in exposing systems of social injustice. Her dissertation, “Representations of Poverty in American Literary Journalism,” analyzes the intersection of poverty, race, and environment in book-length narrative nonfiction written between the mid-1960s and mid-1980s.