CWA4730 Contributed Recipes

  • warning: Parameter 1 to theme_field() expected to be a reference, value given in /ip/cwa/www/includes/theme.inc on line 170.
  • warning: Parameter 1 to theme_field() expected to be a reference, value given in /ip/cwa/www/includes/theme.inc on line 170.
  • warning: Parameter 1 to theme_field() expected to be a reference, value given in /ip/cwa/www/includes/theme.inc on line 170.
  • warning: Parameter 1 to theme_field() expected to be a reference, value given in /ip/cwa/www/includes/theme.inc on line 170.
  • warning: Parameter 1 to theme_field() expected to be a reference, value given in /ip/cwa/www/includes/theme.inc on line 170.
  • warning: Parameter 1 to theme_field() expected to be a reference, value given in /ip/cwa/www/includes/theme.inc on line 170.
  • warning: Parameter 1 to theme_field() expected to be a reference, value given in /ip/cwa/www/includes/theme.inc on line 170.
  • warning: Parameter 1 to theme_field() expected to be a reference, value given in /ip/cwa/www/includes/theme.inc on line 170.
  • warning: Parameter 1 to theme_field() expected to be a reference, value given in /ip/cwa/www/includes/theme.inc on line 170.
  • warning: Parameter 1 to theme_field() expected to be a reference, value given in /ip/cwa/www/includes/theme.inc on line 170.
  • warning: Parameter 1 to theme_field() expected to be a reference, value given in /ip/cwa/www/includes/theme.inc on line 170.
  • warning: Parameter 1 to theme_field() expected to be a reference, value given in /ip/cwa/www/includes/theme.inc on line 170.

These are the recipes that members of the IU Support Staff community have contributed. See how easy it is to make delicious healthy food and avoid the MSG fast food traps. If you have a great idea send in a recipe of your own.

Homemade Vinegar

To make homemade vinegar which is considerably tastier than anything purchased in the store.

Use an affordable vinegar. Boxed wine still creates a product that is considerably tastier than store bought vinegar.

Software:
Some portion of wine. Either a white or a light red wine.
Unfiltered, unpasteurized vinegar.

Hardware:
Several Mason Jars
Cheesecloth
A stockpot large enough to do a hot water bath.
A pair of jarring tongs to remove your jars from the hot water bath.

First Sterilize your mason jars. Because of the alcohol in the wine, and then the acidity of the vinegar the likelyhood of undesirable germ contamination is low, but still possible. If all your mason jars and rings go through a dishwasher with a full heated dry cycle and you fill them while they are still hot everything should be fine.

Fill the mason jars with the wine leaving about an inch and a half of space at the top of the jar. Fill most of the remaining space with unfiltered vinegar. Then put 4 layers of cheesecloth tautly on top of the jar and put the major jar lid ring on the jar. Put the jar in a dark cabinet for a couple months and then begin tasting the vinegar every couple weeks until it no longer really tastes like wine anymore.

When you are satisfied with the state of your vinegar I would recommend sterilizing it. Sterilization is necessary if you want to pickle with your vinegar. Replace the cheesecloth on your jars with fresh mason jar lids. Put the jars in a boiling water bath with the water covering the liquid but not quite making it to ring for 10 minutes. Then remove the jars and when they are cool they are ready to use. The vinegar will be somewhat cloudy. This sediment is from the fermentation process. If you leave the jars after sterilization for some time this sediment will fall to the bottom and you can move the vinegar carefully into a new container. You will have to sacrifice a little bit of vinegar to get this clarified product. This step is only really for aesthetics, there is nothing harmful about ingesting the sediment, but the clear vinegar is very attractive.

The following steps are optional unless you want to pickle safely with your vinegar. You will need to test the acidity of your vinegar either with store bought ph strips before sterilizing it, or you can use a scale and an eye dropper. Measure out a few grams of baking soda in a small bowl on your scale. Then use an eye dropper with distilled vinegar and put a drop on the baking soda. When the bubbling completely ceases put another drop on the baking soda. Repeat until there is no bubbling at all. Note how many drops this takes. Then do the same with your home made vinegar. If it takes less of your vinegar to reach a non bubbling state with the baking soda then your vinegar is acidic enough to safely pickle with.

Mexican Pumpkin Soup with garlic and greens

1 large onion chopped
5 cloves of garlic, peeled and finely chopped
2 bouillon cubes (low sodium) . Vegetable broth can also be used, but costs a lot more.
2 cups pureed cooked/baked pumpkin or 1 cup canned pumpkin
1 16 ounce can pinto beans
1/2 tsp chili paste
4 medium red potatoes, diced in 1/2" cubes
1 tbs oregano
pinch of cayenne or other red pepper
1/2 tsp chili powder
1/2 tsp cumin
1/2 cup of low-fat soymilk (skim milk)
salt to taste
Finely cut kale (rinse well and cut out stems, unless very young kale)
minced parsley

Heat onions in a large pot over medium heat until they soften
Add garlic and cook for 1 minute
Add 4 cups of water, 2 bouillon blocks, pumpkin, pinto beans, chili paste and potatoes
Stir in the oregano, cayenne, chili and cumin.
Bring to a boil and then turn down to a simmer

Simmer for about 30 minutes until the potatoes are tender.
Stir regularly to prevent burning
5 minutes before removing from heat add the well rinsed sliced kale and parsley
Remove from heat and let cool for 5 minutes

Stir in the soy milk. add salt to taste and serve.
(This soup can be frozen)

Google: "Benefits of Pumpkin/Squash-Kale-Pinto beans"

Ginger Miso Salad Dressing

3-4 tbs light miso
2 tbs grated fresh ginger
1/4 cup cider vinegar or lemon juice
2 tbs dark sesame oil
1/2 cup light olive oil
1/3 cup of water

Combine miso, ginger, cider vinegar and sesame oil in a blender and blend on low speed until smooth. Gradually add oil in a thin steady stream until mixed. Then very slowly add water until thick and creamy. Taste and add more miso if you want a richer flavor. Keeps forever when refrigerated.

I made the mistake of using a Japanese miso with a very pronounced flavor and a very briny taste to it. I should have used the miso more sparingly. Miso is made from soybeans as well as other grains and has a wide ranging palette of taste .

This past weekend I made a vegetable/mung bean soup which was a little bland, so I added a squirt of miso dressing to my bowl of soup. Perfect! It added a bit of saltiness that was lacking.
Incidentally, never boil miso along with your soup, because miso's beneficial enzymes will be eliminated.
Google : "Benefits of Miso" and "Benefits of Ginger" for the virtues of these ingredients.

Balsamic Vinagrette

1/2 cup of walnut oil or olive oil
1/4 cup of balsamic vinegar
salt and pepper to taste.

I made this dressing beforehand in a jar and allowed it to sit in the fridge so the flavors could mingle. Shake well before pouring onto the salad.

Though this salad dressing calls for walnut oil, I opted for olive oil. Light olive oil tends to have less of a pronounced flavor, allowing the balsamic vinegar to come into its own, and it's cheaper!

Green Bean and Cabbage Salad

Half head green cabbage chopped
1 cup green beans chopped into bite size pieces
1 whole red onion finely chopped
1 yellow zucchini/squash chopped

Chop all the vegetables and toss into a bowl.
(you can eat green beans raw- no problem- I prefer to blanch them in boiling water for a few minutes, then rinse in cold water. That way the deep green color is preserved.
The yellow squash can also be eaten raw. However I sauteed the chopped squash in a little oil with a couple of minced cloves of garlic until browned lightly)

Links to the dressings used for this salad in the Oct 15 2010 cooking class.
Balsamic Vinaigrette
Ginger Miso Dressing

Mixed Vegetable Pasta

1 lb penne or similarly shaped dried pasta
1 can diced tomatoes
3 medium carrots
2 cups frozen green beans
1 can garbanzo beans, drained and rinsed.
1 medium zucchini
1 Tbsp cooking oil
2 Tbsp good extra virgin olive oil
2 Tbsp vinegar
several hearty shakes of Italian Seasoning
salt and pepper to taste

Put on a large pot of water to boil, when it has come to a boil add the pasta and cook per package instructions to a firm al dente. While the water is coming up to heat and the pasta is cooking, saute the carrots on high heat until they have a light golden brown on them in a large frying pan. When the carrots look like they are nearly done add the zucchini and frozen green beans. Continue to saute until everything has a light brown, then add the diced tomatoes and reduce while stiring regularly until the tomato liquid has reduced and started to coat the vegetables. At this point add the garbanzo beans, al dente pasta, a few tablespoons of the pasta cooking water, the vinegar, and toss to coat. Leave on low heat stirring regularly for a minute or two until the pasta has reached a level of tenderness you enjoy. Serve with a light drizzle of the olive oil on top and a sprinkling of your favorite Italian hard cheese. This can be a side dish or a main dish.