Education | Educational Psychology for Elementary Teachers
P251 | 5159 | Kristi Post


COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course provides a survey of theory and research in educational
psychology, with emphasis on understanding and applying concepts in
day-to-day situations that are encountered in elementary classrooms.
Students will read, discuss, and apply a range of learning and
developmental principles as they relate to classroom instruction,
assessment, motivation, classroom management, and student
characteristics. The goal of this course is to produce teachers
capable of applying educational psychology to classroom situations,
therefore resulting in effective classroom learning environments and
instruction that are responsive to the needs of all students in
elementary classrooms.

COURSE MATERIALS

Ormrod, J. (2000). Educational Psychology: Developing learners (3rd
ed.). Columbus, OH: Merrill
P251 Course packet (available at Mr. Copy located at 10th and Dunn)

COURSE EXPECTATIONS

Read assigned material prior to class and be prepared for thoughtful,
thorough discussion as a professional in your field. Active
participation in classroom discussions and activities requires that
students be prepared for class.
Participate in class activities and discussions. Many of the topics
covered in this course will be presented via activities. Therefore,
your cooperation and enthusiastic participation is essential to your
success as a student in this course.
Complete course assignments as scheduled.
Engage with others thoughtfully and respectfully.
Attend all classes. Class sessions will not be a regurgitation of
textbook reading but rather will expand on readings through
discussions, projects, and activities. It is not possible to meet
course expectations without regular class attendance. It is a simple
fact that poor attendance is associated with poor academic
performance. A maximum of FOUR absences is allowed (this includes sick
days, mental illness days, death in family, car broken into, sick
roommate, etc.). If a student accumulates more than the allotted four
absences, the final course grade will be lowered: 5 absences will
result in the final grade being lowered by 10%, 6 absences will result
in the grade being lowered by 20%, and 7 or more absences will result
in a final grade of F for the course.
Have fun in all that you do during this course.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Final course letter grades will be based on points earned on the
assignments. The purpose of all assignments is to identify and apply
information that will assist you in becoming a practicing teacher in
your area of interest in the field of education. Papers are typically
2-6 double-spaced pages in length; please keep papers to 8 pages or
less or seek permission from instructor if you want to explore a topic
in more detail.  Therefore, clear writing and brevity are a must!
Also, NO PAPERS WILL BE ACCEPTED UNLESS THEY ARE IN APA FORMAT. For a
review of APA protocol students can refer to their textbook or the 4th
Edition of the APA Publication Manual.
Concept Maps: Students will create three concept maps. These concept
maps will be based on one chapter from each of the three units.
Details can be found in the project descriptions of the course packet.

Panel Discussion: Each student will be placed on a panel of
approximately 5-7 students. Discussion topics will be announced during
the first two weeks of the semester. Requirements for this project can
be found in the project description section of the course packet.

Mid-term exam: Theorists Paper. Students will write a paper of
approximately 5 double-spaced pages. Details regarding this paper can
be found in the course packet.

Intervention Paper: Students will write a paper of approximately 1-3
double-spaced pages. Details regarding this paper can be found in the
course packet.

Hot Topics Paper: Students will write a paper about a controversial
educational topic of their choice. A list of suggested topics and
other details can be found in the course packet. This paper will be
approximately 1-3 double-spaced pages in length.

Parent-Teacher Conference: Each student will be paired up with another
student for two conferences. Each pair of students will play the role
of co-teacher and the role of parent. Details about this project will
be provided at least one week prior to the conducting of the
conferences.

Exam: A cumulative exam will be given during class time two weeks
prior to the end of the semester. The format of this exam is dependent
upon how the course develops throughout the semester (i.e., the exam
could be a traditional paper-and-pencil format or perhaps something
more like an activity or project).

Participation and Attendance. Students will earn points for regular
attendance as well as for participating in various projects,
discussions, and activities that take place during class time. Points
will also be earned for completing several assignments, such as
establishing goals for field experience, presenting a journal article
to the class, completing response journals for guest speakers,
completing observation logs during field experience, and participating
in other group projects. Details for specific assignments can be found
in the course packet and/or will be distributed at the appropriate
time during class.

GRADING

Concept Maps (3): 5%
Panel Discussion: 15%
Theorists Paper: 15%
Intervention Paper: 10%
Hot Topics Paper: 10%
Parent-Teacher Conference: 15%
Exam: 15%
Participation and Attendance: 15%

Since Indiana University uses plusses and minuses in its grading
system, your percentages will be converted to these letter grade
equivalents:
A+=   B+=   C+=   D+=   F=<60
A=    B=    C=    D=
A-=   B-=   C-=   D-=

General grading guidelines for all assignments:

A  -  extraordinary high achievement; shows unusually complete command
of the subject matter; represents an exceptionally high degree of
originality, creativity, and synthesis/application ability.

B  -  very good, solid, above average quality of work; good synthesis
and application ability.

C  -  satisfactory quality of work; average level of
synthesis/application ability.

D  -  minimally acceptable performance (either or both quantity and
quality of work).

F  -  unacceptable work; does not meet course objectives for the
project.

ALL ASSIGNMENTS ARE DUE AT THE START OF CLASS ON THE SPECIFIED DUE
DATE, UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED. WORK PRODUCTS THAT ARE LATE,
INCOMPLETE, OR SHOW LACK OF MEANINGFUL THOUGHT MAY BE ELIGIBLE FOR A
25% REDUCTION OF POSSIBLE POINTS FOR EACH DAY THEY ARE LATE (THIS
INCLUDES WEEKENDS). You can turn in late assignments at my mailbox
which is located on the 4th floor of the Education Building in the
Counseling and Educational Psychology Department (open 8 a.m.  5
p.m., Mon.  Fri.). Please send me an e-mail if you place a late
assignment in my mailbox.

M101 FIELD EXPERIENCE/LAB DESCRIPTION AND POLICIES
The field experience and lab components of this course are designed to
give you an opportunity to participate in an elementary classroom,
dialogue with elementary teachers and other educational professionals,
apply theories and principles of educational psychology, and reflect
on ideas about teaching and learning. Classroom
observations/participation and lab discussions/activities will focus
on integrating and making connections between theory and practical
applications. Students should view P251 and M101 as a coordinated
learning experience and make efforts to integrate the theories and
knowledge with classroom experiences and discussions. The goal for
each student is to develop insight and understanding into what makes
an effective and caring teacher. Additionally, to increase awareness
of the type of teacher that you would like to become. Namely, what are
the knowledge, skills, and experiences needed to attain your own goals
as a teacher?

Field experiences will be arranged through the early experience office
(ROOM 1000). You will gain 21 hours (minimum) of exposure to real
classroom life. Whenever a field experience is not scheduled, we will
meet in lab. Attendance in lab is mandatory. Your grade (Pass/Fail) in
the lab and field component is determined by your performance in the
following areas:
1. Acquisition of 21 hours of field experience
2. Attendance in all labs
3. A satisfactory rating of field performance by your cooperating
teacher
4. Completion of a field reflective journal (see P251 syllabus and
course packet)
5. Completion of all lab assignments.

Hopefully the insight gained from watching teachers already working in
the field will become invaluable during your future teaching careers.
You will see many of the theories and ideas that we discuss in class
being applied (or perhaps not!). Therefore, the purpose of these field
visits is to give you first-hand opportunities to observe and work
with students and teachers in a real world setting and to see how
useful much of the information learned in this class can be. Presence
in an outside classroom means responsibility. How you act influences
not only the teacher's and principal's perceptions of you, but of the
whole teacher education program at Indiana University. These teachers
and principals have been kind enough to open up their classrooms to us
. . . I only ask that you return the kindness by presenting yourselves
in a favorable way, including your behavior in the classroom as well
as your promptness and courtesy. Likewise, the manner in which you
conduct yourself during P251 and M101 during discussion involving
field experiences can also influence your experience in the field.
Please remember that your role is to observe and participate, not to
judge or evaluate the teachers and classrooms. Any and all discussions
that take place during P251 and M101 will observe the rules of
CONFIDENTIALITY: students will refrain from including any identifying
statements (such as a teacher's or student's name) when discussing
field experiences.

While you are in your classrooms, I ask that you take about 30 minutes
to complete any observation requirements for that week. Those
observation requirements are included in the course packet. During the
rest of your stay, the teacher has been told that you are free to help
them in a variety of ways, including everything from one-on-one
tutorial help to grading papers to room decorations. They have also
been told that they can ask you to teach a small lesson, but they are
to give you plenty of preparation time. If this occurs, I will be glad
to be of assistance. The teacher that you visit may be nervous with
you in her/his classroom. The students may be more rambunctious than
usual. Please remember that the teacher sets the rules in the
classroom and when they ask for something to happen, you need to be a
role model for the students. They are curious why you are in their
classroom and they are wondering what they can get out of you before
you leave.

CALENDAR

8/28  Introductions; Overview of course

8/30  Community-building; Top Ten lists

UNIT 1: ASSESSMENT

9/4  LABOR DAY  CLASS DOES  MEET!!
Traditional assessment
READINGS: Ch. 16
ASSIGNMENT DUE: Resume and letter of introduction

9/6  Authentic assessment; designing an assessment tool for P251
READINGS: Ch. 16

9/11  Bloom's taxonomy
READINGS: Ch. 13 (pp. 518-525)

9/13  KRISTI'S CATCH-UP DAY (please note: this does NOT mean class is
cancelled!)

UNIT 2: DEVELOPMENT

9/18  Cognitive development: Piaget; Vygotsky
READINGS: Ch. 2 (pp. 29-50)

9/20  Psychosocial development
READINGS: Ch. 3 (pp. 74-94)

9/25  Moral development
READINGS: Ch. 3 (pp. 95-115)

9/27  The Brain  a quick glance
READINGS: TBA
ASSIGNMENT DUE: Hot Topics Paper

10/2  Effects of poverty and resiliency on development
GUEST SPEAKER tentatively scheduled
READINGS: E. Werner, "Children of the Garden Island"

10/4  KRISTI'S CATCH-UP DAY
ASSIGNMENT DUE: Concept Map I

UNIT 3: LEARNING THEORIES

10/9  Social cognitive learning theory; Constructivism
READINGS: Ch. 11

10/11  Behaviorism
READINGS: Ch. 10

10/16  Information processing
READINGS: Ch. 6

10/18  Complex cognitive processes
READINGS: Ch. 8
ASSIGNMENT DUE: Concept Map II

UNIT 4: DIVERSITY & CLASSROOM CLIMATE

10/23  Intelligence theories; Creativity
READINGS: Ch. 4 (pp. 121-135)
ASSIGNMENT DUE: Theorists paper

10/25  Gender; SES; Culture
READINGS: Ch. 4 (pp. 136-160)

10/30  Gender, SES, Culture (cont'd)

11/1  Inclusion
READINGS: Ch. 5

11/6  Inclusion (cont'd)

11/8  Classroom management
READINGS: Ch. 15

11/13  CATCH-UP DAY; PREPARATION FOR P-T CONFERENCES
ASSIGNMENT DUE: Concept Map III

11/15  PARENT-TEACHER CONFERENCES (tentatively scheduled)

11/20  Motivation
GUEST SPEAKER tentatively scheduled
READINGS: Ch. 12
ASSIGNMENT DUE: Intervention Paper

11/22  THANKSGIVING BREAK

11/27  Parent Involvement
READINGS: TBA

11/29  FINAL EXAM tentatively scheduled

12/4   Violence prevention
GUEST SPEAKER tentatively scheduled
READINGS: TBA

12/6  LAST CLASS!!!  Wrap-up; final reflections on field experience;
course evaluations
ASSIGNMENTS DUE: Field Experience Summary and Reflections
Teacher Interview