Health, Physical Education And Recreation | Quantity Food Purchasing and Production
N321 | 6398 | Victoria M. Getty, M.Ed., R.D.


Office hours: Wednesdays 2-4 p.m. and Thursdays 12:30-2:00 p.m. or by
appointment.	
	Sign up on my office door for a specific office appointment
during these posted
	times, or contact me for an appointment outside normal office
hours.
Course assistant: Laura Willis; e-mail: lcwillis@indiana.edu
	
Class objectives:
1.	Students will understand food product flow in a foodservice
organization.
2.	Students will understand principles of food purchasing,
forecasting, receiving,
	production, inventory, distribution, and service in a
foodservice operation.
3.	Students will understand principles of menu planning and
evaluation; students will
	design a fully functional menu for an operation of their
choice.
4.	Students will be able to modify recipes to adjust for desired
volume of production.
5.	Students will plan appropriate facility design, layout, and
equipment to operationalize
their menu.
6.	Students will be able to incorporate environmental concerns
into the selection of
	equipment and the operation of a foodservice establishment.
7.	Students will be able to explain principles of food safety and
will develop a limited
	HACCP plan for a foodservice operation.
8.	Students will utilize labs in the residence hall dining
facilities and tours of local foodservice operations to develop
foodservice skills and to analyze and evaluate food product flow under
differing conditions.

Required materials:
1.	Text:  Payne-Palacio, J. and M. Theis. West & Wood's
Introduction to Foodservice, 9th edition, Merrill/Prentice-Hall, Inc.,
Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2001.
2.	A clean white lab coat, hairnet, and closed toe shoes are
required for laboratory experiences and in-class tours.

Lecture outlines and reading response questions will be available over
the University server via a website for this class. Accessing these
resources is optional, but is recommended to facilitate note-taking
and class discussions. The website address is
. A supplementary textbook,
Spears, M.C. Foodservice Organizations: A Managerial and Systems
Approach, 3rd edition, Prentice-Hall, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ,
1995, is on reserve in the HPER Library under my name.

Course requirements:
1.	Students are expected to attend class on time and to
participate in class discussions and activities. Attendance will be
taken for all guest speakers and tours and will be noted via sporadic
in-class activities. A student may miss one of these in-class
attendance activities without penalty (20 points). Students are
expected to do the required readings before the
	class for which they are assigned.
2.	Students will complete exams as given in class (2) and during
the final exam period. On
	exams, students will be responsible for material covered in
class, in the textbook, and
	through the class labs, tours, and activities. No make-up
exams will be allowed, unless
	arranged beforehand or in case of an extremely valid and
verifiable emergency. The two
	semester exams will count for 75 points each and should take
the first hour of class; the
	second hour will cover class material as announced. The final
exam will be worth 100
	points, and students will have the full two-hour final exam
period. All exams are partly
	comprehensive, though emphasis will be given on the most
recent information.
3.	There are four other activities that will require time outside
of class to complete.
		A. Reading Reports (2 @ 15 pts each): The purpose of
the reading reports is to familiarize you with current reference
materials available in foodservice, relevant to quantity food
purchasing, production, and service. Topics are indicated on the class
schedule and are negotiable.
		Each reading report is to be two typed, double-spaced
pages long. Find an article in a hard copy journal or current trade
magazine relevant to the topic and summarize the article. Include your
comments/opinions/conclusions along with the summary and a copy of the
article. Suggested references include (this list is not exhaustive):
	Food Management; Restaurants and Institutions; Journal of the
American Dietetic Association; Supervisory Management; Cornell Hotel
and Restaurant Administration Quarterly.
		You must use a different journal for each report. If
you wish to substitute an
	internet project for one of your reading reports, please see
me.
		B. Field experience interview and report (50 pts): In
groups of two, students will interview the manager of a commercial
foodservice establishment of your choice. The foodservice does not
have to be located in Bloomington, but it cannot be a place where you
currently work or have worked previously. On September 5, you and your
partner will hand in a list of three establishments you would like to
visit, in order of preference. Your assignment will be confirmed on
September 7.
		The outline of information you will need to get from
the manager is attached to this syllabus. Call and set up an
appointment early! Since the interview will take time, make sure the
manager knows that you might spend about an hour with them in addition
to about ˝ hour observation time. It could be helpful to the manager
to have a copy of the questions before the interview. It would be wise
for you to call a day or two beforehand to confirm your appointment
with the manager, and it would be very appropriate for you to send a
thank you note afterwards.
		The report itself should address the areas covered on
the interview handout, be about 5 pages long, and should include a
sketch of the kitchen and dining area layouts.

		C. Lab experiences and discussion (50 pts): In pairs,
students will gain direct experience in Residence Hall foodservice
operations. The weekly lab rotations will begin on October 19 and end
on November 16. A schedule of the locations and assignments will be
provided in class. Students are to take notes during and/or following
the lab experience, noting their questions, observations, comments,
etc. These notes are to be handed in during the class period following
each lab. At least one discussion time will be scheduled to share
observations and experiences. Use these lab experiences wisely to
observe personnel, equipment, layout, food safety, production
procedures, etc. Appropriate dress for the lab experiences is a clean
white lab coat over clean pants, jeans, or skirts (no shorts); hair
restraint; closed toe shoes; minimum of jewelry and perfume; no
fingernail polish.
		It is each student's responsibility to be at the
assigned location; do not skip this assignment except for a verifiable
illness or emergency. In case of an emergency or illness, it is the
student's responsibility to notify the contact person, your lab
partner, and me. You will also need to arrange a make-up session with
the contact person within two weeks of the missed session. Any lab
session missed and not made up will result in a 50-point deduction
from your final grade points.

		D. Design project (100 pts): Each student will work
with a partner on this project. It will be completed like building
blocks, each section building upon the previous section until the
final project is complete. It will take the whole semester to plan and
execute. Each section when handed in on time will be returned within
the following two class meetings with corrections/suggestions and the
number of points received. All previous sections must be handed in
with each new section due.

	The first part is the topic, due Sept. 14 (5 points). This is
a written statement as to the type of operation you will be designing,
why you chose it, what the target audience is, the location, setting,
seating, estimate of labor required, and the general type of menu you
will develop.

	The second part is the menu, due Sept. 28 (15 points). The
menu does not need to be in final form, but it must be complete with
every item you will be serving and the prices. Include the specific
price calculation for one of your main menu items; the rest of your
prices may be adjusted from that calculation. Also include
portion/serving sizes, a description of each item, and how each item
is to be prepared (i.e. scratch, mix, ready-to-serve). Remember to
hand in the previous section, too.

	The third section, due October 10, is a write-up of a HACCP
plan (10 points) for one menu item that poses a high food safety risk.

	The fourth section, due October 31, is the equipment plan (15
points). It should include all equipment needed to prepare, store, and
serve the menu you have developed; if pictures are available of the
large kitchen pieces, please include them. For one of the larger
pieces of equipment, write up a one-page request for capital
expenditure, which should include the justification for the equipment
and the approximate cost.
	The layout and design section (15 points) is due November 21.
A layout of the kitchen/storage/receiving area and dining area designs
should be prepared on graph paper (provided). This will include the
location of each piece of major equipment, storage areas, etc., and
seating capacity. The layout should also indicate by arrows the
	expected flow of labor during food production. This section
may be handwritten (neatly!).
	The final project presentation (15 points) will be given to
the class on one of the
	last two days of class. The presentation must be between 10
and 15 minutes long. Make the presentation as if you were speaking to
a group of interested investors. Sell your wonderful idea to them! You
may use visual aids or handouts as needed to sell
	your plan. Dress appropriately for the presentation-no jeans
or shorts.
	The final project (25 points) is to be handed in after your
presentation. This should
	include the menu in final (slick) form plus all previous
sections (with corrections if necessary). The project must be in a
folder or binder; if you want a copy, you will
	need to make one for yourself.

4.	Several class tours and outside speakers are planned. Proper
dress is required for the tours (same as for the lab experiences).
Remember that we are guests! Students are expected to take notes on
their observations during these tours and for the speakers.

Sept. 12	Beasley Produce Company, 4863 West Vernal Pike (2.3
miles west of Rte. 37,
		across from Post Office annex; look for the Beasley
sales trucks)
		Tour guide: Glen Anderson, Director of Sales
		Meet at corporate office door at 9:00 a.m.

Oct. 3		Monroe County Health Department
		Speaker: Bob Schmidt, Chief General Sanitarian
		Meet in classroom at the usual time.

Oct. 5		Bloomington Convalescent Center (714 S. Rogers) and
Hospital (605 West 2nd St)
		Tour guides: Susan Vaughn, C.D.M. (BCC); Marge
Beasley, DHCFA (Hospital)
		Meet at the entrance to the hospital at 8:20 a.m.

Oct. 12		IU Dining Services
		Speakers: Sandra Fowler, Director for Dining Services;
Diana Dominguez, Associate
		Director; Ancil Drake, RPS Executive Chef; Jane
Lueken, Dining Services
		Administrative Dietitian; all contact people for the
dining hall lab rotations.
		Meet at Read dining hall at the usual time.

Nov. 14	IU Food Stores, 600 N. Rogers
		Bob Tegeler, Manager of Food Stores and Warehouse;
Assc. Director of Dining Services
		Meet at the classroom/test kitchen inside the front
door on left at 9:00 a.m.

Nov. 28	Scholar's Inn Dessert Café, 717 N. College Ave.
		Tour guide: Richelle Wiley, Head Executive Chef
		Meet in parking lot at 8:00 a.m.

5.	Spelling and grammar always count. Except when indicated, all
work done outside the classroom is to be handed in typed neatly and
stapled. Handwritten, paper-clipped, and folded assignments will not
be accepted. Points may be deducted for inappropriate spelling and
grammar.

Grading:	In-class activities/attendance:	4% 	(20 points)
		Reading reports (2 @ 15 points each)	6% 	(30
points)
		Field experience report	10% 	(50 points)
		Lab experiences/discussion	10% 	(50 points)
		Exam 1	15% 	(75 points)
		Exam 2	15% 	(75 points)
		Design project:
		Topic	5 points
	Menu	15 points
	HACCP	10 points
	Equipment	15 points
	Layout/Design	15 points
	Presentation	15 points
	Final project	25 points
		Design project total = 	20%	(100 points)
		Final exam	20% 	(100 points)

	Grades will be assigned based on achievement of points
according to the following percentages: 97-100 = A+; <97-93 = A;
<93-90 = A-; <90-87 = B+; <87-82 = B; <82-80 = B-; <80-77 = C+; <77-72
= C; <72-70 = C-; <70-60 = D; < 60 = F. Students can view their grades
via the Post 'Em system at
.

Course evaluation:  It is the policy of the School of HPER to evaluate
all courses taught through the School. Final student course
evaluations will be conducted in a manner that maintains the integrity
of the process and the anonymity of evaluators.

Academic integrity:  Academic and Personal Misconduct by students in
this class are defined and dealt with according to the procedures in
the Code of Student Ethics. The basic principle is that students take
credit only for the ideas and efforts that are their own.

These statements on Course Evaluation and Academic Integrity are
provided as required by the School of Health, Physical Education, and
Recreation, Indiana University. Long versions of these statements are
available at
http://www.indiana.edu/~hperweb/newsletter/teachingProcedures.html

Class Schedule

Date		Topic	Reading assignment
8/29		Introduction; trends and types of foodservice;	
Chapters 1, 2
		food product flow

8/31		Menu planning; pricing	Chapter 4; Ch. 16 p. 508-513
			(Spears p. 182-185)

9/5		Purchasing	Chapter 5
		Field interview proposals due

9/7		Receiving, storage, security	Chapter 6
		Reading Report #1 due (topic = trends in/types of
foodservice)

9/12		Beasley Produce Company tour

9/14		Production, recipes, forecasting	Chapter 7
		Design project topic due

9/19		Production, forecasting, quality control	
Chapter 7

9/21		Exam 1

9/26		Assembly, distribution, service	Chapter 8

9/28		Food safety/HACCP	Chapter 3
		Design project menu due

10/3		Monroe County Health Department (Bob Schmidt)

10/5		Bloomington Convalescent Center/Bloomington Hospital
tours  meet at 8:20 a.m.

10/10		Facilities planning and design	Chapter 11
		Design project HACCP plan due	

10/12		IU Dining Services: preparation for labs; equipment	
Chapter 12
		Meet at Read dining hall at the usual time

10/17		Equipment	Appendix B

10/19		Lab #1

10/24		Exam 2; Field experience discussion
		Field experience report due

10/26		Lab #2

10/31		Cleaning and sanitation		Chapter 9
		Design project equipment plan due

11/2		Lab #3

11/7		Financial management	Chapter 16; Spears Chapter 21
		Reading report #2 due (topic = HACCP/trends in design
or equipment)

11/9		Lab #4

11/14		IU Food Stores tour

11/16		Lab #5

11/21		Environmental/energy control	Chapter 10
		Design project layout due (i.e. full project draft
due)

11/23		No class-Have a nice Thanksgiving!

11/28		Scholar's Inn tour  meet at 8:00 a.m.

11/30		Principles of cooking	Appendix A

12/5		Class presentations

12/7		Class presentations; overflow/review/course
evaluations

	Thursday, December 14 Final exam (10:15-12:15)


Field Experience Report
Your field experience report should be about 5 pages typed,
double-spaced. The following questions are designed to help you draw
information from your visit. Feel free to add your own questions as
you go, but you should cover the range of information provided here.
On the report, be sure to include the facility you visited, the date
of your visit, and your names.		Have fun!!

1.  Type of foodservice system
	a. What type of foodservice system is used?
	b. Why was this type of system chosen?

2.  Menu
	a. What type of menu is used?
	b. Who is responsible for menu planning and changes?
	c. How often does the menu change?
	d. Are menus printed "in-house" or purchased? If purchased,
from what company?

3.  Ingredient control
	a. Are recipes standardized? If so, how and by whom?
	b. What sources are used for recipes?
	c. Describe or draw a diagram of the recipe format used.
	d. Explain the ingredient control procedure used.

4.  Quantity food production
	a. List the major pieces of equipment in the main cooking
area, in the baking area,
		and in the salad/cold food area.
	b. Are any other major pieces of equipment used?
	c. List standardized portion sizes for some of the items on
the menu; for example,
		one soup, a casserole, meat, fish, poultry, vegetable,
dessert, etc. Do you feel
		the portions are adequate, too large, or too small?
	d. Draw a diagram of the kitchen layout and indicate work flow
with arrows.
		(Attach a separate piece of paper if needed.)
	e. Draw a diagram of the dining/serving area. Is it well
arranged or crowded?

5.  Production planning
	a. What method is used for production forecasting?
	b. Who is responsible for making the production schedule?
	c. Draw or attach a sample of the production schedule.

6.  Purchasing
	a. Who is responsible for purchasing, and what are their
qualifications?
	b. Are specifications used? If so, who determines the
specifications?
	c. What are the purchasing procedures? Are they formal or
informal; are central or group
		purchasing methods used?
	d. Is a prime vendor used? Who is the prime vendor? If no
prime vendor is used,
		list the names of five vendors used by the facility.
7.  Receiving and storage
	a. Describe the receiving process.
	b. Describe storage and issuing.
	c. What method(s) is/are used for inventory control?
	d. If there is liquor served, what are the control measures?

8.  Sanitation and safety
	a. How are food temperatures monitored? Did you observe
thermometers in use?
	b. How frequently is there an in-house inspection? How
frequently does the health
		department inspect?
	c. What was the score on the last sanitation inspection and
what deficiencies
		were listed, if any?
	d. What methods are used to ensure food sanitation?
	e. Where are the fire extinguishers located and what type are
they?

9.  Personnel
	a. Briefly describe the company's plan for orientation and
training procedures.
	b. What performance appraisal method(s) is/are used?

10. Computer use
	a. Are computers used in the facility? If so, what kind are
they and what are
		their functions?

11. Financial
	a. What financial reporting forms are used, and by whom?

12. Policy/procedure manual
	a. What is included in the manual?
	b. Is there a disaster plan in the manual or elsewhere in the
facility?

13. Security
	a. Are there security precautions against either internal or
external theft?
	b. Are there procedures in place to protect employees from a
crime attempt?

14. What else did you observe during your visit? Indicate at least one
positive point
		about the facility and at least one item for
improvement.


N321aug00


Class Schedule

Date		Topic	Reading assignment
8/29		Introduction; trends and types of foodservice;	
Chapters 1, 2
		food product flow

8/31		Menu planning; pricing	Chapter 4; Ch. 16 p. 508-513
			(Spears p. 182-185)

9/5		Purchasing	Chapter 5
		Field interview proposals due

9/7		Receiving, storage, security	Chapter 6
		Reading Report #1 due (topic = trends in/types of
foodservice)

9/12		Beasley Produce Company tour

9/14		Production, recipes, forecasting	Chapter 7
		Design project topic due

9/19		Production, forecasting, quality control	
Chapter 7

9/21		Exam 1

9/26		Assembly, distribution, service	Chapter 8

9/28		Food safety/HACCP	Chapter 3
		Design project menu due

10/3		Monroe County Health Department (Bob Schmidt)

10/5		Bloomington Convalescent Center/Bloomington Hospital
tours  meet at 8:20 a.m.

10/10		Facilities planning and design	Chapter 11
		Design project HACCP plan due	

10/12		IU Dining Services: preparation for labs; equipment	
Chapter 12
		Meet at Read dining hall at the usual time

10/17		Equipment	Appendix B

10/19		Lab #1

10/24		Exam 2; Field experience discussion
		Field experience report due

10/26		Lab #2

10/31		Cleaning and sanitation		Chapter 9
		Design project equipment plan due

11/2		Lab #3

11/7		Financial management	Chapter 16; Spears Chapter 21
		Reading report #2 due (topic = HACCP/trends in design
or equipment)

11/9		Lab #4

11/14		IU Food Stores tour

11/16		Lab #5

11/21		Environmental/energy control	Chapter10
		Design project layout due (i.e. full project draft
due)

11/23		No class-Have a nice Thanksgiving!

11/28		Scholar's Inn tour  meet at 8:00 a.m.

11/30		Principles of cooking	Appendix A

12/5		Class presentations

12/7		Class presentations; overflow/review/course
evaluations

	Thursday, December 14 Final exam (10:15-12:15)