Folklore | ETHNOGRAPHY OF MUSIC
F430 | 2432 | Tuohy


Meets with F253.  F430 is designed for students interested in the study of
music in human life and in cross-cultural approaches to the study of music
and culture.  It will acquaint students with theories and methods
(emphasizing those from the social sciences) for studying music in
socio-cultural contexts.  This semester's class focuses on the ethnographic
study of music (including musical sounds, performance, people, concepts,
behaviors, discourse, and events).  On one hand, we will read and analyze
ethnographies of music--written works based on field research on selected
aspects of music and studied as they occur in particular socio-cultural
situations.  In the process, students will be introduced to several types of
music and musical practices in different parts of the world.  On the other
hand, we will discuss theoretical and methodological approaches to fieldwork
generally to understand the nature of ethnographic methods and the reasons
for their importance in the study of folklore and ethnomusicology.  One of
the goals of our discussion of practical and conceptual issues in fieldwork
is to encourage student participation in and contributions to the
ethnography of expressive forms and social life--during the semester and in
the future.  Students will find opportunities to pursue their interests in
world areas, musical styles, and topics through flexible research
assignments.

Assignments/Grading: includes class preparation and participation; one
midterm essay exam; 4-5 short writing assignments on required class
materials; and a research paper of 6-10 pages, based on field, archival, or
library research.  A portion of class time will be devoted to discussion of
research and writing projects.

Class Materials: will include a few short articles and four or five books
(ethnographies of music; most with CD or tape) available for purchase at the
bookstores. The tentative list is: Paul Berliner's The Soul of Mbira: Music
and Traditions of the Shona People of Zimbabwe (1993 [1978]; 2nd. ed.),
Daniel Cavicchi's Tramps Like Us: Music and Meaning among Springsteen Fans
(1998), Steven Feld's Sound and Sentiment: Birds, Weeping, Poetics, and Song
in Kaluli Expression (1990 [1982]; 2nd ed.), Marina Roseman's Healing Sounds
from the Malaysian Rainforest: Temiar Music and Medicine (1991), and Kay
Kaufman Shelemay's A Song of Longing: An Ethiopian Journey (1991).

Formal music training is not required, although students are expected to
have done prior course work in ethnomusicology and/or folklore.

Fulfills a COAS Social and Historical Studies, Social Inquiry distribution
requirement.