Education | Web-Based Educational Psychology
P251 | 5746 | Christy Kendrick


OVERVIEW
Educational Psychology is a survey course designed to introduce
students to both the science (key principles and research) and art
(practice and application) of teaching. Through the use of both
scenarios and personal reflection, grounded in creative, analytical,
and practical-thinking skills, this Web-based course will introduce
issues, concepts, and theories debated in the field of educational
psychology: theories of learning and development, teaching students
with special needs, strategies for effective instruction and classroom
assessment, motivational issues, learning environments, and assessment
of student learning. Course content, early field experiences, and lab
work are integrated into a Web-based learning environment. Students
will have the opportunity to explore individual interests and topics
as they pertain to this course and extend on their educational focus.

Keep in mind that this course is essentially a survey of challenges
facing educators and society today. While this means that we have a
lot of ground to cover in a relatively short period of time, please
ask questions and participate in class discussions. We will all get
out of this class what we collaboratively put into it.

COURSE GOALS:
Throughout this course, you will be helped to:

1.Construct and elaborate on a personal theory and portfolio of
learning and teaching. Support these with scientific research in the
areas of development, instruction, assessment, student learning,
family and community, and professional development.

2.Compare and contrast teaching, learning, and development theories as
they are applied in today's classrooms and on the Internet.

3.Evaluate and critique a teacher's influence on his/her classroom and
the educational community by identifying his/her motivations;
developmental, learning, cultural, and assessment beliefs; and support
criticisms with scientific research.

4.Apply critical-thinking, self-reflection, and self-regulation skills
for regular, meaningful contributions to the Web-based community via
discussions, assignments, and group work.

5.Identify the instructional and curricular needs of students through
case studies that support the development of students and discuss
(make a case for) needed support systems for secondary students in an
online community and in a traditional classroom.

6.Develop an attitude of professionalism for good teaching; foster
personal flexibility in order to open avenues for learning and growth
throughout a lifetime; and integrate theories of learning and
development to multiple perspectives.

METHODS TO ACHIEVE OBJECTIVES
1.This course will be taught online. Oncourse Web site:
http://oncourse.iu.edu. All students are required to participate
actively in the online discussions and group work. (Please see the set
of guidelines at the end of the syllabus.) We meet Saturday from 9:00
a.m. until 12:00 p.m. on September 7th and Saturday from 2:00 p.m.
until 4:00 p.m. on September 14th.

2.Required:
Ormrod, J. (2002) Educational Psychology. Prentice-Hall
McDevitt & Ormrod, J. E. (2002). Child Development and Education.
Prentice-Hall.
Online reserve readings found on the Oncourse Web site.

3.Assignments. All students will complete six major projects for the
P251/4/5 course. Each major assignment will be graded out of 100
points possible. Rubrics, project descriptions, and self/group
evaluation are posted for each assignment. Assignments with an
asterisk next to them may be completed in either a small group or
individually. Make sure all of the members of your group have their
names on the project.  You must do a minimum of two group projects
during the semester. Assignments will not be graded until self- and
group evaluations are submitted.

Portfolio:
Case Study* 10%  Due Oct. 17
Behavior Management Plan* 10%  Due Nov. 24
Educational Teacher Analysis 10%  Due Dec. 8
Assessment Plan* 10%  Due Dec. 15
Theory of Teaching/Learning 10%  Due Dec. 16
Discussion Leader* 15%	
Quizzes	15%  Oct. 6th, Nov. 10th, Dec. 1st
Participation (Weekly & Group Activities) 20%
Total  100%

Evaluation:
A range: Extraordinary high achievement; shows unusually complete
knowledge of the appropriate ideas and issues; incorporates extensive
and insightful analysis and interpretations; includes high-quality
writing combined with thoughtfulness and creativity

B range: Very good understanding of major issues and ideas, overall
above-average analysis and writing

C+, C range: Acceptable understanding of issues, with areas that are
somewhat underdeveloped or with particular ideas missing

C-, D ranges: Does not meet a basic level of satisfactory
understanding; does not meet minimal requirements of the School of
Education

F: Completely unacceptable quality

A  94.0-100
A- 90.0-93.9
B+ 88.0-89.9	
B  84.0-87.9
B- 80.0-83.9
C+ 78.0-79.9
C  74.0-77.9
C- 70.0-73.9
D  60.0-69.9
F 59.9 and below
				
Portfolio: All of your assignments, notes, handouts, etc. should be
kept and put into a portfolio. Within your portfolio, make a list of
the main points you take away from each topic that correspond to your
corresponding INTASC principles. Your portfolio is due on Dec. 16th by
noon and is your final exam. In addition, you need to turn in a
printout of the Oncourse grade book that summarizes your grades for
the semester and a 1/2- to 1-page statement (your best argument) for
what percentage of the participation points (worth 20% or your grade)
you believe you deserve. A complete portfolio must be submitted in
order to pass the course. The portfolio should be professional in both
appearance and manner.

PARTICIPATION
Without regular participation in class, the assignments and
discussions can have little meaning to you or your future. This grade
will also reflect your ability to work with a group, show evidence of
your reading and participation in activities throughout the semester,
and your contributions to the course. Therefore, it is extremely
important to generate and participate in class discussion. The
understanding and application of concepts is best reinforced by
"lessons learned" of others. You should strive to participate in the
forum discussions at least 4 out of every 7 days. I would like to see
you comment on your classmates' discussion questions, reports, and
lessons learned. Besides commenting on other students' work, you will
be given a final overall participation grade of 10 points. All
discussion questions, comments to each other, or just plain ol'
rapping will be done in the Virtual Classroom (a discussion forum set
up for you to post general questions to each other). The Virtual
Classroom is your "student lounge" so you should keep your "chatting"
there. You may comment on each other's projects, lessons, and ideas
that are held in the student drop box. I will be the
observer/facilitator of this general process and will be assessing
your contributions to the topic-related discussions posted by the
discussion leader. From time to time, I will interject comments, but
for the most part, the discussion will be left to you. I will also be
throwing out some ideas that you can hash over. I send out handouts
and Web sites on a regular basis, and you may comment on any of those.
I would also like to mention that it is my online policy that you log
on and "participate" 4 of the 7 days in the week minimum. Of course,
since you will be so excited about this class, more than likely you
will be logging on more often :) Remember that just logging on is not
the same thing as logging on and "participating."

In addition, keep in mind that a majority of the topics we will be
covering are controversial in nature and do not have a "right" or a
"wrong" answer. This will require you to use analytical, practical and
creative thinking skills to make objective judgments on the basis of
well-supported reasons. You are expected to look for flaws in
arguments and to resist claims that have no supporting evidence. All
assignments should address the following concepts: (1) ask questions
and be willing to wonder; (2) define the problem; (3) examine the
evidence; (4) analyze assumptions and biases; (5) avoid emotional
reasoning ("I feel this way, it must be true"); (6) don't
oversimplify; (7) consider other interpretations; and (8) tolerate
uncertainty.

Please note: Students will not be able to pass class or lab without
participating in the online discussions. Consequently, if you are
having technical or other difficulties with your participation, please
contact the instructor immediately.

Leader: You will lead (teach/facilitate) a topic discussion on
Oncourse. The class will divide into groups to lead the topics. We
will be using the Ormrod and the McDivitt & Ormrod texts as
foundations for discussion. As the leader, your group is responsible
for presenting the main ideas. Your group will need to send the
instructor a lesson plan of what activities you plan to do (and
identify who will be responsible for what part), along with items that
need to be posted on Oncourse prior to your presentation week. Your
group will become "experts" on the topic and will be responsible for
guiding discussion; providing activities, scenarios, and/or handouts;
identifying community and Web site resources; and structuring the
"lesson" for our class. The purpose of this activity is to gain a
deeper understanding of the intricate nature of online teaching and
how the concept of teaching and learning changes with the use of
technology. At the end of the unit, your group will need to identify
the strengths and weaknesses of your "lesson," and the class will
provide constructive feedback on what they thought worked well and
offer suggestions for future groups.

Group work:  Any time you work as a group, you will need to meet in an
Oncourse chat room (I will set these up for your group) and have a
discussion on what you plan to do and the responsibilities each person
will take.  Once this is decided and agreed upon, one member (the
group leader) will need to write this out and send the Game Plan to
all members of the group and the instructor.  The Game Plan is a
contract among group members.  At the conclusion of the project, each
member will evaluate the contributions of his or her group and will
provide confidential feedback to the instructor within 24 hours of the
due date.

RESPONSIBILITIES AND EVALUATION
Work Policy: You are required to read and adhere to the Indiana
University Code of Student Ethics policy on academic dishonesty and
plagiarism. If you are unfamiliar with these policies and regulations,
then you are required to make yourself familiar with them immediately.
You will be citing and referencing large amounts of work for this
course. If you are unsure if you are citing work correctly, refer to
http://www. education.indiana.edu/~frick/plagiarism/.

All assignments (excluding in-class work) are to be typed and
double-spaced. Font sizes should not be larger than 12 point. Students
not completing assignments will receive a grade of 0. Adhere to the
APA 5th edition style guidelines for all typed work (including
reference citations). See http://www.apastyle. org/elecref.html for
guidelines.

When completing assignments, please keep in mind that the quality of
your writing does matter. A well-written paper is also much easier to
read and grade, so please check your grammar, spelling, and so forth.
Remember to ask, "Who is my audience?" when writing papers (Hint: it
should not just be your instructor). Slang will not be accepted in
assignments. I highly recommend using the Writing Center in Ballentine
Hall as a resource for papers and projects.

Turning in Assignments: Assignments for the course are due by midnight
on Oncourse the last Sunday before the beginning of the next unit,
unless noted in the syllabus. The easiest way to turn in papers is to
send them to "instructor" as an attachment using your Oncourse mail
account. If you do this, I will be able to read and grade online. You
will be able to see your grades automatically when I have completed
grading by going to "My Grade Report" under "Tools" in Oncourse. As an
alternative, particularly if Oncourse is experiencing problems, you
should e-mail me with your document as an attachment, preferably in
Microsoft Word, although I can open other kinds of attachments.
Products will be not be considered turned in on time or graded without
the reflection attached. The reflection involves a very short time
commitment, but make sure it is completed. I strongly recommend making
back-ups of all of your work for both the course and the lab.

Late Policy: One individual assignment (excluding final portfolios and
quizzes) may be turned in as many as 2 weeks late with no penalties.
You must let me know in advance that this is the assignment you choose
to turn in late. Group assignments, because of their very interactive
nature, will not be accepted late. Late contributions to a discussion
forum will be counted as a 0. There is not an option to "make up"
missed postings. Any additional late papers will lose 10% every 2
days. Failure to complete leader duties will result in losing 30% of
available participation points.

Midterm Check-Up: Every student needs to schedule an appointment for
an individual interview to take place during the month of October. I
want to hear your comments, concerns, and suggestions. Bring your
up-to-date portfolio and resume. Plan on about 15 minutes, unless you
have significant concerns; then we will schedule additional time.

Indiana University School of Education Principles
and
INTASC Core Standards

In February 1996, the IU School of Education provides a core of six
principles as a framework for the development of education classes.
P251, P254, and P255, Educational Psychology for Elementary Teachers,
are organized around these principles, which include: community,
critical reflection, meaningful experience,
intellectual/personal/professional growth, knowledge and multiple
forms of understanding, and personalized learning. These courses
incorporate these principles in daily activities, assignments, field
experiences, and discussions. More information and explanation can be
found online at: http://education.indiana.edu/~tep/elemed/praxis.html

In addition, this course also adheres to the "Model Standards for
Beginning Teacher Licensing and Development" as established by the
Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC).
These standards identify a "common core of teaching knowledge and
skills" that INTASC deems necessary for effective, high-quality
teaching. More information about INTASC and the model standards can be
found online at: http://www.ccsso.org/intascst.html

P251 and P254 (elementary education programs) specifically address
INTASC standards (described as principles) 2.1A, 2.1B, 5.1A, 5.1B, and
8.1A as explained below:

Principle 2.1 A and B: Understand how children learn and development
Evaluation/Criteria:  Students will read, critique, and develop
several case studies. They will answer questions and analyze the
situations from a developmental perspective focusing on the
appropriateness of lessons and teacher expectations. In addition,
students will also demonstrate their understanding of development and
learning by successfully answering exam questions.  Over the course of
P251each student will develop a personal philosophy of teaching and
learning, write a case study, develop a behavior management plan, and
an assessment plan that incorporates theories and concepts learned and
that also describes their understanding of child development.

Principle 5.1 A and B: Understand individual and group motivation
Evaluation/Criteria:  Case studies (text, video, or ILF) focusing on
motivational issues will be read or watched. Students will analyze
specific situations in terms of types of motivation, effectiveness of
practices, and reasons for various behaviors observed. In addition,
the reflective teaching journal, observations for M101, the behavior
management plan, and the assessment plan include the analysis of
teaching strategies used to promote extrinsic and/or intrinsic
motivation.

Principle 8.1 A: Understand formal and informal assessment strategies
Evaluation/Criteria:  Several methods will address assessment
strategies. Students will assess one another's performance on the
classroom forum discussions and group work. A rubric will be provided
and these assessments will be included as part of the grade that each
student receives for the project. Students will complete an assessment
plan and design/identify modifications needed to meet student needs.
In addition, students will complete an educational teacher analysis
where they will interview, observe, and assess teacher strategies and
actions toward educational issues.
________________________________
P255 and P254 (secondary education programs) specifically address
INTASC standards (described as principles) 2.1, 2.2, 3.1, 3.2, 4.1,
4.2, 5.1, 5.2, 7.1, 8.1, and 10.2 explained below:

Principle 2.1 and 2.2: Understand how children learn and development
Evaluation/Criteria:  Students will read, critique, and develop
several case studies. They will answer questions and analyze the
situations from a developmental perspective focusing on the
appropriateness of lessons and teacher expectations. In addition,
students will also demonstrate their understanding of development and
learning by successfully answering exam questions.  Over the course of
P255 each student will develop a personal philosophy of teaching and
learning.

Principle 3.1 and 3.2: Understand how students differ in their
learning approaches
Evaluation/Criteria:  Students will read, critique, and develop
several case studies and share differing perspectives via discussion
forums.  Students will also develop a behavior management plan, and an
assessment plan that incorporate the various theories and concepts
learned and describe their understanding of child development.
Students will also identify differing approaches to student learning
and environmental factors.

Principle 4.1 and 4.2: Understand a variety of instructional
strategies that develop students' critical thinking, problem solving,
and performance skills.
Evaluation/Criteria: Case studies (text, video, or ILF) focusing on
instructional strategies that develop student learning will be read or
watched. Students will analyze specific situations in terms of types
of effective practices and reasons for various behaviors observed

Principle 5.1 and 5.2: Understand individual and group motivation and
behavior
Evaluation/Criteria:  Case studies (text, video, or ILF) focusing on
motivational issues will be read or watched. Students will analyze
specific situations in terms of types of motivation, effectiveness of
practices, and reasons for various behaviors observed. In addition,
the reflective teaching journal, observations for M101, the behavior
management plan, and the assessment plan include the analysis of
teaching strategies used to promote extrinsic and/or intrinsic
motivation.
Principle 7.1: Plans appropriate instruction based on knowledge of
subject matter, students, community, and curriculum goals
Evaluation/Criteria: Students will design and lead classroom forum
discussions and provide resources related to the topic under study and
provide reflective/constructive feedback to peers. Students will also
identify appropriate instructional activities and resources in the
assessment plan.

Principle 8.1: Understand formal and informal assessment strategies
Evaluation/Criteria:  Several methods will address assessment
strategies. Students will assess one another's performance on the
classroom forum discussions and group work. A rubric will be provided
and these assessments will be included as part of the grade that each
student receives for the project. Students will role play the an IEP
meeting about standardized test scores and classroom performance and
design/identify modifications needed to meet student needs.  In
addition, students will complete an educational teacher analysis where
they will interview, observe, and assess teacher strategies and
actions toward educational issues.

Principle 10.1 and 10.2: Fosters relationships with parents and
agencies in the community to support students' learning and
well-being.
Evaluation/Criteria:  After participating in a series of online
discussions about the role of family and community in adolescents, the
students will act as an advocate for students in the larger community
and will provide available community resources and role play these
actions through the assessment plan.

COURSE SYLLABUS: Class & Lab
Reading	Assignment Due

Week 1	Sept. 7: Computer Technology
o  Paloff & Pratt (online text)
Sept. 7
o  Log in onto Oncourse (class & lab)
o  Add bio and photo to your profile
o  Fill out field placement forms

Weeks 2 and 3	Sept. 8-22:
Overview of Educational Psychology
o  Development Text: Chapters 1 & 2
o  Schroeder, Johnson & Jensen (1985) see Oncourse*
o  Royse (1991) see Oncourse*
o  Smoller (1984) see Oncourse*	Sept. 14
o  Letter of Introduction & resume (bring hard copies and copies on
disc)
o  Introductions and goals on discussion forum
o  Three Oncourse readings

Sept. 15
o  Lab forum Unit 1 closes at midnight

Sept. 22
o  Discussion forum closes at midnight

Weeks 4 through 10	Sept. 23-Nov. 10:
Development & Learning Theories
Physical Development:
o  Development Text Chapters 3 & 7
Theories of Learning:
o  Development Text Chapters 5 & 2 & Educational Psychology Text
Chapters 6 & 7
Cognitive Development:
o  Development Text Chapter 4 & Educational Psychology Text Chapters 9
& 10

Sept. 29
o  Physical development forum closes at midnight
o  Lab forum Unit 2 closes at midnight

October
o  Contact me to schedule midterm conference

Oct. 6
o  Quiz #1 due by midnight

Oct. 13
o  Lab forum Unit 3 closes at midnight

Oct. 17
o  Case Study due by midnight

Oct. 27
o  Theories of Learning forum closes at midnight
o  Lab forum Unit 4 closes at midnight

Nov. 10
o  Quiz #2 due by midnight
o  Cognitive Development forum closes at midnight
o  Lab forum Unit 5 closes at midnight

Weeks 11 through 13	Nov. 11-Dec. 1:
Motivation & Classroom Practices
Motivation:
o  Educational Psychology Text Chapters 11 & 12
Classroom Practices:
o  Development Text Chapters 8 & Educational Psychology Chapters 13 &
14

Nov. 24
o  Behavior Management Plan due by midnight
o  Lab forum Unit 6 closes at midnight

Dec 1.
o  Motivation & classroom practices forum closes at midnight
o  Quiz #3 due by midnight

Dec 6.
o  Field Placement hours due

Dec 8.
o  Educational Teacher Analysis due by midnight
Weeks 14 & 15	Dec. 2-Dec. 15:
Assessment & the Big Picture/Wrap Up
Assessment:
o  Educational Psychology Text Chapters 15 & 16
The Big Picture:
o  Development Text Chapters 12, 13, & 14	Dec. 15
o  Assessment & the Big Picture forum closes at midnight
o  Wrap up forum due by midnight
o  Lab forum Unit 7 & Wrap Up closes at midnight
o  Assessment Plan due by midnight

Dec. 16
o  Final Portfolio due by noon to my desk 4009-B

P251/4/5 Web-based Laboratory Class Outline
http://oncourse.iu.edu (IUB) M1/201

This course is divided into large content domains. Some of these
domains will last for several weeks. The course instructors, Kenin
Krieger and Christy Kendrick, will provide discussion questions,
activities, and so forth. You will participate as facilitators,
wrappers, and contributors to the virtual lab during the upcoming
weeks.  If you have questions, feel free to e-mail us through the
Oncourse account.

This lab section is comprised of two different Educational Psychology
lab sections, one live class and one Web-based class. As a group, you
will be discussing theory, classroom experiences, ideas, concerns,
questions, and so forth. This will provide you with the opportunity to
learn and share your perspectives/ideas on the course content with
your peers. The lab section of this course is designed for you to
begin to connect your learning to your actual teaching experiences and
observations.

For each unit you are required to integrate concepts from class/text
with observations that you make from your field placement or prior
observations. These observations provide you with the opportunity to
observe and interact with master teachers in their lesson preparation,
implementation, and reflection. The group discussion forum, set up on
a unit basis, will allow you to share your observations as they
pertain to both theory and practice. Unit lengths span 2 weeks. You
are encouraged to supplement your comments with readings from the
texts, research in the field as it relates to topics of study, and
resources that you find helpful. In addition to the field placements,
there will be questions posed by the instructor(s) and the
facilitators on the lab site. Please note, the readings in the lab
section correspond to the Educational Psychology text by Ormrod and
are supplementary to the readings we will be completing in the
Web-based class (although there is some overlap).  You are encouraged
to read them; however, all of the information will be covered in the
readings for the P251/4/5 course.

Please Note. The quantity and quality of your responses will be taken
into consideration when determining grades.  Quality postings must
make reference the text, site observations, add to the discussion and
be free from grammatical and spelling errors. Postings that restate
other's postings, are short, do not reference the text, or are not
quality postings will not be given full credit. This will be explained
to you in detail in class or in the course syllabus.

Lab runs in units. You must post 2-3 times throughout each week (each
unit is 2 weeks long). Facilitators should log in daily and contribute
to the discussion, posting initial questions on Mondays. Wrappers
should participate throughout the week and summarize the discussion by
the end of the unit.

Online Discussions
Each student will be a "facilitator" for the course discussions for
one unit in lab online. When you are facilitating the discussion, you
will be assessed on your
ability to ask relevant, thoughtful and meaningful questions,
which further the class discussion. Also, you will need to
provide feedback/questions/thoughts on a regular basis
for that unit at least every other day if not more in order to receive
the full credit. You have a lot freedom to determine how you would
like to structure your questions, feedback, and so forth, as long as
it is professional and relevant for the unit that we are covering that
particular week.

Each student will also be a "wrapper" for a unit. Therefore, each
student will have the opportunity to be the facilitator and wrapper
once each time for lab. Myself and the other instructor will always
post unit questions, but it is the facilitators who will pose initial
reactions and questions while wrappers will post final thoughts and
summarize the unit.

Wrappers are responsible for synthesizing discussions and
incorporating creative, analytical, and practical-thinking skills into
the classroom by following these main points:
Main concepts for the unit;
Things to think about; and
Questions for future learning.

Minimum Course Expectations:
o Mandatory attendance at all in-class orientation sessions

o Forum contributions (quality of comments, complete
wrapper/facilitator roles, reading of group member's comments, ability
to work cooperatively, timeliness of postings, 2 postings per week)

o Letter of introduction to supervising teacher

o Resume

o Complete a minimum of 20 hours at field placement

o Receive satisfactory marks from the supervising teacher for the
teacher education program (cannot receive unsatisfactory comments from
supervising teacher)

o Complete journals (minimum of seven, one for each observation)

A or B work  = pass

Course Outline for M101/201

Unit 1
Weeks 1 and 2-Orientation: Monday, September 2nd through Sunday,
September 15th
Introduce yourself to your lab group. Please comment on 2 other
classmates' introductions. Comment on individuals that you have not
met before this class.  Look around Oncourse and become familiar with
it.

Unit 2
Weeks 3 and 4: Monday, September 16th through Sunday, September 29th
Post during week 3 Monday-Sunday and week 4 Monday-Sunday. This is the
typical week, with two units.
Chapters 2 and 3

Unit 3
Week 5 and 6: Monday, September 30th through Sunday, October 13th
Week 5-live chat to be determined by group; week 6-one week unit
Chapters 1-5; Chapter 10

Unit 4
Weeks 7 and 8: Monday, October 14th through Sunday, October 27th
Post as usual
Chapters 6, 7, 8, 9 and 11

Unit 5
Weeks 9 and 10: Monday, October 28th through Sunday, November 10th
Post as usual for this two week unit
Chapters-12

Unit 6
Weeks 11 and 12: Monday, November 11th through Sunday, November 24th
Post as usual for this 2 week unit
Chapters 13, 14 and 15

Unit 7
Weeks 13 and 14: Monday, November 25th through Sunday, December 15th
Post as usual for this final 2-week unit.
Chapter 16

Wrap Up
Week 15: Monday, December 9th through Sunday, December 15th
Post as usual for just 1 final week

*Observations/Reflections will be picked up twice: at midterm and in
final portfolio.

WEB-BASED DISCUSSIONS

Tips for lab:
Each student will be responsible for helping to facilitate the course
discussions for one unit. When you are facilitating tto post initial
reactions and facilitate discussions so that a conducive learning
environment is created. Facilitators are encouraged to post additional
thought questions or to encourage them from clas