Education | Cognitive Assessment and Intervention
P591 | 6003 | Dr. Karen Gavin


GOALS

Understand the history of intelligence and intelligence testing and
the practical uses of assessment;

To acquire knowledge and skill in the administration, scoring, and
interpretation of major the measures of intelligence including the
WISC III, WAIS III, and SBIV;

To exhibit proficiency in the communication of  assessment results via
oral and written reports;

To effectively integrate observational, interview, and assessment data
to develop empirically supported intervention ideas for children and
adolescents

To understand the ethical principles and code of conduct required of
school psychologists;

To recognize the diversity of children and the complex systems within
which assessment and intervention occur.

REQUIRED TEXT

Sattler, J.M. (2001). Assessment of children: Cognitive Applications
(4th ed.). San Diego, CA: Jerome Sattler Press.

Thomas, A. & Grimes, J. (2002). Best practices in school psychology IV
(Vol. 2). Bethesda: NASP.

** Additional articles may be placed on reserve in the Education
Library's Electronic Reserve System (Eres), accessible through the
EBSCOhost online system, or disseminated in class.  If they are Eres
articles, you will need to go to:

Direct URL:   http://129.79.35.24/coursepage.asp?cid=439
Password:   cognitive

RECOMMENDED TEXT

Kaufman, A. & Lichtenberger, E. (2000). Essentials of WISC III-III and
WPPSI-R assessment. New York: Wiley.
**This is on reserve in the Education library and in the Institute for
Child Study library.

Kaufman, A. & Lichtenberger, E. (1999). Essentials of WAIS III-III
assessment. New York: Wiley.

REQUIRED MATERIALS

Stopwatch  - Please try to find one that is quiet as well as easy to
use!

Large Manila envelope - Due to the confidential nature of your
assignments, it is necessary to turn in all protocols, consent forms,
reports and videotapes in an envelope to ensure confidentiality.  Put
your name, course number and instructor on the outside of the
envelope.

2 Videotapes

COURSE REQUIREMENTS	

Each student is expected to attend all class sessions, complete
reading assignments in advance, and be prepared to participate in
class discussion and activities.  Students are assigned
articles/readings to discuss for designated class sessions throughout
the semester (see Course Schedule).  Supplemental readings or
exercises may be assigned during the semester to address specific
issues as they arise within the course. Class participation grade will
be based upon student's preparations for class and completion of
non-graded assignments, such as the practice scoring exercise.
Each student will complete an in-class midterm exam.
Each student will be responsible for completing an in-class
presentation with a classmate.  Each dyad will be responsible to
review, practice, and present an additional measures of intelligence.
The possible measures will be discussed in class.  For the
presentation, the dyad should include a brief overview of the
theoretical base and age of the test, identify any major differences
as compared to the four measures studied (WISC III, WAIS III, WJIII,
SB-IV) in terms of administration or content, and highlight any
specific research findings/reviews that suggest the usefulness of the
measure.  The dyad should select 1-2 subtests of the measure to
demonstrate administration and allow 10-12 minutes for your colleagues
to practice the assessemnt activities.  Select subtests that are
different from others subtests demonstrated in this course.  Each dyad
should prepare a 2-3-page handout on the measure for distribution to
classmates.  The presentation should be between 40-45 minutes and
students must use Power Point computer software (or other presentation
software) for the presentation.  Topics for presentations must be
submitted by October 23. All presentations are scheduled for November
11, 13, 18, or 20.
Each student will conduct 10 practice administrations: 6 WISC III, 2
WAIS III, 1 Alternate (WJIII, SB-IV, or DAS), 1 Screener (K-BIT, WASI,
or TONI). Either WISC III #2 or #3 will be your critique and scoring
of your partner's WISC III administration.
Each student will submit a videotape and report of the WISC III 2 or
3, 5, and the Final Project: WISC III.  Videotapes will be submitted
to monitor adherence to standardized administrative procedures and
efficient test administration.  Feedback on administration procedures
for videotape 2 or 3, and 5 will be in the form of a checklist with
comments.  Videotape of administration 10 will be part of the Final
Project.
The Final Project for each student will be a videotape, report, and
protocol for test administration #10 of the WISC III.  Failure to
follow standardized administration procedures in the final videotape
or more than 1 major error on the protocol will result in an
Incomplete for the course.

COURSE GRADING
9 Practice protocols   30

2 Reports (5 points each)  10	

Midterm   20

Class participation 10

Group Presentation = 5 points

Class Participation & Assignments = 5 points

Final Project (Test #10, Protocol, and video) 30
100 points = 100%


TESTING AND VOLUNTEERS

Test Security and Responsibility

Testing materials in this course are "secure" tests - sharing the
tests or allowing others (e.g., friends, relatives, or coworkers who
are not in or have not taken this course) to look at, play with,
examine, and so on, test materials and manuals violates test security
and is a violation of ethical and professional practice! You will be
responsible for any damage, loss, or theft that occurs while a test
kit is signed out to you. Follow procedures for checking out test kits
from the clinic. Each time you check out a test kit, you should ensure
that all necessary items are present and intact! Please notify Shauna
Steele immediately if you find a problem with the test kit.  Failure
to do so may result in your being charged for the missing item or a
new test kit.

Subjects

You will need to locate your own subjects for testing. These cannot be
children/adults being evaluated for services. Possible sources for
subjects include friends, neighbors, university students, and children
of close friends. Do not test family members, research subjects or
students you work with. Before testing children, you must secure
permission of their parents or legal guardian. Failure to secure
consent will result in immediate failure of this course.  The
instructor will provide consent forms. Consent forms MUST be turned in
with your test protocol! Inform possible examinees that you are a
student at Indiana University. You would like them to volunteer to
help you learn how to administer tests. You are not authorized to
present yourself as a representative of the Indiana University, of the
Department of Counseling & Educational Psychology or of the School
Psychology Program. Do not go into a school system, training
institution, hospital, or any other organization without the course
instructor's authorization.

Test Results

No persons, except you, the course instructor, and the graduate
assistant, is to know the score of any examinee. Parents must be told
beforehand that the test results cannot be disclosed to them. General
comments, such as "She's doing well," should not be made. Tell the
parents (or the examinee, in the case of a young adult or adult) that
you are just learning how to administer the test and are not sure how
reliable the results will be. In recruiting examinees, you can
emphasize that the session will be interesting, challenging, and a
learning experience. Parents often appreciate the fact that the test
will be a pleasant and positive learning experience for their child.

Course Violations

You must obtain and turn in a consent form with each of your test
protocols. Tests administered within the context of P591 may not be
used for any purpose other than learning to administer, score, and
interpret the assessment instruments. You are to make no
recommendations for psychological or medical treatment to the examinee
or to the parents on the basis of your evaluation. You may, of course,
make such recommendations in your written report for this course. If
you have difficulty coping with an anxious parent or examinee that is
pressing you for advice, consult the instructor. Any breach of these
polices will result in immediate failure of this course.

GRADING OF RECORD FORMS

Protocol Completion

Complete personal information section of the protocol. Please limit
identifying information such as name to the first name and last
initial or use a fictitious name when discussing cases in class. When
completing record forms, fill in the child's (adult's) responses
verbatim or as close to verbatim as possible; indicate if your give a
prompt, question for elaboration or clarification, or give an example
as directed in the test manual. Everything you do must be noted on the
protocol. If you question a child on an item and the child gives you a
nonverbal (pointing) response that is correct, the protocol needs to
reflect the pointing response (e.g., car Q pt). You must indicate that
sample items have been administered if appropriate. If you do not
complete the protocol or leave it blank, we will assume that you did
not question or prompt or give an example and will assign your grade
accordingly.

The following grading criteria will be used for record forms:
Record forms will be marked with a "fraction" indicating major
errors/minor errors (e.g., 1/3 would indicate 1 Major error and 3
Minor errors and would be the equivalent to a C grade). Do not use
your own judgment when the response is in the manual - follow the
scoring guidelines exactly!

Majors Errors
Inappropriate basal or ceiling
Incorrect summation of scaled scores or raw scores
Incorrect computation of CA
Omission of Question (Q) when required by manual (Similarities,
Vocab., Comp.)
Omission of subtests
Transforming raw score to scale score incorrectly
Administering wrong subtest (Coding A/B)
Failure to give example or sample item where required (administration
of samples must be recorded on protocol)
Failure to appropriately record examinee's responses
Incorrect calculation or failure to record the number of junctures
(WISC III - Object Assembly)

Minors Errors
Judgment, i.e., assignment of inappropriate credit or failure to give
appropriate credit on items (Similarities, Vocab., Comp.)
Omission of P (pass) and F (fails)  on SBIV
Order not recorded on Picture Arrangement
Wrong starting level
Misreading chart in recording percentiles
Time not recorded when necessary

Grading Scale
# of Major Errors/  # of Minor Errors/  Grade
0   0   A+ (100)
0   1   A (95)
0   2   A- (92)
0   3   B+ (88)
0   4   B (85)
0   5   B- (82)
1   0   B (85)
1   1   B- (82)
1   2   C+ (78)
1   3   C (75)
1   4   C- (72)
1   5   D+ (68)
2   0   C (75)
2   1   C- (72)
2   2   D+ (68)
2   3   D (65)
2   4   D- (62)
2   5   F (50)
3   0   D (65)
3   1   D- (62)
3   2   F (50)
4+   0+	   F (50)

Note: If in reviewing your practice protocols you realize you made a
mistake, note the error in the margin of the protocol and it will not
be counted against you.

P591 Examination Chart


	
due Date	
Examinee's AGE	
Date of TEST	
# of Major Errors	
# of Minor Errors	
Grade	
# of Points
1. WISC III    (2pts)    9/23					
2. WISC III*   (2pts)    9/30	
3. WISC III*   (2pts)   10/8						
4. WISC III    (4pts)   10/14						
5. WISC III*   (4pts)	10/28						
6. WAIS III    (4pts)	11/6						
7. WAIS III    (4pts)	11/20						
8. Alternate:  (4pts)   12/4						
9. Screener:   (4pts)	12/4						
10. WISC III:  Final Project   10pt= video 10pt=protocol   10pt=report
12/13						

P591 Course Schedule
(Subject to changes)

DATE  TOPIC

9/2 - Course overview
Ethics and regulations: NASP and APA
Reading: Review your School Psychology Program manual and Sattler: 3

9/4 - Brief history of intelligence & intelligence testing
Reading: Sattler:  1 & 5

9/9 - Testing conduct and observation techniques
Reading: Sattler: 7
		
9/11 - Psychometrics
Reading: Sattler: 4

9/16 - Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - Third Edition (WISC
III-III): Overview, technical considerations, and administration
Reading: Sattler: 8 & 9; WISC III manual - ICS

9/18 - WISC III-III:  Administration (cont.)
	
9/23 - WISC III Interpretation & Report Writing
Reading:  Sattler 21; McDermott, Fantuzzo & Glutting (1990);
EBSCO: Zachery(1990) in The Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment,8,
pp. 276-289
WISC III Protocol # 1 Due (Clinic)
	
9/25 - Report Writing (cont.)
Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale- Third Edition (WAIS III-III):
Overview, technical considerations, and administration.
Comparing the WISC III & WAIS III
Reading: Sattler: 12; Tulsky, Zhu & Prifitera; WAIS III manual in ICS
			
9/30 - WAIS III: Administration (cont.)
WAIS III Interpretation
Reading: Sattler: 13; WAIS III manual in ICS
WISC III Protocol # 2 due with videotape & reportPartner)

10/2 - Stanford Binet Intelligence Scale: Fourth Edition (SB-IV):
Overview, technical considerations, and administration.
Wechsler vs. Stanford-Binet
Reading: Sattler: 14
	
10/7 - Indiana Association of School Psychologists  - No Class

10/8 - WISC III Protocol # 3 due with videotape (Partner) - Place in
professor's box

10/9 - Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Ability (WJIII): Overview,
theoretical orientation
Presenter: Julia Byers, Ph.D. at 5:30 - 7:00 PM in Room ______
Reading: Carroll (1997)

10/14 - Screening instruments & specialized instruments
Presenter: Jason Nelson
Reading: Sattler: 16 (skim)
WISC III Protocol # 4 Due

10/16 - Video review of test administrations: WISC III, WAIS III,
SBIV, WJCA

10/21 - Midterm Exam

10/23 - Factors influencing cognitive performance
Reading: Sattler 6; Ceci & Williams(1997);Halpern (1997); Polmin &
DeFries(1998)

10/28 - Assessment of children with hearing, visual or auditory
impairments
Reading:  Chaudry & Davidson (2001); Simeonsson & Rosenthal (2001)
WISC III Protocol # 5 due with videotape & report

10/30 - Assessment of culturally and linguistically diverse students
Reading: Best Practices 24; Frisby (1999: Part 1); MacMillan & Reschl:
MacMillian & Reschley (1998; Suzuki & Valencia(1997);

11/4 - Assessment of infants and preschoolers
Reading: Best Practices 76 & 79

11/6 - Autism & Cognitive Processing
Presenter: Julia Byers, Ph.D.
Reading: Evaes & Awadh (1998); Marcus, Flagler & Robison (2001);
Rodier (2000)
WAIS III Protocol # 6 Due

11/11 - 11/20	Class presentations - Test Review
WAIS III Protocol # 7 Due

11/25 - Course Review
	 	
11/27 - Thanksgiving - No Class

12/2 - Mental retardation & Giftedness
Presenter: Jason Nelson
Reading:  Detterman,Gabriel & Ruthsatz (2000); Winner (1997)

12/4 - Communicating Results
Reading:  Shellenberger (2001)
Alternate and Screener Protocols # 8 & #9 Due

12/9 - Using Intelligence Tests for Treatment Planning
Reading:   Ebsco: Kranzler (1997) in School Psychology Review, 26(2)
Ebsco: Gresham & Witt (1997) in School Psychology Quarterly, 12(3)

12/11 - Pediatric Neuropsychology
Guest Speaker:  Philip Fasteanu, Ph.D.
Trip to Indianapolis

12/13 - Final Project Due by noon
Turn in WICS protocol, videotape, report, and consent form


Student Academic Conduct for P591

The university may discipline a student for academic misconduct, which
is defined as any activity that tends to undermine the academic
integrity of the institution. Academic misconduct includes, but is not
limited to, the following:

1. Cheating.

A student must not use or attempt to use unauthorized assistance,
materials,
information, or study aids in any academic exercise, including, but
not limited to, the
following:

a. A student must not use external assistance on any "in-class" or
"take-home"
examination, unless the instructor specifically has authorized
external assistance. This
prohibition includes, but is not limited to, the use of tutors, books,
notes, and
calculators.

b. A student must not use another person as a substitute in the taking
of an
examination or quiz.

c. A student must not steal examinations or other course materials.

d. A student must not allow others to conduct research or to prepare
work for him
or her without advance authorization from the instructor to whom the
work is being
submitted. Under this prohibition, a student must not make any
unauthorized use of
materials obtained from commercial term paper companies or from files
of papers
prepared by other persons.

e. A student must not collaborate with other persons on a particular
project and
submit a copy of a written report which is represented explicitly or
implicitly as the
student's individual work.

f. A student must not use any unauthorized assistance in a laboratory,
at a computer
terminal, or on fieldwork.

g. A student must not submit substantial portions of the same academic
work for
credit or honors more than once without permission of the instructor
to whom the
work is being submitted.

h. A student must not alter a grade or score in any way.

2. Fabrication.

A student must not falsify or invent any information or data in an
academic exercise
including, but not limited to, records or reports, laboratory results,
and citations to
the sources of information.

3. Plagiarism.

A student must not adopt or reproduce ideas, words, or statements of
another
person without appropriate acknowledgment. A student must give credit
to the
originality of others and acknowledge an indebtedness whenever he or
she does any
of the following:

a. Quotes another person's actual words, either oral or written;

b. Paraphrases another person's words, either oral or written;

c. Uses another person's idea, opinion, or theory; or

d. Borrows facts, statistics, or other illustrative material, unless
the information is
common knowledge.

4. Interference.

a. A student must not steal, change, destroy, or impede another
student's work.
Impeding another student's work includes, but is not limited to, the
theft, defacement,
or mutilation of resources so as to deprive others of the information
they contain.

b. A student must not give or offer a bribe, promise favors, or make
threats with the
intention of affecting a grade or the evaluation of academic
performance.

5. Violation of Course Rules.

A student must not violate course rules as contained in a course
syllabus which are
rationally related to the content of the course or to the enhancement
of the learning
process in the course.

6. Facilitating Academic Dishonesty.

A student must not intentionally or knowingly help or attempt to help
another student
to commit an act of academic misconduct.


Taken from The Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities, and Conduct.
Copyright 1998 The Trustees of Indiana University, p. 17-18.

Code of Conduct for P591

Effective: September 30, 1999
Adapted from the Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities and Conduct,
Indiana
University, pages 17-18

Preamble:

The Department of Instructional Systems Technology, as part of Indiana
University, subscribes to the academic mission as stated in the
Student Handbook: "the University exists for the advancement of
knowledge, the pursuit of truth, the development of students, and the
promotion of the general well-being of society."  Students are
expected to exercise their freedom to learn with responsibility and to
respect the general conditions which maintain such freedom.

Agreement:

In this spirit, the student agrees to follow the general regulations
outlined in the Student Handbook during the course and conduct of the
Instructional Systems Technology Department Qualifying Examination.
The student agrees not to engage in academic misconduct, which is
defined as any activity which tends to undermine the academic
integrity of the institution. Academic misconduct includes, but is not
limited to:

1. Cheating.

A student must not use or attempt to use unauthorized assistance,
materials, information or study aids during the course of the IST
qualifying examination.  Cheating includes, but is not limited to, the
use of another person as a substitute in the taking of an examination;
collaborating with other persons on a particular project and
submitting work which is represented explicitly or implicitly as the
student's individual work; using unauthorized assistance in a
laboratory, at a computer
terminal, or on fieldwork.

2. Fabrication

A student must not falsify or invent any information or data in an
academic exercise including, but not limited to, records or reports,
laboratory results, and citations to the sources of information.

3. Plagiarism.

A student must not adopt or reproduce ideas, words, or statements of
another person without appropriate acknowledgment. A student must give
credit to the originality of others and acknowledge an indebtedness
whenever he or she: quotes another person's actual words; paraphrases
another person's actual words; using another person's ideas, opinion
or theory; or borrows acts, statistics, or other illustrative
material, unless the information is common knowledge.

4. Interference.

A student must not steal, change, destroy, or impede another student's
work.  Impeding another student's work includes, but is not limited
to, the theft, defacements, or mutilation of resources so as to
deprive others of the information they contain. A student must not
offer or give a bribe, offer favors, or make threats with the
intention of affecting the grade or evaluation of academic
performance.

5. Facilitating Academic Dishonesty.

A student must not intentionally or knowingly help or attempt to help
another student to commit an act of academic misconduct.