Education | Practicum in School Psychology
P595 | 6004 | Dr. Karen Gavin


Course Description:

This practicum is designed to orient school psychology students to
school-based practice, particularly through the development of
observational skills.  Working with teachers, parents, and students
requires effective observational skills to provide the data that a
school psychologist needs for collaborative problem-solving.  These
skills form a foundation for later course work in assessment,
consultation, and intervention.  Through the use of readings, class
discussion, field experiences, and most practice, this practicum will
focus on orienting oneself to the ecology of school environments, in
addition to conducting and analyzing the results of classroom
observation.

Objectives:

Upon completion of this practicum, students will:

1. demonstrate knowledge of the role of observation and interviewing
in school psychology assessment, consultation, and intervention.

2. demonstrate knowledge of both anecdotal and structured behavioral
observation techniques.

3. conduct classroom observations utilizing narrative recording,
semi-structured recording, behavioral coding, and time-sampling
methods.

4. begin to develop an appreciation for the culture of the schools, a
sense of how the context of schools affect student behavior, and
awareness of the types of professional behaviors necessary to be
effective in providing high quality services in that culture.

5. begin to understand the structure of behavioral interviewing as a
precursor to behavioral consultation for collaborative
problem-solving.

Course requirements:

Attendance at all practicum class meetings and participation in class
discussions and activities is expected.

Complete assigned readings and activities in preparation for class
meetings and class discussion.  Come to class prepared to discuss
readings and activities.

Students placed at Clear Creek Elementary will serve as a classroom
partner (Helping Hand) to a general education teacher.  Provide
classroom assistance, including a range of instructional support
activities such as small and large group instruction, tutoring, and
special projects and activities.  Students are to arrange a regular
and weekly time for providing classroom support that
MEETS THE NEEDS OF THE TEACHER.

For students in other schools who will be shadowing a school
psychologist, activities will vary.  You will assist with classroom
observation, the functional assessment of behavior, observe case
conferences, and assist the psychologist in other ways as required by
the psychologist.  You will also need to spend time in a general
education setting, in addition to special education settings to
experience the range of services available to students.  Students are
to arrange a regular and weekly time that MEETS THE NEEDS OF THE
PSYCHOLOGIST.

Remember: You are a professional guest who represents Indiana
University, the School of Education, and the School Psychology
program.

Hours as a classroom partner or assignment to a school psychologist is
typically 4 hours per week.  For a 2 credit hour course, your time
total time commitment to the practicum is 150 clock hours per semester
(about 8-10 hours per week).

Conduct three (3) observations in a general education classroom.

Observation 1  (Due 10/10):  unstructured, narrative focusing on
classroom arrangements, instructional activities, teacher and student
behavior

Observation 2  (Due 10/28):  semi-structured anecdotal observation,
observing antecedents and consequences in a more structured manner
	
Observation 3  (Due 11/25):  time-sampling procedure focusing on the
on-task behavior of an identified student and compared to a designated
peer.

ALL observations will be accompanied by a brief summary.

Interview the classroom teacher or school psychologist to whom you are
assigned.  Ask about:  greatest challenges and rewards of the
position, opinions of how they perceive and address needs of students
who may be at-risk for learning and behavior problems.  Summarize and
turn in a 2- to 3-page report of the interview.  Due 12/9

Participate in activities at the Institute for Child Study (ICS)
clinic.
Your participation will include:

Attendance at the initial ICS organizational meeting.

Observation of a parent intake and/or parent meeting when student
clinicians are collecting information relevant to a clinic referral.
This may be completed through reviewing a videotape of the session.

Attendance at a minimum of one Friday morning clinic meeting,
including the general staffing and group supervision time.

Attend at least one ICS inservice during the semester (if scheduled).

Keep a practicum activity log which documents the date, time, and
brief description of all activities associated with practicum
experiences.  This includes class meetings, readings, assessment
activities, participation in meetings, school observations, shadow
activities with the psychologist, and teacher/psychologist interviews.
Format provided in class.

GRADING POLICY:

Grades will be assigned based on the student's ability to integrate
classroom discussion and readings with activities and field
experiences.  Each student will be individually evaluated based on:

Completion of all practicum requirements

Quality of assignment

Improvement in response to feedback and self-analysis

Evaluation from field/practicum site (see attached evaluation form)

Participation in class discussion and activities

A Mastery Approach to assignments will be used.

Grading Scale:

100  A+	
95   A
92   A-	
88   B+	
85   B	
82   B-	
78   C+
75   C
72   C-
68   D+
65   D
62   D-

P595 Schedule of Classes
(Changes my occur in the schedule)

Date - Topic 			

9/2 - Course Overview and Requirements

9/9 - Observation in School Psychology:
What are We Looking For and Why?
Reading:  Borich, Chapter 3
Hintze, Volpe, & Shapiro (2002)
Shapiro & Kratochwill

9/16 - Structuring Observation: Importance of Antecedents &
Consequences	
Reading:   Borich, Chapter 4
Alberto & Troutman, Chapter 4

9/23 - "Interviewing 101"
Reading:  Sattler, Chapter 2
Witt & Elliott (1983)

9/30 - The Context of Behavior: Instructional & Environmental
Variables
Reading:  Ysseldyke & Elliott (1999)
Gettinger & Stoiber (1999)
Rosenfield (2002)

10/7 - NO CLASS - Attend IASP Conference
	
10/10 - NARRATIVE OBSERVATION DUE

10/14 - Observation in Time:  Time-Sampling Methods & Coding Systems
Reading:   Alessi (1980)
Wasik & Loven  (1980)

10/21 - Time-Sampling & Structured Observation
PLA-CHEK Presentation
	
10/28 - SEMI-STRUCTURED ANECDOTAL OBSV. DUE
Reading:   McConaughy & Ritter

11/4 - Introduction to Functional Assessment
Reading:   Foster-Johnson & Dunlap
Skiba et al.	

11/11 - Target Behaviors: What Data Should We Collect
Reading:   Barnett et al.

11/18 - Computer Assessment
TIME-SAMPLING DUE (PLA-CHEK)

11/25 - Practicum Review
		
12/2 - Single-Subject Design: Monitoring Intervention Effectiveness
Reading:   Kerr & Nelson, Chapter 3
		
12/9 - Course Wrap-Up
INTERVIEW DUE

Reading List

Alberto, P. A. & Troutman, A. C. (19  ). Applied behavior analysis for
teachers (2nd ed.). Columbus, OH: Merrill. (Chapter 4, pp. 95-142).

Alessi, G. J. (1980). Behavioral observation for the school
psychologist: Responsive-discrepancy model. School Psychology Review,
9(1), 31-45.

Barnett, D. W., Bauer, A. M., Ehrhardt, K. E., Lentz, F. E., &
Stollar, S. A. (1996). Keystone targets for change: Planning for
widespread positive consequences. School Psychology Quarterly, 11(2),
95-117.

Borich, G. D. (1994). Observation skills for effective teaching (2nd
ed.). New York: Merrill. (Chapter 3, pp. 38-60).

Borich, G. D. (1994). Observation skills for effective teaching (2nd
ed.). New York: Merrill (Chapter 4, pp. 64-74).

Foster-Johnson, L. & Dunlap, G. (1993). Using functional assessment to
develop effective, individualized interventions for challenging
behaviors. Teaching Exceptional Children, Spring 1993, 44-50.

Gettinger, M. & Stoiber, K. C. (1999). Excellence in teaching: Review
of instructional and environmental variables. In Reynolds, C. R. &
Gutkin, T. B. (Eds.) The handbook of school psychology (3rd ed.) New
York: John Wiley.

Hintze, J. M., Volpe, R. J., & Shapiro, E. S. (2002). Best practices
in the systematic direct observation of student behavior. In Thomas,
A. & Grimes, J. (Eds.), Best practices in school psychology - IV.
Washington, DC: National Association of School Psychologists.

Kerr & Nelson (1989 ). Classroom measurement of student progress. (3rd
ed.). Strategies for managing behavior problems in the classroom.
Chapter 3 (pp.68-106).  New York: Macmillan.

Knoster, T. P., & McCurdy, B. (2002). Best practices in functional
behavioral assessment for designing individualized student programs.
In Thomas, A. & Grimes, J. (Eds.), Best practices in school psychology
- IV. Washington, DC: National Association of School Psychologists.

McConaughy, S. H. & Ritter, D. R. (1995). Best practices in
multidimensional assessment of emotional and behavioral disorders. In
Thomas, A. & Grimes, J. (Eds.). Best practices in school psychology -
III. Washington, DC: National Association of School Psychologists.

Rosenfield, S. (2002). Best practices in instructional consultation.
In Thomas, A. & Grimes, J. (Eds.), Best practices in school psychology
- IV. Washington, DC: National Association of School Psychologists.

Sattler, J. M. (2001). Assessment of children: Behavioral and clinical
applications. San Diego: Jerome Sattler. (Chapter 2, pp. 44-63).

Shapiro, E. S. & Kratochwill, T. R. (19   ). Introduction: Conducting
a multidimensional behavioral assessment. In Shapiro, E. S. &
Kratochwill, T. R. (Eds.) Conducting school-based assessments of child
and adolescent behavior.  New York: Guildford Press.

Skiba, R., Waldron, N., Bahamonde, C. & Michalek, D. (1999).
Functional assessment and IDEA: An opportunity for school
psychologists. Unpublished paper.

Skinner, C. H., Rhymer, K. N., & McDaniel, E. C. (19  ). Naturalistic
observation in educational settings. In Shapiro, E. S. & Kratochwill,
T. R. (Eds.) Conducting school-based assessments of child and
adolescent behavior.  New York: Guildford Press.

Ysseldyke, J. & Elliott, J. (1999). Effective instructional practices:
Implications for assessing educational environment.  In Reynolds, C.
R. & Gutkin, T. B. (Eds.) The handbook of school psychology (3rd ed.)
New York: John Wiley.

Wasik, B. H. & Loven, M. D. (1980). Classroom observational data:
Sources of inaccuracy and proposed solutions. Behavioral Assessment,
2, 211-217.

Witt, J. C. & Elliott, S. N. (1983). Assessment in behavioral
consultation: The initial interview. School Psychology Review, 12(1),
42-49.